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Box 3, Folder 1
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The diary records Rush's travel, accompanied by a servant and via horses, between the outskirts of Philadelphia and Carlisle, Pennsylvania, for an initial meeting with the trustees of Dickinson College. During the meeting the Trustees selected Dr. Charles Nisbet to serve as the College's first president. Rush described the taverns and other travel lodges at which he stopped, along with Tavern staff and other patrons, the quality of the food and drink, along with conversations he witnessed or took part in. Discussion often centered on the topics of the Constitution, paper money, as well as Dickinson College. Rush also described the results of a rapid Spring thaw on the Susquehanna River, the unusually cold weather, the scenery, and the presence whiskey stills in Irish settlements and their impact on their communities.

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Alonzo William Slayback Diaries, 1898-1901 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Alonzo William Slayback (1879-1969), of St. Louis, Missouri, was the youngest of six children and the only son of Col. Alonzo W. Slayback (1838-1882) and Alice A. Waddell (1839-). The collection includes two diaries kept by Alonzo William Slayback from 1898 to 1901. The first diary consists of 17 double-sided pages of remarks fastened with a metal brad to several small slips of paper that serve as an index. The 43 numbered remarks, which range in date from October 20, 1898, to August 19, 1899, and undated, describe Slayback's conversations, encounters, and dates with several different women. The second diary, a small account book from the Merchant's National Bank of St. Louis, contains 42 pages of letters addressed to V, Veda, or Olga; the woman Slayback loved whose fickleness elicited passionate and conflicted feelings in him. Eighteen letters are dated from December 4, 1899, to November 16, 1901. Together, the diaries provide insight into dating and courtship in St. Louis, Mo., at the end of the 19th century.

The collection includes two diaries kept by Alonzo William Slayback from 1898 to 1901. The first diary consists of 17 double-sided pages of "remarks" fastened with a metal brad to several small slips of paper that serve as an index. The 43 numbered remarks, which range in date from October 20, 1898, to August 19, 1899, and undated, describe Slayback's conversations, encounters, and dates with several different women. The second diary, a small account book from the Merchant's National Bank of St. Louis, contains 42 pages of "letters" addressed to V, Veda, or Olga; the woman Slayback loved whose fickleness elicited passionate and conflicted feelings in him. Eighteen letters are dated from December 4, 1899, to November 16, 1901. Together, the diaries provide insight into dating and courtship in St. Louis, Mo., at the end of the 19th century.

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Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

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Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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American woman's travel diary, 1878 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 volume — 1 v.

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American woman traveling in Europe. The diary, begun on April 6, 1878, and ending on Nov. 9, 1878 in Augsburg, covers the travels of an American woman through England, France, Germany, Sweden, Norway, and Russia. Included are descriptions of visits to museums and royal palaces. While in Norway, the author met and spent time with Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant. Formerly known as Anonymous diary, 1878.

The diary, begun on April 6, 1878, and ending on Nov. 9, 1878 in Augsburg, covers the travels of an American woman through England, France, Germany, Sweden, Norway, and Russia. Included are descriptions of visits to museums and royal palaces. While in Norway, the author met and spent time with Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant. Formerly known as Anonymous diary, 1878.

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Amy Morris Bradley was a nurse and agent of the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War as well as an educator in Maine, 1840s-1850s, and Wilmington, N.C., 1865-1890s. Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

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Chief of Protocol and ambassador to Spain, Morocco, and Denmark under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations; resident of New York, N.Y., Long Island, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

Details on Angier Biddle Duke's life as well as information on the Duke, Biddle, and Drexel families can be found in the Biographical Data Series. These materials include some of A.B. Duke's military records; articles on A.B. Duke; articles and biographical entries on A.B. Duke; "in memoriam" booklets from his first wife's funeral and the funeral of Angier Buchanan Duke, A.B. Duke's father; and genealogical materials on the families. Selected condolences out of the hundreds sent to Robin Chandler Duke after her husband's death in 1995 also reveal much about the personality and life of A.B. Duke. In addition, the narratives in the Diaries Series offer a great deal of material concerning the personalities of A.B. Duke and his family and acquaintances throughout his life.

The Correspondence Series also offers information on the Duke, Biddle, Semans, and Trent families, though correspondence between immediate family members makes up a small percentage of this large series. The correspondence files are most useful for the documentation they provide about A.B. Duke's career. Additional biographical data on A.B. Duke and family members, particularly useful for information on Robin Chandler Duke's social and political activities, can be found in the Clippings Series.

The Photograph Albums and Photographs Series contains hundreds of photographs of the Duke, Semans, and Biddle families. Some early photographs of Angier Biddle Duke were taken during his enlistment in the Army from 1940-1945. An album entitled "A celebration of the life of Benjamin Newton Duke, 1979" can be found in the Scrapbooks Series. Finally, as A.B. Duke served as president of the Duke Family Association of NC from 1988-1995, there are a number of items related to the meetings of this genealogical association found in the Correspondence Series.

Angier Biddle Duke was best known for his ambassadorial skills and his political acumen beginning with his appointment to the office of Ambassador to El Salvador in 1952 as the youngest ambassador ever appointed to a post. His subsequent career in diplomacy and politics, including his appointment as Chief of Protocol under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, is well-documented throughout the majority of the series. A series of written and taped diaries entitled the "Ambassador's Diary" are especially interesting for A.B. Duke's candid reflections on his experiences.

The political and social events of the 1960s and 1970s are well-represented in the papers in the multimedia formats associated with the Audio, Film, and Videotape Series, containing numerous recordings of speeches, toasts, and visits of foreign dignitaries; the Scrapbooks and Photograph Albums and Photographs Series, which hold many candid and formal photographs of politicians, diplomats, celebrities, and artists; and the Clippings Series. One scrapbook covers President Kennedy's trip to Berlin, West Germany; another oversize scrapbook covers an international incident at Palomares, Spain (1966): while Duke was that country's ambassador, an undetonated U.S. nuclear bomb was lost off the coast of Spain, then recovered after an increased international outcry against nuclear weapons. Materials in the Protocol Papers Series also concern Kennedy's assassination and the transition to a Johnson White House during the period when A.B. Duke was Chief of Protocol. As Jacqueline Kennedy had already become a good friend of A.B. Duke's family, there are items in the Correspondence Series reflecting her close relationship with them in the difficult years after her husband's assassination.

The head of the State Department Office of Protocol serves as principal adviser to the President and Secretary of State on matters of diplomatic procedures governed by law or international customs and practice. Angier Biddle Duke's responsibilities as Chief of Protocol from 1961-1965 and 1968, including his role in the arrangements for the Kennedy funeral, are best represented by materials in the Protocol Papers Series, arranged alphabetically by country, and by many valuable letters and telegrams in the Correspondence Series, and in the Writings and Speeches Series. In addition, a great deal of relevant information, both contemporary and retrospective in nature, can be found in the Interviews Series. Several important volumes in the Scrapbooks and Diaries Series are also were created as records of his tenure as Chief of Protocol, and the Pictures Series contains many candid and formal photographs during this period. Finally, events relating to the Office of Protocol are found in audio or film format in the Audio, Film, and Video Series. Memorabilia from this period such as invitations, dinner menus, guest lists, and souvenir programs from inaugurations abroad can also be found in the Miscellaneous Series.

A.B. Duke's extensive organizational activities in later decades are documented in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Interviews, Printed Materials, and Writings and Speeches Series. A large number of materials reflect A.B. Duke's long involvement in the administration of Long Island University as well as in other institutions such as the International Rescue Commission, various Democratic committees, CARE, the NYC Dept. of Civic Affairs and Public Events, the Spanish Institute, the Appeal to Conscience Foundation, the Japan-American Institute, the World Affairs Council, and the American Council of Ambassadors, and many others. The Subject Files and other series also illustrate A.B. Duke's later involvement in organizations attempting to establish more democratic structures in countries such as El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guyana.

Some materials also reflect Robin Chandler Duke's later involvement in politics, including her unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination to fill Koch's congressional seat in 1978, and her role as chairwoman of Population Action International.

Although they contain relatively few documents, the Legal and Financial Papers provide some information on A.B. Duke's income and financial activities, and on the Doris Duke Trust; also in the legal papers is a publisher's contract for the biography of Doris Duke and a copy of Angier Buchanan Duke's will. Other legal and financial matters related to the Duke and Biddle families, particularly the Doris Duke estate (1995) are referred to on a regular basis in the Correspondence Series. Very little is to be found in the collection on the administration, maintenance, or acquisition of Angier Biddle Duke's residences in Washington, NYC, or Long Island, though some illustrations of residences can be found in the Clippings and Pictures Series.

Collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library which contain information relevant to the Angier Biddle Duke Papers include the James Buchanan Duke Papers and especially the Semans Family Papers. The Duke University Living History Program collection, also in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains an interview with Angier Biddle Duke recorded in the 1970s.

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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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Annie L. Hobbs Diaries, 1854-1869 0.2 Linear Feet — 4 Items

Annie L. Hobbs of Laconia, N.H. was an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, N.H. and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Vt. during the 1850s and 1860s. Collection contains two manuscript pocket diaries, dated 1867 and 1869, and two pocket memoranda books, dated 1854-1855, 1859, and 1863-1865, kept by Annie L. Hobbs, an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, Belknap County, New Hampshire and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont. In the diaries, Hobbs records her travels to and from her schools, evening readings, croquet games, naps, teas, Saturday excursions, her sewing work, occasional written work, receipt of letters and newspapers, Methodist festivals and Sabbath observances, and fluctuations in her health. Hobbs also regularly records her moods and her uncertainty about whether or not to go back for another term. Generally, the diaries document the life of a young female teacher living away from home, her daily routine, social contacts, and her intellectual pursuits. In the two memoranda books, Hobbs records student names and recitation periods, Lyceum lectures she attended, mathematical equations, and her expenses for 1863 to 1865.

Collection contains two manuscript pocket diaries, dated 1867 and 1869, and two pocket memoranda books, dated 1854-1855, 1859, and 1863-1865, kept by Annie L. Hobbs, an instructor at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College (Methodist) in Tilton, Belknap County, New Hampshire and at the Troy Conference Academy in Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont. In the diaries, Hobbs records her travels to and from her schools, evening readings, croquet games, naps, teas, Saturday excursions, her sewing work, occasional written work, receipt of letters and newspapers, Methodist festivals and Sabbath observances, and fluctuations in her health. Hobbs also regularly records her moods and her uncertainty about whether or not to go back for another term. Generally, the diaries document the life of a young female teacher living away from home, her daily routine, her social contacts, and her intellectual pursuits. In the two memoranda books, Hobbs records student names and recitation periods, Lyceum lectures she attended, mathematical equations, and her expenses for 1863 to 1865.

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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

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Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.

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Blanche Simmons Diary, 1879-1880 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Blanche Simmons (1857/8-1941) was the daughter of Sir John Lintorn Arabin Simmons (1821-1903), Field Marshal and Colonel Commandant of the Royal Engineers, and his second wife, Blanche Weston. The collection consists of a single diary that records the events of two distinct trips taken by Blanche Simmons and her parents in 1879 and 1880. The first half of the diary documents a family vacation to Belgium and the Netherlands from September 19th to October 13th, 1879, with stops in Brussels, Spa, Utrecht, Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam, Antwerp, and Ghent. The second half of the diary documents a trip to Berlin, Germany, from June 11th to July 9th, 1880, during which Blanche's father, Sir John Simmons, and Major Ardagh attended a conference in Berlin for "the settling of the Greek frontier" accompanied by Blanche, her mother, and their escort, Captain Wood.

The collection consists of a single diary that records the events of two distinct trips taken by Blanche Simmons and her parents in 1879 and 1880. The first half of the diary documents a family vacation to Belgium and the Netherlands from September 19th to October 13th, 1879, with stops in Brussels, Spa, Utrecht, Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam, Antwerp, and Ghent. The diary describes the sights and the family's activities in these cities, in smaller towns, and on nature walks. Art museums and churches, as well as the headdresses and clothing worn by local women are described in particular detail. Many commercial albumen prints on card stock and dried plant specimens are affixed to the diary pages, and the entry for Friday the 3rd includes a humorous, rhyming poem relating events of the first half of the trip.

The second half of the diary documents a trip to Berlin, Germany, from June 11th to July 9th, 1880, during which Blanche's father, Sir John Simmons, and Major Ardagh attended a conference in Berlin for "the settling of the Greek frontier" accompanied by Blanche, her mother, and their escort, Captain Wood. As in the earlier vacation, commentary chiefly centers on sightseeing with an emphasis on museums, but also relates details of the conference, as recounted to Blanche, and describes several formal functions attended by her party, including receptions at the British Embassy and a small dinner gathering at the New Palace in Potsdam with Crown Prince Friedrick, Crown Princess Victoria of Great Britain, Prince Wilhelm, and Princesses Victoria-Augusta and Caroline of Schleswig-Holstein. Sights in Cologne, Dresden, and Aachen are also described, and the diary concludes with two humorous "Odes," one commemorating the events of the trip and the other, a twenty-three stanza piece written by Major Ardagh, on the Conference of Berlin.

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Bob Sheldon papers, 1968-1991 2.1 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Political activist; nurse; owner of Internationalist Book Store in Chapel Hill, N.C. Sheldon was murdered in the store on February 21, 1991. Drafts of Sheldon's speeches, articles, diary and notes; news clippings; printed materials; and transcripts of trials and FBI files. Materials relate chiefly to his political activism as a draft resister in 1968; a visit to China in the 1970s, including slides; work with the Communist Workers Party in the 1970s and the Green Party in the 1980s; union organizing at Cone Mills Textile plant in the 1970s; and various Palestine issues in the 1980s.

Drafts of Sheldon's speeches, articles, diary and notes; news clippings; printed materials; and transcripts of trials and FBI files. Materials relate chiefly to his political activism as a draft resister in 1968; a visit to China in the 1970s, including slides; work with the Communist Workers Party in the 1970s and the Green Party in the 1980s; union organizing at Cone Mills Textile plant in the 1970s; and various Palestine issues in the 1980s.

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Carlyle Marney papers, 1899-1979 58 Linear Feet — Approx. 45,000 Items

The papers of Carlyle Marney span the years 1899-1979, although the bulk of the collection begins in the late 1950s. Included are correspondence, drafts of writings and sermons, press releases, leaflets, pamphlets, bulletins, financial records, clippings, newsletters, calendars, reports, course materials, minutes, printed material, notes, pictures, tapes, and films. Reflected in the papers is information on rural poverty, the American Baptist Convention, the Baptist Church, especially in Texas and North Carolina, Christian writings, Abingdon Press, which published many of Marney's books, and racial prejudice. Concerning prejudice see in particular the Writings and Speeches Series: Marney (Structures of Prejudice) and the Correspondence Series (Church and Race Conference).

The principal focus of the collection is Marney's professional career as a Baptist clergyman, serving two lengthy pastorates at First Baptist Church in Austin, Texas (1948-1958), and at Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina (1958-1967), and as Founder-Director of Interpreters' House, an ecumenical center of study and work at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (1967-1978). He divided his duties to eventually develop a tripartite profession as a pastor, author, and speaker. He transcended his Southern roots to attain a national reputation as a speaker and theologian. The collection illuminates Marney as an independent and controversial figure within the Southern Baptist Church. One of the hallmarks of his ministry, which separated him from most Southern Baptists, was his ecumenical focus. According to his biographer, John J. Carey, "Marney sought to be a force for Baptist renewal and to broaden the ecclesiastical and theological bases of the Southern Baptists."¹

The Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Engagements Series form the major groups in the collection. The Correspondence Series, which comprises almost one-third of the bulk of the collection, consists chiefly of professional correspondence, but there is also a group of folders for Marney family members. Prominent correspondents include James T. Cleland, William Sloan Coffin, Pope A. Duncan, Findley Edge, Harry Golden, William J. Kilgore, Martin Luther King, Jr., Karl Menninger, Bill Moyers, Guy Ranson, and Elton Trueblood. Abingdon Press and the American Baptist Convention also have major files in this series. The Association of Southern Baptists for Scouting, Christian Century Foundation, and the Myers Park Baptist Church are other organizations represented in this series. The above-named topics also appear under appropriate topical headings in the Subject Files Series. There are also files in the Correspondence Series for the Church and Race Conference (Charlotte, N. C., 1965) and the God is Dead movement.

Both published and unpublished works appear in the Writings and Speeches Series. Marney was the author of twelve books and contributed articles to various theological journals; other single sermons appear in various anthologies. Most of his books were published by Abingdon Press, a Methodist publisher. There is also a copy of the book published in 1953, These Things Remain, as well as television programs, 1954, under the same title. Included in this series are the texts of unpublished books, such as City of Light/City of Wilderness,Great Encounter,Recovery of the Church, and Tragic Man/Tragic House.

In the files of writings of other persons are works of Karl Menninger and Guy Ranson, who also appear in Marney's correspondence. Other writers appearing in this section are Rufus Carrollton Harris, William Jackson Kilgore, Franklin Hamlin Littell, John David Maguire, Orval Hobart Mowrer, H. Richard Niebuhr, Schubert Miles Ogden, Clyde Penrose St. Amant, and John Egnar Skoglund.

The Engagements Series, 1958-1978, primarily reflects the latter portion of Marney's career, during his tenure at Myers Park Baptist Church and at Interpreters' House. Both this series and the Calendars Series testify to Marney's busy schedule of speaking appointments, especially during the Myers Park pastorate. In fact, the church hired a full-time administrator to aid in managing the daily activities of the church. Marney preached at major colleges, universities, and seminaries across the United States, including Harvard University, Yale University, and Duke University. He accepted a variety of speaking engagements including the Chautauqua Institute in New York; the Massanetta Center in Virginia; worship services; conferences and symposia; religious organizations, such as Temple Beth El Sisterhood; retreats; and the North Carolina Council of Churches. In addition, Marney spoke at military installations, the Southern Textile Association, and various secular organizations and clubs, such as the Chamber of Commerce, Sertoma Club, and YMCA.

Two major topics in the Subject Series are the Christian Century Foundation, of which Marney was a trustee, and the Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention. These two topics overlap with files in the Correspondence Series. Other files of interest include Abingdon Press, the Boy Scouts of America, the Committee on Religion in Appalachia, First Baptist Church (Austin), Myers Park Baptist Church, and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. There is also a mimeographed copy of a diary (prepared from tapes), 1954, Sept.-Nov., that Marney wrote on a trip to Korea and Japan, as part of a preaching mission for the Army and Air Force in the Far East.

The President's National Advisory Commission on Rural Poverty Series contains reports on aspects of rural poverty, such as economics, education, conservation and development of natural resources, health and medical care, government, housing, and farming.

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Series includes notes on such topics as Christian missions, church history, theology, and Old and New Testament studies. An early volume, 1899-1902, contains notes for a class by W. O. Carver on Christian missions.

The Notes Series contains notes Marney made from the works of various theologians and other authors, such as F.S.C. Northrop, Hans Reichenbach, A. C. Reid, Paul Tillich, Harold H. Titus, Arnold J. Toynbee, and Alfred North Whitehead.

In the Audiovisual Series features sermons, lectures, and books in the following formats: cassette tapes, reel-to-reel tapes, and motion picture films. Of particular interest are the series of reel-to-reel tapes of Laymen's Hour recordings and the Massanetta Springs Recordings made by Marney. The Laymen's Hour was a radio broadcast; most of the recordings in this series are in 1965, with one in 1962. Massanetta Springs, Inc. is the Conference Center of the Synod of Virginia, Presbyterian Church, U. S., located near Harrisonburg, Va. These recordings, 1957-1974, were a series of annual lectures at Bible conferences at the center. Originals are closed to use, but listening copies are available for many of the recordings; otherwise staff need to arrange to have use copies made. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

1. John J. Carey, Carlyle Marney: A Pilgrim's Progress(Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1980) , p. 36.

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Carolina Wren Press records, 1940-1994 and undated 80 Linear Feet — 117,750 Items

The Carolina Wren Press Records span the years 1940 through 1992, with most of the material dated between 1970 and 1990. The papers are divided into two large groups, the Carolina Wren Press Records and the Carolina Wren Press Records: Judy Hogan Papers.

The Carolina Wren Press Records group contains material relating to the founding and publishing activities of the press and to organizations with which the press was affiliated. The papers are divided into the following series: Correspondence, Writings, Publications, Printed Material, Lollipop Power Press (a feminist press publishing non-sexist children's books), Homegrown Books (a publication for reviews of small press work), Hyperion (a poetry journal), Grant Material, Organizations, Office Files, Financial Papers, COSMEP (Committee of Small Magazine Editors and Publishers), and Photographs and Audiovisual Material. Each of these series documents not only the growth and activities of Carolina Wren Press and associated organizations, but also the origins and development of the small press movement in the United States and particularly in the South.

The Carolina Wren Press Records: Judy Hogan Papers group documents the life and activities of the author Judy Hogan, the founder of Carolina Wren Press. The material is divided into the following series: Correspondence, Diaries, Writings, Teaching Materials, Financial Papers, Biographical Material. While some of the correspondence and diary entries may mention the Carolina Wren Press, the papers in this group focus primarily on Hogan's personal life, her education, her writing and projects, and her teaching activities.

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Charles Alfred Euston FitzRoy (1892-1970), 10th Duke of Grafton, was a soldier and farmer. The collection consists of a single daily diary that records the events of two trips taken by Charles Alfred Euston FitzRoy and his third wife, Rita, in 1949. Slightly less than half of the diary is used, 171 pages in all, with entries from February 7 through May 28, and from August 8 through October 7. The first portion of the diary describes FitzRoy's daily activities while staying on his ranch near Enkeldoorn in Southern Rhodesia (now Chivhu, Zimbabwe) in March and April and while in Kenya visiting acquaintances in February and on safari in May. The second used portion of the diary records the daily activities of FitzRoy, his family, and friends while hunting in northern Scotland.

The collection consists of a single daily diary that records the events of two trips taken by Charles Alfred Euston FitzRoy, 10th Duke of Grafton, and his third wife, Rita, in 1949. Slightly less than half of the diary is used, 171 pages in all, with entries from February 7 through May 28, and from August 8 through October 7.

The first portion of the diary describes FitzRoy's daily activities while staying on his ranch near Enkeldoorn in Southern Rhodesia (now Chivhu, Zimbabwe) in March and April and while in Kenya visiting acquaintances in February and on safari in May. Comments on ranch operations are often brief references to visiting "the dip" where livestock is submerged in chemicals to kill parasites, but include references to a cattle drive to Salisbury (now Harare, Zimbabwe). Outside of ranching, much of FitzRoy's time was spent sketching, visiting acquaintances, and sightseeing in nature reserves and towns including Victoria Falls in Southern Rhodesia, Livingstone and Mazabuka in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), and Fort Victoria (now Masvingo, Zimbabwe). Daily commentary during the 12-day hunting safari in Kenya is more extensive, providing details about stalking and killing several types of antelope, a gazelle, an impala, a zebra, and an African buffalo.

The second used portion of the diary records the daily activities of FitzRoy, his family, and friends, including the Duke of Gloucester on a few occasions, while hunting in northern Scotland. Comments chiefly recount the location of various members of the party and the number and type of animals killed, typically grouse, stags, and rabbits.

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English businessman and schoolmaster. Manuscript journal written in 25 annual vols. of Lett's Diary. Years included are 1859, 1861-1879, and 1900-1904. Volume 1870 has been rehoused into 7 different parts.

Manuscript journal written in 25 annual vols. of Lett's Diary. In the early volumes, Baker lived in Bayswater, England, and was a partner in a firm in the Colonial Commission trade. He wrote of attending plays, concerts, and sporting events. He spent much of his time working among boys and young men at the West London Youths Institute. Although married with children, he wrote of his great affection for boys, and sometimes mentioned taking them home and sleeping with them. He described marital discord caused by his wife's "cold" treatment of particular boys. In 1875, his wife left him.

Entries also document his financial difficulties, which necessitated his borrowing large sums of money and which culminated in bankruptcy in 1875. He attempted to open a school in 1877, but had few students due to "terrible scandals," which he attributed to his wife. By 1875, he had been ordained into the Church of England, and the later volumes describe his life as a curate in various parishes. In 1902, he signed on as chaplain on the S.S. Macquerie on a 3-month voyage to Australia, but left the ship in Melbourne with the atheist Captain angry at him. At the end of the last journal, he was living in his home town of Derby.

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Charles Davis Jameson was an American civil engineer who lived and worked on railroads in China with the Perkin Syndicate between 1895-1918. The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan. There are seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are also 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan.

There are also seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are albumen and gelatin silver prints. One of the albums is a commercial Japanese album that features hand-tinted photographs. Two albums focus on Shanxi province; three others focus on Beijing. Subjects include waterways and boats, landscapes, groups of Chinese or Westerners, engineering projects, street scenes, rural life, caravans, portraits, missionaries, houses for Westerners, farming and rice crops, and temples and other buildings. Five photographs in photograph album 2 are duplicates of photographs in the William Hillman Shockley photographs collection.

There are 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. Three photographs of international locations, including Fingall's Cave, Scotland; a temple in Agra, India, and a scene of Geneva, Switzerland, are all mounted. The subjects of the other two photographs are a Chinese waterway with three boats, and a courtyard with a Western man being waited on by a Chinese servant. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

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Charles L. Abernethy Sr. papers, 1713-1972, bulk 1907-1959 85 Linear Feet — 160 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 60,855 items

Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. (1872-1955) was a Democratic Congressman representing eastern North Carolina from 1922-1935. His professional papers consist chiefly of correspondence and records from his law practice and legal cases, with smaller amounts of writings and speeches, financial papers, printed materials, diaries, and some personal papers, including early deeds. There is also a large group of photographs, photo albums, and clippings scrapbooks chiefly documenting Abernethy's political career. One album from 1907 contains postcards of Beaufort, N.C.; another contains photographs of a three-month Congressional trip to Alaska, 1923, and includes images of President and Mrs. Harding and a diary transcript of the trip. Other items include some papers of his son, Charles Laban Abernethy, Jr., also a lawyer, and a volume of his poetry.

The collection principally comprises a large series of correspondence and legal records accumulated by North Carolina lawyer and politician Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. during his tenure as U.S. Congressman. There are papers relating to the senior Abernethy's law practice and business dealings in Beaufort and New Bern, N.C. (including legal papers concerning land development in Carteret County, Cape Lookout, and Horse Island maintained by both father and son).

Other materials include deeds and other early papers, political speeches, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks of Abernethy's political career, a diary, and the Abernethy coat-of-arms. There are also papers assembled by Abernethy's son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., a lawyer in his father's firm, and a volume of his poetry.

A lare group of photographs and albums includes a photograph album containing snapshots the elder Abernethy took during a congressional trip to Alaska for three months of 1923 (including photographs of President and Mrs. Harding), as well as a typescript of his diary from the trip; and an album containing postcards of Beaufort, N.C, in 1907, featuring a celebration of either the 200th anniversary of the town's founding or the opening of passenger and rail service to the town (or both).

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The records of the Charles W. Hoyt Company advertising agency span the years 1894-1973 with the bulk dating between 1909-1928. The collection primarily documents the founding and operation of the company, and to a lesser extent the personal activities of the Hoyt family (Charles, Effie, Winthrop, and Everett) and Winthrop's service during World War II in the U. S. Army Air Force. Materials include correspondence, scrapbooks, company publications and manuals, financial records, clippings, diaries, writings, drawings, photographs, house advertisements, Nazi medals, song lyrics, and printed material. Very little information exists in the collection concerning the Hoyt Company's clients. The only client advertisements that survive were produced for Merck and Co. The Hoyt company scrapbooks document some activities for clients including Arnold Bakers, Golden Blossom Honey, Jamaica Tourist Board, KLM, Stanley Home Products, the Charles B. Woolson Co. and the State of New Hampshire. The collection contains correspondence between family members as well as between the company and Merck and Co., the Charles B. Knox Co., and William Benton, one of the founders of the Benton and Bowles advertising agency. Another notable person mentioned in the collection is Hoyt Company employee Samuel Meek, who would go on to become an important executive for the J. Walter Thompson Company advertising agency. The collection is organized into the Company Series; the Family Series; and the Winthrop Hoyt World War II Series. Large-format items are located in the Oversize Materials.

The Company Series contains the bulk of material in the collection and is concerned with the founding, and subsequent operation of the Charles W. Hoyt Company from 1909 to 1965 by Charles W. Hoyt (until his death in 1928), and then by his sons Winthrop and Everett "Red" Hoyt. The Company produced and sold advertising and marketing plans to clients in addition to providing other advertising services. Charles Hoyt's philosophy of "planned" advertising is well-documented.

The Family Series consists of personal diaries, correspondence, photographs and other printed materials relating to Hoyt family members as distinct from the activities of the Charles W. Hoyt Company. Family members for whom materials exist include Charles W. Hoyt, Effie Smith Hoyt, Winthrop Hoyt, and Everett "Red" Hoyt.

The Winthrop Hoyt World War II Records Series documents Hoyt's service during the war as an intelligence officer in the United States Army Air Force. It includes correspondence and writings, photographs, Nazi medals and other materials.

Oversize Materials include items removed from other series due to their size.

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The Chris Costner Sizemore Papers span the time period 1952-1989, with the bulk of the papers dating between 1956 and 1979. The collection consists largely of correspondence; diaries and writings by Sizemore; publicity centered on film and book promotions or speaking engagements; materials related to her appearances; interviews and documentary materials (including film, video- and audiocassettes); and assorted materials including photographs, legal and financial papers. Most items relate to Sizemore's struggle with multiple personality disorder (dissociative identity disorder), both personally through letters, writings, and diaries, and publicly through interviews, documentary media, and news clippings. The papers provide an in-depth look into the life of a woman with a rare disorder who later came to clearly articulate her life to the public and become a mental health advocate. A biography was written by her doctors in 1957, Corbett Thigpen and Hervey Cleckley, called The Three Faces of Eve. It was turned into a film the next year. Under the pseudonym, Evelyn Lancaster, Sizemore co-authored The Final Face of Eve with James Poling in 1958. In 1977 she wrote, under her given name, the autobiography I'm Eve. The Correspondence Series is arranged chronologically, and consists primarily of incoming letters. Dr. Corbett Thigpen, the doctor to deliver the original diagnosis of multiple personality disorder, is prominent in much of the collection. This series documents his relationship to Sizemore during treatment and continuing well into the 1970s. He corresponded with Sizemore about his writings, revealing much about the publication of The Three Faces of Eve (book), and its subsequent movie release. The series also contains correspondence with other doctors, family members, Sizemore's editors and publishers, and organizations for which she lectured. The Writings Series is comprised primarily of the holograph manuscript, typescript, final galley proofs, and paperback edition of I'm Eve, the memoir written by Sizemore with the help of Elen Pittillo. This comprehensive view of the book's publication is represented from handwritten copy to final edition. The Writings Series also includes some short descriptions of Sizemore's life and examples of her poetry, as well as a few writings by others. There are six diaries in the Diaries Series, kept during parts of the 1950s and 1970s. Within these volumes, Sizemore discloses inner thoughts, which reveal very personal information about enduring mental illness and its effects on her family. The Publicity Series includes news clippings and journal articles about Sizemore and multiple personality disorder, as well as media related to her published works. The Events Series contains materials and ephemera related to Sizemore's public life of art shows, lectures, broadcasts, and appearances, often for mental health organizations. It also contains materials from her book tour for The Three Faces of Eve. The Photographs Series contains pictures from these events and of Sizemore's family life. The Additional Materials Series contains financial and legal papers, medical files, and identifying documents. There is also an Audio Visual Materials Series that contains interviews and documentary materials that again reflect the public's interest in Sizemore's life, as well as her own desire to document and share her experiences in writing, speaking, and art. Included is a documentary film by Dr. Thigpen, and video and audiocassettes of television interviews, other appearances, and of family members discussing a shared past (sound quality of some of the audiocassettes is very poor).

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Cochrane Family papers, 1777-1957 and undated 5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items

Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane served in the British Navy from 1839-1886, where he fought in the Anglo-Chinese war and rose to the rank of admiral. He was also instrumental in administering the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company during its early years. His brother, Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was also active in the Royal Navy from 1847-1873, participating in the British campaign to suppress the slave trade in West Africa during the 1860s. He was also a landowner and landlord of the Redcastle Estate in County Donegal, Ireland, and served in his later years as High Sheriff for County Donegal. The collection contains correspondence, legal and financial documents, notes and writings, notebooks and diaries, clippings, printed books and pamphlets, photographs, maps, charts, diagrams and technical drawings pertaining to the lives and careers of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro and Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane, and to the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company. The papers span the years 1777-1957, with the bulk of the collection being dated from 1850-1905, and document the naval careers of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane and Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane, the role of the Cochrane family as landlords in Western Ulster, and the development of the colonial asphalt industry in Trinidad during the 19th century.

The Cochrane Family Papers span the years 1777-1957, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1850 and 1905. The collection consists of correspondence; legal and financial documents; personal, naval, and technical notes and other writings; notebooks, diaries, and almanacs; clippings and other saved print material; and photographs, maps, charts, drawings, diagrams, and other visual materials preserved by the Cochranes. The majority of these documents pertain to two members of the Cochrane family: the brothers Admiral Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane and Admiral Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane. The bulk of the papers deal with three principal subject areas: the naval careers of the brothers; family matters and finances, particularly the finances of their Redcastle Estate in County Donegal, Ireland; and business papers and correspondence relating to the family estates and the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company, established by Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, and continued by his son Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane. The collection is particularly rich in documenting the beginnings of the asphalt industry in Trinidad and land-use issues in Ireland during the 19th century. In addition, Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was stationed off the coast of West Africa during much of the 1850s and 1860s, and the collection contains a number of documents relating to the British attempts during that time to suppress the African slave trade, an effort in which Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was active. The collection is divided into three series, the Family Papers Series, the Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series, and the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Series, each of which are divided into subseries by format. This division retains the original division of the collection, but researchers should be aware that there is significant crossover between the subject areas of the Family Papers Series and the Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series, and those interested in one of these series should be aware that there may be pertinent material in the other.

The Family Papers Series, the largest of the three, documents two main subject areas: the naval careers of Ernest Grey Lambton and Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, and the family finances relating to the Redcastle estate. The former of these is documented primarily in the Correspondence subseries and the Notes and Writings Subseries, while the latter is most heavily represented in the Legal and Financial Documents Subseries, which contains a number of rental and account books pertaining to the Cochrane and Doherty family estates in Ireland. The Cochranes were all active inventors, and the Legal and Financial Documents Subseries also includes patent forms for a number of inventions, including means of laying telegraph wire and ships' boilers and propulsion. The Notebooks and Diaries Subseries is comprised primarily of bound volumes of writings by Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, documenting his daily activity and travels, although it does contain two notebooks used by Thomas Cochrane for surveying during his travels in the 1850s and an Irish Land Commission notebook belonging to Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane as well. The two remaining subseries, Print Materials and Visual Materials and Artifacts, are much smaller in size, and contain materials pertaining to both brothers, and to the family more generally.

The Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series contains material accessioned separately from the rest of the collection, which documents Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane's naval life and activities off the Western coast of Africa; his correspondence with Richard Doherty (whose daughter he later married) about financial and estate matters in County Donegal; and his time spent as a landlord in County Donegal, where he became High Sheriff and a member of the Grand Jury after retiring from the navy. The Correspondence Subseries contains Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane's correspondence with Samuel W. Blackwall of Sierra Leone; Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane; Thomas Barnes Cochrane; Richard Doherty; and others. Of the other subseries, the Legal and Financial Documents and Visual Materials subseries relate primarily to his life in County Donegal, while the Notebooks and Diaries and Notes and Writings subseries deal more extensively with his earlier naval career and time in West Africa. This series was kept separate from the Family Papers Series to preserve the original order of the documents. As should be clear from this description, however, many of the subject areas of this series overlap with those of the Family Papers Series, and researchers interested in the naval career of Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane or the Cochranes' role as landlords in Northern Ireland should also consult that series.

Finally, the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Series documents the Cochrane family's involvement in the early asphalt industry in Trinidad. The vast majority of the papers included here are those of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, who took over the job of overseeing the Cochrane properties and interests in Trinidad after he was invalided during the China wars. However, there are also materials of Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, pertaining to the company. To be found here are business correspondence pertaining to the export of asphalt and bitumen from Trinidad, shipping arrangements, experiments conducted on the potential uses of bitumen from Pitch Lake, and other matters related to the establishment and operation of the business; notes relating to experiments conducted, and to the climate and area; legal documents establishing the company and documenting the extent of the Belle Vue, Mon Plaisir and Esperance Estates in Trinidad; maps and plans of these estates and of Pitch Lake; and two printed volumes and other miscellaneous items pertaining to Trinidad. The material contained in this series should be of interest to those researching the development and early stages of the asphalt industry, and to those interested in colonial business, finance, and resource use during the 19th century.

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Coleman family papers, 1895-1971 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 364 Items

Residents of Canada, Europe, and Asheville, N.C. Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Fleury Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts and the "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music instruction (violin and piano), women's society life in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century.

Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts, "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music clubs, instruction and performance (violin and piano) in Europe and the U.S., women's society life and fashions in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century. There are few comments about current events, even during the World Wars and the Depression, but there are extensive accounts of social life and customs in Europe and Asheville, N.C.

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David Barrows papers, 1836-1870 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 265 Items

Hosiery manufacturer and English emigrant. The collection includes letters, diaries and miscellaneous papers documenting the business enterprises and family life of Barrows.

Letters, diaries, and miscellaneous papers documenting the business enterprises and family life of a young Englishman who immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1842. Ten diaries (1850-1853) present a detailed account of hosiery manufacture as a family enterprise in which both men and women participated. Community events in Nicetown, Pa., were described as well. Diaries also document the relationship between Barrow and his alcoholic father who was sometimes physically abusive to family members. The author described his efforts to attain financial independence and to create a new life for himself and his wife. Letters from Ann Rusby, a teacher, and diary entries by Barrows, reveal much about their courtship, their sexual relationship and their secret marriage. Letters to and from family members in England depict the contrast in living and working conditions between the two countries. The collection includes an assortment of envelopes arranged by method of sealing.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Dorothy Allison papers, 1965-2010 92.5 Linear Feet — 69,375 Items

Dorothy Allison is an author and feminist who has written numerous books and short stories, including Trash (1988), Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), and Cavedweller (1998). The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works), personal and professional correspondence, research materials and subject files, her personal journals, and other materials. Includes some photographs, electronic files, and oversize materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works). All of Allison's unpublished works are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Personal and professional correspondence, including exchanges with her publishers and other authors, are held in the chronological and work files. The collection also contains Allison's research materials and subject files, covering topics on feminism, lesbianism, sexuality, pornography, writing, and other related files. Allison's journals, dating from 1985 through the 2000s, consist of both handwritten and electronic formats, with all of the electronic journals printed for the archive. All of Allison's journals are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Also included are materials from her speaking engagements, workshops, and other professional activities. There are a variety of special formats within the collection, including some photographs, electronic files, audio tapes, video cassettes, DVDs, and oversize posters.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Missionary to India and author of religious works. Cousin to Virginia Woolf; daughter of James Fitzjames Stephen, who was brother to Leslie Stephen, Virginia Woolf's father. Handwritten diary, 151 full pages, by 16-year-old Dorothea Jane Stephen. Entries document the author's anticipation of Jubilee Day (July 21, 1887, the 50th anniversary of Queen Victoria's reign), as well as her activities on the day itself (written in red rather than black ink), and the parties and church services following it. Other topics include her daily life in London and two family trips in England. In particular, Stephen chronicled (through both words and ink drawings) her family, including her mother and two sisters; school classes and examinations; visiting rounds; current fashion, horses, and carriages rides; leisure activities and sports, especially collecting bugs, reading, dancing, and playing lawn tennis; and visiting the coast at Barnstaple, England. She also described sites in London, including Buckingham Palace, St. Jame's Park, Piccadilly, and Kensington Heights.

Handwritten diary, 151 full pages, by 16-year-old Dorothea Jane Stephen. Entries document the author's anticipation of Jubilee Day (July 21, 1887, the 50th anniversary of Queen Victoria's reign), as well as her activities on the day itself (written in red rather than black ink), and the parties and church services following it. Other topics include her daily life in London and two family trips in England. In particular, Stephen chronicled (through both words and ink drawings) her family, including her mother and two sisters; school classes and examinations; visiting rounds; current fashion, horses, and carriages rides; leisure activities and sports, especially collecting bugs, reading, dancing, and playing lawn tennis; and visiting the coast at Barnstaple, England. She also described sites in London, including Buckingham Palace, St. Jame's Park, Piccadilly, and Kensington Heights.

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Duke Vigil collection, 1968 - 1988 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

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The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5-11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The collection features announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, ephemera, press releases, clippings, a diary, sound recordings and WDBS broadcasts, and photographs. Individuals prominent within the collection include John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, David Henderson, Duke President Douglas Knight, Samuel DuBois Cook, and Wright Tisdale. Major subjects include student demonstrations, race relations, Duke University employee wages and labor union, and the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1988. English.

The collection features a variety of materials documenting the Vigil at Duke University from April 5-11, 1968. These materials originate from numerous sources and were compiled by University Archives staff for teaching and research. The first series, Subject files, contains primary documents, including announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, and ephemera; media coverage including press releases and clippings; personal papers and a diary about the Vigil from John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, and David Henderson; and analyses and materials relating to the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988.

The Sound recordings series features five audiotapes made by a Duke student during the Vigil. Additional sound recordings can be found in the Related collections series. These collections include the WDBS broadcast recordings and the University Archives Photograph Collection, and they provide further audio and visual documentation of the Vigil. The WDBS records feature eleven audiotapes of radio broadcasts on events during the Vigil. The Photograph Collection includes over twenty black and white photographs of the Vigil, one color photograph, and numerous negatives, contact prints, and slides.

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Dula Family papers, 1894-1946 2 Linear Feet — 380 Items

Lenoir, N.C. residents. Collection consists primarily of letters from Alfred Weimer Dula to his wife Adelaide (Mast) Dula and letters from Harry Stuart Hickman to his wife Elizabeth (Dula) Hickman. Many of the letters deal with experiences during WWII. Alfred Dula was one of the first optometrists in N.C. and wrote to his wife while travelling to small towns. Harry Hickman wrote from Aviation Medical School, San Antonio, Tex. There are other miscellaneous letters to and from various family members, some from abroad. There is one travel diary of a trip from Montreal to points in Europe.

Collection consists primarily of letters from Alfred Weimer Dula to his wife Adelaide (Mast) Dula and letters from Harry Stuart Hickman to his wife Elizabeth (Dula) Hickman. Both families were residents of Lenoir, N.C. and members of the Dula family that were related to Tom Dula. Many of the letters deal with experiences during World War II. Alfred Dula was one of the first optometrists in N.C. and wrote to his wife while travelling to small towns. Harry Hickman wrote from Aviation Medical School, San Antonio, Texas. There are other miscellaneous letters to and from various family members, some from abroad. There is one 20th c. travel diary of a trip from Montreal to points in Europe.

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Dunlap family papers, 1733-1984 3.2 Linear Feet — 741 Items

Family with members in both Ripon, Wis., and Ann Arbor, Mich. Collection contains letters and photocopies of letters between family members, naturalization papers; a poem by Helen E. (Richley) Healy; copies of an undated memoir by Gertrude (Clark) Dunlap; an undated chronicle of the early years of James E. Dunlap; several other memoirs, journals and diaries; descriptions of a voyage in an American clipper ship; Civil War letters; genealogies of various families including the Dunlap, Dunlop, Life, Clark, Cooke, and Delamere families; original photographs; and a land deed. The 2007 addition (2007-0168) (600 items; 2.5 lin. ft.; dated 1821-1910 and undated) contains genealogies and family histories of the Dunlap and Life families and biographies of the family members; diaries dated 1865, 1867, 1873-1898, and 1910; autograph books; letters and a scrapbook from the Civil War; daguerreotypes and ambrotypes; and a bayonet presumably from the Civil War. Also included are transcripts of several of the letters and diaries.

Collection contains letters and photocopies of letters between family members, naturalization papers; a poem by Helen E. (Richley) Healy; copies of an undated memoir by Gertrude (Clark) Dunlap; an undated chronicle of the early years of James E. Dunlap; several other memoirs, journals and diaries; descriptions of a voyage in an American clipper ship; Civil War letters; genealogies of various families including the Dunlap, Dunlop, Life, Clark, Cooke, and Delamere families; original photographs; and a land deed.

The 2007 addition (2007-0168) (600 items; 2.5 lin. ft.; dated 1821-1910 and undated) contains genealogies and family histories of the Dunlap and Life families and biographies of the family members; diaries dated 1865, 1867, 1873-1898, and 1910; autograph books; letters and a scrapbook from the Civil War; daguerreotypes and ambrotypes; and a bayonet presumably from the Civil War. Also included are transcripts of several of the letters and diaries.

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E. Ireland was a mature, unmarried Scottish woman at the time she authored a series of travel diaries from 1916 to 1920. Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

Collection consists of five volumes (686 pages) of an illustrated travel diary kept by E. Ireland, a mature unmarried Scottish woman, between 20 August 1916 and 28 February 1920. The diaries document Ireland's travels throughout the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, the Philippines, Hong Kong, China, Japan, South Africa, and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). Typical entries describe local inhabitants and customs, conversations with fellow travelers, and sites visited. Many entries include sketches, pasted in postcards, photographs, postage stamps, menus, passenger lists, and other ephemera.

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Elgin Wendell Mellown papers, 1939-1969 2 Linear Feet — 67 Items

Collection contains bound manuscript diaries kept by Elgin W. Mellown (1904-1975), while superintendent of public schools in Sumter Co., Alabama during the 1940s-1960s, and other materials which shed light on conditions in Alabama schools during that period. The diaries are sometimes difficult to interpret: on occasion Mellown used an entry for organizing his thoughts on a subject, but most of the time entries consist of briefly jotted reminders and sometimes only appointments. Names are often rendered as abbreviations. Collection also contains audio tapes featuring interviews with school staff and citizens, both black and white. There are also slides related to Mellown's work.

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Elisabeth Baldwin Wiley Harris was a resident of a large plantation near Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia. The bulk of the collection consists of six volumes and fragments of a manuscript diary with daily entries from 1862 to 1893, written by Elizabeth Harris. Although there is a fragment of the diary dated 1858, the daily entries begin Jan. 4, 1862, and continue, with brief interruptions for illnesses and family crises, until Oct. 26, 1893. Harris occasionally mentions local and national politics, events connected with the Civil War, and slavery, but most of the entries concern the weather, family matters, births, deaths, illnesses, the state of her soul, and daily activities. The collection also contains one letter dated 1860, two letters dated 1957 and 1958, and a genealogy from the donor which gives background information about the author and her family.

The bulk of the collection consists of six volumes and fragments of a manuscript diary with daily entries from 1862 to 1893, written by Elizabeth Harris. Although there is a fragment of the diary dated 1858, the daily entries begin Jan. 4, 1862, and continue, with brief interruptions for illnesses and family crises, until Oct. 26, 1893. Harris occasionally mentions local and national politics, events connected with the Civil War, and slavery, but most of the entries concern the weather, family matters, births, deaths, illnesses, the state of her soul, and daily activities. The collection also contains one letter dated 1860, two letters dated 1957 and 1958, and a genealogy from the donor which gives background information about the author and her family.

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Elizabeth Ringgold diaries, 1910-1924 0.3 Linear Feet — 4 volumes

Elizabeth Ringgold was a resident of rural northeastern Oklahoma. Chronicle of routine farm activities. Daily entries document family and social life and more broadly the effects of World War I, the intrusion of the oil industry, and routine socialist and Ku Klux Klan activities.

Chronicle of routine farm activities. Daily entries document family and social life and more broadly the effects of World War I, the intrusion of the oil industry, and routine socialist and Ku Klux Klan activities. Includes memoranda notes on pages at the back of each volume.

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May be the author Eliza Wilson (Mrs. Robert Wilson) of Kirkdale, Liverpool, England. Entries describe the social life and travel of a British woman living in India with General Craigie, his wife, and daughters. They left England in November 1854, traveled by ship with stops in Egypt, and arrived in Madras in January 1855. The group lived in Madras but journeyed to other cities in southern India, including Bangalore, Mysore, and Vellore. There are references to the Sepoy Rebellion, 1856-1858, before Wilson departed India in 1860.

Entries describe the social life and travel of a British woman living in India with General Craigie, his wife, and daughters. They left England in November 1854, traveled by ship with stops in Egypt, and arrived in Madras in January 1855. The group lived in Madras but journeyed to other cities in southern India, including Bangalore, Mysore, and Vellore. There are references to the Sepoy Rebellion, 1856-1858, before Wilson departed India in 1860.

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Ephraim Kirby papers, 1763-1878 and undated 8 Linear Feet — Approx. 2900 Items

Revolutionary soldier, lawyer, state legislator, and land speculator, of Litchfield, Connecticut. The papers of Ephraim Kirby consist of correspondence, broadsides, legal papers, bills and receipts pertaining to the Revolutionary War, early settlements west of the Alleghenies and Alabama, land speculation, internal improvements, and U.S. and Connecticut politics. Revolutionary War letters describe life in the Continental Army, the quartermaster disorder, military engagements, including Germantown and the surrender of Cornwallis, and the beginnings of Ephraim Kirby's legal practice. Political correspondence concerns the government of the United States under the Articles of Confederation; the ratification of the Constitution; foreign relations with Great Britain, France, Algiers, and Spain; Madison's resolutions regarding trade and navigation; Jay's Treaty; Whiskey Rebellion; taxation for revenue; the presidential campaigns of 1796 and 1800; Cherokee affairs; politics and patronage in Connecticut; and the repeal of the Judiciary Act of 1801. Other correspondence relates to Kirby's legal practice; the operation of the U.S. Postal Service; land speculation and the early settlement of western lands, particularly in New York and Pennsylvania; the building of turnpikes; and a description of Washington, D.C., 1802. Of particular interest are Kirby's reports to Thomas Jefferson on the Mississippi Territory and correspondence during his journey to Natchez, Mississippi, including a description of the lands east of the Pearl River, settlers, crops, trade conditions, Spanish settlements and military posts, and Native American tribes. A diary of Reynold Marvin Kirby, son of Ephraim Kirby, describes his life in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812.

The papers of Ephraim Kirby date from 1763 to 1878, and consist of correspondence, broadsides, legal papers, bills and receipts pertaining to the Revolutionary War, early settlements west of the Alleghenies and Alabama, land speculation, internal improvements, and politics. Revolutionary War letters describe life in the Continental Army; military engagements, including the battle of Germantown and the surrender of Cornwallis; the conduct of General Oliver Wolcott; the beginnings of Ephraim Kirby's legal practice, and the purchase of law books.

Political correspondence concerns the government of the United States under the Articles of Confederation, the ratification of the Constitution, foreign relations with Great Britain, the Citizen Genet affair, James Madison's resolutions regarding trade and navigation, the proposal to arm frigates against Algiers, Jay's Treaty, Whiskey Rebellion, the need for taxation for revenue. There are also comments on the presidential campaigns of 1796 and 1800; the role of newspapers in politics (as Kirby knew many publishers and printers); relations with France; Cherokee affairs; the use of political patronage; Republican versus Federalist politics, especially in Connecticut; the repeal of the Judiciary Act of 1801; and American relations with Spain after the Louisiana Purchase.

Other correspondence relates to Kirby's legal practice, especially the collection of debts and the publication and sale of his book, Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Superior Court and Court of Errors of the State of Connecticut from the Years 1785 to May, 1788; lands claimed by both Pennsylvania and Connecticut; land speculation by Kirby and others in lands in Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, and Georgia, and in the Western Reserve; the early settlement of western lands; the Yazoo land fraud; the building of turnpikes, especially in Connecticut and Pennsylvania; the Connecticut militia, in which Kirby was an officer; Kirby's duties as supervisor of the U.S. Revenue for Connecticut; routes and the operation of the U.S. Post Office; the collection of debts; the settlement of the estate of Reynold Marvin, with whom Kirby studied law; the Royal Arch-Masons of the United States, of which Kirby was the first general grand high priest, including some material written in code; and a description of Washington, D.C. in 1802. There are also letters referring to life at Yale University in the 18th century; a yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans, 1804; and the settlement of Ephraim Kirby's complicated estate.

Of interest are Kirby's correspondence and reports to Thomas Jefferson written following his appointment in 1803 as commissioner to receive and determine the titles of the lands east of the Pearl River. Kirby journeyed overland from Connecticut to Natchez, where he arrived December 1803. His reports to Jefferson include descriptions of the lands east of the Pearl River, settlers, crops and produce, trade conditions, Spanish settlements in West Florida and Mobile, Spanish military posts, and Native American tribes. He also receives many letters during this time from friends and business partners back home. The next year, 1804, Kirby was dead of a fever in Alabama.

The notable correspondents who have a number of letters in the collection include Elisha Babcock, Ezekial Bacon, Miles Beach, John James Beckley, John Bird, Abraham Bishop, Elijah Boardman, Putnam Catlin (father of artist George Catlin), Tench Coxe, James Easton, Pierpont Edwards, William Edwards, Daniel Everitt, Gideon Granger, Stanley Griswold, Hugh Hughes, Thomas Ives, William Samuel Johnson, William Judd, Jeremiah Mason, John Cosens Ogden, Jeremiah Olney, Daivd Parmelee, Elijah Phelps, James Rivington, Nathaniel Smith, Jedediah Strong, Benjamin Tallmadge, Uriah Tracy, Elijah Wadsworth, John Welch, John Willard, and Alexander Wolcott, Jr. A number of commissions for Ephraim Kirby and his son Reynold Marvin Kirby are signed by Oliver Wolcott, Jonathan Trumbull, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and others.

A diary of Reynold Marvin Kirby, son of Ephraim Kirby, describes his life in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812 beginning when he entered the army in 1813 as a lieutenant in the 3rd U.S. Artillery and telling of his military engagements and duties.

For more information on the contents of the correspondence, please consult with a reference archivist to access the detailed original cardfile description.

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Ettie Crystal Riddell papers, 1886-1968 10 Linear Feet — 2733 Items

Active in Disciples of Christ in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and other states. Husband, Louis Riddell, was a minister for the denomination. Collection contains correspondence, diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials relating to Riddell and her husband, Louis Riddell. The materials document not only Riddell's personal life as the wife of a minister and her involvement in the Disciples of Christ ministry, but also the evolving role of women in American religious communities. Notebooks contain sermons that Ettie Riddell delivered to women's groups. Her diaries date chiefly from the 1930s to the 1960s, but there are also two early diaries from 1894 and 1896. Other materials, especially correspondence, clippings, and sermon notes, document the ministry of Louis Riddell and the lives of other Riddell family members.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials relating to Riddell and her husband, Louis Riddell. The materials document not only Riddell's personal life as the wife of a minister and her involvement in the Disciples of Christ ministry, but also the evolving role of women in American religious communities. Notebooks contain sermons that Ettie Riddell delivered to women's groups. Her diaries date chiefly from the 1930s to the 1960s, but there are also two early diaries from 1894 and 1896. Other materials, especially correspondence, clippings, and sermon notes, document the ministry of Louis Riddell and the lives of other Riddell family members.

A large number of the materials are annotated by Dorothy S. Bruce (now Welbon), granddaughter of Ettie Crystal Riddell and Louis D. Riddell. The materials are in original order as received; basic processing but no rearrangement was performed. Container list was created by the donor.

The list includes notations for ECR (Ettie Crystal Riddell) and LDR (Louis D. Riddell).

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Eugene Clyde Brooks papers, 1774-1971 and undated 4.1 Linear Feet — 3,105 Items

Professor of Education at Trinity College, Durham NC. Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, and an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

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Cataloged from item. Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain.

Collection comprises a diary (124 pgs.) maintained by an unidentified woman who was educated, knowledgeable about sailing, and quite religious, during her voyages and travels around the northern coast of Scotland to cities in Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, and Spain. The diary began with a business trip, when she accompanied her husband (who was likely captain of the unnamed ship), from Workington, Eng., to Horten, Norway, in order to deliver a cargo of rails to the Norwegian government. The rest of the travel was apparently for pleasure. The author described ocean and weather conditions, with emphasis on dangers for ships; lighthouses; shipwrecks; landscapes; architecture; historic sites and ruins; castles; cathedrals and churches; palaces; paintings, sculptures, and artists; bridges and engineers; and gardens. She also commented on the inhabitants of and various practices in individual European countries, often in comparison to England, and with a particular focus on the women in each country. She made occasional literary references. More often she interwove her Evangelical beliefs into her descriptions, with references to the resurrection of the dead, comments on Protestant denominations, and strongly worded anti-Catholic sentiments. Includes visits to William Thorburn, who was then British Consul to Sweden; Antwerp's Cathedral of Our Lady; Waterloo battlefield; the Norman Cathedral at Durham; and the Castle site at Newcastle.

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Chiefly family and professional correspondence, but also printed material, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, diaries, clippings, and photographs. The collection primarily pertains to the Farrar family and to Preston C. Farrar. Much of the Correspondence Series (1801-1976, undated) consists of personal letters among family members, especially written to Preston C. Farrar; his wife Edna P. Farrar; brother Samuel Clark Farrar, Jr.; sister Josephine; father Samuel Clark Farrar; and mother Ettie Farrar. However, the series also documents the careers in education of Samuel Farrar, Sr., and Preston Farrar. Business letters from Samuel Farrar concern real estate investments in Pennsylvania and New York that father and son owned jointly.

The Diaries Series (1887-1927, undated) includes diaries Preston C. Farrar kept while attending Washington and Jefferson College (1887-1891). The Writings and Speeches Series (1890-1925, undated) includes writings by Preston C. Farrar on teaching literature, English, and education. The Printed Material Series (1878-1957) includes drama and opera programs for New York City theaters, collected by Edith P. Farrar (1899-1957). The Photographs Series contains pictures and photograph albums primarily of family and friends (1888-1938, undated). The Scrapbooks and Clippings Series (1879-1945, undated) contains items that pertain to educational law and school operation; family events; local Allegheny elections; and world news, especially World War I. The Genealogy Series (1740-1984, undated) contains primarily correspondence, notes, and transcripts of wills relating to the Cooke/Cook family.

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Fenimore Family papers, 1805-1890s 1 Linear Foot — 489 Items

Collection contains business letters to lawyer Jason Laurance Fenimore (1769-1869). Also included are family letters, genealogy, some ephemera, poems, and unidentified volumes. Topics include business in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, banking, railroads, coal and timber land, mining, and navigation; and farm and family life in Philadelphia and in Burlington, N.J. There are also some diaries.

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Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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Frank Clyde Brown (1870-1943) served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University, and as Comptroller and University Marshall of Duke University. He oversaw the initial construction of Duke University's West Campus and the renovation of East Campus. Brown also founded the North Carolina Folklore Society. The Frank C. Brown Papers contain correspondence, logs, diaries, reports, lantern slides, notebooks, clippings, a scrapbook, and other materials. While some papers relate to teaching and English department activities, the bulk of the collection concerns the construction of Duke University, including correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, builder and manufacturer information, construction progress reports, travel diaries of visits to other campuses, and records of James B. Duke's views on architecture and involvement in campus planning. English.

The Frank C. Brown Papers include both Personal papers and Subject files relating to his career as a student, professor, and folklorist and also to his role in the construction of the Duke University campuses. The Personal papers series includes correspondence, biographical information, writings, addresses, lectures, clippings, diaries, coursework, blueprints, and slides. It includes correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, manufacturers' literature, construction progress reports, diaries of trips made in 1924 and 1926 to look at other campuses, and a lantern slide presentation on the campus. This series contains records documenting James B. Duke's views on architecture and his involvement in the planning of the campus. Also present is a diary/scrapbook kept by Brown and President William Preston Few during a 1924 tour during which they visited some twenty colleges and universities around the Eastern United States.

The Subject files series contains the alphabetical office files of Frank C. Brown. The bulk of the files pertain to the construction of the Duke University campuses and include information on planning, design, building materials, furnishings, builders, manufacturers, and vendors. A few items interfiled in the Subject files series relate to Brown's activities as a faculty member and as a member of professional and academic organizations.

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Frank Whitson Fetter papers, 1902-1992 114 Linear Feet — 68,400 Items

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American economist on the faculty of Northwestern University, and economic advisor to international banks and governments. The papers of Frank Whitson Fetter span the years 1902-1992, with the bulk dating from the 1920s through 1980. Included are correspondence, diaries and journals, teaching materials, published books, articles and book reviews, and all the supporting research for these publications. There is also printed material, as well as additional research materials on index cards and microfilm. The files also contain fellowship and grant applications, conference and seminar programs, notes and texts of lectures and speeches, as well as financial papers, a scrapbook and photographs. The collection highlights the academic and consulting experiences (particularly the Kemmerer Commission) of a twentieth-century American economist, and documents his intellectual development as an historian of economic thought, as well as his many years of consulting and government service regarding international monetary issues. Centering on Fetter's publications and research, and to a lesser extent his teaching, the largest series in the collection are the Publications Series and the General Research Series. His publications and research focused on the study of the history of economics, British banking and monetary policy, inflation, and international economic thought. As reflected in the Correspondence Series, he corresponded with economists, academics, and writers. The Commissions, Consulting and Government Services Series includes the materials used to produce various economic reports for the foreign governments of Guatemala, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, Poland, and China. Other files contain Fetter's personal diaries, detailing how he spent his time while commissioned abroad, as well as an oral history about his international work. There is a relatively small amount of material concerning Fetter's personal life.

The papers of Frank Whitson Fetter span the years 1902-1992, with the bulk occurring from the 1920s through 1980. Included are correspondence, diaries and journals, college and university course materials, published books, articles and book reviews, and all the supporting research for these publications. There is also printed material, as well as additional research materials on index cards and microfilm. The files contain fellowship and grant applications, conference and seminar programs, notes and texts of lectures and speeches, as well as financial papers, a scrapbook and pictures. The collection highlights the academic and consulting experiences (particularly the Kemmerer Commission) of a twentieth-century American economist, and documents his intellectual development as an historian of economic thought. Centering on Fetter's publications and research, and to a lesser extent his teaching, the largest series in the collection are the Publications Series and the General Research Series. His publications and research focused on the study of the history of economics, in particular inflation and international economic thought. As reflected in the Correspondence Series, he corresponded with economists, academics, and writers. There is a relatively small amount of material concerning Fetter's personal life.

Fetter's research interests and publications were wide-ranging, and are documented in both the Publications and General Research Series. His articles and pamphlets from 1921-1990 address such topics as Irish and Latin American currency, economists and their relationship to politics, as well as trade, tariff and hard money issues. The articles focus mainly on the economic history of Great Britain in the 19th century, including the rise and fall of various economic trends and theories in the British financial system. One of the Kemmerer missions provided the basis for Fetter's first book, Monetary Inflation in Chile (1931), which foreshadowed his enduring interest in the causes of monetary instability. When later interests changed his focus to classical economics, and in particular to British economic thought from Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill, he illuminated the classic controversies over money and banking which at the time of the Napoleonic Wars shaped the economic theories and institutional structures that served Britain and the world before 1914. Such ideas are illustrated in Fetter's Development of British Monetary Orthodoxy 1797-1875 (1965) and The Economist in Parliament: 1780-1868 (1980). These are just two of the books for which the Publications Series holds drafts and final copies of manuscripts, revision notes, English and foreign language editions, background research, and correspondence. Manuscripts, research and correspondence are also available for Fetter's unpublished books, one dealing with the role of foreign capital in assisting developing countries, and the other concerning the rise of England's Overend, Gurney bank, and its subsequent financial collapse in 1866.

The General Research Series is a complement to the Publications Series, as Fetter used these research files for many different projects. The Alphabetical Files Sub-Series, organized by topic, reflect Fetter's personal and professional interests, and holds the body of reference material Fetter collected throughout his career. Much of this material deals with English banking history, and includes files on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, the bullion controversy, and tariff issues. Examples of other interests are also in these files, including documents of Fetter's debunking efforts concerning the inscriptions on the Christ of the Andes monument and on the Jefferson Memorial. Other materials of interest are the de Tocqueville files, and his efforts at cataloging the economic references in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories. A second alphabetical series of index cards and microfilm contain research on many topics of interest to Fetter. The Research on Published Articles and Pamphlets Sub-Series complements the Published Articles and Pamphlets Sub-Series in the Publications Series and contains correspondence and background research for the articles and book reviews.

In addition to research, Fetter's career involved a great deal of international consulting outside academia. He eagerly accepted commissions for projects throughout the world, and in the 1920s participated in the missions led by the Princeton economist, E.W. Kemmerer (known as the "money doctor"), advising numerous Latin American governments and others on their monetary problems. The Commissions, Consulting and Government Services Series includes the materials used to produce various economic reports for the foreign governments of Guatemala, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, Poland, and China. Other files contain Fetter's personal diaries, detailing how he spent his time while commissioned abroad. Photographs taken during consulting visits are in the Pictures Series. He worked collaboratively with the US. government and the government of India, Cuba, and Germany to secure economic stability for each of these countries. In the early 1950s Fetter was a State Department advisor on the German Debt Settlement. Fetter also testified before United States Congressional and Governmental Committees in the 1950s. In 1974, an oral history interview conducted by someone from the Harry S. Truman Library detailed Fetter's years of consulting and government service regarding international monetary issues.

Not only was Fetter a consultant, he also taught economics at Princeton, Haverford College, Northwestern University, and, upon his retirement, at Dartmouth College, where he adapted his Northwestern University course material for his classes. Fetter occasionally taught or advised at institutions such as Swarthmore College, the School for Advanced International Studies, and the University of Wisconsin. Both the Northwestern University Series and the Teaching Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series highlight such Fetter courses as "Money and Banking,""History of Economic Thought,""International Investment," and "Latin American Culture and Civilization." Also of interest are the files on the Ford Foundation Faculty Research Summer Seminar in 1957, where Fetter taught "International Economic Problems and Economic Development" to faculty from various colleges and universities throughout the Midwest. Fetter served on various Northwestern University committees such as the Budget Committee (1954) and the Honor System Committee (1963-1964).

His Student Papers Sub-Series in the Personal Files Series and Teaching Files Sub-Series in the Professional Files Series describe his educational experiences both as a student and teacher. The Teaching Sub-Series chiefly covers Fetter's teaching experiences before his appointment to Northwestern University, with just a few files during and after the Northwestern years. Fetter applied for and received a number of fellowships and grants throughout his career including a grant from the American Philosophical Society in the 1980s for research on the Overend, Burney Bank. These files are found in the Fellowships and Grants Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series.

Letters to and from colleagues with whom Fetter was closely associated, as well as correspondence with friends and family members including his father, the Princeton economist, Frank Albert Fetter, can be found in the General Correspondence Series. Among his correspondents were J. Garner Anthony, Robert D.C. Black, J. Chester Bradley, R.C. Brooks, Colin Campbell, Lino Castillejo, S.G. Checkland, (Chick) Eagen, Luther Evans, Max Farrand, Milton Friedman, Craufurd Goodwin, Barry Gordon, Frank Graham, Keith Horsefield, Hollard (Ho) Hunter, Per Jacobsson, E.W. Kemmerer, John Maynard Keynes, Charles Kindleberger, Samuel Loescher, Vernon Mund, Leslie Pressnell, Lord Robbins, Richard Sayers, Franklin Scott, Joseph B. Shane, Frederick Jackson Turner, F.W. Taussig, Alan Valentine, Jacob Viner, C.R. Whittlesey and Harold Williamson. Other letter writers of note are E.M. Forster, Upton Sinclair, and Gore Vidal. The Midwest Economics Association Sub-Series consists of correspondence documenting Fetter's involvement with the association and his term as president in 1952. The References and Recommendations Sub-Series, the last in the series, include letters written by Fetter, as well as letters requesting recommendations, and letters thanking him for writing.

Varying aspects of Fetter's personal and professional life are reflected in this collection in both the Personal Files Series and the Professional Files Series. The Alphabetical Files Sub-Series in both series highlight his personal and professional interests. An enthusiastic sportsman, Fetter's canoe and cross-country ski trips are represented, as is his involvement in forestry and conservation through such groups as the Hanover Conservation Council and the Izaak Walton League of America. An active member of the Religious Society of Friends, Fetter's interest in peace concerns is evident throughout his life. He participated in the Institute of International Relations sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee, held at Haverford College in 1934 and 1935. These files are located in the Teaching Sub-Series of the Professional Files Series. During the 1970s, Fetter also supported peace efforts during the Vietnam conflict, participating in letter writing efforts to the U.S. Congress. His associations with a number of professional organizations are represented in the files of the American Economic Association, the Midwest Economic Association, the History of Political Economy, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. During the 1930s, he also wrote a number of editorials (primarily on gold issues) for the St. Louis Dispatch, which are also included here. Other complementing sub-series in the Personal and Professional Files Series are the Travel files and the Conference and Seminars files and the Lectures and Speeches files. Fetter traveled widely, sometimes to attend language school courses, and other times to attend conferences or deliver lectures throughout the world. Personal information, including his marriage to Elizabeth Pollard in 1929, and his second marriage to Elizabeth Stabler in 1978, are a part of the Biographical Material Sub-Series in the Personal Files Series. Financial information is found in the Financial Papers Sub-Series of the same series.

Fetter was a consistent diarist, and the Calendars, Diaries and Journals Series records many events of the author's life. The earliest diaries document Fetter's 1917-1918 work with the New York Shipbuilding Yard, and his 1920 trip and work throughout the Western United States. There are other miscellaneous travel journals, including those of Elizabeth (Polly) P. Fetter from her 1929 trip to China and her 1937 trip to England. There is also a straight run of calendars from 1967-1989, and an Address Book Sub-Series containing the addresses of friends and colleagues throughout the United States and abroad.

The Pictures Series contains personal images as well as documentary photographs of Fetter's consulting work. Included are images from the commissions in South and Central America, in Poland and China, from his consulting work in Cuba for the Commission of Cuban Affairs (1934), in Ecuador for the Export-Import Bank (1939), and in India for the Lend-Lease Administration (1943-1944). Yet the majority of photographs are from Fetter's trip to Russia in 1930, taken mainly in Kazan and Moscow. Other travel photographs include those taken at the Economic History meeting in Switzerland in 1965, the Economic History meeting in Switzerland in 1965, several canoe trips, and a Colorado ski trip in 1976. There are also photographs taken at Northwestern University in 1956 and Dartmouth College in 1968.

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Frederic B.M. Hollyday papers, 1818-1982, bulk 1860s-1946 2 Linear Feet — Approx. 298 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor of German history in the Department of History at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists chiefly of letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War; letters and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, with enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic; and papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, including family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938. In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke; genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogical information, a diary in typescript, and legal papers, of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

Collection consists chiefly of three main groups of papers. The first comprises letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War. The second contains correspondence and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, contain enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic. The third group comprises the papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, and includes family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938.

In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke as well as an agenda for the meetings of the Academic Council on the same issue. Correspondents include: Edwin H. Cady; Jay Luvaas, Professor of History at Allegheny College and Ph.D. graduate at Duke; Roger Marshall, Special Assistant to President Sanford; Terry Sanford, President of Duke University; and Richard L. Watson, Jr., Acting Chairman of the History Department.

Other papers in the collection include genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogy, diary in typescript, legal papers and other documents of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

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Chiefly diaries but also includes correspondence, other writings and speeches, printed material, memoranda, photocopies of clippings, financial and genealogical papers, and family photographs. The collection principally relates to Newton's career as a politician and attorney as described in his extensive diaries, 1907-1984. He ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, 8th District, N.C. in 1938, 1940, and 1942. He also unsuccessfully ran for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate in 1944.

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Gilmore Ward Bryant papers, 1860s-1933 2.0 Linear Feet — 3 boxes; 35 items

The collection concerns the Bryant family, who came to Durham, North Carolina to found the Southern Conservatory of Music. There are seven diary volumes: five by James Alonzo Bryant, Gilmore's father and a Bethel, Vermont farmer, and two by Mattie E. Bryant, Gilmore's wife and voice teacher; 19th and early 20th century tintypes, an ambrotype, an albumen print, and gelatin silver photographs of members of the Bryant, Clark, Bird, Dean, Chamberlain, and McConoll families from Vermont, and others; sheet and manuscript music by Bryant; and a copy of the 1920-1921 illustrated Southern Conservatory "Calendar," as well as a sheet of examination grades.

Gilmore Ward Bryant (1859-1946), originally from Bethel, Vermont, founded the Southern Conservatory of Music in Durham in 1898 or 1899, along with his wife, Mattie E. Bryant. The collection contains seven diary volumes: five by James Alonzo Bryant, Gilmore's father and a Vermont farmer, containing brief entries related to the weather, visitors, farm tasks and sales, and church activities; and two by Mattie Bryant, containing brief entries about weather, church activities, visitors, and Conservatory events.

The collection is rich in photographs depicting members of the Bryant, Clark, Bird, Dean, Chamberlain, and McConoll families from Vermont, and others. There are 19th and early 20th century tintypes, many mounted in two small personal albums; an ambrotype; an albumen print; and gelatin silver photographs.

The Conservatory's history and Bryant's career in music are represented by published and manuscript sheet music composed by Bryant (there is also one piece by P.A. Schnecker), and a sheet of examination grades. A copy of the 77-page illustrated "Calendar" of the Southern Conservatory of Music, contains information about its mission, faculty, administration, facilities, and programs, accompanied by many images of the Conservatory building, its faculty and staff, interior rooms, and students at practice.

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Harold Grier McCurdy papers, 1918-2006 22.6 Linear Feet — 9934 Items

Collection contains an unpublished manuscript of A Photorealist in Quest of God by McCurdy. This work traces the artistic development of his son, John. Among the correspondence are letters between John and his parents, and diaries detailing the early lives of both John and his sister, Ann. Also included is an exhibition catalog of John's work (1977); an essay by John with publishers' responses; his doctoral dissertation; reprints of articles John wrote; original art work; legal papers, handwritten notes, printed material, yearbooks, course work, diplomas, correspondence; and slides and photographs. Other works by Harold McCurdy include Barbara, The Unconscious Autobiography of a Child Genius and About Mary. Another group of materials include correspondence, clippings, articles, and other items relating to Harold McCurdy's writing, teaching, and publishing career.

Addition (2000-0424) (8216 items, dating from 1918-1999) provides a relatively well-rounded and sometimes intimate look into McCurdy's personal and professional life over the majority of his lifetime. Materials include correspondence from and to McCurdy; writings on psychology, poetry, and drama; diaries; subject files; cartoons; and 254 color slides of paintings and other sketches and writings by McCurdy's son, John Derrickson McCurdy.

Addition (2009-0021) (8 items; 0.2 lin. ft.; 1949-2006) consists of 6 bound notebooks and diaries kept by McCurdy. Some of the diaries appear to be sequential; other notebooks include clippings and writings. There is also an index of McCurdy's submissions (1949-1998), as well as a compilation of his poetry (2006).

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Hawley Family papers, 1794-1953 (bulk 1857-1953) 1.5 Linear Feet — 515 Items

Includes correspondence (original and photocopied), writings, genealogy, pictures, and miscellaneous. Letters written by Thomas Swearington Hawley between 1861 and 1865 document his experiences as a surgeon with the 11th Missouri Infantry. Among his letters are many written shortly after the end of the Civil War from Demopolis, Alabama. Hawley's wife joined him in Alabama, and their letters to family members describe the attitudes and living conditions of the people of Alabama. In letters to each other in the early 1860's , the Hawley women wrote about domestic matters, occasionally referring to current events. Writings include a typed copy of Gideon Hawley's journal of his missionary service to Indians in Massachusetts and New York in 1794; 14-year-old Elizabeth Hawley's diary of her summer trip to visit her aunt in Delaware, Ohio in 1882; and Nelson J. Hawley's record of his experiences as a surgeon during World War I.

Miscellaneous volumes include two autograph books containing poetry and scraps; a scrapbook containing advertising trade cards; and a scrapbook containing printed and manuscript lyrics, most of them minstrel songs. Genealogical material on the Hawley and related families and a few family photographs are included.

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Helen Smith Bevington papers, 1918-2001 9.75 Linear Feet — 3422 Items

Family and personal papers, primarily Bevington's personal and professional correspondence (1931-2001), which includes letters from Ray Bradbury (1976-1993); typescripts of diary entries (1959-1989); 22 heavily annotated books of modern poetry, and research notes. There are also correspondence and professional records for Bevington's husband, Merle. Other items include one color and 9 black-and-white photographs, a scrapbook, passports, geneology information/records, awards, newspaper clippings, class records, and unpublished manuscripts.

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Henkel Family papers, 1812-1953 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 165 Items

Solomon, Ambrose, and Socrates Henkel were prominent Lutherant churchmen active in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Correspondence (1812-1894), account books, and notes for sermons, articles and lectures, belonging to the Henkel family. The primary authors are Solomon and Ambrose Henkel, and their nephew, Socrates Henkel, prominent Lutheran churchmen. Includes information on the Lutheran Church in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and on the publishing house Henkel Press, Inc., at New Market, Virginia. Some of the material is in German. The correspondence touches on many subjects, chiefly church matters, but there is a small group of Civil War letters from Henkel family members recounting battles (Fort Sumter; Mine Run, Va.), Union occupation, and camp life. One letter from 1860 mentions the hanging of an abolitionist. Also included is a diary begun in 1802, written by Paul Henkel, with a transcription; there are also miscellaneous writings, items relating to religious music, and advertisements.

The Henkel Family Papers span the years from 1812-1953 and include correspondence (1812-1894), account books, and notes for sermons, articles and lectures, belonging to the Henkel family. The letters are described individually in this inventory. The primary authors are Solomon and Ambrose Henkel, and their nephew, Socrates Henkel, prominent Lutheran churchmen. Includes information on the Lutheran Church in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and on the publishing house Henkel Press, Inc., at New Market, Virginia. Some of the material is in German. The correspondence touches on many subjects, chiefly church matters, but there is a small group of Civil War letters from Henkel family members recounting battles (Fort Sumter; Mine Run, Va.), Union occupation, and camp life. One letter from 1860 mentions the hanging of an abolitionist. Also included is a diary begun in 1802, written by Paul Henkel and transcribed by R. R. H. Baur; there are also miscellaneous writings, items relating to religious music, and advertisements.

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Henry George Austin Vicars was a British Army officer stationed in India in the 1850s and 1860s. He entered the army in October 1851, and was Adjutant of the 61st Regiment during the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857 and 1858. In his diaries, dated 1853-1855, 1857-1860, and 1864-1865, he reports on the mutinies, the Delhi siege and massacres, executing mutineers, cholera epidemics and fevers, and daily life as a soldier. Entries discuss his daily routine, the weather, his amusements and engagements, his clothing, his friends and fellow officers, his travels with the army, news and rumors he has heard, sermons and other church services he attended, and his home leave in London.

Collection consists of nine diaries kept by Vicars, largely during his service in India, as well as a small amount of loose pages originally tucked into the volumes. The diaries are dated 1853-1855, 1857-1860, and 1864-1865. Volumes are all Letts's Diary, including almanacs and other reference materials printed at the front of the book; they are in varied physical condition, ranging from fair to poor. They contain daily entries discussing Vicars's routines, including his daily schedule, military activities and movements, his amusements and leisure time, sermons he heard and news he read, correspondence and other communications he maintained, and his general thoughts and personal prayers. Entries discuss army life including parades, drills, firing and target practice, distribution and preparation of Enfield rifles and ammunition, and other changes in British uniforms and clothing during this period. Vicars also records his work as adjutant in attending different court marshals and punishments for army men due to theft, drunkenness, or more serious crimes. More routine topics discussed include the climate and weather; his current view and location at different forts and locales in India, Mauritius, Ceylon, at sea, and England; hobbies and pursuits he enjoyed such as horseback riding, shopping, reading, photography, and cricket; and different dinners and events he attended as an officer.

Vicars's volumes for 1857 and 1858 contain detailed reports about his regiment's role in suppressing the Sepoy Rebellion. He records hearing initial news of the Delhi massacre in May 1857, and describes his march and movement toward Delhi and his participation in the battles of July 1857. Later entries describe attending the execution of mutineers, ongoing cholera epidemics and fevers plaguing British troops, and the fallout from ongoing conflict throughout India. The battles of 1857 had a lasting impact on Vicars; he refers to the anniversary of the Delhi siege and sorties in the 1864 volume.

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H. J. M. Shaw diary, 1902-1909 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 item

H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876) was an English mining engineer and businessman who spent much of his time in China between 1902 and 1909. This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909. The diary entries are in two distinct parts: June through August, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and April 1908 to March 1909 starting with Shaw travelling back to England with stops in Japan and Canada. Subsequent entries describe his vacation trips while back home including time spent in Ireland. The final entries describe his trip back to China and his daily activities once in Weihan, China.

This collection consists of the diary of H. J. M. Shaw (b. 1876), an English mining engineer and businessman. The diary covers the period 1902-1909 (predominantly the last 2 years) and its entries provide insight into the life of a turn-of-the-century business and vacation traveler. The diary entries are typically brief day-to-day accounts of location, weather, and people met. There are occasionally longer anecdotes regarding stories he's heard or that were related to him, meetings with Chineses government officials, and reactions to events in the news. There are also a couple drawings where Shaw attempts to show what is causing his dental problems. The diary can be seen as two distinct parts. In the first part, entries commence on June 21, 1902 during the start of a trip to China and describe events while travelling across the Atlantic to New York and then North America by train across Canada to Vancouver. Shaw then travels abord the Empress of China to Yokahama, Japan and then on to China. The second part starts with entries in April 1908 while Shaw is travelling in a houseboat along the Hsun Hsien River in China with friends. The diary then describes Shaw's trip back to England with stops in Japan and Canada along the way. When back in England, entries describe his subsequent vacation trips to visit friends in Worcestershire and taking a vacation in Ireland. Entries from October to November 1908 describe his trip back to China this time through France, Italy, Egypt, Singapore and Hong Kong. The remainder of the diary describes his daily activities in Weihan, China which typically included work in the morning, a visit to the library to meet his Chinese teacher or to a golf club in the afternoon, and dinner with his wife and friends in the evening. The diary also contains two draft letters. The first is a letter dated June 18, 1903 to the chief engineer of the Henan mining works describing how he was treated during his visit. The other is dated June 9, 1904 regarding the return of books from the mines to the Tientsin Municipal Library. There are also two newspaper clippings; one describing an explosion within the city of Canton, China and a letter to the editor response to an article in the China Times on Missionaries in China.

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Idris Knox papers, 1951-1997 2.4 Linear Feet — 276 Items

North Carolina woman who taught school in Europe. Letters (76 items; dated 1951-1953) to parents chiefly sent from Paris with a few from Germany, describing social life and post-war atmosphere. Includes one photograph of New Year's Eve party, and telegram. Addition (200 items; dated 1976-1997) contains 42 ledgers and two loose-leaf file folders containing Knox's journals. There are also copies of the family's newsletter, and some of Knox's correspondence.

Letters (76 items; dated 1951-1953) to parents chiefly sent from Paris with a few from Germany, describing social life and post-war atmosphere. Includes one photograph of New Year's Eve party, and telegram.

Addition (200 items; dated 1976-1997) contains 42 ledgers and two loose-leaf file folders containing Knox's journals. There are also copies of the family's newsletter, and some of Knox's correspondence.

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Papers of MacKinnon, including correspondence with her sister, Louise Mae Davis Stephens, her husband, Francis T. MacKinnon, and other family members and friends (ca. 1920s-1930s); her diary during her courtship (1919-1922); and photograph albums, portraits, scrapbook, and mementos. Also includes husband Francis MacKinnon's WWI scrapbook and letters to family written during his military service in Europe; sister Louise Stephens' personal correspondence, photographs, portraits, mementos, and scrapbooks (ca. 1912-1937); courtship letters of Inez MacKinnon's parents, Jefferson Davis Stephens and Mae Inez Yarborough (ca. 1900); Jefferson Stephens' diary (ca. 1899-1926); and 19th-century papers of the Stephens and Yarborough families, including an 1821 court order by the Territory of Florida. (accession #91-081)

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Irvin Family papers, circa 1890s-2016 10.25 Linear Feet — 23 boxes; 2 oversize folders — approximately 5150 Items

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; materials, including photographs and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas, kept by Frank and Dona Irvin, relating to their early life near Houston, and documenting aspects of African American history in that area; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; family photographs; videos; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items.

Photographs also form an important part of the collection. Along with papers and records, Frank and Dona Irvin kept early photos and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas; together, these materials speak to their early life near Houston, and document aspects of African American history in that area. There are also family photographs from later decades (1930s-1980s).

For preservation purposes, original audiovisual media are closed to use; copies may be available on request.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Isabella S. Gardner diary, 1852-1874 and undated 0.6 lin. ft. Linear Feet — 8 items

Collection comprises a printed 1853 "West of England Pocket Book or Gentleman's Diary with an almanack" presented to Isabella Gardner by her husband in 1852. Gardner filled the volume with routine diary entries, usually briefly mentioning the weather and the health of family members, whether they were any visitors, along with any travel or activities and with whom the family took tea or had dinner. More unusual entries have to do with a tooth extraction, the birth of Frank, and a fire at their home. Entries became less frequent from October to December 1853. Also, several pages list household accounts and amounts paid, usually for food and servant salaries. Several items post-dating the diary were laid-in, including four brief letters to and from family members, a recipe for a throat tonic, a note with dates of ancestors, and a religious flier. A child later made drawings in available spaces on pages of the diary.
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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.

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James T. Cleland papers, 1928-1975 50 Linear Feet — 50,000 Items

Contains personal and professional papers relating to the life and work of James Tough Cleland, preacher, Dean of the Duke University Chapel (1955-1973), and Professor of Preaching in the Divinity School (1945-1968). Materials include addresses, sermons, lecture notes, speeches, clippings, printed materials, correspondence, a tape recording, committee records, course materials, photographs, subject files, a scrapbook, diaries, and gift albums. Albums include sketches, engravings, frontispieces, and colored illustrations from printed materials. Major subjects include armed forces chaplains, hospital chaplains, death and dying, euthanasia, spirituality, Christianity, the study and teaching of the book of Paul, the study and teaching of the Bible, study and teaching of preaching, Duke University Chapel, Duke University, and the Divinity School. Materials range in date from 1825 to 1982 (bulk 1928-1975). Contains restricted materials. English.

Contains personal and professional papers relating to the life and work of James T. Cleland, preacher, Dean of the Duke University Chapel (1955-1973), and Professor of Preaching in the Divinity School (1945-1968). Types of materials include addresses, sermons, lecture notes, speeches, clippings, printed materials, correspondence, a tape recording, committee records, course materials, photographs, subject files, a scrapbook, diaries, and gift albums. Gift albums include sketches, engravings, frontispieces, and colored illustrations from printed materials. Materials range in date from 1825 to 1982 (bulk 1928-1975). Box 19 contains restricted materials.

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James T. Powers papers, 1860s-1945 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 12 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approximately 1290 items — Approximately 1290 Items

James T. Powers was a well-known comic actor, songwriter, playwright, and vaudeville entertainer based in New York City. The materials in the collection cover the entirety of his career, from the 1880s to the 1930s, when he retired. There are also items relating to the acting career and family of his wife, Rachel Booth Powers. The materials are arranged into the following series: Correspondence, Financial and Legal Papers, Photographs and Other Images, Print Materials, Rachel Booth Powers Papers, Sheet Music, Volumes, and Other Writings. The collection contains over 260 images, including tintypes, several lithographs, gelatin silver photographs, and albumen prints, dating from approximately 1860 to the early 1940s. The rest of the collection includes scrapbooks, autograph albums, a diary by Rachel Booth Powers, many clippings, drafts of scripts and reminiscences, sheet music, notebooks, and other professional papers. Taken as a whole, the collection provides a rich look at the society and culture of vaudeville theater in New York City during Rachel and James T. Powers' careers.

Most of the collection pertains to James T. ("Jimmy") Powers, spanning his entire career as a comic actor, songwriter, playwright, and vaudeville entertainer from the 1880s to the 1930s, when he retired. There are also materials relating to the acting career and family of his wife, Rachel Booth Powers. The materials are arranged into the following series: Correspondence, Financial and Legal Papers, Photographs and Other Images, Print Materials, Rachel Booth Powers Papers, Sheet Music, Volumes, and Other Writings.

The correspondence, financial, and legal papers chiefly center on professional matters, including contracts and letters of thanks for the Powers' involvement in charity efforts during both world wars. Print materials include scripts of plays, clippings relevant to James and Rachel Powers, autobiographical material, and theater ephemera.

The collection contains a separate series for the writings of Rachel Booth Powers. Included here are several essays she wrote while in school, her teaching certificate, two autograph books dating from 1876 and 1877, and a diary kept in 1897. There is also a scrapbook containing newspaper clippings of poems written by her older sister, Alice Booth. In the Sheet Music series one can find numerous popular pieces dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including songs for which Powers wrote the lyrics.

The Volumes series consists of 24 undated notebooks belonging to James Powers that contain ideas for plays, rough drafts of what seem to be vaudeville skits, lyrics for songs, reminiscences of his career, and other notes. Finally, other writings include loose scripts of plays written by Powers, as well as some prose material. Of note in this series is a script that Powers intended to turn into, in his own words, a "motion picture play."

The Photographs and Other Images series, the largest group in the collection, contains over 260 images, dating from approximately 1860 to the early 1940s, of James Powers, Rachel Booth Powers, their families, and various stage personalities; there are also a few related clippings and theater programs mentioning either Powers or Rachel Booth. Formats include one ambrotype and 21 tintypes, followed by many late 19th and early 20th century albumen prints, lithographs, and early modern gelatin silver prints. The professionally-taken photographs of persons and theater scenes, along with the other collection materials, are particularly rich as a resource for studying vaudeville and Broadway theater culture during the careers of James T. and Rachel Booth Powers.

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James T. Sears papers, 1918-2011 and undated, bulk 1950-2004 138 Linear Feet — 317 boxes — 86,700 Items

Educator, gay rights activist, and author of many works on sexuality, identity, and sex education, and the history of homosexuality and the gay rights movement in the United States. The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2011, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004. The papers are arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers; and Oversize Material. The Research and Writings series is divided into subseries for major works by Sears, as well as subseries for other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals. Formats include but are not limited to correspondence, research files, writings, interviews, recordings, serials and newspapers, photographs, and diaries. The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), both early activists for gay rights. Taken as a whole, the collection offers a deep and rich source of information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative; the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society.

The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004, and are arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers Series; and Oversize Material, which contains chiefly newspapers and other large-format serials. The Research and Writings series, the largest in the collection, is divided into subseries for each of Sears' major works; in addition, there are other large subseries for Sears' other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals.

The collection documents the career and life of a gay rights activist, educator, and author who has performed ground-breaking research on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, and the teaching of human sexuality in the classroom. The evolution and publication of Sears' major book-length works, articles, and other editorial work is fully documented in this collection in the form of drafts, correspondence, recorded and transcribed oral histories, many research files, and a wide variety of images and recordings. Sears' professional papers contain teaching and course materials as well as files on publicity, speeches, and other activities. Sears also worked as a journal and book editor, thus the collection houses various iterations of authors' accepted work along with Sears' line edits and final publications. Many electronic files accompanied the research, writing, and teaching files; these have been archived on the library's server. An extensive collection of audiovisual materials includes videos, sound recordings, and other media either assembled through Sears' research and teaching activities, or acquired from other sources (note: original recordings are closed to use; unless otherwise noted, listening or viewing copies must be made for research access).

The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), authors and early activists for gay rights. These two large sub-collections contain writings, correspondence, research files, diaries, audiovisual material (separated and removed to the Audiovisual Series), and photographs.

Taken as a whole, the James T. Sears Papers offer a rich source of primary documents and information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative. The collection also provides extensive documentation on the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society. The collection also include anthropological field notes of Sears' extensive research and travels in the Philippines related to sexualities and sex education.

Consent forms signed by individuals whose interviews or images were recorded for possible use in publications are sometimes filed with other records relevant to that publication; oftentimes, however, permissions may have been filed in the Research Permissions Subseries box in the Research and Writings Series, or have not been located in the collection. Researchers wishing to publish information on individuals represented in the Sears Papers must have in hand the consent forms, or obtain permission from the individuals.

For more details on the contents and arrangement of individual series or subseries in the Sears Papers, see the series and subseries descriptions that follow.

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Jay Rutherfurd papers, 1887-1995 8 Linear Feet — Approx. 2613 Items

Broadcast journalist, businessman, and resident of Palm Beach (Palm Beach Co.), Fla. These papers are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection also contains more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows. In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. These materials also document Jay Rutherfurd's trips to Morocco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as the social life of Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Florida.

The papers of Jay Rutherfurd are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection features more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows.

In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. The material also documents Rutherfurd's trips to Morroco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as social life in Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Fla.

Original audiovisual recordings are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be produced before contents can be accessed. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this material.

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Jerome J. Shestack papers, 1944-2011 and undated, bulk 1965-2000 128 Linear Feet — 86 boxes — Approximately 57,000 items — Approximately 57,000 items

Jerome Shestack was a prominent lawyer and human rights advocate. His papers chiefly document the leadership roles he undertook for social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files, organization files, writings and speeches, publications and clippings, as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary. Topics covered in the collection include but are not limited to: the history of the American Bar Association; law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina; the rights of the mentally disabled; and Shestack's role in standing against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The papers of Jerome Shestack span the years of 1944 to 2011, and document the leadership roles he undertook for legal and social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the American Jewish Committee, the International Criminal Court, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files; organization files; writings by Shestack and others, such as reports, editorials, articles, and speeches; publications and clippings; trial testimonies and proceedings; as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary.

The materials provide insights into Shestack's many professional achievements and how his work in the legal profession intersected his passion for human rights. Shestack held leadership roles in many law and human rights organizations, often simultaneously; therefore, the materials also reveal how organizations often collaborated with one another to address human rights from a legal standpoint. A large portion of the material focuses on Shestack's dedication to the law profession through his active roles in the American Bar Association, which includes his position on the 1987 judicial committee against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork, as well as his role as American Bar Association President from 1997 to 1998.

Other materials in the collection demonstrate Shestack's work to promote and defend human rights on a broad international scale. Significant file groups for countries and their associated human rights cases include Argentina, China, Israel, Russia, and South Africa. His particular interests pertaining to human rights include but are not limited to: law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina and other human rights abuses; the rights of the mentally disabled; and the history of human rights advocacy.

The worldwide respect Shestack gained for his advocacy work is represented in the collection through extensive correspondence and subject files documenting his connections to notable human rights activists and prominent political leaders, including President Jimmy Carter, President George Bush, René Cassin, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Some audiovisual materials are scattered throughout the collection: a CNBC interview of Shestack as ABA President, International League for Human Rights Awards Dinner cassettes, Wingspread Interview cassettes, a Court TV Bosnia Trial VHS recording, and a recording of the Independent Counsel Symposium. Original media are closed to use; listening or viewing copies must be made for access.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Jessie Vanderbilt McNamee was born in 1874 to a wealthy family residing in Staten Island, New York (Richmond County). In 1901 she married Charles Dewar Simons(1874-1922) and they had one child, Charles Dewar, Jr. Ms. Simons served as a volunteer ambulance driver with the Dongan Hills Motor Corps; helped found and served as the ranking member of the Richmond County chapter of the Red Cross Motor Corps during World War I; served as Vice President of the National Federated Workers for Disabled Soldiers; and was an active member of the Veteran Association of Women War Workers. Her travels throughout Europe during the 1920s and 1930s are documented in diaries, correspondence, and other materials in this collection. Ms. Simons was a friend and neighbor of Alice Austen, a noted photographer who also served in the Richmond County Motor Corps. The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

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John Buck Diary, 1887 August 10-September 25 0.5 Linear Feet — 4 Items

John Buck was an American, most likely a resident of the New York metropolitan area. The collection consists of a diary in four volumes that chronicles the vacation in Great Britain of a young American named John Buck from August 10 to September 25, 1887. The volumes comprise 249 handwritten pages in total, with commercial prints, menus, receipts, and theater playbills attached to the back of selected pages. The script is elaborate, but legible, and the narrative is remarkably descriptive. Humorous sketches illustrate the first volume in particular and the third volume includes three photographs of the author. The diary provides a detailed account of Buck's voyage on the R.M.S. Britannic and his time in London, where he spent the majority of his vacation socializing and attending the theater. Buck also stayed in Edinburgh, Scotland, with Henry Irving, the famous actor and manager of the Lyceum Theatre, and with the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort at Badminton House.

The collection consists of a diary in four volumes that chronicles the vacation in Great Britain of a young American named John Buck from August 10 to September 25, 1887. The volumes comprise 249 handwritten pages in total, with commercial prints, menus, receipts, and theater playbills attached to the back of selected pages. The script is elaborate, but legible, and the narrative is remarkably descriptive. Humorous sketches illustrate the first volume in particular and the third volume includes three photographs of the author.

Buck began his diary, which he entitled "Eight Weeks Vacation and How I spent it," with a detailed account of the people and activities on board the R.M.S. Britannic while on route from New York City to Liverpool, England. Upon landing, he traveled to London, where he spent the majority of his vacation. Although he visited tourist destinations such as London Tower and Winsor Castle, Buck professed little interest in sightseeing and clearly preferred the social life, including attending dinner parties, meeting pretty young women, playing sports such as pool, baseball, and tennis, and above all, attending and discussing the theater. Initially, Buck socialized with an actor he met aboard the Britannic, W. A. Faversham, and the noted basso profundo, Franz Vetta, whom he met in London. From August 30 to September 4, Buck stayed in Edinburgh, Scotland, as the guest of Henry Irving, the famous actor and manager of the Lyceum Theatre. He spent these days in the company of Mr. Irving, Bram Stoker, the actress Ellen Terry, and her son, Teddy Craig. Buck frequently noted Mr. Irving's thoughtfulness and recounted their activities and conversations, including one humorous anecdote about Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. From September 5 to September 9, Buck stayed with the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort at Badminton House. Buck described the house and grounds, formal dinner parties, informal breakfasts, sporting activities, and sightseeing excursions to Gloucester Cathedral and Raglan Castle. The remainder of the vacation was spent in London, much as it began, visiting acquaintances and going to the theater until September 20 when he departed for Liverpool and the return voyage on the Britannic. Buck ceased recording events mid-Atlantic due to his sudden interest in a female passenger.

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Born in Union, Maine, John Emory Bryant (1836-1900) was an abolitionist, teacher, Union officer with the 8th Maine Volunteers, agent of the Freedmen's Bureau, newspaper editor and publisher, lawyer, and Republican politician in Georgia. The collection includes letters, journals, scrapbooks, writings, speeches, and printed materials related to the lives of John Emory Bryant (JEB), his wife Emma Spaulding Bryant, their daughter Emma Alice Zeller and her husband Julius Zeller and their descendants, and William Anderson Pledger who was a Republican contemporary of JEB. The bulk of the collection falls into four main divisions: the early years in Maine (1851-1860), during the American-Civil War (1861-1865), during Reconstruction in Georgia, and the later years in New York (1888-1900). Some of the materials are not original and are copies or typescripts. Of note are materials regarding Georgian Republican politics; conditions for Radical Republicans and African-Americans during Reconstruction, including correspondence with Henry McNeal Turner; historical views about the differences between the North and the South; Ku Klux Klan activity in Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; and a particularly passionate exchange between Emma Spaulding Bryant and her husband regarding her visits to a doctor about "uterine difficulties" (these 10 letters from Emma Bryant have been digitized and are available online).

The collection includes letters, journals, scrapbooks, writings, speeches, and printed materials related to the lives of John Emory Bryant (JEB), his wife Emma Spaulding Bryant, their daughter Emma Alice Zeller and her husband Julius Zeller and their descendants, and William Anderson Pledger who was a Republican contemporary of JEB. The bulk of the collection falls into four main divisions: the early years in Maine (1851-1860), during the American-Civil War (1861-1865), during Reconstruction in Georgia and after (1865-1887), and the later years in New York (1888-1900). Some of the materials are not original and are copies or typescripts. Of note are materials regarding Georgian Republican politics; conditions for Radical Republicans and African-Americans during Reconstruction, including correspondence with Henry McNeal Turner; historical views about the differences between the North and the South; Ku Klux Klan activity in Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; and a particularly passionate exchange between Emma Spaulding Bryant and her husband regarding her visits to a doctor about "uterine difficulties." These 10 letters from Emma Bryant have been digitized and are available online at: https://library.duke.edu/specialcollections/scriptorium/bryant/

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John Esten Cooke papers, 1840-1941 and undated 0.75 Linear Feet — Approx. 296 Items

John Esten Cooke (1830-1886) was a novelist, historian, lawyer, and Confederate Army Officer, of Millwood (Clarke Co.), Va. Professional and personal correspondence and literary notes of John Esten Cooke and of his brother, Philip Pendleton Cook, poet and storyteller. The John E. Cooke papers include letters from boyhood friends, Civil War letters, business letters from publishers, critical letters from literary friends during the 1870s and 1880s, and notebooks of the war period. Includes manuscript copies of Cooke's Surry of Eagle's Nest, A legend of Turkey Buzzard Hollow, and On the road to despotism. The Philip P. Cooke papers include letters to his father, of interest in themselves as literary productions. Correspondents in the collection include W.H. Appleton, George W. Bagby, Alexander R. Boteler, W.H. Browne, O.B. Burie, M.B.T. Clark, W. De Hass, M. Schele De Vere, H.K. Douglas, E.A. Duyckinck, G.C. Eggleston, William Evelyn, Wade Hampton, J.W. Harper, H.B. Hirst, J.B. Jones, J.P. Kennedy, C.C. Lee, W.H. Lee, B.W. Leigh, A.H. Sands, W.G. Simms, David Strother, and Beverly Tucker.

Professional and personal correspondence and literary notes of novelist and Civil War Confederate officer John Esten Cooke and of his brother, Philip Pendleton Cook (1816-1850), poet and storyteller. The John E. Cooke papers primarily consist of business letters from publishers and critical letters from literary friends during the 1870s and 1880s, but also include letters from boyhood friends, a few Civil War letters. There are also diaries from the war period, and manuscript copies of Cooke's novel about Stonewall Jackson, Surry of Eagle's Nest, A Legend of Turkey Buzzard Hollow, and article "On the Road to Despotism." The Philip P. Cooke papers include letters to his father, of interest in themselves as literary productions; he was considered to be equally talented if not more so than his father.

Civil War era items include a few letters written to Cooke, indicating his state of illness and discouragement during the war and his lack of communication with family; and Cooke's four manuscript diaries. The diaries contain references throughout to battles around Richmond, Cold Harbour, Chancellorsville, J.E.B. Stuart, Robert E. Lee, Gen. John R. Cooke, Stonewall Jackson (especially his death in 1863), Gen. William N. Pendleton, the re-election of Lincoln, camp life, and the social life of Stuart's staff. They also contain Cooke's literary jottings and references to literary figures such as Victor Hugo. A copy of the 1941 edition of the diaries is included in the collection.

Correspondents in the collection include W.H. Appleton, George W. Bagby, Alexander R. Boteler, W.H. Browne, O.B. Burie, M.B.T. Clark, W. De Hass, M. Schele De Vere, H.K. Douglas, E.A. Duyckinck, G.C. Eggleston, William Evelyn, Wade Hampton, J.W. Harper, H.B. Hirst, J.B. Jones, J.P. Kennedy, C.C. Lee, W.H. Lee, B.W. Leigh, A.H. Sands, W.G. Simms, David Strother, and Beverly Tucker.

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John Franklin Heitman papers, 1863 - 1911 2.6 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

John Franklin Heitman (1840-1904) was professor of Trinity College in Randolph County from 1883 to 1892, and Acting President of the school from 1884-1887. He later served as Headmaster of Trinity High School from 1892 to 1895. He also published several periodicals during his career. The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications such as the North Carolina Education Journal and the North Carolina Home Journal, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh. English.

The John Franklin Heitman Papers contain correspondence, bound volumes, printed material, and financial and legal documents. Much of the material dates from the 1884-1887 period in which Heitman served as Acting President of Trinity College. Topics include college finance, the U.S. Government's sponsorship of education for Cherokee Indians, the Civil War, publications, Trinity College administrative issues, and Trinity High School administrative issues. Major correspondents include Julian S. Carr and John W. Alspaugh.

This collection is arranged into two series. The first, Correspondence, dates from 1863 to 1894, with one letter from 1911. It includes both personal and professional correspondence, and is arranged chronologically. The second series, Bound Volumes and Other Material, includes a Civil War diary, grade books from Trinity High School, financial and legal documents related to Trinity College, and publications edited by Heitman, as well as a sampling of other types of print materials. This series is arranged alphabetically by topic.

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The John Lakin Brasher Papers, 1857-1983 and undated (bulk 1917-1970), are comprised of church-related and personal correspondence; records of the Iowa Holiness Association; records of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference; religious writings and speeches (including sermons, diaries and manuscripts of published works); printed material (tracts, religious brochures, serials, and hymnals); photographs (including many of camp meetings); transcriptions of tape recordings; legal papers; financial papers; and miscellanea. Most of the material concerns the religious career of John L. Brasher; the Holiness (Santification) movement in the Methodist Church, particularly in Alabama; Holiness education and the administration of the John H. Snead Seminary in Boaz, Alabama and Central Holiness University (later John Fletcher College) in University Park, Iowa; and camp meetings in the South, particularly Alabama, and the Midwest. Includes biographies of clergy and accounts of religious and family life in rural north Alabama. Among correspondents are Joseph P. Owens, F.D. Leete, John Paul, and missionaries in Eygpt, India, China, and Japan. Contains letters and printed material concerning the separation and reunification of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The John Lakin Brasher Papers, 1857-1993 and undated (bulk 1917-1970) are comprised of church-related and personal correspondence; records of the Iowa Holiness Association; records of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference; religious writings and speeches (including sermons, diaries and manuscripts of published works); printed material (tracts, religious brochures, serials, and hymnals); photographs (including many of camp meetings); transcriptions of tape recordings; legal papers; financial papers; and miscellany. Most material concerns the religious career of John L. Brasher; the Holiness (Sanctification) movement in the Methodist Church, particularly in Alabama; Holiness education and the administration of John H. Snead Seminary in Boaz, Ala.; and Central Holiness University (later John Fletcher College) in University Park, Ia.; and camp meetings in the South, particularly Alabama, and the Midwest. Includes biographies of clergy and accounts of religious and family life in rural north Alabama. Among correspondents are Joseph P. Owens, F. D. Leete, John Paul, and missionaries in Egypt, India, China, and Japan. Contains letters and printed material concerning the separation and reunification of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Brasher's activities as a minister are documented throughout the collection. The Correspondence and Transcriptions of Tape Recordings Series reveal Brasher's reflections on scripture and provide accounts of congregational reactions to his preaching. Transcripts of his sermons appear in the Writings and Speeches Series, Sermons Subseries as well as in the Transcriptions of Tape Recordings and in some of the published articles (Printed Material Series, Serials Subseries) and manuscripts of his books (Printed Material Series, The Way of Faith). His diaries and correspondence document his travels and his preaching engagements. Numerous invitations to preach and requests for guidance reflect Brasher's leadership role among ministers, missionaries, and church officials. Letters to and from converts regarding their religious experiences and responses to Brasher's preaching and writing are scattered throughout the Correspondence Series.

Brasher's administrative role in religious organizations and in church-affiliated educational facilities is well-represented in the Correspondence Series as well as in the Iowa Holiness Association Series and the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series. Minutes, reports, and financial records are among the papers of these organizations, reflecting both Brasher's leadership and involvement and the activities of the organizations themselves. The Pictures Series includes some photographs of the schools with which Brasher was associated and of the attending students.

Brasher's career as an author is well-documented, not only in the Writings and Speeches Series, but throughout the collection. The Correspondence Series includes letters to and from his publishers and from editors of various religious serials to which Brasher contributed. The Printed Material Series contains many of these serials with articles by Brasher as well as tracts he wrote.

Throughout the collection, information on church history abounds. The Correspondence Series and the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series in particular contain letters concerning the rivalry between the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; and the eventual unification of the two organizations. Conflicts between Fundamentalist and Modernist ideas also appear in the correspondence and in the Printed Material Series.

As Historian of the Alabama Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Brasher wrote biographies of preachers, missionaries, and church officials involved in the Holiness Movement. These biographies appear in the Writings and Speeches Series, Biographical Sketches of Colleagues Subseries. Some of these biographies were published in Glimpses: Some Personal Glimpses of Holiness Preachers I Have Known, and with Whom I Have Labored in Evangelism, Who Have Answered to Their Names in the Roll Call of the Skies. Manuscripts of some of those appearing in the published work can be found in the Glimpses Subseries. Some of the letters and questionnaires from which Brasher wrote his sketches appear in the Methodist Episcopal Church, Alabama Conference Series, Biographical Information Subseries. The letters from which his information was gleaned vary in degree of detail, with some providing only dates and places of birth, marriage, ordination, etc.; and others giving descriptions of incidents in the religious life of the subject.

Correspondence, Pictures, Transcriptions of Tape Recordings, and the Family Biography Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series document Brasher's life with his family. Brasher's biographical writings and other works in the Family Biography Subseries, and the Transcriptions of Tape Recordings Series also provide a small but rich glimpse into the traditional lore, customs, and folkways of the rural upland South.

Details of camp meetings are documented throughout the collection. The Transcripts of Tape Recordings Series contains transcripts of camp meetings. The Printed Material Series includes promotional literature for camp meetings; descriptions of facilities; and hymnals (some shape-note) used in these services. An unusual collection of copies of photographs of camp meetings from the early 1900's through the 1940's in Ohio, Iowa, Alabama, Michigan, Texas and Pennsylvania can be found in the Pictures Series.

The Boatman Family Papers, also housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains correspondence from John Lakin Brasher and other members of the Brasher family.

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John Simpson papers, 1825-1875 and undated 5.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items

Irish-born surgeon in the British Navy who participated in several Arctic voyages. The papers of John Simpson date from 1825 to 1875 and span his entire career as a naval surgeon aboard the English vessels Blonde, Plover and Superior. The collection is arranged into the following series: Accounts of Voyages, Correspondence, Legal Papers, Medical Files, Native Cultures, Meterology Files, Additional Papers, Other Printed Material, and Poetry, Plays, and Amusements. Simpson's journals from the Arctic voyages on the HMS Plover and Superior on which he served as surgeon or assistant surgeon provide detailed accounts of the voyages, including life on board and the medical problems afflicting the crew and passengers. The collection includes detailed meteorological observations aboard the Plover. There are also unique and valuable materials on native cultures in present-day Alaska, Canada, and the Arctic which include extensive Simpson's notes on the local languages, a number of sketches of Inuit people and culture, hand-drawn maps, and drawings of geographical features. Also included in the collection are a variety of legal papers; correspondence; papers and items related to poetry, plays, and amusements aboard the Plover; and miscellaneous other papers and printed materials. A number of the volumes, flyers, and broadsides were printed on board ship. There are additional materials that briefly describe voyages to Guyana, and documents relating to Simpson's service aboard other ships.

The papers of John Simpson date from 1825 to 1875 and span his entire career as a naval surgeon aboard the English vessels Blonde, Plover and Superior. The collection is arranged into the following series: Accounts of Voyages, Correspondence, Legal Papers, Medical Files, Native Cultures, Meterology Files, Additional Papers, Other Printed Material, and Poetry, Plays, and Amusements. Simpson's journals from the Arctic voyages on the HMS Plover and off the coast of West Africa on the Superior provide detailed, vivid accounts of the voyages, including life on board and the medical problems afflicting the crew and passengers, including scurvy, fevers, gonorrhea, and depression. Journals from the HMS Plover also chronicle the provisions that were stockpiled on board and the daily rations provided to the officers and crew. The collection includes detailed meteorological observations aboard the Plover such as temperature and barometrical readings and descriptions of wind and weather conditions.

Simpson was also a keen observer of native cultures in present-day Alaska, Canada, and the Arctic; his unique and valuable materials on Inuit lands and society include extensive notes on the local languages, a number of sketches of Inuit people and culture, hand-drawn maps, and drawings of geographical features.

He also described in detail his experiences off the coast of West Africa, where he served as surgeon on board the Superior, one of the many British Royal Navy ships that transported African "emigrants," often freed from illegal slave ships, to British colonies; during Simpson's service the Superior operated between Sierra Leone and Guyana. There are briefer references in correspondence and possibly in his journals to stays in Malta, Panama, and other locales such as San Francisco (1842).

Also included in the collection are a variety of legal papers; correspondence; papers and items related to poetry, plays, and amusements aboard the Plover; and miscellaneous other papers and printed materials, some of which relate to Simpson's education and career. A number of the volumes, flyers, and broadsides were hand-printed on board ship. There may be references in the papers to Simpson's service on the Blonde, which traveled to the coast of China in 1842, but the journals seem to start with his service on the emigration ship Superior, following the Blonde.

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John William Firor papers, 1860-1986 2 Linear Feet — circa 1,530 Items

The papers of John William Firor span the years 1860-1985, but the bulk of the papers falls between 1900 and the 1950s. Included are correspondence, articles, a diary, postcards, printed material, clippings, notes, and pictures. This collection primarily consists of his personal and family correspondence, although there are papers relating to his work as a university professor, author, and farmer.

Firor began his career as a horticulturist prior to World War I and eventually broadened his interests to the field of southern agricultural economics, teaching at the University of Georgia. A major focus for his work was problems relating to Georgia agricultural crops, including especially pecans and peaches, but also watermelons, tomatoes, Irish potatoes, and apples. Particular interests in this field included fertilizer tests, diseases, expansion and economics of the farming industry, the impact of the boll weevil, distribution of farm price information, and general farm problems. In addition, he was known for developing the idea of carlot marketing of poultry and livestock.

The single diary in the papers covers chiefly the latter part of Firor's career as a professor in the College of Agriculture at the University of Georgia, 1949-1952, with only intermittent entries for 1941-1948. He wrote about veterans, his farm, and his economic, agricultural, and political philosophy. Entries also discuss various farming topics, such as cost and prices, crops, planting, cattle, sales, and the effects of temperature and rainfall on crops.

The Correspondence Series comprises over one-half of the collection. Pre-World War I correspondence consists primarily of incoming letters. Family correspondents include Firor's mother, Anna Catherine Wisotskey Firor, and his brothers Guy W., George, and David F. Some of the letters concern J. William Firor's job searches. In his World War I letters from France, he reflected on the U.S. Army, the Armistice, the French people, and AEF (American Expeditionary Forces) University (1919). He wrote to his fiancee Mary Valentine Moss, a student at Simmons College in Boston, and to Guy and his wife Helen. Firor and Mary corresponded from 1915 until their marriage in 1920. In France Firor met Viscountess Therese de Montford, and their correspondence extends into 1953. After the war, his letters express concern about the arrival of the boll weevil in Georgia. He referred to varieties of pecan trees, fruit trees, spraying, and some letters pertain to his job searches. Few letters exist for the 1930s.

Correspondence in the 1940s and 1950s includes a few World War II letters that Firor wrote from Lowry Field, Colorado and letters from Yvonne Ragon, a friend in France. Other war and post-war letters pertain to Firor's return to the University of Georgia and changes in the College of Agriculture and in courses in rural sociology. In letters between Mary and J. William Firor, and their daughter Anne Byrd Firor Scott, professor of history at Duke University, Dr. Scott wrote of her career and family life. In 1951 Firor wrote to former students in agricultural economics and associates in response to the volume of letters presented upon his retirement from the University of Georgia. Most of the post-1951 correspondence is between Firor and his daughter Anne Scott. Prominent individuals represented in the Correspondence Series include Reuben “Shorty” Brigham (late 1940s), Harmon Caldwell (late 1940s), Paul Wilber Chapman (1940s), William Mauzy Kemper (ca. 1908-1914), and Anne Firor Scott (1949-1961).

The Writings and Speeches Series includes clippings of Firor's articles from such publications as The Country Gentleman, The Georgia Democrat, The Progressive Farmer, Southern Ruralist, and The Southern Agriculturalist. Included is a rough draft of his " Farm Plan for the Future," 1952. Firor wrote on a variety of southern agricultural topics, such as economics, prices, mortgages, the marketing of crops, sharecroppers, surpluses, farm ownership and management, father and son farming, planting, conservation, and farm people. The writings reflect a particular concern for problems relating to the cultivation of the pecan, sweet potato, peach, watermelon, and cotton crops. He also wrote about politics and veterans as farmers.

The Subject Files Series includes biographical and genealogical files on the Moss and Firor families as well as a folder for Anne Firor Scott. There are folders for Thurmont, Md., Firor's boyhood home, and for Country Gentleman, to which Firor frequently contributed articles. In the Printed Material Series is a booklet, In Memoriam: Rufus Lafayette Moss (1913). In addition, there are clippings about Paul W. Chapman in the Miscellaneous Series.

Addition (2012-0161) (450 items, 0.6 lin. ft.) contains family correspondence (1942-53), photographs, photocopies of letters from John William Firor and some transcriptions of these created by by Anne Firor Scott, material about Mary Valentine Moss, legal documents, genealogical material, and material produced by Anne Firor Scott while writing a biograpy of John William Firor. This addition may require further processing before use.

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Jonathan Kennon Smith papers, 1649-1988 4 Linear Feet — 8 boxes, 477 items

This collection holds miscellaneous papers (192 items; dated 1649-1971) including originals and copies of letters, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Pearson, Smith, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas; letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tenn.; copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regt., C.S.A.; anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; Melton family genealogy; and Smith family albums. A later addition (283 items, dated 1774-1986) includes information pertaining to the genealogy of several related families (including the Thompson and Wyly families, as well as information on the descendants of Col. Samuel and Mary Webb Smith). Includes printed works on genealogy and other topics compiled by Emma C. C. Brown and Jonathan K. T. Smith (primarily Smith). Also includes: correspondence; legal documents; copies of church records; clippings; writings about the history of Benton County, Tenn., and some of its citizens and communities; photographs; printed and other material on Camden, Tenn.; copy of the diary of Anne William Smith; copy of a portrait of Anne William Smith by Gustavus Grunewald (1847-1848); a recording entitled The Remembrance Pilgrimage about the Smith family of Nymcock, Tenn.; A Century with St. Mark's: An Informal History by Clara L. Cape; and an extensive biographical sketch on Col. Maurice Smith.

This collection is largely genealogical in nature and holds miscellaneous papers of Jonathan Kennon Thompson Smith including originals and copies of letters, papers, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Smith, Pearson, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas. The Smith family descended through Maurice Smith (1801-1871) of Person County, North Carolina who later moved to Fayette County, Tennessee in 1831, and finally to Dallas County, Arkansas in 1843.

In addition to family correspondence of Maurice Smith (1801-1871); the collection has letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tennessee. Copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regiment, C.S.A., to his parents, a history of Tulip and Tulip Ridge, Arkansas, by Smith entitled The Romance of, Tulip (Memphis: 1965), On this Rock . . . the Chronicle of a Southern Family, which is a history by Smith of the family of Colonel Samuel Smith and Mary Webb Smith of Abram's Plains, North Carolina; biographies of the Captain Nicholas Martian (1591-1657) and of Samuel Granville Smith (1794-1835); anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; a history of the Pearson family by Smith entitled This Valued Lineage; history of the Thompson family by Smith entitled These Many Hearths; albums of the Smith family containing pictures, clippings, and copies of letters and wills dating as early as 1649; genealogy of the Melton family by Herman E. Melton entitled Sassafras Sprouts; an anthropological study of the Indians of Kentucky Lake, Tennessee, by C. H. McNutt and J. Bennett Graham; and a pamphlet, 1961, by Smith entitled A Statement of Faith.

There is a microfilm copy of 'The Remembrance Pilgrimage. The Story of a Southern Family' (1964) available.

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Joseph Belknap Smith papers, 1802-1916 5 Linear Feet — 1305 Items

Speculator and one of the founders of the Columbia Mining Company in Columbia Co., Ga. Collection (672 items; dated 1802-1872, bulk 1845-1872) includes personal and business letters, letterpress books (1849-1855), scattered diaries (1845-1907), miscellaneous business record books, and other papers of Smith and members of his family, mainly concerning Smith's speculative enterprises in mining, railroads, cotton planting, the Columbia Minining Co., and grain mills in Georgia, Tennessee, and other parts of the nation. The bulk of the material is of the period 1845-1872. Includes information on gold mining in Georgia and Tennessee, business conditions in the South before and after the Civil War, and the development of the railroad system in the South.

Business papers of Joseph Belknap Smith relating to his investments in copper mines in Michigan and Tennessee, gold mines in Georgia, the New York Bay Cemetery Company, a lumber company and a cotton and land company in England, a project to build a railroad and telegraph from Caracas to La Guaira, Venezuela, a grain mill, sawmills, and salt mines and lands in Georgia. Included are contracts; scattered financial reports; schedules of property belonging to the Columbia Mining Company containing lists of slaves and their values; contracts for hiring slaves and freedmen; land deeds; broadsides of a steamboat company in Georgia; advertisement for an apparatus of Edward N. Kent for separating gold from foreign substances; letterpress book, 1849-1855, containing copies of the correspondence of Smith and one of his partners, George Wood, about their copper mines in Tennessee; diaries, 1845-1861, 1863-1864, and 1866; daybook, 1846-1850; and a ledger, 1860-1873, containing valuations of the mine and mill properties of Smith and his partners and the amount of the Confederate soldiers' tax and war taxes for some of the Civil War years. There are also letters, 1857-1860, from Eliza Annie Dunston concerning her experiences as a teacher in Illinois and Mississippi, her travels, and her social life; scattered family correspondence; reports of the Columbia Mine post office in account with both the Federal and Confederate governments; petition of a number of Wilkes County, Georgia, citizens requesting a military exemption for Smith, miller and postmaster; circulars of Alabama Central Female College and Thomson (Georgia) High School; letters from Herschel V. Johnson and Company, agents for those who had cotton tax claims against the United States government; address of Jacob R. Davis to black voters of the 18th district of Georgia; and correspondence, 1860s, containing references to a ball to be given in New York City in honor of the Japanese emissaries, secession sentiment in Georgia, enlistment of volunteers, camp life and rumors in the Confederate Army, marketing of scrap iron, production of salt, raising of hogs for the Confederate government, commodity prices, the siege of Petersburg and the performance of African American troops there, the use of buildings at Emory and Henry College (Emory, Virginia) as army hospitals, Sherman's march to the sea, the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, the difficulty of securing freedmen to work on the farms in Georgia, and elections in Georgia in 1868.

Unprocessed addition (Boxes 4 and 5) includes correspondence, both business and personal, to either Smith or his wife, Jane Septima Smith; legal and financial papers of the Columbia Mining Company; six volumes of Smith's diary (1867, 1884, 1905, 1907); and his photograph. One of the letters described how life after the Civil War changed for both black and whites.

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Joseph John Spengler papers, [ca. 1896]-1987 111.8 Linear Feet — 60,387 Items

Chiefly correspondence, printed material, critiques of publications, bibliographies, class notes, and other papers relating to his career, publications, and affiliation with different economics associations (26,378 items, 52.7 linear feet; dated 1928-1987). Some are photocopies of Spengler's correspondence with William Richard Allen. The collection also includes manuscripts of some of his works, information concerning Duke University's administrative policies and staff, reprints of published articles relating to his career, and a charcoal portrait. (1-9-87, 88-010, 93-180, 00-213) No container lists exist for these accessions.

Addition #93-294 (34,009 items, 59.1 linear feet; dated [ca. 1896]-[ca. 1976], bulk 1914-1960) contains primarily business and Spengler and Kress family correspondence, especially between Dot and Joe ([ca. 1919]-[ca. 1976]). Also includes manuscripts for Dot's genealogical novel, Family Saga in America ([ca. 1930s]) and Joe's work, Life in America; as well as Dot's journals and diaries (1924-1939, 1969). There are Christmas cards, postcards, and newspaper clippings; photographs of family and friends, including 2 tintypes, 32 cartes-de-visite, 1 color and 91 black-and-white prints, and 76 healthy nitrate negatives; and lace knitted by Dot's grandmother.

Also includes 6 photograph albums kept by Dot, two of which contain pictures taken by her with a brownie camera in and of Piqua, OH (1914-1919). The other albums contain photographs and memorabilia depicting Dot's life as a college student at Miami University, OH (1919-1921); and two showing views of the Spengler's homes, friends, and life in Tuscon, AZ, Tampa, FL (1930-1938), and Durham, NC and Duke University (1932-1940). The latter also records the 1938 Duke University faculty baseball team.

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Joseph M. Scammell papers, 1910-1952 and undated 14 Linear Feet — 34 boxes; 2 oversize folders

Joseph M. Scammell (1888-1953) was a military historian, author, and educator. His papers comprise two main groups: military history education materials in the form of lectures, curricula, and other course materials, and published and unpublished writings by Scammell and others, chiefly articles and lectures on international and U.S. military history from Classical Greece to World War II. There are also files of personal and professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, maps, and diaries. Scrapbooks contain articles on World War II campaigns in Britain, Germany, Latin America, and Turkey.

The papers of military historian and educator Joseph M. Scammell comprise two main groups: military history education materials in the form of curricula, lectures, student assignments, and other course materials, and writings by Scammell and others, chiefly typed and handwritten manuscripts and published articles on international and U.S. military history from the Greeks to World War II. There are also smaller amounts of personal and professional correspondence, including letters from editors, printed materials, maps, and clippings. Scrapbooks in the Clippings Series contain articles on World War II campaigns in Britain, Germany, Latin America, and Turkey.

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The papers of Wallace W. Elton span the years 1909 to 1990, although the bulk of the material dates from the 1940s to the 1960s. They consist of correspondence, memoranda, financial records, advertisements, military records, reports, photographs, drawings and other artwork, diaries, scrapbooks, memorabilia, printed material, and clippings. The collection documents the career of Elton; advertising history, especially agency management and the role of the creative director; and the automobile industry, especially advertising campaigns. Clients of the J. Walter Thompson Company represented in the collection include Chesebrough-Pond's, Ford Motor Company, and Pan American World Airways.

Aspects of Elton's education, his service in the United States Navy, his career, and professional projects and associations, including the International Executive Service Corps, are documented in the Personal Series. An alumnus of Brown University, Elton was active in the affairs of the university from about 1967 to 1985. The Personal Series includes correspondence with Brown University's president and others. The series includes advertisement proofs from NW Ayer & Son, where Elton directed the art and layout work for the Atlantic Refining Company, the Ford Motor Company, and other accounts. After resigning from the J. Walter Thompson Company, he became a Vice President for the International Executive Service Corps [IESC], a non-profit group formed to help improve the performance of private enterprises in developing countries. Detailed diaries recorded during Elton's IESC travel describe his work for the organization and include original illustrations. There are also newspaper accounts of IESC activities.

The bulk of the Personal Series documents Elton's executive roles in the J. Walter Thompson Company's corporate administration and the creative departments. Company policies, administrative issues including change in the organization, recruitment, and marketing plans are documented. In personal notes, Elton recorded his private observations about the management of the company and client relations. His interest in the history of the company continued after his retirement and is demonstrated in his participation in Retired Directors Reunions and contributions to the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives Fund. Materials that document Elton's work with J. Walter Thompson Company clients or campaigns are in the Clients Series and the Advertisements Series. While the former focuses on administrative issues in the creative process and the later series focuses on the advertisements and other graphic materials, there is considerable overlap between these two series.

The Clients Series documents communications with clients; the development and production of advertisements and campaign implementation; campaign presentations; and marketing schemes. Call reports record meetings or other communications with clients and are scattered throughout the files. The collateral material, which includes brochures, package and label designs, and other point-of-sale materials, were parts of advertising campaigns created to supplement display advertisements in magazines and newspapers and outdoor advertising. They were given directly to consumers or distributed by the clients.

The Ford Motor Company is the subject of the bulk of the Client Series. Since the Detroit Office of the J. Walter Thompson Company is responsible for the Ford account, a substantial amount of correspondence and memoranda from this office is in the series. It documents the interplay between the creative team in the New York office and account management in the Detroit office, and thereby demonstrates features of J. Walter Thompson Company corporate organization. Correspondence and memoranda from Norman H. Strouse document his management of the Ford Motor Company account in Chicago. Some campaigns were developed as lengthy projects, for example "Project X," an around-the-world tour for the 1958 Ford, and entailed extensive planning and time to accomplish. The Ford Motor Company files include documentation for all phases of such projects, including security measures to preserve the secrecy of the project during the planning phases. "Project M" developed around the concept of using Princess Grace [Grace Kelly] and the palace at Monaco to introduce the 1963 1/2 model year cars. The J. Walter Thompson Company negotiated an agreement between the Ford Motor Company and United Feature Syndicate for use of the services of Charles M. Schulz and the rights to use Schulz's Peanuts comics characters in advertising. The subsequent work executed for the Ford Motor Company's Falcon model is described in the Clients Series and the advertisements are in the Advertisements Series.

Most of the advertisements in the Advertisements Series are from Elton's personal portfolio. For many of the advertisements in the series, he was responsible for the creative idea for the ad copy. Elton sometimes depicted himself, and his wife, as characters in the advertisements. Insight into the creative process and the agency-client relationship can be studied through editorial notes attached to the advertisements or accompanying textual materials which provide information about the campaign or the artwork. A scrapbook contains photographic reproductions of older advertisements paired with tear sheets and proofs of contemporary advertisements developed by J. Walter Thompson Company. Ford Motor Company automobile models were advertised during the year preceding their introduction on the market and, although the publication dates are printed on most of the advertisements, the model year is not always obvious. Several Chrysler Corporation (competitive) advertisements are interfiled with the Ford materials. Norman Rockwell was the artist for some of the Pan American World Airways advertisements. The history of outdoor advertising can be studied from materials in the Personal Series, Advertisements Series, and Pictures Series.

Some of the portraits of Wallace W. Elton in the Pictures Series are by photographer Yousuf Karsh. J. Walter Thompson Company executives and staff are depicted at meetings and social events. Henry Ford and Edsel Ford and various models of Ford Motor Company cars, trucks and tractors are also depicted. In addition to photographs in the Pictures Series, there are photographs of Wallace Elton and International Executive Service Corps activities in the Personal Series.

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The diaries of William James Carlton span the years 1862 to 1877; the biography dates to about 1964. There are transcripts of the diaries and a draft manuscript of a biography, A Portrait of William James Carlton, 1838-1902, by Frankie McKee Robins. The transcripts are slightly annotated. For the years from 1862 to November 1864 the diaries chronicle William James Carlton's participation in the United States Civil War. From 1864 to 1877, the diaries primarily describe family events and church-related activities. A December 1873 entry indicates that no diaries were kept for the years 1865 to 1872. The bulk of the biography describes the years from 1861 to 1862.

The diaries begin during approximately the fifth month of William Carlton's enlistment in the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. His entries describe drills, recreation and holiday celebrations, sermons addressed to the troops, illness, and funerals. He briefly describes incidents and comradely associations among various regiments, including the 3rd Rhode Island [Heavy?] Artillery. Most of the descriptions of battles are from an observer's point of view but there are some sketchy descriptions of those in which he participated. Ships carrying troops, supplies, and mail are frequently named. During the period in which the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry was in the areas of Hilton Head and Daufuskie Island, South Carolina, and Fort Pulaski, Georgia, William Carlton visited the local area. He describes trips to Jones, Bird, and Tybee islands in Georgia. While on Daufuskie Island, the Stoddard plantation on Calibogue Sound was occupied by his regiment.

Entries from 1862 to 1864 reveal William Carlton's personal interests and activities. They include frequent discourse about specific books, magazines, and newspapers he read, with comments on authors and texts and comparisons of different titles. Correspondence between family and friends is regularly noted, including "sub rosas" to a brother. There are observations about African Americans, some of whom were escaped slaves, others were servants or in another sort of service to the Union, and a Black regiment, which Mr. Carlton refers to as the South Carolina Volunteers.

The diaries for 1873 to 1877 primarily discuss family activities and illness, the children's social development, and birthdays and holiday celebrations in Elizabeth, N.J., and nearby areas of New York. The Carltons were members of St. Paul's, probably a Methodist Episcopal church, in Elizabeth. Church-related activities were central in family life and included attendance at Sunday School and services. The diaries have notes about various preachers and the titles of sermons they gave. William Carlton was a trustee of the church. He was also on the board of the YMCA (probably the Young Men's Christian Association) and served as its Treasurer in 1873. His advertising business is mentioned only cursorily in the Diaries. In the entry for December 5, 1864, he wrote, "Commenced to canvas for advertisements this morning for several papers." Most other business-related entries merely note that he went to the office. In 1873 Mr. Carlton was the chair of the Committee on Credentials for the Advertising Agents Convention held at the Astor House. In 1877 he discussed the purchase of the Lady's Book with Mr. [Louis Antoine] Godey. There are a few mentions of Mr. Carlton's employee, "Thompson" [James Walter Thompson], including social occasions he shared with Mr. Carlton. James Walter Thompson bought the William J. Carlton agency from Mr. Carlton in 1878 and renamed it the J. Walter Thompson Company.

The biography briefly describes William James Carlton's early years, including his family and education. The bulk of the Biography describes William Carlton's military service and the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. The biography Appendix includes information from secondary sources, such as biographical sketches of members of the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry and other military officers; excerpts from reports and published sources about the 48th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry; and other aspects of the Civil War. The biography Outline includes scattered, brief references to the William J. Carlton's advertising business but is predominantly descriptive of family life.

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Ken Wainio (1952-2006) was an American surrealist author and poet based in San Francisco, California. Collection includes manuscripts and drafts of many of Wainio's poems and writings, including his novel, Starfuck. Also includes his journals and diaries, published poetry and printed materials, some correspondence, snapshots, and other biographical information.

The majority of the collection consists of drafts or manuscripts of Wainio's writings, which ranged from poetry to short stories to novels to plays. The condition of the drafts is fairly good, although many are incomplete or only excerpts of the text. There are many draft versions of Amorfos, Letters from Al-Kemi, and The Spiral Canyon, which was later published by New Native Press as Starfuck, Wainio's first novel. Small amounts of material exist for several poems, short stories, and plays.

The remainder of the Writings, Manuscripts, and Drafts series includes some of Wainio's published works, present in both broadside form as well as in journals or other serials. Of note are the several issues of Beatitude, edited by Wainio at one point, as well as two issues of Vanishing Cab, his own publication. Also in the series is a small amount of Wainio's artwork.

There are over 30 journals present in the Journals series and they include diary entries, travel plans and notes, drafts of writings and poems, as well as sketches and artwork. They offer insight into Wainio's thought process as an author, as well as his methods of writing.

The remainder of the collection contains correspondence, including a series of correspondence between Wainio and Thomas Rain Crowe; personal materials, including obituary information, some of Wainio's college papers, and other miscellaneous materials; and photographs, which are largely undated snapshots taken by Wainio during his travels through Greece and the United States.

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Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Lane family papers, 1862-1916 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 7 Items

The Lane family were residents of Wallingford, Connecticut. This Civil War collection consists of a diary, correspondence, a scrapbook, and other materials. The diary belonged to Oscar B. Lane, who enlisted in June of 1861 and served as the drummer boy for the 5th Connecticutt Volunteers. The diary (1862, May 3-Sept. 10) contains entries concerning the Battle of Winchester during Jackson's Shenandoah Campaign and the Battle of Cedar Mountain of the second Bull Run Campaign. Correspondence (1863, Sept. 5-Dec. 18) from Theodore, Josiah, and Oscar Lane to their sister Harriet were written from Portsmouth, Va., while the three of them served with Harland's Brigade. Letters describe the shooting of deserters, camp life, and the social life in the city of Norfolk, Va. The scrapbook contains clippings concerning Veteran's Drum Corps, the Grand Army of the Republic, photographs, badges, a survivors roster for the 5th Regiment of Conn. Volunteers, postcards, and clippings concerning Wallingford, Conn. Other papers include programs for a veterans' reunion and a convention of the Conn. Fife and Drum Corps.

This collection of Civil War papers consists of a diary, correspondence, a scrapbook, and other papers. The diary belonged to Oscar B. Lane, who enlisted in June of 1861 and served as the drummer boy for the 5th Connecticutt Volunteers; the entries (1862, May 3-Sept. 10) comment on the Battle of Winchester during Jackson's Shenandoah Campaign and the Battle of Cedar Mountain of the second Bull Run Campaign. Correspondence (1863, Sept. 5-Dec. 18) from Theodore, Josiah, and Oscar Lane to their sister Harriet were written from Portsmouth, Virginia, while the three of them served with Harland's Brigade. Letters describe the shooting of deserters, camp life, and the social life in the city of Norfolk, Virginia. The scrapbook contains clippings concerning the Veteran's Drum Corps, the Grand Army of the Republic, photographs, badges, a survivors roster for the 5th Regiment of Conn. Volunteers, postcards, and clippings concerning Wallingford, Connecticut. Other papers include programs for a veterans' reunion and a convention of the Conn. Fife and Drum Corps.

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Lord Edward Pelham-Clinton papers, 1838-1907 10 Linear Feet — 53 Items

Lord Pelham-Clinton was the Groom-in-waiting and the Master of the Household to Queen Victoria. Collection houses the papers of Lord Edward William Pelham-Clinton, including recollections of Queen Victoria and Edward VII, diaries, and autograph albums.

Collection houses the papers of Lord Edward William Pelham-Clinton, including recollections of Queen Victoria and Edward VII, diaries, and autograph albums.

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Louise Hortense Branscomb was a physician from Birmingham, Alabama, who was also heavily involved in community work and with the United Methodist Church. Her papers include diaries, medical notebooks, correspondence, and photographs documenting her and her family's activities during the twentieth century.

This collection includes Dr. Louise Branscomb's diaries, notebooks, correspondence, photographs, and personal papers relating to her medical career and civic service in Birmingham during the twentieth century. There is also a significant amount of material related to the Branscomb family, including correspondence and clippings from Louise's parents and siblings.

Dr. Branscomb's diaries and notebooks comprise the largest portion of the collection; they are held within the Bound Volumes Series. Her earliest diaries date from age thirteen, and continue off and on throughout her life. Along with personal diaries, Branscomb kept travel diaries documenting her various trips, including her World War II travels, Korea, China, India, Europe, Russia, Africa, and South America. Another notable portion of Volumes Series are Branscomb's medical notebooks, which she used as indices to assist her diagnoses and treatment of various illnesses. She also kept logs of her surgeries and baby deliveries. Along with Branscomb's diaries, the Volumes Series includes diaries and ledgers kept by her father, L.C. Branscomb, and her mother, Minnie Branscomb. L.C. Branscomb's notebooks log his sermons, baptisms, and travels, as well as his personal and family expenses.

The Correspondence Series has been arranged in loose chronological order, with some isolated events foldered separately. This includes courtship letters between Louise Branscomb's parents, L.C. and Minnie, as well as condolences following L.C. Branscomb's accident and death in 1930. The majority of the series are incoming letters to the Branscomb family, with only a small number of letters written by Louise.

The Family History Series is sorted by family member, including materials from Louise's parents, L.C. Branscomb and Minnie McGehee Branscomb, as well as some of her siblings: Harvie Branscomb, Richard Edwin Branscomb, Lamar Branscomb, Alline Branscomb, Emily Branscomb, Elizabeth Branscomb, Lewis Branscomb, as well as other relatives. The series also contains assorted ephemera collected by the family, including Confederate money and news clippings.

Louise Branscomb's Personal Papers Series documents her range of activities, including her travels, her medical practice, her work with the United Methodist Church, and her philanthropy to institutions like Birmingham Southern College. The series includes drafts of her speeches and writings, as well as clippings referencing her and her work. Some clippings collected by Branscomb include her annotations or reflections on the subject or event, often dating from later in her life.

The Photographs Series includes informal snapshots of the Branscomb family and their friends, as well as formal portraits of Louise Branscomb. This series also contains her various identification and membership cards.

Finally, the Oral History Series contains four audio cassettes containing an oral history conducted between September and October of 1985 in Birmingham, Ala., when Martha E. King interviewed Dr. Branscomb on behalf of the Women's Division Oral History Project for the United Methodist Church's General Board of Global Ministries. There is also correspondence, biographical information about Dr. Branscomb, as well as detailed descriptions of and an index for the interview. However, no transcript of the interview is available. Interview topics include family, education, missionary work, women's issues in the church, race relations, and Branscomb's representing the church on her travels to Africa.

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Margaret Paton Diaries, 1849-1872 0.5 Linear Feet — 16 Items

Paton was the wife of a merchant from Montrose, Scotland. The collection includes sixteen diaries written by Paton between 1849-1872.

The collection includes sixteen diaries (1849 Oct. 1 to 1872 Dec. 31) kept by Margaret Paton, beginning seven months after her marriage and continuing with little interruption for twenty-three years. She chiefly records her thoughts and moods, how she spends her days, and various events such as the marriages and deaths of persons she knows. Many entries include information about her husband's activities and to a lesser degree her relationship with him. While sometimes recording events of national significance, she primarily focuses on private life and events at a local level.

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A native of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, Margaret Taylor Smith attended Duke University from 1943-1947. After graduating with a degree in sociology, Smith and her husband relocated to Birmingham, Michigan. Smith raised four children while taking an active part in her community through volunteer work and leadership. Smith's work as a research associate studying family life became the basis for a 1987 book, Mother, I Have Something to Tell You. Smith served as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations. In addition, Smith continues her commitment to Duke University by holding leadership positions on multiple boards, by acting as a founding member and chair of the Council on Women's Studies, and by enabling the creation of the Sarah W. and George N. Taylor Endowment Fund for women's leadership and the Margaret Taylor Smith Endowed Directorship for Women's Studies. The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research on American families, specifically relationships between mothers and children, that resulted in the publication of a book, Mother I Have Something To Tell You; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research that resulted in the publication of a book; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. Smith's original folder titles were retained. Smith, an avid note taker, often recorded information on the exterior of folders and manila envelopes. These folders were retained and appear in the collection. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Duke University Series comprises materials related to Smith's leadership and professional voluntarism at the university, including correspondence, event planning notes, meeting minutes, endowment information, and speeches.

The Mother, I Have Something To Tell You Series documents the publication of the 1987 book, authored by Jo Brans, based on Smith's sociological research that describes how mothers deal with children who display untraditional behavior. Specifically, Smith researched American families whose children challenged social and sexual mores during the 1960s and 1970s. The series contains correspondence, drafts, speeches, and Smith's research related to the book, including the mothers' subject files, which typically contain written transcripts of Smith's interviews with the women, both with and without Smith's notes, questionnaires and sociological data, and audiocassette recordings of the interviews. Original audio recordings are closed to research. Use copies need to be created before contents can be accessed.

Materials related to Smith's social and family life are located in the Personal Papers Series, which primarily comprises correspondence with family, friends, and some professional associates, but also includes photographs, newspaper clippings, ephemera from Smith's days as an undergraduate at Duke University, and her father's World War I diary.

The Professional Voluntarism Series contains materials documenting Smith's professional activities, including awards, correspondence, speaking engagements, subject files, voluntarism, and philanthropy. The series particularly highlights Smith's work as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations; her volunteer work with the Junior League; and her interest in ethics and ethical dilemmas.

Later Additions have not been processed. Accession (2010-0066) contains email correspondence. Accession (2010-0135) includes addition research materials, correspondence, proposals, and other miscellaneous notes. Accession (2010-0164) includes correspondence regarding the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture; the Duke University Women's Studies department; Smith's Class of 1947 and their reunions; and other miscellaneous materials and notes.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Mary C. Parks journals, 1827-1878 0.2 Linear Feet — 4 items.

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Journals (1827-July-1832 Jan. 20) in the form of diary entries and extracts from letters, written principally while the author was travelling with family and friends in France, Switzerland, and Germany between July and October, 1827. The bulk of the entries are written from Paris and include an account of a meeting with a group of Osage Indians that were visiting there. Other entries describe the local landscape, history, folklore, and customs of the various places visited. There are numerous color and pencil drawings that illustrate the text. Also includes one letter (1878 Oct. 10) and a clipping.
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Mary Gorham Paine (b. 1843) of Yarmouth, Massachusetts, was married to Eben W. Paine (1835-1904) of Brewster, Massachusetts, a merchant ship captain in the trade between Boston and Zanzibar. They had one son, Allan Thatcher Paine (b. 1882). The collection consists of a single diary kept by Mary Gorham Paine as she traveled twice by ship from Boston to islands near Madagascar. Forty-six manuscript pages provide both a day-by-day account of her trip aboard the Sarah Hobart to Nossi-Be (present day Nosy Be) from December 25, 1879 to May 4, 1880, and a three-page, mid-journey synopsis of the passage with her young son to Reunion Island, begun on December 13, 1883. As is made clear by the text, the intent of both voyages was to join her husband who was probably located in Zanzibar at the time. Newspaper clippings chiefly concerned with literary topics, news and issues relating to Africa, and obituaries for her husband and others are pasted into 18 pages following the narrative portion of the diary together with a photograph of a man and another of a baby, most likely her husband and son. The diary as a whole provides some insight into the life of a sea captain's wife and a description of long-distance ocean travel aboard a barque such as the Sarah Hobart.

The collection consists of a single diary kept by Mary Gorham Paine as she traveled twice by ship from Boston to islands near Madagascar. Forty-six manuscript pages provide both a day-by-day account of her trip aboard the Sarah Hobart to Nossi-Be (present day Nosy Be) from December 25, 1879 to May 4, 1880, and a three-page, mid-journey synopsis of the passage with her young son, Allan, to Reunion Island, begun on December 13, 1883. As is made clear by the text, the intent of both voyages was to join her husband, Captain Eben W. Paine, who was probably located in Zanzibar at the time. Newspaper clippings chiefly concerned with literary topics, news and issues relating to Africa, and obituaries for her husband and others are pasted into 18 pages following the narrative portion of the diary together with a photograph of a man and another of a baby, most likely her husband and son. The clippings lack an indication of the year and source except for the "Literary Leaves" articles which are from the Boston Journal.

The diary provides some insight into the life of a sea captain's wife and a description of long-distance ocean travel aboard a barque such as the Sarah Hobart. Paine initially suffered from sea-sickness, but once recovered, occupied herself with sewing, reading, washing, and baking, as well as socializing and playing cards and Parcheesi with fellow travelers. She often mentioned the activities of her primary companions, Mrs. Crocker and the ship's Captain, who sometimes cooked special meals for his female passengers and was often engaged in washing clothing himself. In addition, Paine unfailingly commented on the weather, foods served at meals, number of miles traveled, number of days at sea, and types of ships sighted. On April 18th, after nearly four months at sea, the ship made port at Tamatave, Madagascar (present day Toamasina). Paine mentioned little about the six days spent ashore and continued with the diary only until arrival at Nossi-Be. The summary description of the second journey centers mainly on Paine's concern with her 20-month old son's well-being and activities aboard ship, her own struggle with sea-sickness and feelings of inadequacy in managing her son, and her appreciation for the assistance of Mrs. Hill and the ship's Captain in caring for him. The final update to the narrative was added on February 4th, 1884, while still en route to their first stop, Reunion Island.

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Mary McCornack Thompson Diaries, 1887-1962 2.4 Linear Feet — 96 Items

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Mary McCornack Thompson was an American Presbyterian missionary who spent over forty years (1889-1932) traveling and teaching in South Africa and Rhodesia. The collection contains diaries, and a few letters. Main subjects are missionary life and travel in Africa. Materials range in date between 1887-1962.

The Mary McCornack Thompson Diaries date from 1887 to 1962 and are arranged into two series: Diaries and Correspondence. The bulk of the collection consists of 90 journals that contain detailed accounts of Mary McCornack Thompson's work as a Presbyterian missionary and teacher with the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in South Africa. During her 43 years as a missionary Thompson worked briefly at the mission station at Esidumbi in South Africa, but she spent most of her time at the Mount Selinda mission in the Melsetter region of Rhodesia ( Zimbabwe). In the diaries, Thompson wrote of her daily activities as a missionary, including building and expanding the mission, encounters with locals, learning Zulu, wildlife, meeting other missionaries, teaching and praying. These detailed entries offer a glimpse into the social conditions, race relations, and native cultures of various South African regions. Thompson also recounts her many travels throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, the United States, and Canada. Included in the collection is one folder of correspondence, mainly from William L. Thompson (Thompson's husband) regarding the collection and the transfer of Mary's diaries to Oberlin College.

The Diaries Series documents Thompson's almost daily activities between the years of 1887-1933, spanning all five of her missionary trips to Africa. Volumes 1-6 describe her first missionary trip (1887-1899), detailing her preparations for travel to Africa, her arrival, and her first encounters with native Africans. During this time Thompson married another missionary, William L. Thompson, and together they traveled for four months, mostly on foot, from South Africa to Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). They settled at Mount Selinda, which would be their home in Africa for the next forty years. Volumes 6-8 describe Mary Thompson's visits to the United States between her missionary trips, including taking cooking and photography classes, and traveling around the U.S.

Volumes 8-35 detail her second trip to Africa (1901-1910), during which time the mission at Mount Selinda began to expand rapidly. Thompson often writes about elections at the mission, as well as prayer services and sermons. She occasionally mentions world events such as the explosion of Mt. Pelee in Martinique, the Russian Revolution, and the detention of Queen Wilhelmina of Holland. She also describes her experiences with local natives who teach her the Zulu language. Volumes 35-40 cover Thompson's trip back to the United States in 1910. She describes lectures and meetings, and discussions on the outbreak of World War I. Her diary entries become less frequent during her stay in the United States.

Volumes 40-57 span her third trip to Africa (1911-1917), and entries tend to be bit longer and more descriptive. On this trip volumes 44-49 were written in diary volumes entitled "Warriors of Africa," whose covers depict African natives, and volumes 52-55 in volumes bearing the title "Empire Exercise," portraying historical events. Volumes 57 and 58 describe Thompson's travels during 1916-17 (at the height of World War I) to Hong Kong, Japan, Canada, and the U.S. Volumes 59-60 recount her time back in the United States; much of the content revolves around religious and political meetings on World War I, and the 1918 U.S. midterm elections..

Volumes 61-77 detail her fourth trip to Africa (1919-1925), and volumes 78-89 her fifth and last trip to Africa (1926-1932). Volume 80 does not begin until page 92, and is filled with various writing; some entries appear to be copies of diaries of historical figures. The diary entitled "Notes on Work at Moody Bible Institute" contains lecture notes, thoughts, scripture quotations, and observations by Thompson while attending a higher-education Christian organization, Moody Bible Institute, in Chicago in 1918, between her third and fourth missionary trips to Africa.

The Correspondence Series contains six letters regarding the collection and transfer of Mary McCornack Thompson's diaries after her death in 1936. The first five letters are from by William L. Thompson (Thompson's husband), to his nieces Margaret and Jay Urice, who are locating and collecting Mary's diaries. The sixth letter is from Jay Urice to Mr. Julian Fowler, a librarian at Oberlin College, about having Mary's diaries sent to Oberlin.

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Mary McMillan papers, 1936-1997 and undated, bulk 1952-1991, bulk 1952-1991 8.1 Linear Feet — 13 manuscript boxes; 2 oversize boxes; 2 oversize folders — 2277 Items

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The Mary McMillan Papers, 1936-1997 and undated (bulk 1952-1991), consist chiefly of journals and printed material, but also include correspondence, writings and speeches, photographic material, scrapbooks, clippings, videocassettes, audio cassettes, and memorabilia. Arranged in nine series based primarily on the format of the material, the papers illuminate the personal life and professional work of McMillan, a United Methodist missionary and teacher at the Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College in Hiroshima, Japan. In addition to her work as a teacher, the collection documents McMillan's service to the Kyodan, a unifying organization for Christian missionaries in Japan, and to the hibakusha, the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as her peace activism. Also included are materials related to the Topaz Relocation Center, a Japanese-American internment camp in Utah where McMillan worked in 1943. The papers are mostly in English, but include some Japanese language materials.

The bulk of the collection consists of the Journals Series, whose 43 journals contain almost daily accounts of McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, her involvement with the Ushita Christian Church, and her encounters with friends and other people. Also included are her personal thoughts about world events, particularly those related to peace and nuclear disarmament. Beginning on Aug. 11, 1939 with the final preparations for her initial departure, McMillan records her activities through her first year and a half in Japan. The 1939 and 1940 journals document in depth McMillan's adaptation to life in Japan, including her training in the Japanese language and customs, her first visits to various cities throughout the country, and the difficulties she faced as an American woman in pre-World War II Japan. After she and other American workers in Hiroshima were forcibly evacuated on Feb. 29, 1941, journal entries are scarce; however, the almost-daily entries resume in 1952 and continue until the day of McMillan's death on July 19, 1991.

In addition to the journals, McMillan's professional work as a United Methodist missionary and teacher at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College is well documented through the Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Printed Material Series. The Biographical Material Series includes McMillan's handwritten autobiographical notes, as well as newspaper and magazine clippings and booklets documenting McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, and with the Ushita Christian Church, which McMillan helped found in 1948. McMillan's correspondence also sheds light on her work through "mission letters," mass mailings which she wrote periodically as a way of updating her supporters in the United States on her work in Hiroshima.

McMillan also was a staunch advocate of world peace and nuclear disarmament, and after her retirement from the United Methodist Church in 1980, she spent much of her time writing letters and speaking in churches throughout the United States promoting her cause. McMillan's role as a pacifist is well well documented throughout the entire collection by her correspondence, photographs of demonstrations and marches, printed materials, and items in the Clippings Series. Much of the material in the Writings and Speeches Series and the Printed Material Series is related to peace activism, and covers topics such as the lingering effects of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima and that city's fight for peace, the first-hand accounts of bomb survivors, and the United Methodist Church's pacifist stance.

Also contributing to an understanding of McMillan's life, the Photographic Material Series and the Memorabilia Series offer visual and three-dimensional documentation of her activities as a missionary, teacher, and friend to the Japanese.

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McFadden Family papers, 1921-2002 6.5 Linear Feet — 4875 Items

William Allen McFadden (1904-1991), Methodist minister from Indiana, graduate of DePauw, Boston University School of Theology, and Union Seminary in New York. He was a lifelong pacifist and social justice worker. His wife was Glenora English McFadden (1910-2001) and her mother was Estella Graves English (1885-1960). The McFaddens had three children: Margaret McFadden (whose papers are also housed in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture), Edith Collins, and David McFadden. This collection consists of numerous accessions containing correspondence, audiocassettes, diaries, photographs, yearbooks, printed materials, newspaper clippings, and other miscellaneous materials, largely produced by William and Glenora McFadden during their courtship and marriage, 1921-1991. Also included is correspondence from Glenora McFadden's mother, Estella Graves English, and correspondence from Margaret McFadden, the McFaddens' daughter. Please consult the Collection Overview below for more information about the materials in each accession.

The accession (2005-0028) (300 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1936-1994 and undated) consists of sermons, letters, and diaries of William Allen McFadden, 1930-1991; sermons, journals, and letters of Glenora English McFadden, circa 1936-1994; and letters of Estella Graves English, 1959-1986. Includes a genealogy list compiled by Irene English Shoemaker. Also contains ephemera, photographs, and clippings.

The addition (2005-0092) (404 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated ca. 1936-2000) contains correspondence to Glenora and Bill McFadden. Also includes photographs, 2 audiotapes, and clippings.

The addition (2007-0048) (760 items, 1.7 lin. ft.; dated 1921-2001) contains sermons, correspondence, and a typescript for History of Israel. Also includes Glenora English's school notebooks; a William McFadden notebook; a yearbook from Bedford High School, 1921; two yearbooks from De Pauw University, 1922 and 1925; and a glass slide.

The 2007 addition (2007-0125) (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1921-1998) contains printed materials, manuscripts, correspondence, sermons, and clippings as well as a yearbook, diary, and commonplace book.

The 2007 addition (2007-0215) (1000 items; 2 lin. ft.; dated 1926-2001) includes correspondence, scrapbooks, audio cassette tapes with recorded sermons, a yearbook, diaries, and photographs from the McFadden family, including letters from Bill to Glenora prior to their marriage. Also included is schoolwork from Margaret McFadden's childhood and high school years, and correspondence from her dating from the 1970s.

The 2009 addition (2009-0207) (2 items; 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1928) includes 2 school notebooks belonging to Glenora English; one consists of her notes from American History and one is a project about United States geography.

The 2013 addition (2013-0188) (375 items; 0.5 lin. ft; dated 1993-2002) consists mainly of family correspondence.

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McKeen-Duren family papers, 1720-1945 and undated, bulk 1855-1900 12.6 Linear Feet — 16 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approximately 3240 items — Approximately 3240 items

Collection documents in great detail the histories of the McKeen and Duren families, particularly of Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. Topics of note documented through correpondence, diaries and journals, other peronal papers, printed material, and images include: religious thought and institutions in New England; the education of women and the careers of female educators; photography throughout the 19th century; the Civil War and its effects on New England society; westward migration patterns; social life in Massachusetts and Vermont; family relations in the 19th century; 19th century New England women writers and their activities; and New England genealogy. There are also many clippings in the scrapbooks debating the abolition of slavery, many written by minister Silas McKeen. The photographs series is large and offers many fine examples of 19th century portraiture and photographic processes, including ambrotypes, cyanotypes, daguerreotypes, tintypes, albumen prints, postcards, and early gelatin silver and platinum prints. The majority are portraits but there are also interiors of family rooms and images of educational institutions, especially Abbott Female Academy in Andover, Massachusetts (now Abbot Academy), whose principal over several decades was Philena McKeen. Three photograph albums round out the photograph series.

the histories of the McKeen and Duren families, particularly of Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. Topics of note documented through correpondence, diaries and journals, other peronal papers, printed material, and images include: religious thought and institutions in New England; the education of women and the careers of female educators; photography throughout the 19th century; the Civil War and its effects on New England society; westward migration patterns; social life in Massachusetts and Vermont; family relations in the 19th century; 19th century New England women writers and their activities; tourism in 19th century England, Scotland, Switzerland, and Egypt; and New England genealogy. There are also many clippings in the scrapbooks debating the abolition of slavery, many written by minister Silas McKeen.

The bulk of the manuscript material is housed in the Correspondence Series, which chiefly consists of exchanges between members of the McKeen-Duren families. The earliest correspondence originates from New England, the McKeen family having been established in the area by brothers James, William, and Samuel McKeen, who emigrated from Ireland in the early 18th century. Beginning around 1823, letters exchanged between Silas McKeen and the father of Serena McKeen (she married Charles Duren) appear. A significant later portion of the correspondence was written by Silas to his son Charles, who served as a Union soldier during the Civil War. The family's exchanges then began to stretch westward during a period in which Philena and Phebe McKeen taught at the Western Female Seminary, Oxford, Ohio, and when Charles McKeen Duren moved to Iowa following the Civil War. Prominent topics in the letters from the latter half of the 19th century include Phebe and Philena's literary and publishing activities; education in New England and the Midwest; the Civil War and its effect on New England citizens; and routine family topics such as health, religion and morality, and social activities. There are very probably references to the abolition movement and slavery: the McKeens, Silas in particular, were outspoken abolitionists.

A rich variety of written communication is found in the Writings Series, divided into two subseries, Manuscripts and Volumes. The Manuscripts subseries contains handwritten copies of a variety of types of writings by members of the McKeen-Duren families. The Volumes subseries contains often unattributed handwritten drafts and notes on fictional pieces; essays, probably written by Phebe or Philena; and sermons, most likely written by Silas McKeen. There may be material related to Silas McKeen's writings on slavery.

The collection is notable for its extensive Photographs Series. Almost all photographic formats across the 19th century can be found here, including many albumen prints, chiefly in the form of cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards; cyanotypes; cased and uncased ambrotypes and daguerreotypes; and tintypes. Also present are gelatin silver and platinum prints. The series is divided into four subseries: Albums, Cased Images, Oversize Prints, and Prints. One family member, perhaps Phebe, was reportedly an amateur photographer, but direct evidence of this remains to be discovered. Interior photographs of the family home show multitudes of photographs hung on the wall. Subjects in the collection's images include family members from babyhood to old age, family friends, travel in England, Europe, and the Middle East, pets, and horses. Other families portrayed in the photographs include Page, Deming (?), Grovenor, and Dunlevy. There are only a few landscapes but there are images of Abbot Academy buildings, grounds, and students with their teachers (Andover, Massachusetts). Some of the photographic items, particularly the cased images, are fragile and should be handled with care.

The Diaries and Scrapbooks Series contains many personal journals and diaries, spanning the years 1804-1900, and scrapbooks, circa 1838-1902. The diaries are quite detailed and were chiefly written by the female members in the McKeen family; topics revolve around family health problems, visitors and travel, readings, the weather, and emotional or religious experiences. There may be passing references to slavery; there is one reference to a prominent abolitionist, later imprisoned, who visited the McKeen house. The scrapbooks house pasted-in clippings pertaining to family members, and many published short pieces written by Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. There are also handwritten extracts of letters, as well as prescriptive pieces and poems, and a series of pages from Civil War periodicals. There are quite a few clippings in the scrapbooks on slavery and abolitionism, as well as references to issues pertaining to statehood; many of the anti-slavery pieces published in New England serials were written by Silas McKeen from the 1830s to the 1850s. The clippings folder in the Printed Material Series contains similar loose items.

The Financial Papers Series contains notifications of contributions to missionary institutions, receipts for good and services, society memberships, and subscriptions. A number of ledgers, some in bound volumes, are also found here.

The Genealogy Series contains extensive handwritten accounts and notes originating from the early 19th century, documenting the ancestry of the McKeen-Duren families and related branches, as well as two hand-written bound volumes containing detailed genealogies of the Duren, Gould, Prichard, and Freeman families. There are also a few printed materials, including obituaries and memorial pieces.

The Legal Papers files contain the earliest documents in the collection (1720). Items include land grants and deed transfers, inheritance inventories, loan notices, service contracts, wills and will abstracts, writs of indenture or apprenticeship, powers of attorney, and other documents.

An assortment of printed items, clippings, and ephemera pertaining to members of the McKeen-Duren families can be found in the Printed Materials Series, including invitations, event programs, announcements, obituaries and memorial pieces, short story reprints, copies of a course curriculum, a copy of the Abbot Academy journal, cards, and other assorted materials, including a hand-drawn map, perhaps the local vicinity where one of the families lived, found in the ephemera folder.

A folder of Oversize Material housing diplomas awarded to members of the McKeen-Duren families completes the collection.

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M. F. Wilson diary, 1903 September 21-1904 September 20 1.0 Volume — 196 pages — paper, photographs (albumen, silver gelatin), illustrations (ink drawings) — 22 x 19 cm housed in box 24 x 21 cm — Numbering: 5-154, [42] p. — Pages 1-4 lacking, 32 pages blank, glossary pages 152-154, 7 pages at end of volume contain photographs, postcards, a newspaper, and Japanese notepaper samples. — Blue goatskin clamshell box.

M. F. Wilson was a midshipman in the gunroom of the HMS Leviathan, a Royal navy cruiser based in the China Station in 1903. Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

There are 64 albumen and silver gelatin photographs, probably all taken by Wilson. Includes panoramas of Hong Kong, Yokohama, and Weihaiwei harbors; as well as photographs of his fellow midshipmen; steam boats used for transport; images of the Leviathan; docking and drydock areas; coaling; along with picnics, hikes, hunting parties, and street scenes from his shore leave, particularly in Mato, Weihaiwei, Shanghai, and the Ming tombs. There are also images related to target practice for the ship and two images of Japanese ships destroyed by the Russians during the Russo-Japanese war.

There are 19 ink drawings, including one map. Subjects include landscapes, sunken vessels, Leviathan target practice, and other incidental images.

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Moses family papers, 1859-1951 14 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — Approximately 10,400 items

Papers relate to a Jewish family originally from South Carolina and Georgia, and residents of New York City, whose members included drama critic and journalist Montrose Jonas Moses, his wife Dorothy Herne and other Herne sisters, and his sister, author Belle Moses. The collection primarily consists of manuscripts written by Belle Moses, as well as her research notes and letters. Notes, clippings, diaries, letters, and other papers of Montrose J. Moses and Dorothy Herne also represent a substantial portion. There are also five scrapbooks assembled by the Herne sisters. Also included are family and travel photographs, nitrate negatives, physician Montefiore Moses' visiting books, and memorabilia such as pins, calling cards, programs, and other keepsakes. Print materials include literature, poetry, and textbooks published around the turn of the century.

The Moses family papers primarily consist of manuscripts written by Belle Moses, and include her research notes and letters. Notes, clippings, letters, telegrams, diaries, theater advertisements, book reviews, and other papers of Montrose J. Moses and Dorothy Herne also represent a substantial portion.

Additional materials include five scrapbooks assembled by the Herne sisters; family and travel photographs dating from the 19th to the 20th centuries, along with corresponding nitrate negatives; and 19th century doctor's visiting books belonging to Montrose and Belle's father, who was a physician in Georgia. Also present are memorabilia such as pins, calling cards, programs, and other keepsakes. Print materials found in the collection include literature, poetry, and textbooks published around the turn of the century.

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Nestia V. Lloyd diaries, 1923-1925 0.2 Linear Feet — 3 volumes

Three annual diaries (1923-1925) kept by Nestia V. Lloyd, a young woman (b. 1902) living with her parents in London and Wales.

Collection consists of three bound diaries kept by Nestia V. Lloyd for the years 1923, 1924, and 1925. The early pages of the diaries include printed matter such as calendars, tips intended for women in the home (regarding cooking, cleaning, personal hygiene and health, fashion), London theaters (including Lloyd's notes about which shows she saw at which theaters), and notes. Lloyd used the diaries regularly and discussed her personal activities, gifts sent and received for various occasions, financial expenses and housekeeping, her work and schooling, her travels and activities through London and Wales, and family news.

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Account of life in camp and traveling while stationed in North India and modern-day Pakistan by an unidentified wife of a British Army officer. The first entry begins in Meean Meer (or Mian Mir), a former large British cantonment in Pakistan. Officers and families traveled to locations including Islamabad, Kashmir, Aliabad, and Pindi Gheb. Illustrated with sketches.
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The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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The Operations and Maintenance Department (and the organizations and individuals who preceded the establishment of the department) was responsible for construction and upkeep of Duke University Buildings. The Operations and Maintenance Department Records include correspondence, plans, architectural drawings, blueprints, financial records, contracts, desk diaries, keys, and other materials related to Duke buildings. Prominent individuals represented in the collection include Frank Clyde Brown, S.W. Myatt, and Horace Trumbauer. Major subjects include the building and administration of Duke University, the planning of buildings and grounds on the Duke Campus, and the establishment of the Duke Construction Company to oversee construction on campus. English.

The Operations and Maintenance Dept. Records include correspondence, plans, architectural drawings, blueprints, financial records, contracts, desk diaries, and other materials related to the construction, maintenance, and use of the buildings of Duke University. The bulk of the collection details the extensive planning and construction of Duke's new West Campus in the 1920s and 1940s, as well as renovations and additions to the East Campus. Discussions with vendors and suppliers, architectural plans and blueprints, and the design of the grounds all contribute to the record of Duke's growth. The collection also includes diaries kept by what became the Operations and Maintenance Department. These record campus events over a nearly twenty year period.

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Oskar Morgenstern papers, 1866-1992 and undated 41.8 Linear Feet — 27,691 Items

Economist, university professor, and author in Austria and U.S., born Carl Friedrich Alfred Oskar Morgenstern in Germany. The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian School of Economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The papers of Oskar Morgenstern, who is associated with the Austrian school of economics, span the years 1866-1992, although the bulk of the materials date from 1917 to 1977. They consist of correspondence, diaries, subject files, printed material, audiovisual material, manuscript and printed writings and their supporting papers, and biographical and bibliographical information about his career and publications. The collection principally concerns Morgenstern's work as an economic theorist, university professor, author and lecturer, and consultant to business and government.

The first two decades of Morgenstern's career as an economist, the 1920s and 1930s, were associated with the University of Vienna where he was educated and was a faculty member until his emigration to the United States in 1938. He published major books about economic forecasting (1928) and the limits of economics (1934) and numerous other writings in which the subjects of business cycles, prices, the depression of the 1930s, economic conditions in Europe and America, currency and exchange, and economic history and theory are prominent. Information about them is scattered throughout the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, and Subject Files Series. Morgenstern's interests and correspondents were international, although principally European and American. A considerable part of the correspondence and writings during these years, and all of the diaries, are written in German. English is also prominent, and other languages also occur.

Morgenstern's output of publications during the 1940s, his first decade at Princeton University, was less extensive than in the 1930s, but he and John von Neumann published their classic Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944. As Princeton editor Sanford G. Thatcher wrote in 1987, in sheer intellectual influence, it probably has stimulated more creative thinking, in a wider variety of fields of scholarship, than any other single book Princeton University Press has published. Information about this book and subsequent international developments in game theory pervades the Correspondence, Subject Files, and Writings and Speeches Series until Morgenstern's death. The elaboration of game theory was not only theoretical but also practical, and Morgenstern's writings and projects illustrate its applications, especially in U.S. military and foreign policy during the Cold War.

The Writings and Speeches Series, including the diaries, and the Subject Files Series are extensive for the 1940s as they are for the later decades of Morgenstern's career. The Correspondence Series, however, is extensive only for the 1920s, 1930s, and 1970s. Part of his correspondence apparently did not survive. However, Morgenstern routinely placed letters and other material in his files for subjects and writings, and many letters are to be found there. There are a number of letters for some correspondents, but extensive correspondence with an individual is not characteristic of this collection. A person's letters may be filed in more than one chronological group of correspondence.

Morgenstern published prolifically during the 1950s to 1970s. His major books focused on accuracy in economics (1950), organization (1951), national defense (1958), international finance and business cycles (1959), the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosions (1967), stock market prices (1970), political, economic, and military forecasting (1973), and expanding and contracting economies in various societies (1976). These books and numerous articles and reviews reveal his interest in economic theory, international economic problems, and the application of mathematics and economics to public policy problems. The Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, and Correspondence Series document many of his publications and such topics as the Cold War, nuclear issues, military and naval affairs (especially the U.S. Navy), defense, space, economic analysis, game theory, the stock market, business cycles, mathematics and economics, statistical validity, and his work with John von Neumann, Martin Shubik, Friedrich A. von Hayek, Gottfried Haberler, Antonio de Viti de Marco, Eveline Burns, Gerald L. Thompson, N. N. Vorob'ev, and others.

Morgenstern taught at Princeton until his retirement in 1970 when be began teaching at New York University, and both schools are represented, particularly in the Subject Files Series. These files and the Writings and Speeches Series document his relationship with public and private organizations, especially the Office of Naval Research, the Rand Corporation, various foundations and scholarly societies, and Mathematica, a consulting firm that did contract work for government and business. Morgenstern was co-founder of Mathematica. The Mathematica Series contains correspondence, memos, policy reports, project proposals, and research papers. The institutions that are often mentioned include NASA, Office of Naval Research, and Sandia Corporation. Topics, among others, relate to analysis of military conflicts, economics of the space program, management research, or peaceful use of nuclear energy. Some materials related to Mathematica Series are still scattered across the rest of the collection.

Morgenstern habitually incorporated into his files pertinent thoughts or information that might be useful for later consideration. Consequently, the Subject Files and Writings and Speeches Series often include letters, memoranda, lecture notes, writings by others, mathematics, printed material, and other Items. Thus, a file for a topic or publication in 1963 may contain relevant dated material from other years and decades.

The diaries, 1917-1977, are relatively complete, but Morgenstern did not write daily or every month. There are significant gaps: 1918-1920; Feb.-May 1938; March 1946-Jan. 1947; and Sept. 1951-Feb. 1952. Shorter gaps also occur in April-May 1924, Sept. 1925; June-July 1948; and April 1949. The diaries are in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Morgenstern's library of printed material was donated to New York University.

Addition (06-067) (2452 items, 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 1935-1976) contains primarily published works by Morgenstern and his major co-authors such as John von Neumann and Gerald L. Thompson in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and German arranged in alphabetical order. Important works contained in this series include typed manuscript portions of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior with annotations, draft chapters of the Question of National Defense, Long Term Planning with Models of Static and Dynamic Open Expanding Economies, the Mathematica Economic Analysis of the Space Shuttle System and some correspondence, as well as supporting documentation and statistics. There are also three audiotape reels with Morgenstern's lectures.

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Parker Pillsbury diaries, 1864-1896 2 Linear Feet — 33 pocket diaries

Parker Pillsbury (1809–1898) was an American minister, lecturer, newspaper editor, and advocate for abolition and women's rights. The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries offer a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years, particularly his work fighting for the rights of women and African Americans and promoting Free Religion. Pillsbury records his interactions with leading social reformers of the nineteenth century, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher and Theodore Tilton among many others. His entries occasionally are accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries contain a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years.

Pillsbury wrote daily or nearly daily about the details of his life recording both the mundane and the profound. A typical entry begins with the weather and his location before providing the names of those with whom he met or correspondeded that day, events he attended, lectures he gave, or work he did. Pillsbury writes about his interactions with William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, the Allcott family, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher, Theodore Tilton and many other leading social reformers of the nineteenth century. His entries are occasionally accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

Due to their consistency and span, the diaries provide a decades' long chronology of Pillsbury's involvement with and importance in the major social reform movements of the late nineteenth century, and in particular, the women's rights movement with which he closely associated during these years. The diaries show him to be a ceaseless traveler, moving up and down the east coast, throughout New England, and through western New York and the Midwest, as he lectured, preached, attended women's suffrage conventions, and otherwise attempted to advance the causes of equal rights for women and African Americans and Free Religion.

The diaries illustrate his close and sustained relationship with major figures in the women's rights movements. He writes of his work as joint editor with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony of the Revolution from 1867 to 1870, and his continued friendship and partnership with Anthony in the following decades. He often visited her in Rochester, they lectured together, and he served as her advisor when she was put on trial in Albany by the State Supreme Court for voting without the right to do so.

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Paul Kwilecki photographs and papers, circa 1910-2008, bulk 1960-2008 42 Linear Feet — 54 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 2 oversize boxes — Approximately 9480 Items

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Collection comprises over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, along with negatives, contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and printed material, totaling over 9000 items. Kwilecki's photographic work documents rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Subjects include local landscapes, tobacco workers, county fairs, hog slaughtering, cemeteries, churches, courthouses, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, shoppers, downtowns, and house porches and interiors. The themes of race relations and religious life predominate. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Significant correspondents in the manuscripts series include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection includes a small set of Vestal photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Paul Kwilecki Photographs and Papers span the whole of his career and include over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, negatives (chiefly safety but also some nitrate and glass plate), contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and other printed material, totaling over approximately 9000 items.

The bulk of the collection consists of Paul Kwilecki's prints and other photographic material documenting rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Although Kwilecki developed an interest in photography in the 1940s, only a very small portion of the images in the collection pre-date 1970.

The collection is organized into two major series: Photographic Materials, containing prints, contact sheets, and negatives, and a Manuscripts Series housing many files of correspondence, writings, and other personal papers.

While initially interested in photographing tobacco workers, Kwilecki turned his focus to other subjects, including county fairs, hog slaughtering times, cemeteries, churches, courtrooms, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, bus stations, shoppers, downtowns, house porches and interiors, and landscapes. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Throughout the collection, the themes of race relations and religious life tend to predominate.

The Manuscripts Series (1967-2008) also provides an interpretation of life in Decatur County but also documents Kwilecki's photographic philosophy and practices. The correspondence and the journals, related to Kwilecki's work and career as a photographer, comprise the largest groupings. The series also contains Kwilecki's personal journals, dating from 1967-1969; Kwilecki's printing notes; news clippings; exhibition brochures; and a brief internet biography of Kwilecki. Many of Kwilecki's writings attempt to express in words the same topics he tried to illuminate through photography.

Additional manuscripts (14 boxes) and photographic materials were received in 2010 following Kwilecki's passing away. They include many folders of correspondence dating from 1971-2008, arranged in original order either chronologically or alphabetically by folder title. Significant correspondents include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection also includes a small set of Vestal's photographic prints. Other files contain writings, clippings, and other items. The writings include journals from the 1970s; typed excerpts from early 20th century Georgia newspapers, some on racial incidents; drafts of Kwilecki's talks; and notes for the Decatur County photography publication (one folder). A few publications round out the last box in the collection.

The negatives are closed to use; contact sheets and prints offer alternate access to Kwilecki's images. Eleven nitrate large-format sheet negatives, dating from approximately the 1940s-1960s, are slated for digitization. Also included in the collection are several glass plate negatives by an unknown photographer dating perhaps from the 1910s.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Percy E. Ryberg papers, 1906-1991 6 Linear Feet — 11 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Collection primarily comprises New York psychiatrist Percy E. Ryberg's personal family correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers, some of which speak to Ryberg's youth in Argentina. Professional correspondence, articles, and other items document his career and interests in sexual and mental health, substance abuse treatments, identity, spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine, and other topics, and the publication of his book, Health, Sex, and Birth Control. Also includes biographical and genealogical information; photographs and photograph albums; and glass plate negatives. Acquired by the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The collection consists primarily of psychiatrist Percy Ryberg's personal correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers (1908-1991), some of which speak to his youth in Argentina. Ryberg's career as a physician and psychiatrist is represented through professional correspondence, writings, and medical research material. The material includes articles on the treatment of alcoholism in the mid-twentieth century, the publication of his book Health, Sex and Birth Control, and research on histamine reactions on the skin. Other topics that may be mentioned in the papers include mental health treatment, gender identity, schizophrenia, and spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine. There are also clippings and correspondence relating to the trial of William Koch (1940s), a U.S. physician who claimed to have developed a cure for cancer.

The collection also includes photographs (1906-1990s), mostly family snapshots and professional portraits of Ryberg, and photograph albums documenting Ryberg's travels and career. Glass plate negatives bear images of diplomas, and a military portrait of Ryberg from 1942.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.