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M. F. Wilson diary, 1903 September 21-1904 September 20 1.0 Volume — 196 pages — paper, photographs (albumen, silver gelatin), illustrations (ink drawings) — 22 x 19 cm housed in box 24 x 21 cm — Numbering: 5-154, [42] p. — Pages 1-4 lacking, 32 pages blank, glossary pages 152-154, 7 pages at end of volume contain photographs, postcards, a newspaper, and Japanese notepaper samples. — Blue goatskin clamshell box.

M. F. Wilson was a midshipman in the gunroom of the HMS Leviathan, a Royal navy cruiser based in the China Station in 1903. Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

Diary of life aboard a British war ship, maintained by M. F. Wilson over one year, including entries related to target practice and other drills, preparation of torpedos, coaling, mooring and unmooring, movements of sailors among the Royal Navy's ships, watches and duties, cleaning and painting, preparations for inspection, and the coming and going of other countries' vessels. He also records activities during free time, including playing football, hockey, rugby, cricket and taking part in boxing matches and hunting parties. Wilson outlines his shore leave excursions to Mato, China; Tokyo; Shanghai; and the Ming Tombs, where he attended dinners and the theater, bathed and swam, or held picnics and hiked. There are descriptions of hotels, bath houses, tea rooms and stores. In an entry for December 12, Wilson notes the purchase of his photographic gear, and in February he announces that war has been declared between Japan and Russia, the progress of which he follows in subsequent entries. Major ports mentioned include Nagasaki, Weihaiwei, China; Hong Kong, Yokohama, Woosung, and Nankin.

There are 64 albumen and silver gelatin photographs, probably all taken by Wilson. Includes panoramas of Hong Kong, Yokohama, and Weihaiwei harbors; as well as photographs of his fellow midshipmen; steam boats used for transport; images of the Leviathan; docking and drydock areas; coaling; along with picnics, hikes, hunting parties, and street scenes from his shore leave, particularly in Mato, Weihaiwei, Shanghai, and the Ming tombs. There are also images related to target practice for the ship and two images of Japanese ships destroyed by the Russians during the Russo-Japanese war.

There are 19 ink drawings, including one map. Subjects include landscapes, sunken vessels, Leviathan target practice, and other incidental images.

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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.

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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

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Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

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Ken Wainio (1952-2006) was an American surrealist author and poet based in San Francisco, California. Collection includes manuscripts and drafts of many of Wainio's poems and writings, including his novel, Starfuck. Also includes his journals and diaries, published poetry and printed materials, some correspondence, snapshots, and other biographical information.

The majority of the collection consists of drafts or manuscripts of Wainio's writings, which ranged from poetry to short stories to novels to plays. The condition of the drafts is fairly good, although many are incomplete or only excerpts of the text. There are many draft versions of Amorfos, Letters from Al-Kemi, and The Spiral Canyon, which was later published by New Native Press as Starfuck, Wainio's first novel. Small amounts of material exist for several poems, short stories, and plays.

The remainder of the Writings, Manuscripts, and Drafts series includes some of Wainio's published works, present in both broadside form as well as in journals or other serials. Of note are the several issues of Beatitude, edited by Wainio at one point, as well as two issues of Vanishing Cab, his own publication. Also in the series is a small amount of Wainio's artwork.

There are over 30 journals present in the Journals series and they include diary entries, travel plans and notes, drafts of writings and poems, as well as sketches and artwork. They offer insight into Wainio's thought process as an author, as well as his methods of writing.

The remainder of the collection contains correspondence, including a series of correspondence between Wainio and Thomas Rain Crowe; personal materials, including obituary information, some of Wainio's college papers, and other miscellaneous materials; and photographs, which are largely undated snapshots taken by Wainio during his travels through Greece and the United States.

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Henry George Austin Vicars was a British Army officer stationed in India in the 1850s and 1860s. He entered the army in October 1851, and was Adjutant of the 61st Regiment during the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857 and 1858. In his diaries, dated 1853-1855, 1857-1860, and 1864-1865, he reports on the mutinies, the Delhi siege and massacres, executing mutineers, cholera epidemics and fevers, and daily life as a soldier. Entries discuss his daily routine, the weather, his amusements and engagements, his clothing, his friends and fellow officers, his travels with the army, news and rumors he has heard, sermons and other church services he attended, and his home leave in London.

Collection consists of nine diaries kept by Vicars, largely during his service in India, as well as a small amount of loose pages originally tucked into the volumes. The diaries are dated 1853-1855, 1857-1860, and 1864-1865. Volumes are all Letts's Diary, including almanacs and other reference materials printed at the front of the book; they are in varied physical condition, ranging from fair to poor. They contain daily entries discussing Vicars's routines, including his daily schedule, military activities and movements, his amusements and leisure time, sermons he heard and news he read, correspondence and other communications he maintained, and his general thoughts and personal prayers. Entries discuss army life including parades, drills, firing and target practice, distribution and preparation of Enfield rifles and ammunition, and other changes in British uniforms and clothing during this period. Vicars also records his work as adjutant in attending different court marshals and punishments for army men due to theft, drunkenness, or more serious crimes. More routine topics discussed include the climate and weather; his current view and location at different forts and locales in India, Mauritius, Ceylon, at sea, and England; hobbies and pursuits he enjoyed such as horseback riding, shopping, reading, photography, and cricket; and different dinners and events he attended as an officer.

Vicars's volumes for 1857 and 1858 contain detailed reports about his regiment's role in suppressing the Sepoy Rebellion. He records hearing initial news of the Delhi massacre in May 1857, and describes his march and movement toward Delhi and his participation in the battles of July 1857. Later entries describe attending the execution of mutineers, ongoing cholera epidemics and fevers plaguing British troops, and the fallout from ongoing conflict throughout India. The battles of 1857 had a lasting impact on Vicars; he refers to the anniversary of the Delhi siege and sorties in the 1864 volume.

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Philip Turner (1740-1815) was a noted surgeon from Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York. The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Items include correspondence with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, William Eustis, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Also includes materials on Turner's family. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Turner served in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, during which he was stationed at Fort Columbus, New York. Included are an extensive collection of military hospital returns from the Eastern Department of the Continental Army describing the state of the Army's sick and wounded and spanning the years 1777 to 1780. Also included is correspondence with George Washington, Tench Coxe, and William Eustis about the procurement of medical supplies and the organization of the Army's medical department during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. After the Revolutionary War, Turner felt that he had not received due compensation for his service, and the collection contains extensive correspondence relating to the decades-long effort of Turner and his heirs to receive this compensation from Congress. This correspondence includes letters to and from Thomas Jefferson, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Additional correspondence, especially with Daniel Parker, Chief Clerk of the War Department, documents Turner's efforts to secure a commission during the War of 1812.

Also included in the collection are correspondence, financial and legal papers, and poetry relating to Turner's family. The majority of this series is addressed to or stems from John Turner and Nancy Turner, two of Philip Turner's children. Correspondents represented include Judith Sargent Murray, American essayist and advocate for women's rights, and her husband, John Murray. Some of the material is related to the efforts of John Turner and John Turner Wait (Philip Turner's grandson) to receive compensation for Turner's Revolutionary War service. The collection also includes a small hide-covered trunk bearing the initials A.T., possibly belonging to Turner's mother Ann.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Turner family papers, 1778-1929 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1316 Items

The Turner family was based in Van Buren, Crawford County, Arkansas. Correspondence, papers, diaries, and scrapbooks of Jesse Turner, Sr. (1805-1894), lawyer, jurist, and Whig politician of Van Buren, Ark.; his wife, Rebecca (Allen) Turner (1823-1917); their son, Jesse Turner, Jr. (1856-1919); and other members of the Turner and Allen families, relating to law practice, family history and personal matters, political activities in Arkansas and the U.S. (1840-1900), secession in Arkansas, the Arkansas Constitution of 1836, social life and customs in Arkansas, life during Reconstruction, and U.S. presidential elections of 1848 and 1860. Correspondents include prominent Arkansas attorneys Albert Pike and Absalom Fowler. There are also a number of letters between Rebecca Allen and Jesse Turner before their marriage, and letters from Rebecca to her son Jesse Jr., as well as diaries written by his mother (1857-1859) chronicling his early childhood.

Correspondence and papers of Jesse Turner, Sr., lawyer, jurist, and Whig politician of Van Buren, Arkansas; his wife, Rebecca (Allen) Turner; their son, Jesse Turner, Jr.; and other members of the Turner family, relating to law practice, family affairs, political activities in Arkansas and the U.S. (1840-1900), the Arkansas Constitution of 1836, secession in Arkansas, social life and customs in Arkansas, and life during Reconstruction. Jesse Turner Sr.'s letters on secession are especially invaluable, as are his letters and those from prominent lawyers and jurists commenting on state and national politics. Correspondents include prominent Arkansas lawyers Albert Pike and Absalom Fowler. There are also a number of letters between Rebecca Allen and Jesse Turner before their marriage, and letters from Rebecca to her son Jesse Jr.

The collection also includes legal records; school records, college letters from the University of Virginia, and other papers of Jesse Jr.; a diary belonging to Rebecca Allen Turner (1857-1859) that comments on her young son's activities; a journal of work on steamboats in the West (1840-1850); and scrapbooks relating to the presidential elections of 1848 and 1860.

For a more detailed description of the context and contents of this collection, please consult with a reference archivist for access to the Rubenstein's digitized cardfile.

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Townsend Family papers, 1829-1972 2.4 Linear Feet — 1699 items

Consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the large Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont.

The collection consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont. The bulk of the correspondence between a large group of family members falls between 1830 and 1939; topics include family matters and spiritualism. One group of letters and a diary were written by a Union soldier, Francis Torrey Townsend, and relate to his experiences in Mississippi and Tennessee as a soldier with Company K, 13th Iowa Infantry. Other materials concern Bessie Meachum's teaching experiences with African-American children at the Beach Institute, Savannah, Ga., at the Lincoln Normal School, Marion, Ala., and at the Rio Grande Industrial School in Albuquerque, N.M.; some of this work was done through the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Church. Some photographs also depict Tougaloo College in Miss., and Le Moyne College in Tenn. Other volumes include the early 20th century diaries of Torrey Townsend and his autobiography; an 1870 diary of Elisa Townsend; a 1892 diary of Mary Meachum; and several diaries and notebooks of Bessie Meachum.