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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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The Black History at Duke Reference Collection chronicles the integration of Duke University. This history includes the Silent Vigil; the Allen Building Takeover; the creation of a Black Student Alliance; the development of a Black Studies Program; interactions between the university and the Durham community; as well as individual efforts from students, faculty, and administrators. The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. Major subjects include black students, civil rights demonstrations, and the effects of desegregation on administrative policies. English.

The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. The collection is divided into six series: The End of Segregation, Black Faculty, Black Studies Program, Student Groups, Public Forums, and Clippings.

The first series, The End of Segregation, includes a bibliography, background materials about desegregation efforts, statistics, reports, and memos. The second series, Black Faculty, includes clippings, and a list of black professors, assistant professors, lecturers, non-tenure track instructors, graduate teaching and research assistants. The appendix to the list includes the Medical School and School of Nursing faculty.

In 1968, there were discussions on campus about establishing a black studies or Afro-American studies program, but no action was taken by the university. One of the demands of the students who took over the Allen Building on Feb. 13, 1969, was for the establishment of a fully accredited department of Afro-American Studies. On May 2, 1969, the Black Studies Committee submitted a proposal to the Undergraduate Faculty Council of the Arts and Sciences for the creation of the Black Studies Program and the courses were approved by the curriculum committee. Walter Burford was named program head in 1970. The third series, Black Studies Program, chronicles some of the history of this program and includes drafts of proposals, enrollment statistics, flyers, photocopies of clippings, and other materials.

The fourth series, Student Groups, contains materials from a variety of groups. Included are: the Afro-American Society, the Association of African Students, the Black Student Alliance, the Black Graduate and Professional Student Association, Black Fraternities and Sororities, and others. The fifth series, Public Forums, includes materials on a number of speakers, rallies, demonstrations, boycotts; one newspaper advertisement; and one Internet site. The sixth series, Clippings, contains mostly photocopies of newspaper articles. The clippings are from 1967-2001 and undated, and cover a wide variety of topics. Of note is a series of articles that appeared in the Chronicle, "Black and Blue: Blacks at Duke," Feb. 13-Feb.17, 1984.

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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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The Central American Solidarity Committee (CASC) was a student organization chartered at Duke University around 1980. CASC was organized in opposition to U.S. policies and activities regarding Central America, especially military aid to Nicaragua, during the early 1980s. The majority of the records are made up of clippings and event flyers and posters, but the records also include correspondence, publications, petitions, bumper stickers, and other materials produced or collected by the Central American Solidarity Committee. The collection also features materials published and distributed by similar groups, such as the Carolina Interfaith Task Force on Central America, the Durham Action Committee on Central America, and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador, Southeast Region. English.

The majority of the records are made up of clippings and event flyers and posters, but it also includes correspondence, publications, petitions, bumper stickers, and other materials produced or collected by the Central American Solidarity Committee. The collection also features materials published and distributed by similar groups, such as the Carolina Interfaith Task Force on Central America, the Durham Action Committee on Central America, and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador, Southeast Region.

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Cookie Teer papers, 1971-2000, bulk 1983-1997 31.2 Linear Feet — 23,400 Items

Dorothy "Cookie" Foster Teer was born on August 15, 1941 to Dorothy and Nello Teer, Jr. of Durham, N.C. After a stint in New York, she returned to Durham in the 1970s. After taking some courses at Duke Divinity School, she joined the committee that founded Triangle Hospice. In the early 1980s, Teer became an overnight radical feminist, activist, and speaker, giving over 400 slide shows around the United States on pornography, sex role stereotyping, and child pornography. A 1987 conversation led to her co-founding of Southern Sisters Bookstore, a Durham, N.C. bookstore "by, for, and about women." By the late 1980s and 1990s, Teer was heavily involved in advocacy efforts around child custody, divorce, and domestic abuse, and frequently had "mothers on the run" living in her home. With a group of other women activists and radicals, Teer founded a writing collective called Women Against Sex. Married and divorced twice, Teer had three children. After Southern Sisters Bookstore closed, Teer took a step back from activism and began working as a real estate agent. The collection dates primarily between 1983-1997, providing thorough documentation of the social, cultural, and political debates over pornography in the United States in the 1980s and 1990s, with materials from both proponents and opponents of anti-pornography legislation, as well as detailed documentation of the pornography industry, and transcripts from hearings organized by the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography. The collection contains some materials related to particular feminist activists and theorists, including Nikki Craft, Catherine MacKinnon, and Andrea Dworkin. Teer's extensive subject files also contain clippings, correspondence, and printed materials pertaining to women's rights, feminists, feminist organizations and events, and social issues related to women and children such as rape, pornography, incest, prostitution, domestic violence, child custody, and child abuse. Other materials relate to her ownership of the Southern Sisters bookstore (Durham, N.C.), such as promotional materials, newsletters, events fliers, and calendars.

The materials in the Dorothy "Cookie" Teer Papers date from 1971 to 2000, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1983 and 1997. These materials include: newspaper clippings, magazines, correspondence, photographs, meeting minutes, manuscripts, notes, published books, audio and videotapes, organizational records, and court transcripts. The collection documents Teer's activism during this period, the feminist issues with which she was concerned, feminist and anti-pornography activism in and around Chapel Hill and Durham, N.C., and the activities of the organizations of which Teer was a member, including the National Organization for Women (N.O.W.) and Pornography Awareness.

This collection provides thorough documentation of the social, cultural, and political debates over pornography in the United States in the 1980s and 1990s, with materials from both proponents and opponents of anti-pornography legislation, as well as detailed documentation of the pornography industry, with a focus on publications such as Playboy and Hustler. Transcripts from hearings organized by the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography supplement these materials, with testimony from all sides of the pornography debate. The collection contains some materials related to particular feminist activists and theorists, including Nikki Craft, Catherine MacKinnon, and Andrea Dworkin. Teer's extensive subject files also contain newspaper and magazine clippings, correspondence, and printed items pertaining to women's rights, feminists, feminist organizations and events, and social issues related to women and children such as rape, pornography, incest, prostitution, domestic violence, child custody, and child abuse. Other materials relate to her ownership of the Southern Sisters bookstore (Durham, N.C.), such as promotional materials, newsletters, events fliers, several rolodex files, rubber stamps, and calendars.

The collection is organized into four series: Subject Files, Orange County Human Relations Commission, Attorney General's Commission on Pornography, and Southern Sisters Bookstore.

The Subject Files series contains clippings and academic articles related to violence against women and children. Other materials include extensive documentation of the anti-pornography movement, the work of the Orange County Human Relations Commission, the National Organization for Women (N.O.W.), and various feminist or anti-pornography symposia. Includes files on feminist artist and activist Nikki Craft and feminist scholar and lawyer Catherine MacKinnon. Several files relate to the women's/feminist Southern Sisters Bookstore in Durham, N.C., of which Teer was a proprietor.

The Orange County Human Relations Commission series contains materials related to the Orange County Human Relations Commission and the Committee for Justice for Women of Orange County. Some materials consist of pamphlets or news clippings related to the HRC's focus areas, especially the status of women and children within the county and the state; series also contains planning for and documentation of the public hearings on the status of women and children in Orange County, N.C., organized by the Human Relations Commission and held in 1989.

The Attorney General's Commission on Pornography series contains materials related to the commission's 1985-1986 investigation into pornography. Consisting almost entirely of transcripts from public hearings on pornography, some with annotations, this series details many aspects of the U.S. pornography industry. This series also contains some materials from the 1983 Minneapolis hearings on pornography.

The Southern Sisters Bookstore series contains materials related to the feminist/women's Southern Sisters Bookstore, of which Teer was co-owner, President, and CEO. Materials include financial records, flyers, mailing lists, mission statement, bibliographies of materials related to feminist issues, as well as materials such as cards from the bookstore's Rolodex, signs, and rubber stamps. Contains some correspondence from patrons, donors, and supporters of the store.

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Duke Vigil collection, 1968 - 1988 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

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The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5-11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The collection features announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, ephemera, press releases, clippings, a diary, sound recordings and WDBS broadcasts, and photographs. Individuals prominent within the collection include John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, David Henderson, Duke President Douglas Knight, Samuel DuBois Cook, and Wright Tisdale. Major subjects include student demonstrations, race relations, Duke University employee wages and labor union, and the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1988. English.

The collection features a variety of materials documenting the Vigil at Duke University from April 5-11, 1968. These materials originate from numerous sources and were compiled by University Archives staff for teaching and research. The first series, Subject files, contains primary documents, including announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, and ephemera; media coverage including press releases and clippings; personal papers and a diary about the Vigil from John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, and David Henderson; and analyses and materials relating to the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988.

The Sound recordings series features five audiotapes made by a Duke student during the Vigil. Additional sound recordings can be found in the Related collections series. These collections include the WDBS broadcast recordings and the University Archives Photograph Collection, and they provide further audio and visual documentation of the Vigil. The WDBS records feature eleven audiotapes of radio broadcasts on events during the Vigil. The Photograph Collection includes over twenty black and white photographs of the Vigil, one color photograph, and numerous negatives, contact prints, and slides.

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German broadsides collection, 1870-1990 and undated, bulk 1920s 5.8 Linear Feet — Approximately 519 items

The German broadsides collection spans the years 1870-1990, with the majority of items dating from the 1920s. Broadsides (single-sided announcements and texts) predominate, but there are also several diplomas, leaflets, handbills, campaign publications, political brochures, propaganda posters, and other ephemera documenting the political, economic, and social conditions in Germany, Eastern Europe, Russia, and China, particularly during the Weimar Republic. Many of the broadsides relate to elections during the 1920s and the legacy of World War I as well as the political implications of women's suffrage during that time. Political parties represented include the Socialist Party, the Communist Party, the German Democratic Party, and the German National People's Party, as well as several smaller parties. The majority come from cities across Germany, with Leipzig and Berlin strongly represented. Additional materials include Allied propaganda leaflets and Holocaust exhibition posters, as well as materials relating to the assassination of German Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau in 1922, and several diplomas, 1870-1924 relating to the Von Baudissin family. Closely related to the German Newspaper Clippings Collection.

The German Broadsides Collection spans the years 1870-1990, with the majority of items dating from the 1920s. Broadsides predominate, but there are also leaflets, handbills, campaign publications, political brochures, propaganda posters, and other ephemera documenting the political, economic, and social conditions in early 20th century Germany, Eastern Europe, Russia, and China. Many of these items contain political cartoons and caricatures. Sizes vary greatly, from small leaflets 3x5 inches, to large posters 28x32 inches in size.

The collection provides rich documentation on the political climate in early twentieth-century Germany, in a variety of cities, but especially Leipzig and Berlin, and within a variety of political parties. The bulk of this material was produced in the years from 1919-1924 and from 1928-1930, both periods of political and economic instability. In the Weimar Republic, 1913-1933, numerous political parties vied for German votes and materials in the collection document this competition. With the extension of suffrage to German women in 1919, political parties (especially the Socialist Party) began to tailor their election propaganda towards these new voters, as is reflected in numerous broadsides in this collection. Of note in the collection are two Käthe Kollwitz drawings, and the Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten broadside "An die deutschen Mütter."

The majority of the political pieces were disseminated by the Socialist Party, the Communist Party, the German Democratic Party, and the German National People's Party, with some material from the Center Party and from Richard Kunze's anti-Semitic German Social Party.

The elections broadsides along with other political ephemera chiefly relate to the 1919 National Assembly election and the 1920 and 1924 Reichstag elections; these are arranged according to election, and within each election according to city. Broadly speaking, they address economic, political, and cultural themes debated in national, state, and local elections in the 1920s in Germany, as well as the legacy of the First World War.

Additional materials include several diplomas, 1870-1924, from the Universities of Berlin and Leipzig, relating to the Von Baudissin family; two sets of Holocaust exhibition posters produced in the late twentieth-century by the Anti-Defamation League and the United States Holocaust Memorial Council; and posters relating to commemorations of the assassination of German Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau in 1922, the political situation in China, Poland, and Russia, among others, and international peace, workers, and anti-imperialism movements. The collection also includes three unaddressed letters from the Zentralkomitee Internationale Arbeiterhilfe about events in Hungary and China.

Closely related to the German Newspaper Clippings Collection.

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Inside-Outside Alliance records, 2012-2019 and undated 2.25 Linear Feet — 0.08 Gigabytes

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Collection includes zines, newsletters, flyers, posters, banners, and a petition which document Inside-Outside Alliance's activism concerning the Durham County Jail and policing in Durham, North Carolina. This collection also documents the stories of Durham County Jail detainees and community members.

Collection includes zines, newsletters in physical and digital forms, banners, posters, fliers, and a petition which document Inside-Outside Alliance's activism concerning the Durham County Jail and policing in Durham, North Carolina. Banners protest video visitation policy and oppose the presence of ICE in Durham, N.C. Posters list names of those who died in custody. This collection also documents the stories of Durham County Jail detainees and community members.

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Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.

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Collection contains materials, including an annual report, bibliographies, a course syllabus for Introduction to the Civilizations of Southern Asia, fliers, a monograph, a newsletter, and reprints, together forming a reference collection for the program. There are a few duplicates.