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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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Bonnie Campbell papers, 2000-2016 3 Linear Feet — 4 boxes

Printed materials, advertisements, and publications designed by Bonnie Campbell, former Art Director at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Collection consists of printed materials and publications designed by Bonnie Campbell during 16 years as Art Director at the Center for Documentary Studies. Campbell's work included designing promotional and marketing materials, such as postcards, posters, and brochures, for many CDS programs and projects including their Duke curriculum programs, community programs, exhibits, and awards series. Campbell also designed several CDS publications, including Document, the center's newsletter, along with photography books Beyond Beauty: Photographs from the Archive of Documentary Arts, One Place: Paul Kwilecki and Four Decades of Photographs (Paul Kwilecki), Sodom Laurel Album (Rob Amberg), and In This Timeless Time (Bruce Jackson).

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Carl Mydans photographs, 1935-1968 2 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 66 items — 66 Items

Photojournalist (1907-2004) for the Farm Security Administration and Life magazine. Collection consists of 65 black-and-white and one color photographs taken during assignments for the Farm Security Administration and for Life magazine from 1935 to 1968. Subjects include rural America, migrant farm workers, and the community of Freer, Texas, during the Great Depression; the Sino-Japanese War and 1940s China; World War II, including the Japanese occupation of the Philippines, General MacArthur's return, the liberation of Italy and France, and the surrender of Japan; Japanese war crimes tribunals; the Fukui, Japan, earthquake in 1948; and the Korean War. Most of the images measure 8x10 and 11x14 inches and have detailed captions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 65 black-and-white and one color photographs spanning Carl Mydans' career. Images from his early work for the Farm Security Administration include photographs of cowboys and ranchers from Freer, Texas; migrant workers and rural life in Texas and Arkansas during the Great Depression; a photograph of the Capitol building through a Washington, D.C. slum; and political banners from the 1936 presidential election.

The majority of the collection dates from Mydans' time working for Life magazine as a war photographer. Subjects include the Sino-Japanese war beginning in 1941, his time in the Philippines and the battle for Manila, his coverage of the Allies in France and Italy during the liberation of Europe, and his travels with General Douglas MacArthur during MacArthur's return to the Philippines and the subsequent surrender of the Japanese. Mydans' World War II images are fairly evenly split into equal parts combat and street scenes: there seem to be just as many photographs of tea rooms and markets in China as there are photographs of Japanese bombing raids in the Philippines. This portion of the collection also includes some of Mydans' most iconic photographs, including a portrait of General MacArthur with his sunglasses and pipe, a photograph of MacArthur leading the army ashore in the Philippines, and an image of a "collaborator" being shaved following the liberation of France.

Another significant component of the collection is Mydans' post-World War II images, which include Japanese war crimes tribunals, Korean War coverage, portraits of coal miners and politicians in Europe, and photographs taken during the Fukui earthquake. Also included is a self-portrait of Mydans in Vietnam, the only photograph taken in color, from 1968.

Nearly all of the photographs have handwritten captions on the back, which have been transcribed in the Collection Description portion of the finding aid. Some of the handwritten captions have been supplemented by a caption list, available in hard copy in Box 3. Brackets indicate information added by library staff. Some prints are also signed by Mydans.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Daylight is a nonprofit organization dedicated to publishing art and photography books. It was founded by Michael Itkoff and Taj Forer in 2004. This collection includes materials, largely page proofs and galleys, from the publication of several Daylight books. There is also assorted loose materials promoting and publicizing Daylight's publications.

The majority of this collection consists of proofs and galleys created during the process of publishing documentary photography books. Materials have been arranged by title. Many photograph proofs include edits and markups regarding the color and printing process. Also included is a small amount of miscellaneous material promoting and publicizing the work of Daylight.

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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection contains 45 color and black-and-white photographs from Jay Turner Frey Seawell's projects "National Trust" and "The Mall." The two series document Washington, D.C. from 2011-2015. The series "National Trust" “explores the careful manufacturing of appearances in relation to power, politics, and media in the United States." "The Mall" is Seawell's response to "the mainstream narrative of American history that dots the landscape" of Washington, D.C. Seawell is a photographer based in Washington, D.C. Seawell was the winner of the 2016 ADA Award for Innovation in the Documentary Arts.

Jay Turner Frey Seawell won the 2016 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Innovation in Documentary Arts for his series "National Trust" and "The Mall." The ADA Collection Awards were established to diversify the ADA’s collection in order to better reflect the multitude of viewpoints and communities from which work is being made in the documentary arts today.

All images measure 12 x 18” on 16 x 22” paper and were printed with an Epson 9890 printer and Epson Ultrachrome HDR inks on Hahnemühle Photo Silk Baryta from digital RAW files.

Seawell provided the following abstract about his work:

National Trust

National Trust explores the careful manufacturing of appearances in relation to power, politics, and media in the United States. The subjects of National Trust range from historical structures to political spectacles and media culture, but they are all inextricably tied to appearances. Architectural forms recall the grandeur of GrecoRoman temples, and political rallies exist as meticulously staged theatre sets full of patriotic glitz. These carefully constructed façades can stand for different things, but in a sense they are intended to inspire trust among the citizenry. This trust has been shattered. I depict these surface appearances as existing amidst an atmosphere of mystery and darkness that recurs throughout the body of work, and this aesthetic mirrors an ongoing and profound erosion of trust in American society.

The Mall

In 2013 I moved to Washington, DC, the epicenter of historical commemoration in the United States. While photographing in the capital, I have responded to the mainstream narrative of American history that dots the landscape. Walking through the grounds of the National Mall, I wonder: How much strength does the official narrative about the United States hold for me? The Mall has become a space for confronting fears and anxieties about my country. In these pictures a contested space emerges, a place where idealism and beauty collide with darkness and disenchantment. The pictures come from a position of skepticism about the story that the capital wants to sell. It’s also a story from which I haven’t fully broken free.

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The Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) is administered by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University to support documentary photographers who address humanitarian issues in the U.S. and abroad. The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection represents a selection of images from the documentary projects of six LHDFP fellows: Alex Fattal, Maital Guttman, Kate Joyce, Elena Rue, Amanda van Scoyoc, and Lucy Wilson. The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations (South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Ethiopia), as well as Boston, Massachusetts. They show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). In addition to photographic prints, there are also some documents relating to the projects, and DVDs of the photographers' documentary work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection spans the years 2003-2008 and consists of selected images from the documentary collections of six of the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) fellows in the following locations: Alex Fattal (South Africa); Maital Guttman (South Africa); Kate Joyce (South Africa); Elena Rue (Ethiopia); Amanda van Scoyoc (Boston, Mass.); and Lucy Wilson (Zimbabwe). The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged and displaced families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations, as well as people in the communities of Chelsea and Boston, Massachusetts. Images show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). Several series reveal the after-effects of displacement and social conditions in post-apartheid South Africa (Kwazulu-Natal and Bloemfontein). Two of the photographers' projects also include black-and-white images taken by the children and their families, along with quotes from those individuals regarding the images.

The collection consists of 147 color and black-and-white unmatted prints, ranging in size from 6.5x10 inches to 13x20 inches. There are also 4 DVDs containing both still- and moving-image documentaries with text and audio interviews. Several of the projects include paper copies of the introductions to the bodies of work, as well as full captions for the photographs. Many of the photographs are also available as digital images currently mounted on the LHDFP section of the CDS website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019 22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing 14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files

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Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints in darkroom and inkjet formats, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, Barth's images document cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, through landscape and portraiture. Series include images from Central and South American countries to the Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; portraits of migrants and images of migrant services at Arizona/Mexico border stations; images from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; images of Syrian refugees and others in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints, darkroom and digital, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, the photographs document the cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, and her interest in portraiture. Series include The Americas, whose images range from Central and South American countries to Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; migrants and migrant services at the Arizona/Mexico border; the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; refugees in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War, in the city of Sarajevo. In addition to many portraits of individuals and families, there are also landscapes.

Areas represented in The Americas series include Bolivia; Patagonia, Argentina; the Bahamas; Foz do Iguaçu and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; El Salvador; Guatemala; Martissant, Cité Soleil, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Nicaragua; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Cusco, Peru. Includes images of people working, cooking, minding children, participating in local festivals, traveling, and playing. Several portraits feature people in traditional dress. The largest group of images was taken in Haiti, where Barth returned following the 2010 earthquake. These photographs include scenes of people among the rubble in Martissant and Port-au-Prince, as well as some portraits of hospital patients. The Americas series images are arranged alphabetically by country.

The two short digital videos were taken by Barth in South America and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.