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Collection

Akea Brionne Brown photographs, 2016-2018 2.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 33 prints

These thirty-three color inkjet portraits are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown, and explore the life of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

These thirty-three color inkjet photographs are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown and explore the lives of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards and streets. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. Two are sized slightly smaller at 15 3/4 x 20 3/4 and 15 x 20 1/4 inches.

The prints are accompanied by the artist's statement, in which she writes: "The project manifested through my own personal critique and observation of the suburban landscape as an ideologically 'white space.' I began to consider the importance of representation and exposure in relation to the formation of black identity, the performativity of blackness, and the ways in which the home transforms into a place of familiarity and/or unfamiliarity depending on who enters the space. In turn, this body of work aims to highlight an often overlooked group in contemporary American culture: the black, suburban middle class."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Alen MacWeeney photographs, 1962-1986, bulk 1965 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 14 prints — The prints all measure approximately 13x18 inches; image sizes vary and are given in the inventory. All sizes given are rounded up to the nearest 1/8 of an inch.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals and families, as well as some of animals, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes. The prints measure 13x18 inches. A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images along with others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals, including an old man in a field, a Benedictine monk, a woman in a doorway, and a farming family, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes.

The black-and-white inkjet prints are printed on uncoated textured art paper, and measure 13x18 inches. Image sizes range from 6 1/8 x 10 1/4 to 11 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches.

A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images and others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

Online
Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; subjects in other documentary projects include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy going about his day, tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina, and views of the art-filled interiors of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document collaborations with other photographers and writers, including Gertrude Duby Blom and E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his career at Duke University as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's exchanges with other photographers, friends, and professionals, but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Collection

Benjamin Lowy photographs of Iraq, 2003-2008 3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 32 items

The collection consists of thirty-two 9x13 inch untitled digital color inkjet photographs taken by Benjamin Lowy, documenting the U.S. military presence in Iraq from 2003 to 2008. The prints are arranged in two series: Windows and Nightvision. Images in the Windows series were taken from the bulletproof windows of the armored Humvees in which Lowy spent most of his time while on missions in Iraq; they depict street scenes with Iraqi civilians, tanks, soldiers, checkpoints, military impoundments, street life, urban Iraqi culture, and a war-ravaged Iraqi landscape. Taken through U.S. military-issue night vision goggles, photographs in the Nightvision series reveal greenish images of late-night raids, prisoners and soldiers, landscapes, families, women, and street scenes. The images in this collection were published in 2011 as a photobook titled Iraq | Perspectives. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of thirty-two 9x13 inch untitled digital color inkjet photographs taken by Benjamin Lowy, documenting the U.S. military presence in Iraq from 2003 to 2008. The images were published in 2011 as a photo book, Iraq | Perspectives.

The prints are arranged in two series: Windows and Nightvision. Images in the Windows series, reproduced as sixteen 13x19 inch color digital inkjet prints, were taken from the bulletproof windows of the armored Humvees in which Lowy spent most of his time while on documentary missions in Iraq. The images include street scenes with Iraqi civilians, tanks, soldiers, checkpoints, military impoundments, and images documenting urban Iraqi culture, and a war-ravaged Iraqi landscape. Images in the Nightvision subseries, consisting of sixteen 13x19 inch color digital inkjet prints, were taken through U.S. military-issue night vision goggles, and reveal late-night raids, prisoners and soldiers, families, women, night landscapes, and street scenes.

All the images were shot with a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera and printed on Epson Professional Paper. They are arranged in original order as received from the photographer.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection
The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Christopher Sims photographs, 2005-2018 3 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 71 prints — 17x22 inches

Christopher Sims is a documentary photographer from Atlanta, Georgia, currently on the faculty at Duke University, Durham, N.C. The 71 color digital photographs in this collection appear in his book, The Pretend Village: Inside the U.S. Military Training Grounds (2021). The photographs were taken by Sims from 2005-2018 at fictitious Iraqi and Afghan villages constructed on U.S. Army bases in remote areas of North Carolina and Louisiana, and in Death Valley, California. Images taken between military training exercises show actors, many of them real-life immigrant Afghans and Iraqis, playing police officers, doctors, craftspeople, farmers, and café owners. Images taken during training include American soldiers in motion or at rest, fictional civilians and insurgents, and simulations of dead or wounded soldiers and civilians. Other images are of buildings, streets, fake interiors, props, rubble, and graffiti and murals. The inkjet prints measure 17x22 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 71 17x22-inch color digital photographic prints in this collection were created by Christopher Sims, author, academic, and documentary photographer based in Durham, North Carolina, and used to illustrate his book, The Pretend Village: Inside the U.S. Military Training Grounds, published in 2021. The photographs, taken between 2005-2018, document the landscapes, people, buildings, interiors, and daily activities at fictitious Iraqi and Afghan villages constructed on the training grounds of U.S. Army bases in remote areas of North Carolina and Louisiana, and in Death Valley, California.

Images taken between military training exercises show actors, many of them real-life immigrant Afghans and Iraqis hired by the U.S. Army, playing police officers, doctors, craftspeople, family members, religious leaders, farmers, and café owners. Images taken during training include American soldiers in motion or at rest, fictional civilians and insurgents, and simulations of dead or wounded soldiers and civilians. Other images are of buildings, streets, fake interiors, props, rubble, and graffiti and murals. The prints measure 17x22 inches.

Collection

Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017 4.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 60 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 50.4 Gigabytes — 9101 files — 60 color photographic prints; 9101 digital files (8502 jpeg, 442 tiff, 115 png, 11 mp4, 25 pdf, 3 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 1 txt)

Online
Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises three bodies of documentary work comprising 60 large color inkjet photographs and 9101 digital files of low-resolution and full-resolution images and some videos, as well as supporting journalistic documents and data, also in file format. The "Malta Detention" project consists of color photographs taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013 of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. The "On Board the MV Aquarius" project comprises color photographs and materials compiled by Zammit Lupi in December 2017 while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières. The "Journeys of Hope – Refugees in Balkans" project includes color photographs and files compiled by Zammit Lupi in 2016 while documenting migrants and refugees in the Balkans. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises three bodies of documentary work comprising 60 color photographs and 9101 digital files of low-resolution and full-resolution images and some videos, as well as supporting journalistic documents and data, also in file format.

The "Malta Detention" project consists of color photographs taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013 of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes 20 color inkjet prints and over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles.

The "On Board the MV Aquarius" project comprises 20 color inkjet photographs and over 4000 digital image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Zammit Lupi in December 2017 while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières. While there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily.

The third project, "Journeys of Hope – Refugees in Balkans," consists of 20 color photographs and over 5000 digital image files, documents, and news articles compiled by Zammit Lupi in 2016 while documenting migrants and refugees in Croatia, Greece, Macedonia, and Serbia.

The born-digital resources related to these three projects include over 9000 image files, primarily in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing the 60 color inkjet photographs in the collection. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Tiff images from these projects are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the Rubenstein Library reading room.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

Collection

Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Emilio Nasser photographs and video on La Cornuda de Tlacotalpan, 2016-2022 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 24 photographic prints — 8 1/4 x 11 3/4 inches — 789 Megabytes — 1 mp4 video file — The color photographs were printed on 300-gram Fine Art Inkjet Photo Rag Hahnemuhle paper.

Emilio Nasser (1980- ) is a documentary photographer and multimedia artist originally from Argentina and currently based in Switzerland. Collection consists of 24 inket color photographs, one six-minute digital video, and a reproduction of a field notebook, all part of Nasser's project to document a local legend about a river creature called "La Cornuda de Tlacotalpan" and the social aspects of legends, mythologies, and collective memory. Images include views of the river and its waterside town, Tlacotalpan, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, and portraits of individuals wearing a large headdress representing the creature. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts Awards collections at Duke University.

Collection consists of a set of 24 color inkjet photographs measuring 8 1/4 x 11 3/4 inches, one six-minute digital MP4 video, and a 28-page color photocopy reproduction of a field notebook. They all form part of a documentary project by artist Emilio Nasser to explore the social and cultural dimensions of the legend of the "Cornuda de Tlacotalpan," a river monster with a large mouth and fangs who lives in the Papaloapan River in Veracruz, Mexico. Nasser's field notebook includes sketches created by locals, who are shown in the video as they draw the creature and talk about what it means to the community. Photographs include river and waterside town views and a series of portraits of local individuals wearing a large headdress representing the creature.

Collection

"From Fallujah" exhibit photographs and supporting materials, 2013, 2018-2021 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 11.8 Gigabytes — 1 video file (mp4 format) — The 58 exhibit-quality inkjet prints range in size from 6 7/8 x 9 3/4 inches to 10 3/8 x 15 3/8 inches, and were printed from digital negatives on fine art cotton rag paper. The largest items in the collection are two exhibit panels which measure approximately 18x24 and 18x30 inches.

"From Fallujah" was a group photography exhibit curated by John Bechtold, held in Durham, N.C. in October 2021. Collection consists of 58 inkjet color exhibit prints, 74 proof prints, one digital video of a photographers' panel discussion, and related materials such as correspondence between the curator, translator Noor Ghazi, and the photographers; two exhibit panels; a comment book; and a publicity card. The exhibited images explore the city of Fallūjah, Iraq (ٱلْفَلُّوجَة, al-Fallūjah) from the perspective of four emerging photographers - three men and one woman - from Fallūjah: Harith Khaleel Ali / حراث خ ليل ع, Mohammed Jamal Ali / م م حد ج مال ع ل, Mohamed Al-Ani (also listed as Mohamed Mahmoud Kazem) / م م حد م م حود ك اظ, and Sura Abbas Jasim / سىر ع با س ج ا س. Images are chiefly of the city's street life during the day and at night, children in the city, the Euphrates River, and green spaces just outside the city. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The core of the collection consists of 58 color inkjet exhibit prints from the work of four emerging photographers - three men and one woman - from Fallūjah, Iraq (ٱلْفَلُّوجَة, al-Fallūjah); supporting materials include proof prints and exhibit materials. The photographers are: Harith Khaleel Ali / حراث خ ليل ع; Mohammed Jamal Ali / م م حد ج مال ع ل; Mohamed Al-Ani (also listed as Mohamed Mohmoud Kazem) / م م حد م م حود ك اظ; and Sura Abbas Jasim / سىر ع با س ج ا س. The photographs were shown in Durham, North Carolina from October 1-November 6, 2021 as part of the Click Photography Festival; the project was conceived and co-ordinated by John Bechtold, with translation support by Noor Ghazi. The materials are chiefly in English but some correspondence and exhibit materials are in Arabic.

The exhibited photographs and other materials explore the city of Fallūjah from the perspectives of the four photographers. Images are chiefly of the city's street life during the day and at night; settings include thoroughfares and boulevards; mosques and minarets; markets, malls, and shops; children in the city; the Euphrates River, its promenades, and bridges; and surrounding rural and green areas. The prints range in size from 6x9 to 10x15 inches.

Supporting materials include 74 color proof prints; two exhibit panels; an exhibit comments book; a publicity postcard; and many emails between the organizers and photographers which provide context on the project and document the complexities of organizing it. Two small prints reproduced by the curator from a Wikipedia site about Fallūjah were used in the exhibit as a means of juxtaposing militarized images of the city. A one-hour digital video of a panel discussion with the photographers, held in conjunction with the exhibit and with the Click Photography Festival, rounds out the collection.