Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Deeds Remove constraint Format: Deeds

Search Results

collection icon

D. W. Newsom papers, [ca. 1890]-1950 and undated 11.2 Linear Feet — 2640 Items

Primarily incoming and outgoing personal and business correspondence, bills and receipts, bank statements, and deeds (1890-1950). The material documents Newsom's real estate activities and Durham N.C.'s economic and urban development from the 1920s-1940s. Also includes financial ledgers; scrapbooks of Newsom's newspaper real estate advertisements; notebooks in shorthand; various Newsom family estate papers; and a poem by Newsom, "To the Men of the Golden Star," read by him at a World War I memorial service held at Trinity College (1919). The collection contains few records of Newsom's tenure as an official of Trinity College and Durham County. (02-102)

collection icon

Falkener Family papers, 1893-2001 9 Linear Feet — 7000 Items

African-American family based in Greensboro (Guildford Co.), North Carolina. Waldo C. Falkener served on the Greensboro City Council from 1959-1963. His wife, Margaret, was also politically active. The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener, and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, including photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Later accessions include clippings, correspondence, and other materials documenting the political careers of the Falkeners. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. The council minutes include committee reports (finance, public works, transportation, and real estate committees), as well as ordinances, laws, memoranda, and letters. Meeting notes are arranged by date, spanning 1959-1966. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. Some correspondence relates to the life of Falkener's father, Henry Hall Falkener, also an active politician and public school teacher. Documents span beyond Falkener's death in 1992 up until 2001, including obituaries and memorial material. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, George H. Falkener, Henry Hall Falkener, Madge Z. Mitchell Falkener, and Margaret E. Falkener. Materials include photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Printed materials consist largely of those published by the Greensboro City Council, including annual budget reports, personel reviews, and handbooks. The collection includes newspaper articles about Falkener's civic services and letters of appreciation (1972, 1979), as well as materials related to the successful campaign to name a Greensboro elementary school after Falkener and his father (2001).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

collection icon
Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt.

Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt. Sophy was 37 years old, Sarah was 13 years old, and Henry was 10 years old at the time.

collection icon

Person Family papers, 1754-1971 6 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Family active in Louisburg, Franklin Co., N.C. and also in Nash Co., N.C. Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person. Addition comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person.

Addition (05-110) (200 items, 1.7 lin. ft.; dated 1754-1971 and undated) comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

collection icon
The Ridgely family resided in Towson (Baltimore Co.), Md. Captain Charles Ridgely began construction of Hampton Mansion there in 1783. At his death in 1790, his wife Rebecca, and nephew Charles Ridgely Carnan (who later changed his name to Charles Carnan Ridgely) desputed the will, especially in regard to the mansion and other property. Collection comprises family documents. Includes a deed (29 July 1790) related to the dispute between Rebecca Ridgely and Charles Ridgely Carnan; a letter to Charles Carnan regarding a payment and receipts from a linen draper (1791); warrants issued during Charles Carnan Ridgeley's term as governor; and a "Ridgely notebook" (1892). Also contains Mrs. Ridgely's letters (1858 and undated) to her daughter, Eliza White. There are documents with unclear connections to the Ridgely family, including an indenture (1838) between Charles Carroll III and Reuben Musgrove for rent of and a copy of a Murray family tree (1850s).

Collection comprises family documents. Includes a deed (29 July 1790) related to the dispute between Rebecca Ridgely and Charles Ridgely Carnan; a letter to Charles Carnan regarding a payment and receipts from a linen draper (1791); warrants issued during Charles Carnan Ridgeley's term as governor; and a "Ridgely notebook" (1892) that contains copied Ridgely family letters, genealogical information, and notes on family history and land holdings. Also contains Mrs. Ridgely's letters (1858 and undated) to her daughter, Eliza White, who was traveling in France with her children. The letters chiefly discuss family matters such as illness, births, weddings, child rearing, and household management. Mrs. Ridgely also writes about social life in Baltimore, her daughter's itinerary, and many requests for purchases from French and English merchants.

There are documents with unclear connections to the Ridgely family, including an indenture (1838) between Charles Carroll III and Reuben Musgrove for rent of land on Doughoregan Manor (Ellicott City, in Howard County, Md.) and a copy of a Murray family tree (1850s).

collection icon
Collection comprises correspondence, documents and print materials belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735 to 1859, and consist of over eighty letters, both incoming and outgoing, many legal and financial papers, other manuscript documents, and ephemeral print items such as broadsides and circulars. One folder contains military muster lists and fines stemming from Anderson's service as clerk of the 68th regiment of the Virginia militia. Topics in the correspondence include slavery and slave trade, particularly in Virginia, colonization efforts, emancipation, the status of mixed-race individuals, Virginia and U.S. politics, Virginia military history, religion and church affairs, and education. Of particular note are several letters and documents relating to Anderson's children, who he fathered with one or more slaves; one of these children, Haidee, was sent to Eaglewood, a boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké Weld and Theodore Dwight Weld. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of correspondence, documents and ephemera belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735-1859. The earliest document is a deed of gift of land from Thomas Vine of York County, Virginia, to his grandson.

There are over 100 pieces of incoming and outgoing correspondence dating from 1804 to 1859, with a few letters dated much later. Many of the retained copies and drafts are written on small slips of paper and docketed, which appears to have been Anderson's idiosyncratic method of dealing with his correspondence. Topics include religion and church matters; U.S. and Virginia politics; Virginia history; mercantile transactions; education; and slavery, including prices for slaves in the Richmond market, and Anderson's correspondence referring to purchases and sales of individual slaves. A printed circular letter from 1850 concerns colonization efforts to send freed slaves to Liberia.

Of note are several letters relating to children Anderson fathered with enslaved women, especially his daughter Haidee, who he sent to Eaglewood, the boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld; one long letter was written by Grimké to Anderson, exhorting him to emancipate Haidee and her mother. Eaglewood was part of the utopian community in Raritan Union Bay, New Jersey.

Stemming from Anderson's work as clerk for the 68th Regiment of the Virginia militia in James City County (Jamestown), there are 39 items, some written by Anderson, some by the Sheriff of Williamsburg, which consist chiefly of detailed muster lists and fines (1806-1858), and two printed lists of individuals receiving military pensions received due to an Act of Congress in 1828. Other documents in the collection refer to Virginia history during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, and to the history of the Virginia Norfolk Junior Volunteers, founded in 1802, in which Anderson served.

There are also deeds, wills, and other documents; several dozen financial receipts; and a few printed and partially printed ephemeral items. Family names appearing in the deeds, bonds, and other documents are Bryan, Coke, Moody, Dickeson, Nelson, White, and Chapman. Among the later documents is a list of medical expenses from 1852 that seem to relate to Anderson's slaves or servants, and an 1858 bill for boarding school expenses for Haidee, signed by Theodore Weld. A document from 1855 records citizens protesting a request from the ship "Seabird" to land cargo and passengers, due to an outbreak of yellow fever in the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

collection icon
Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

collection icon

William Sims papers, 1770-1860 3.6 Linear Feet — 385 Items

Correspondence, financial papers, and legal documents, concerning William Sims' extensive plantation holdings in South Carolina. Includes two account books. Correspondence is primarily related to business matters, including cotton trade and prices; the price and availability of slaves; and the beginnings of a textile industry on the plantation. Local and state politicians in South Carolina are often mentioned, as is the general economic plight of the Southern planter in the period (ca. 1819-1830), and currency problems in the state (ca. 1826-1830). One personal letter effusively describes newly settled land in Mississippi and the quality of the cotton grown there.

Detailed financial papers form the bulk of the collection, and concern the cotton trade (including weights, bale numbers, shipping, prices, and sales), and household and plantation expenses. Legal papers are confined to deeds, documents of land litigation, military commissions, and documents relating to slaves, such as indentures and lists of slaves on the plantation. Also includes genealogical information on the Sims family.