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Akea Brionne Brown photographs, 2016-2018 2.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 33 prints

These thirty-three color inkjet portraits are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown, and explore the life of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

These thirty-three color inkjet photographs are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown and explore the lives of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards and streets. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. Two are sized slightly smaller at 15 3/4 x 20 3/4 and 15 x 20 1/4 inches.

The prints are accompanied by the artist's statement, in which she writes: "The project manifested through my own personal critique and observation of the suburban landscape as an ideologically 'white space.' I began to consider the importance of representation and exposure in relation to the formation of black identity, the performativity of blackness, and the ways in which the home transforms into a place of familiarity and/or unfamiliarity depending on who enters the space. In turn, this body of work aims to highlight an often overlooked group in contemporary American culture: the black, suburban middle class."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Alen MacWeeney photographs, 1962-1986, bulk 1965 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 14 prints — The prints all measure approximately 13x18 inches; image sizes vary and are given in the inventory. All sizes given are rounded up to the nearest 1/8 of an inch.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals and families, as well as some of animals, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes. The prints measure 13x18 inches. A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images along with others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals, including an old man in a field, a Benedictine monk, a woman in a doorway, and a farming family, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes.

The black-and-white inkjet prints are printed on uncoated textured art paper, and measure 13x18 inches. Image sizes range from 6 1/8 x 10 1/4 to 11 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches.

A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images and others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 and undated 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

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Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. They are organized into the following series: The Last and First Eskimos; Southern Color; North Carolina; The Idea of Cuba; Game Boy; May Day, 1970: Yale on Strike; Red White Blue and God Bless You: A Portrait of Northern New Mexico; New Mexico in Black and White; River of Traps (New Mexico); Rainbow Gathering; Philadelphia Experience Corps; Old And On Their Own; Mobile, Alabama; and Dream of a House. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia; students on strike at Yale University; counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona; a boy tethered to electronic technology; elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina; and views of the art-filled interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document his many collaborations with other photographers and writers, including noted photojournalist Gertrude Duby Blom and naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his long career at Duke University, as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake magazine. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's letters but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 29.3 Gigabytes — 5031 files — 40 color photographic prints; 5033 digital files (4681 jpeg, 257 tiff, 68 png, 11 mp4, 10 pdf, 2 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 2 txt)

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Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises color photographs and supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises 20 color photographs and over 4000 supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Electronic resources related to these two projects include almost 5000 born-digital image files in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include digital contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing. Note: Tiff images from the "On Board the Aquarius" project are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the library reading room.

The 2017 Aquarius migrant rescue project include many additional related digital files: these include nine videos in mp4 format, taken by Darrin Zammit Lupi. Five document the MV Aquarius rescue and a transfer of refugees from another ship; three are interviews with an Italian rescuer and two migrants; and one is a news report video narrated by Lupi. The interviews describe conditions in detention centers in Libya and on board the escape boats.

Other supporting documents and digital content for the 2017 Aquarius migrant project comprise press releases in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, and other languages; shot lists; demographic data summarizing the makeup of the migrants on board the rescue ship; screen shots of Reuters social media posts relating to this story, featuring Zammit Lupi's images; and scans of a 17-page journal kept by Zammit Lupi while aboard the rescue ship.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

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Derek Anderson photographs, 2006-2008 1 Linear Foot — 16 Items

Durham-based photographer specializing in editorial and documentary photography. Collection contains 16 11x14 color digital photographs produced by Derek Anderson for his project "When the Dust Settles: A photographic survey of the former Liggett & Myers tobacco factory in Durham, NC." Photographs include captions and range in date from 2006 to 2008.

Collection contains 16 11x14 color digital photographs produced by Derek Anderson for his project "When the Dust Settles: A photographic survey of the former Liggett & Myers tobacco factory in Durham, NC." Photographs include captions and range in date from 2006 to 2008.

More information about the survey is included in the Detailed Description below.

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Eliot Dudik photographs, 2009-2010 2.0 Linear Feet — 1 box — 39 items

Collection comprises 39 digitally printed color photographs selected from a project by photographer Eliot Dudik, "Road Ends in Water," which documents the expansion of U.S. Route 17 in South Carolina and the landscapes, buildings, inhabitants, and way of life in the areas affected by this highway project. Images include house interiors, churches, abandoned buildings, remains of Confederate breastworks, hunting and fishing camps, natural areas, a "hanging tree," old rice fields, and portraits of local people. The prints are sized 15x19 inches. Dudik's work received the 2015 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Emerging Documentarians and has been published as a photobook in 2010. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 39 color photographs selected from a project by photographer Eliot Dudik, "Road Ends in Water," which documents the expansion of U.S. Route 17 in South Carolina and the landscapes, buildings, inhabitants, and way of life in the areas affected by this highway project. Images include house interiors, churches, abandoned buildings, remains of Confederate breastworks, hunting and fishing camps, natural areas, a "hanging tree," old rice fields, and portraits of local people.

The images are sized 11x14 inches and were digitally printed on 15x19 inches Canson Platine Fiber Rag from scans of 4x5 sheet film. Dudik's work received the 2015 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Emerging Documentarians and has been published as a photobook in 2010.

Dudik included the following artist's statement: "Change is descending upon an otherwise quiet, unhurried, unobtrusive, place. The main highway, U.S Route 17, that bisects South Carolina's 'lowcountry,' north to south, is being widened to accommodate commerce, tourists, and urban refugees. Not only are many homes, some historic, disappearing before the tracked blades of expansion, but also the new, faster thoroughfare encourages greater disregard and obliviousness to the charm and culture the basin harbors."

"This collection of images and thoughts is a tribute to, and an acknowledgment of, the respect the modest souls of this region, obscure from the mainstream, deserve for their tenacity, good humor, social commitment, and acceptance of the ebb and flow of the often incomprehensible vagaries of existence."

"A photographic adventure became an artistic journey and culminated in a unique awakening to an otherwise overlooked cultural phenomenon. While the road ends in water, it began there as well."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families photographs and oral histories, 2008-2009 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 50 color photographic prints; 940 electronic files (54.6 megabytes) — 50 prints; 940 electronic files

The Center for Documentary Studies is a center at Duke University established for the study of the documentary process. The color photographs and oral histories in the Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families collection form part of a multimedia project carried out under the auspices of the Center for Documentary Studies. Beginning in March 2008, photographers Alix Lowrey Blair, Andrew Lewis, Tom Rankin, Elena Rue, and Steve Schapiro, along with audio specialists Ben Adler, Rob Dillard, Camille Lacapa, Susannah Lee, and John Biewen, each visited an American farm and documented the farm families' experiences over the course of a year. The locations for the Five Farms series are: a family farm on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona; an organic farm in California's Capay Valley; a dairy farm in western Massachusetts; a diversified farm in central Iowa; and an African American-owned hog farm in eastern North Carolina. Details on each farm are found in the series descriptions in this collection guide. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The color photographs and oral histories in the Five Farms: Stories From American Farm Families collection form part of a multimedia project carried out under the auspices of the Center for Documentary Studies. Beginning in March 2008, photographers Alix Lowrey Blair, Andrew Lewis, Tom Rankin, Elena Rue, and Steve Schapiro, along with audio specialists Ben Adler, Rob Dillard, Camille Lacapa, Susannah Lee, and John Biewen, each visited an American farm and documented the farm families' experiences over the course of a year. The locations for the Five Farms series are: a family farm on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona; an organic farm in California's Capay Valley; a dairy farm in western Massachusetts; a diversified farm in central Iowa; and an African American-owned hog farm in eastern North Carolina. Details on each farm are found in the series descriptions in this collection guide.

The photographs in the collection, chosen for the 2009 project exhibit, portray farmers and family members, farm workers, farm animals, and landscapes. The first set of 25 13x16-inch color digital prints, five from each photographer, is accompanied by a second set of 25 prints of the same images, but in varying sizes ranging from 12 1/8 x 17 inches to 13 3/8 x 20 inches. All prints are arranged and foldered by geographical location. The photographer's names are written on the back of all the prints, and the captions are also included on the backs of the prints in the first set.

The oral history interviews and short sound files, over 100 hours of recordings, provide many details on the lives of the families, typical activities on each farm, the local culture and natural environments, and thoughts of individuals on the past, present, and the future. Also included are digital files containing ambient sounds, theme music, and credits, all used in a five-part Public Media radio program broadcast in July 2009. Although most of the files are currently stored in .wav format, there are also a handfule of mp3 files.

The Five Farms project culminated in an exhibit from April 27-August 21, 2009 at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies; other outreach included a multimedia website and programs on public radio stations nationwide.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Glenn Scarboro photographs, 1962-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 168 items — 168 items

This collection of 166 black-and-white inkjet 13x19 inch photographs by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, the photographer's hometown, while other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York. The street scenes in Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents, small businesses, houses, and churches; rural themes include horse shows. county fairs, and country landscapes. There is also a series of family portraits taken in the 1960s. Collection includes one handmade photobook by Scarboro containing eleven photographs and handwritten text. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection of 166 13x19 inch black-and-white inkjet prints by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, a small town with industries linked to tobacco, railroads, and textile mills, and the artist's hometown. Other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York.

The street scenes of Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents of all ages and backgrounds, chiefly from the 1960s; small businesses; people and their cars; house exteriors and interiors; churches; and outdoor advertising and logos. One photograph is of the house of free black craftsman Thomas Day, in Milton, NC.

Rural themes include portraits of country people, barns and tobacco warehouses, livestock, and rural landscapes, with a large series of images particular focused on southern Virginia horse shows and county fairs.

There are no photographs of the social protests and political activities that took place in small towns such as Danville at that time, but the street photographs do speak to social culture and conditions in southern Virginia during the 1960s, and some, as the photographer notes, allude to the sense of social disruption and alienation in small-town Southern society.

The series ends with a series of portraits, chiefly of Scarboro and his immediate family, taken in the 1960s. One portrait of Scarboro in New York City was taken by photographer, instructor, and friend Emmet Gowin.

The collection also includes a 15-page handmade artist's book by Scarboro containing eleven black-and-white photographs taken in 1963 and printed from original negatives in 1965. The book was assembled in 1972 and is number six of a limited edition of seven, and features a unique cover with a pen-and-ink drawing.

A print inventory created by the photographer contains additional biographical narrative and commentary, and is available in the first box. The photographs are arranged in original order as received.

From the artist's statement: "There was a photograph in The Family of Man made by Jerry Cooke (originally published in Life magazine) of a woman sitting quite forlorn on a bench in a very dark place that gave no clues as to time, place, person or situation...which are the four psychiatric attributes of reality. She was alone. The quote under the photograph read, 'I am alone with the beating of my heart.' (Lui Chi) Making photographs in the streets of my hometown in the 60/70s calmed the beating of my unsettled heart and gave a face to the feelings of social alienation endemic to that time. Danville streets were the places of my earliest identity. In the process of becoming a close observer of ordinary life…I had become an artist.

Anxiety is always at the edge of identity."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Henry Horenstein photographs, 1970-2013 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — 153 prints

Collection comprises 153 black-and-white and color prints selected from projects by photographer Henry Horenstein. Subjects in this collection range widely: appearing in the images are members of Horenstein's family; beachgoers in Cuba; blues and country musicians and their fans; the human body seen in extreme close-ups; racing jockeys, horses, and gamblers; burlesque and drag performers; and street scenes, storefronts, theaters, highways, and nightlife in various places. Locations include Havana, Los Angeles, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Tennessee, Texas, and Venezuela. "Wesorts" refers to unique mixed-race communities in central Maryland whose residents refer to themselves as "we sorts." Formats include chromogenic, pigment inkjet (giclee), and gelatin silver prints, in sizes ranging from 8x10 to 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 153 black-and-white and color prints from portfolios by photographer Henry Horenstein, taken from 1970 to 2013 over the course of his long career. Subjects range widely, with some emphasis in the collection on images of entertainment and music culture: country and blues musicians, including Nathan Abshire, Loretta Lynn, Del McCoury, Dolly Parton, Stringbean, and Doc Watson, the venues where they perform, and their fans; street musicians, honky tonk bands and barroom dancers and drinkers; and drag and burlesque performers in Los Angeles, New York City, and Caracas and Buenos Aires, Venezuela.

"Wesorts" refers to a project to document small, unique mixed-race communities in and near Marbury, Maryland; the term is said to have been coined from the phrase used by residents to refer to themselves, "we sorts of people."

Other images include early portraits of Horenstein's family and friends; life on the El Malecón waterfront in Havana, Cuba; a highway in Louisiana; a historic theater in Branson, Missouri; close-up images of the human body; and behind the scenes in horse racing, including horses in action and at rest, grooms, owners, bettors, and jockeys, one of whom is Steve Cauthen.

The prints come in sizes ranging from roughly 8x10 to 20x24 inches. Photographic formats include chromogenic, pigment inkjet (giclee), and gelatin silver darkroom prints; they are often marked with edition numbers, printing dates, and other information.

With only a few exceptions, the images in this collection have been published by Horenstein in photobooks throughout his career. They have been exhibited widely and are held in the collections of museums, galleries, and other institutions.

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Jasmine Clark photographs, 2013-2017 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 36 prints

Titled "After Eisenhower" in reference to the outgoing President's speech about military power, this body of work by photographer Jasmine Clark consists of 36 16x20 inch color inkjet photographs of signs, symbols, slogans, and advertising that permeate the streets and outdoor spaces of military-based towns. The images convey complex themes of patriotism, Christianity, masculinity and feminity, and other iconographic expressions of "Middle America" culture. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Titled in reference to outgoing President Eisenhower's speech regarding the dangers of military power, this collection consists of 36 16x20 inch color inkjet photographs from the documentary project "After Eisenhower" by photographer Jasmine Clark. Clark documented signs, symbols, slogans, murals and advertising that permeate the streets and outdoor spaces of an anonymous military town or towns. No locations are recorded for the photographs, but they were all or almost all taken in California. The images convey complex themes of patriotism, Christianity, masculinity and femininity, and other iconographic expressions of "Middle America" culture.

From the artist's statement: "The photographs in 'After Eisenhower' are influenced by my upbringing in a United States Marine Corps community in Twentynine Palms, California...My sister and I were exposed to the ideologies of American patriotism and nationalism. We learned the critical distinction between the two; namely, that the embedded framework of American nationalism is inseparable from and in service to the systemic cultural narrative that brown skin and other physical characteristics are negative."

"The military is intertwined in the established patriotic, national and Christian identity. How is patriotism learned and sustained without any direct military relationship and in a society that oppresses any aspect of your identity? President Dwight D. Eisenhower's farewell presidential address warned about the implications of military power and its impact on American culture. In response to my curiosities and Eisenhower's warning, my work probes how American patriotic identity manifests when its symbols, e.g., the national anthem and the American flag, are conflated with complex and polarizing issues such as racial discrimination, religion, gender identity, and nationalism. The saturation of these oversimplified messages is disconcerting. They are meant to have clear meanings. However, these places and artifacts suggest more problematic truths about American life and our relationship to our military."

For her work "After Eisenhower," Clark received the Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Emerging Documentarians in 2017.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.