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Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 29.3 Gigabytes — 5031 files — 40 color photographic prints; 5033 digital files (4681 jpeg, 257 tiff, 68 png, 11 mp4, 10 pdf, 2 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 2 txt)

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Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises color photographs and supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises 20 color photographs and over 4000 supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Electronic resources related to these two projects include almost 5000 born-digital image files in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include digital contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing. Note: Tiff images from the "On Board the Aquarius" project are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the library reading room.

The 2017 Aquarius migrant rescue project include many additional related digital files: these include nine videos in mp4 format, taken by Darrin Zammit Lupi. Five document the MV Aquarius rescue and a transfer of refugees from another ship; three are interviews with an Italian rescuer and two migrants; and one is a news report video narrated by Lupi. The interviews describe conditions in detention centers in Libya and on board the escape boats.

Other supporting documents and digital content for the 2017 Aquarius migrant project comprise press releases in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, and other languages; shot lists; demographic data summarizing the makeup of the migrants on board the rescue ship; screen shots of Reuters social media posts relating to this story, featuring Zammit Lupi's images; and scans of a 17-page journal kept by Zammit Lupi while aboard the rescue ship.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

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Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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John Hope Franklin was a celebrated and pioneering historian specializing in Southern and African American history. The papers document his entire career as well as his personal life and political interests: his prolific writings on African American and Southern history; his role as a mentor and colleague; his role in associations such as Phi Beta Kappa, the American Historical Association, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and others; his participation in the civil rights movement, including his work with the NAACP Legal and Educational Defense Fund, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and Justice Thurgood Marshall; and his engagement with numerous civic, community, and educational organizations such as the Board of Foreign Scholarships and Fisk University's Board of Trustees. There is also a significant amount of material from Franklin's work on President Clinton's Advisory Board for the President's Initiative on Race in 1997 and 1998. Items in the collection include files of correspondence in original order; research sources and notes; writings by and about Franklin; materials relating to family history; papers and diaries of other family members, including his father, and wife, Aurelia; printed material; event folders; many informal and publicity photographs; video and sound recordings; and awards and other memorabilia. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The John Hope Franklin papers document the whole of Franklin's professional career as a historian, as well as his personal life, early student years, and political interests. Collection materials include correspondence, research materials assembled by Franklin, writings by and about Franklin, drafts of writings, materials relating to family history, printed material, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, clippings, photographs, video and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts. The collection was acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Academics series chronicles Franklin's career as a professor of history. It includes materials documenting his role as a mentor and advisor to numerous undergraduate and graduate students, his lecture notes and other classroom materials, and his administrative and committee work at various institutions, including Brooklyn College, University of Chicago, and Duke University. Portions of this series are restricted.

The series on the Advisory Board for the President's Initiative on Race contains items Franklin gathered during his work on President Clinton's race initiative, "One America in the 21st Century." The bulk of the series dates from the year-long work of the Advisory Board, from 1997 to 1998, and primarily comprises items sent to the Board for consideration in its work, meeting materials, publicity, and scholarly materials.

The videos and sound recordings in the Audiovisual series were created or assembled by John Hope Franklin. The series has been arranged into three subseries: ABPIR Materials, Recordings of Franklin, and Recordings of Others. Originals in the Audiovisual Materials Series are closed to use. Use copies are available for some items. Please contact Research Services staff in advance before coming to use this series.

The Correspondence series is one of the largest series in the collection, and comprises personal and professional correspondence received and sent by Franklin throughout his adult life.

The Engagements series includes invitations, correspondence, programs, and itineraries related to Franklin's participation in scholarly, civic, and social events. These materials have been arranged chronologically.

Franklin's Honors and Awards series includes certificates and diplomas, as well as logistical and administrative documentation for many of the awards ceremonies. The series is divided into Honorary Degrees and General Awards, both sorted in chronological order.

The Personal and Family Materials series contains the earliest items in the collection, with materials from Franklin's parents and grandparents. It includes files documenting Franklin's life and interests outside of his scholarship and public service. Materials are arranged by family member, with Franklin's wife, Aurelia, and his father, Buck Colbert Franklin, heavily represented. Also contains papers related to Theodore Currier, Franklin's mentor; John Hope eventually served as an executor of his estate.

The Research, Biographical, and Subject Files series contains newspaper clippings, subject files, travel guides, and photocopies of Franklin's FBI file. Also contains publicity and newspaper coverage of Franklin's many interviews and public appearances throughout the twentieth century.

The large Service series includes files acquired through Franklin's government, professional, and community service with various organizations and projects. Materials range from the early 1950s through the 2000s and are arranged alphabetically by organization or project name.

Franklin's prolific writing career is documented in the Writings series, which includes materials on his many books, articles, speeches, book reviews, essays, interviews, and other works, many unpublished. A portion of this series is restricted; please contact the Rubenstein Library for more information.

The Writings by Others series documents the ongoing relationship Franklin had with other authors and historians. It includes correspondence, drafts, and printed materials. Files are arranged alphabetically by author.

Finally, the Courtland Cox papers is a series of manuscripts belonging to Cox, a civil rights activist, collected by Franklin as supporting materials for a research project. The Rubenstein Library also holds a separate collection of Cox papers chiefly relating to his work with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019 22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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New Day Films archive, 1968-2018 44.5 Linear Feet — 73 boxes; 36 film reels; 798 digital files

The New Day Films archive represents the activities of a feminist film-maker run cooperative founded in 1971, and spans the history of the organization to the present day. Materials include: analog elements as well as digital files for many of the cooperative's films dating from 1971 to the present; files assembled by individual co-founders Liane Brandon, Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, and Amalie R. Rothschild; correspondence between co-op members; records relating to film production and distribution; steering committee and annual meeting minutes; policies and other guidelines; reports on activities; fund-raising proposals; film sales and rental receipts; press mentions, articles, posters and other publicity; publications about New Day films such as brochures, catalogs, and magazines; and some photographs of events and members. Topics range widely and include women's studies, multiculturalism and diversity; social and political history; gender and socialization; media, culture; the environment; mental health; parenting and family; and global concerns. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The New Day Films archive represents the activities of the feminist film-maker run cooperative founded in 1971, and spans the history of the organization to the present day. Their ground-breaking films about the lives of women were among the earliest of the emerging women's movement. Materials include: files assembled by individual co-founders Liane Brandon, Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, and Amalie Rothschild; correspondence between co-op members; records relating to film production and distribution; steering committee and annual meeting minutes; conference call minutes; policies and other guidelines; reports on activities; fund-raising proposals; film rental receipts; press articles, posters and other publicity; publications about New Day films such as pamphlets, catalogs, and magazines; and photographs of events and members.

Analog elements and digital versions for many of the co-founder's films form an important part of the collection and relate to these seminal feminist film titles: Woo Who? May Wilson (Rothschild, 1969);Sometimes I Wonder Who I Am (Brandon, 1970); Anything You Want to Be (Brandon, 1971); Growing up Female (Klein, Reichert, 1971); Betty Tells Her Story (Brandon, 1972); It Happens to Us (Rothschild, 1972); Nana, Mom, and Me (Rothschild, 1974); and Not So Young Now As Then (Brandon, 1974). Another central piece of the collection are the 214 born-digital film files representing 103 filmmakers who form the New Day cooperative.

Topics explored in the New Day films and other materials range widely, and include but are not limited to: women's studies; multiculturalism and diversity; social and political histories; gender and socialization; media culture; the environment; mental health; parenting and family; and global concerns such as immigration and labor.

The materials in this collection were donated by Liane Brandon and Amalie R. Rothschild, and were acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing 14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files

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Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints in darkroom and inkjet formats, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, Barth's images document cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, through landscape and portraiture. Series include images from Central and South American countries to the Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; portraits of migrants and images of migrant services at Arizona/Mexico border stations; images from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; images of Syrian refugees and others in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints, darkroom and digital, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, the photographs document the cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, and her interest in portraiture. Series include The Americas, whose images range from Central and South American countries to Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; migrants and migrant services at the Arizona/Mexico border; the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; refugees in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War, in the city of Sarajevo. In addition to many portraits of individuals and families, there are also landscapes.

Areas represented in The Americas series include Bolivia; Patagonia, Argentina; the Bahamas; Foz do Iguaçu and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; El Salvador; Guatemala; Martissant, Cité Soleil, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Nicaragua; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Cusco, Peru. Includes images of people working, cooking, minding children, participating in local festivals, traveling, and playing. Several portraits feature people in traditional dress. The largest group of images was taken in Haiti, where Barth returned following the 2010 earthquake. These photographs include scenes of people among the rubble in Martissant and Port-au-Prince, as well as some portraits of hospital patients. The Americas series images are arranged alphabetically by country.

The two short digital videos were taken by Barth in South America and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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R. Wensell Grabarek papers, 1963-2013 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box containing mini-dv tapes, DVDs, and a hard drive.

Collection consists of 11 DVDs, 9 mini-dv videocassettes, one hard drive, and 12 video files primarily associated with interviews of former Durham, North Carolina mayor R. Wensell Grabarek, from 2004 to 2013, in which Grabarek details his career and participation in desegregating Durham in the early 1960s.

The collection consists of DVDs and video files primarily associated with interviews of former Durham, North Carolina mayor R. Wensell Grabarek (1963-1971). In 2004, Grabarek was interviewed by Steven Channing for his film, Durham: A Self-Portrait (2007); in 2011, historian and author Tim Tyson interviewed Grabarek, in a conversation initiated by Phail Wynn, Duke University's Vice President of Durham and Regional Affairs; in February 2013, Angela Hampton, the host of Heart of Carolina Perspectives on local ABC affiliate WTVD, sat down with Grabarek to discuss the events of May 1963 and their impact on the desegregation of Durham; and in July 2013, Craig Breaden and Kirston Johnson of the Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library interviewed Mr. Grabarek for an oral history to accompany the donation of his papers to the Rubenstein Library. In addition to these interviews, there is a copy of the May 24, 1963 episode of the CBS News program Eyewitness to History, profiling civil rights efforts in North Carolina and featuring a segment on Durham and Wense Grabarek.

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Silent film clip of Trent Room dedication at Duke University Medical Library, 1956 April 20 .2 Linear Feet — 2 videocassettes; 1 digital mp4 file — VHS (TRT: 00:02:00)

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This black-and-white silent film clip is from the April 20, 1956 dedication of the Trent Room History of Medicine Collections at Duke University. The ceremony was held at Duke's Medical Library in the new Trent Room. Speakers include Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Duke President A. Hollis Edens, Dean Wilburt C. Davison, John Fulton, and James T. Cleland. Attendees at the ceremony also included the Trent daughters. The recording is about two minutes long. The medical artifacts and books also briefly shown in the film are from the History of Medicine Collection assembled by Duke surgeon and faculty member Dr. Josiah Charles Trent (d.1948). Those collections are now in the Rubenstein Library at Duke University. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

This silent black-and-white film clip copied from a videocassete copy tape is from the April 20, 1956 dedication of the Trent Room History of Medicine Collections at Duke University. The ceremony was held at Duke's Medical Library in the new Trent Room. Speakers include Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Duke President A. Hollis Edens, Dean Wilburt C. Davison, John Fulton, and James T. Cleland. Attendees at the ceremony also included the Trent daughters. The recording is about two minutes long; the sound element has been lost.

The medical artifacts and books briefly shown in the film are from the History of Medicine Collection assembled by Duke surgeon and faculty member Dr. Josiah Charles Trent. The collection was donated by the Trent family to Duke and eventually displayed in the Trent Room and the Medical Library, and is now in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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The records of the Durham, N.C. organization Student Action with Farmworkers comprise: administrative and event files; correspondence; reports, articles, and other publications; student project files; outreach and teaching materials; photographs, artwork, and scrapbooks; audio and video recordings; and materials related to labor organizing and protests across the U.S. Hundreds of student-led projects document through interviews, essays, photographs, videos, and other materials the lives of migrant farmworkers and their working conditions, mostly in NC but also in SC. Major themes in the collection include: history, working conditions, and abuses of migrant farmworkers in the U.S.; education and outreach efforts; housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development for migrant youth; grassroots theater; labor organizing and boycotts; and service learning. Materials are in English and Spanish. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Founded in 1992 in Durham, North Carolina, Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bring students and farmworkers together to learn about each other's lives, share resources and skills, improve conditions for farmworkers, and build diverse coalitions working for social change. The SAF records comprise: correspondence; meeting agendas; student projects; reports, articles, and other publications; event files; teaching materials; photos; scrapbooks; ephemera; and other documentation of SAF's programs. Materials relate more widely to immigrant and migrant worker issues, service learning, labor organizing, and protests and boycotts across the U.S.

The largest series (63 boxes) contains hundreds of individual SAF student projects directed by college-age students and interns as well as farmworker and migrant youths. Materials also include administrative files, many of which house intern applications. Project files typically contain recorded interviews, often with transcripts; essays; notebooks; artwork; poetry; audio and video recordings; theater materials; and photographs in analaog and digital formats. Some photograph albums and collages are also found here. Most of the projects took place in North Carolina but also in South Carolina. Umbrella programs include Into the Fields (ITF) and Levante. Major themes involve worker education, housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development; and grassroots theater as a tool for teaching and activism. Materials are in English and Spanish. Many other materials on SAF projects are found in the Administrative Series.

The large Administrative Files Series contains organizational records created or compiled by SAF staff and are organized in subseries for SAF projects, fundraising, general administrative files, organizations, and resource files (articles, fliers, and other publications).

The Printed Material Series contains Student Action with Farmworkers publications, SAF press coverage, student papers and theses, some children's books, and farmworker-related reports, articles, newsletters, data sheets, resource directories, and alerts from around the world.

The Joan Preiss Papers Series contains records related to an activist and long-time collaborator of SAF. Comprises a variety of printed materials, primarily articles and newsletters, as well as correspondence, protest ephemera, promotional material for unions and activist organizations, meeting notes, student papers, and photographs. The materials relate to migrants and farmworkers both in North Carolina and throughout the United States.

Finally, the Ephemera and Artifacts Series contains items such as posters, t-shirts, stickers, and buttons related to Burger King, Subway, Gallo, and Mt. Olive boycotts and protests. Some materials relate to protests and boycotts in other regions such as Florida and Western states. Also contains SAF publicity ephemera, and props and other materials from the Levante activist theater group.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Videos by Latina Women: New Visions of the Globalizing South, 2003 40 items — Electronic files including 11 PDFs, 17 TIFFs, and 12 MOVs — 8.27 Gigabytes

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Videos and fieldnotes created by students in 2003, in the CDS Continuing Education course "Visual Storytelling" in collaboration with 8 Latina immigrants. The course was taught by CDS Faculty member Nancy Kalow.

Materials include digital video, photographic, and text files for the project "Videos by Latina Women: New Visions of the Globalizing South," created as part of Nancy Kalow's Rockefeller Residency Fellowship. The 12 MOV video files are the documentaries produced during the year by the projects collaborators, including eight recently-arrived Latina immigrant women and the videographers who served as their mentors. The 17 TIFF photograph files are portraits of the creators and shots of them working. The 11 PDF text files include fieldnotes kept by the mentors, interview transcripts, correspondence, release forms, and papers, presentations, and conclusions about the project.