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Letters, reports, certificates of appointment, receipts, loans, and other documents pertaining to the Civil War and to the Lee family (accession#2000-353), and collected by Alfred and Elizabeth Brand. The Civil War Papers Series includes battle reports from Bull Run (1861), Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg; Confederate Army General Orders Nos. 9, 64, and 18; letters detailing the operation of the Confederate Army, outcomes of battles, and Confederate opinions about the Civil War and specific officers. Includes a broadside, "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!;" a transcription of an interview with Jefferson Davis by newspaper writer Augustus C. Buell (1876); a draft of the poem "The Conquered Banner" by the Rev. Abram J. Ryan (1865); two engravings (of Grant and Sherman); John H. Miller and M. French's obligation and oath of allegiance to Virginia and to the Confederate States of America (1862); and J. C. Winsmith's oath of allegiance to the USA and pardon from Andrew Johnson and William H. Seward (1865).

Writers and correspondents in this Series are primarily from Virginia (especially Berkeley County) and Kentucky. Prominent individuals include Pierre Gustave Tonte Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, David Holmes Conrad, Samuel Cooper, Samuel Wylie Crawford, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, J. E. Johnson, I. Nadenbousch, Daniel Ruggles, William T. Sherman, and Edwin M. Stanton.

The Lee Family Papers Series comprises primarily Colonial-era governmental and financial documents pertaining to Francis Lightfoot Lee, "Henry Light Horse Harry" Lee, and Richard Henry Lee, Sr. Documents pertain to slaves; maps and surveys of leased land; and loan indentures. Includes certificates appointing Francis Lightfoot Lee as Justice of the Peace (1757-1768); and a letter from Richard Henry Lee, Sr., to Henry Lee regarding the colonists' agitation for freedom (1770). Ante-bellum and Civil War documents in the Lee family papers include loan indentures; a bill of sale for cotton to the Confederate government; two cartes-de-visite (of Robert E. Lee); letters written by Richard Henry Lee, Jr., discussing the sale of his sister's slaves; and a letter from Robert Edward Lee to Samuel Cooper regarding poorly executed military orders (1865). Several documents throughout the collection include the original rare manuscripts dealer's description.

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Charles Leonard Van Noppen (1869-1935) was a publisher, editor, and author, from Greensboro, N.C. The collection contains letters and papers, mostly relating to the projected extension of Samuel A'Court Ashe's book, Biographical history of North Carolina from colonial times to the present (1908-1925). Collection also contains 356 black-and-white photographs and engravings, almost exclusively 19th century portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

This collection contains 250 brief unpublished biographical sketches of prominent North Carolinians prepared for use in a projected extension of Samuel A. Ashe's, "Biographical History of North Carolina From Colonial Times to the Present." Other papers in the collection include printed forms returned by persons from whom biographical information had been requested, reviews of Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, an album entitled "Platinotypes of English Cathedrals", published in London by Eyre & Spottiswode as well as personal letters and papers of Van Noppen. The collection also includes 356 black and white photographs and engravings almost exclusively 19th Centruy portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

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Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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The Duke University History of Medicine Collections acquire, preserve, interpret, and make available for research and instruction, materials documenting the history of medicine, biomedical science, health and disease in the global context of the Western medical tradition. The collection was assembled by Duke Medical Center Library staff, and contains newspapers and other oversize print materials related to the history of medicine. The earliest date comes from a modern reproduction in black-and-white of an anatomical treatise from 1628. Newspaper issues from the 18th and 19th centuries carry advertisements related to physicians' services, medical practices, and medicinal products. Single sheets from the London Illustrated News concern the activities of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, 1855-1856, and are illustrated with large black-and-white engravings; one issue reproduces a piece of music with verses praising Nightingale. The items were acquired from various sources as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The collection contains newspapers and other oversize print materials related to the history of medicine. The earliest date comes from a modern reproduction in black-and-white of an anatomical treatise from 1628. Newspaper issues from the 18th and 19th centuries carry advertisements related to physicians' services, medical practices, and medicinal products. Single sheets from the London Illustrated News concern the activities of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, 1855-1856, and are illustrated with large black-and-white engravings; one issue reproduces a piece of music with verses praising Nightingale. The items were acquired from various sources as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated 16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Howard Atwood Kelly was a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia; he served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. Among his interests was the life of Florence Nightingale and her memorialization through images. The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, professor, author, and collector of medical memorabilia. The collection comprises 60 images and other memorializations associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs (some of which are albumens), lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, and postcards; in addition, there are photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Almost all the images are mounted on cardstock boards. Portrayals of Nightingale span her adult lifetime; there are images of her during her early career as a nurse in Britain, and providing nursing care for wounded soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. There are also images of her birth and death places. Also included are one piece of popular sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions also accompany many of the images. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia. He served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. The collection is composed of images and memorials associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse, author, and sanitation and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs, lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, postcards, and photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Unless otherwise noted, all images are in black and white. Almost all are mounted on cardstock boards. The images depict Florence Nightingale throughout her adult life; some also portray monuments to Nightingale, and geographical locations associated with her birth, death, and nursing career, including her activities in Scutari (Istanbul) tending to wounded soldiers, the peak of her popularization in the media of the time. Also included are one piece of sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions in slide and photograph format accompany many of the images. Arranged chiefly in chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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John Foot Scrapbook, circa 1810s-1870s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

John Foot, Esq., presumably of Westminster, England. Victorian scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Victorian era scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

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The Picture File was created by the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a vertical file from the 1950s to the 1980s. Images were separated from manuscript collections as well as added individually from other sources. The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. Formats represented include black and white photographic prints; cartes de visite, cabinet cards and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes; engravings and lithographs; political cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. Organized into four main series: Subjects, Geographic, Socialist Party, and People. To allow for better housing, Negatives and Stereographs have been separated into their own series.

The images offer representations of the landscape, culture, and history of most of the southern United States, especially Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Many images of France, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, and some African countries can also be found; a large number of other countries and geographic locations are represented by only a few images. Many political figures and notable personages are portrayed, both in portrait and in caricature; there are especially significant numbers of images of Eugene Debs, Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C.

Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and scenes of devastation both rural and urban. Other conflicts are also depicted, including the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and there are some images from both World Wars. A significant group of items in the People Series pertains to African Americans, ranging from studio portraits to caricatures of individuals and groups of individuals; a smaller group of images features depictions of Native Americans. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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William Helfand is a scholar of pharmaceutical history and art, and collector of ephemera and art related to medicine. The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats, to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.