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The Durham Traditional Arts Survey was conducted in the early 2000s as part of the Document Durham project within the Community Programs department at the Center for Documentary Studies. Participants consisted of folklorists and photographers who traveled through Durham County, attempting to document the diversity of various communities by focusing on traditional artists within those communities. One outcome of the DTAS was the Home Made Visible: Durham 2002 exhibition, which highlighted Durham traditional arts and crafts. Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Jazz Loft Project Records consist of the research and administrative records of author Sam Stephenson's Jazz Loft Project, which documented the events and inhabitants -- including W. Eugene Smith, Hall Overton, and David X. Young -- of 821 6th Avenue, New York City, in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The records include the tapes of an extensive oral history project conducted by Stephenson from 1998 to 2010, general research and administrative notes, logs describing the content of the audio recordings W. Eugene Smith made at the loft, and original audio recordings of Hall Overton's compositions.

The Jazz Loft Project Records include administrative documents, audio and video recordings, and collected research associated with key participants and events in the history of the Jazz Loft building, located at 821 Sixth Avenue in New York City. The collection includes significant documentation of the jazz music scene in New York from 1955-1971, and the life and work of photographer W. Eugene Smith, composer Hall F. Overton, and jazz musician Thelonious Monk. Also of note are materials that document the collection of oral histories, the design and implementation of exhibitions, and conservation reports on audio recordings all related to the Jazz Loft Project. Items in the collection range from 1950 to 2012, with the bulk being created between 2002 and 2009.

A majority of materials in this collection consist of the project's financial and logistical documentation, oral history interviews in print, audio, and video formats, audio reel analysis notes, and biographical/historical articles. Examples of these types of documentation include correspondence, book drafts, promotional materials for exhibitions and events, research notes, and interview transcripts.

The collection contains 824 audiovisual items, including microcassettes, audiocassettes, VHS videocassettes, ¼-inch audio reels, DVDs, CDs, mini-DV videocassettes, and digital audio tapes (DAT). The bulk of this media is associated with oral history interviews, events and exhibitions, and research related to the Jazz Loft Project, but there are also items tangentially related to the Project, such as commercial music recordings, recordings of concerts and performances, original recordings of Hall Overton's opera Huck Finn, and published documentary footage related to W. Eugene Smith and other artists.

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The Duke University Office of Cultural Affairs was created in 1969 as part of the Division of Student Affairs and existed until 1993, when, as part of a reorganization of the Division, it was superceded by the Office of University Life. The Office of Cultural Affairs Records, 1931-2002 (bulk 1958-2002), consist of budgets and financial reports; calendars; contracts; correspondence; meeting minutes; printed materials; black-and-white, color, and 35mm photographs; and videocassettes, audiocassettes, and digital audio tapes. Materials primarily span the years of the OCA's official existence, 1969-1993, but also contain earlier materials about its first director, Ella Fountain Pratt, and later records created by the Office of University Life. Arranged in five series: Subject Files, which provide a broad overview of the OCA's activities, including early correspondence between Duke University and the American Dance Festival, which moved to Duke in 1977; the Chamber Arts Society, a group that promoted chamber music performance in Durham and surrounding areas; the Duke Artists Series, a concert series that began in 1930 and came under the oversight of OCA upon its creation in 1969; the Summer Session, programming for which also became one of the OCA's primary responsibilities; and the Triangle Dance Guild, a group independent of Duke that coordinated with the OCA to promote dance performance on campus and in Durham and surrounding areas from 1976-1984.

The Office of Cultural Affairs Records, 1931-2002 (bulk 1958-2002), consist of budgets and financial reports, calendars, contracts, correspondence, meeting minutes, photographs, and printed materials that document the Office's administration and scheduling of concerts and other performing arts events, arts festivals, and certain performance venues and buildings on the campus of Duke University. The majority of these records span the years of the OCA's official existence, 1969-1993; but there are also older materials that stem from the earlier Duke career of the OCA's initial director, Ella Fountain Pratt, as well as later records created under the Office of University Life, which superceded the OCA in 1993. Audiovisual material in the collection include more than 500 black-and-white, color, and 35mm photographs; additionally, there are several videocassettes, audiocassettes, and digital audio tapes. The collection is arranged in five series beginning with the most general, Subject Files, followed in alphabetical order by four smaller and more specific series that document the history of various concert series or arts organizations.

The Subject Files are not only the largest series but also give the broadest overview of the OCA's activities. Several large folder groups exist within the series, including one that contains early correspondence and negotiations between Duke University and the American Dance Festival, which moved to Duke in 1977. The series also contains correspondence and other records that span Pratt's entire career at Duke, from the late 1950s through her retirement in 1984. The next four series document the history of various concert series or artistic groups that were either administrated by or collaborated with the OCA. The first and largest of these series is the Chamber Arts Society. Founded in 1945 to promote chamber music performance in Durham , this group eventually came under the aegis of Duke University and the Office of Cultural Affairs in 1975. Although files here tell a little of that early history, they primarily document some fifteen years of concerts on campus from the mid-1980s through 2002. Following this are the records of the Duke Artists Series, a concert series that began in 1930. When the OCA was created in 1969, management and oversight of the Duke Artists Series was made one of its primary responsibilities. The files here mainly document several seasons of concerts in the late 1980s and late 1990s. Much like the Duke Artists Series, cultural programming for the University's Summer Session Series also became a primary responsibility of the OCA upon its creation. This series covers more than forty years of summer session history, including programming that continued under the Office of University Life. The final series contains the history of the Triangle Dance Guild. Independent of Duke, this group existed from 1976-1984 and coordinated with the OCA to promote dance performance on campus and in Durham and other local venues.

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Paul Jeffrey papers, 1969-2006 145 Linear Feet — Approximately 3500 Items

Paul H. Jeffrey is a saxophonist, composer, arranger, and educator, professionally active in music since the 1950s. The Paul Jeffrey Papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. Also present are audio and moving image materials, photographs and posters, as well as correspondence, promotional materials, and written records relating to various aspects of Jeffrey's career.

The Paul Jeffrey Papers span the dates 1969 to 2006. The papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. The papers also include photographs, posters, and other written records of Jeffrey's musical career since the 1960s. There are additionally over 500 hours of concert and studio recordings in a number of audio and moving image formats that date since the 1960s. These formats include audiocassettes, open reel audio tapes, compact discs, digital audio tapes, long-playing records, VHS, and Hi-8 video cassettes. The collection is arranged into the following five series: Correspondence, Promotional Material, and Festival Records; Photographs and Posters; Audio and Moving Image Materials; Music Manuscripts; and Oversize Music Manuscripts. Audio and Moving Image Materials are arranged by format, and Music Manuscripts are arranged alphabetically. Acquired as a part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

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Robert Ward was a composer primarily of operas, instrumental works, and symphonic choral works. He won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his opera, The Crucible, which remains his best-known work. Ward served as Chancellor of the North Carolina School of the Arts and as a faculty member at Columbia and Duke Universities. His papers span from his time as a student at the Eastman School of Music in the 1930s to his final years composing in 2012. They include scores, music sketches, recordings, libretto drafts, correspondence, scrapbooks, research and information files, writings and speeches by and about Ward, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, and other materials that document his professional life and work as a composer.

The Robert Ward Papers have been divided into eight series: Biographical Materials, Correspondence, Operas, Instrumental Works, Vocal Works, Music Sketchbooks and Student Works, Music by Others, and Untitled Recordings. Biographical Materials consists of documents pertaining to Ward's work as a composer, including newspaper clippings, profiles, the composer's published writings and interviews, documents from the organizations with which he affiliated, events held in his honor, and certificates and awards he received. The Correspondence series primarily consists of professional communications between Robert Ward and several organizations. Ward's music has been divided into three series based on genre and arranged alphabetically by title of piece within each series: Operas, Instrumental Works, and Vocal Works. Materials for each composition may include scores, recordings, and publicity materials such as newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews. Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Ward, as well as manuscripts for some of his student works. Music by Others includes a variety of scores and recordings by other composers included in Ward's papers, the majority of which are recordings. Untitled Recordings comprises assorted media that contain no composition titles, although some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances.

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Stanley C. Marshall papers, 1944-2005 and undated 17.5 Linear Feet — 11625 Items

Stanley C. Marshall was a pioneer in the field of strategic market planning, and an educator, lecturer, and humanitarian. The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Client files include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Clients include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The collection is organized into four series: Personal Files, Client Files, Professional Files, and Audiovisual Materials.

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Terry Sanford and the New South records, 2000-2005 5.5 Linear Feet — 5 banker boxes, 1 cassette box

Terry Sanford and the New South, a documentary by filmmaker Thomas Lennon, examines Sanford's governorship in North Carolina during the Civil Rights movement and his vision of a New South. Sanford was governor of North Carolina, 1961-1965, and also served as President of Duke University, 1969-1985. This accession (2009-0169) (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of Terry Sanford and the New South, as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. The finished documentary, Terry Sanford and the New South, can be viewed through NCLive, http://media.nclive.org/play_video.php?vid=383.

This collection (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of "Terry Sanford and the New South," as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) advertising agency was founded in 1966 by Mary Wells, Richard Rich, and Stewart Greene, who were associates at Jack Tinker and Partners agency. Until its demise in 1998, WRG was ranked as one of the top 15 advertising agencies in the United States. The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) Records contain primarily print advertisements and broadcast commercials and advertising spots for clients of WRG. Materials span 1966-1998 and include magazine and newspaper advertisements, proof sheets, audiocassettes, videocassettes, analog and digital audio tape. Corporate documentation includes press releases, clipping files, and staff photographs and slides. Clients represented in the collection include: American Motors; Bristol-Myers (Boost, Clairol, Herbal Essence, Vagistat); Cadbury (Canada Dry, Schweppes); Continental Airlines; Ford; IBM; ITT (Technology Institute, Sheraton); Liberty Mutual; MCI; Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer); New York Department of Commerce; Pan Am; Philip Morris (Benson & Hedges, Player, Dunhill); Procter & Gamble (Gain, Oil of Olay, Pringles, Folder's, Sure); Ralston Purina (Chex, Dog Chow, Tender Vittles); Seagram; TWA; and Warnaco (Warner's lingerie). Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) Records contain primarily print advertisements and broadcast commercials and advertising spots for clients of WRG. Materials span 1966-1998 and include magazine and newspaper advertisements, proof sheets, audiocassettes, videocassettes, analog and digital audio tape. Corporate documentation includes press releases, clipping files, and staff photographs and slides. Clients represented in the collection include: American Motors; Bristol-Myers (Boost, Clairol, Herbal Essence, Vagistat); Cadbury (Canada Dry, Schweppes); Continental Airlines; Ford; IBM; ITT (Technology Institute, Sheraton); Liberty Mutual; MCI; Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer); New York Department of Commerce; Pan Am; Philip Morris (Benson & Hedges, Player, Dunhill); Procter & Gamble (Gain, Oil of Olay, Pringles, Folder's, Sure); Ralston Purina (Chex, Dog Chow, Tender Vittles); Seagram; TWA; and Warnaco (Warner's lingerie).

NOTE: Throughout this finding aid, "TRT" refers to "Total Running Time," the total duration of content contained on a tape or film.