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Alpheus Augustus Hurst papers, 1816-1950 2 Linear Feet — 1340 Items

Ledgers (hard back and composition book), legal documents, family correspondence, almanacs, advertisements, and pamphlets.

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Andrew J. Fleming papers, 1833-1840 1.2 Linear Feet — 4 Items

[Place Collection Abstract for Context Here.] [Place Collection Abstract for Scope and Content Here.]

Collection contains a ledger, a daybook, a cashbook, and an account book relating to a firm involved in the importation and sale of sugar, molasses, coffee, tea, corn, and other products. The books record shipment of goods from various ports in the West Indies and the South. Craven Ashford may have been a business partner. Several items are laid in.

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Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

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Cyrus O. Weller physician's ledger, 1880-1886 0.6 Linear Feet — 1 volume

Cyrus O. Weller was a physician in Columbus, Texas. Collection comprises a medical ledger (209 pages, plus 14 pages index), dated 1880-1886, of Texas physician Cyrus O. Weller, whose patients included African Americans. The ledger includes entries for various African-American groups, such as the Union Guiding Star Association, The United Brothers of Friendship, and the Knights of Wise Men. Includes names, dates, prices for treatment, type of visit, and any treatment details, including pulling teeth, excising tumors, treating fractures, vaccinations, and amputations.

Collection comprises a medical ledger (209 pages, plus 14 pages index), dated 1880-1886, of Texas physician Cyrus O. Weller, whose patients included African Americans. The ledger includes entries for various African-American groups, such as the Union Guiding Star Association, The United Brothers of Friendship, and the Knights of Wise Men. Includes names, dates, prices for treatment, type of visit, and any treatment details, including pulling teeth, excising tumors, treating fractures, vaccinations, and amputations. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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D. W. Newsom papers, [ca. 1890]-1950 and undated 11.2 Linear Feet — 2640 Items

Primarily incoming and outgoing personal and business correspondence, bills and receipts, bank statements, and deeds (1890-1950). The material documents Newsom's real estate activities and Durham N.C.'s economic and urban development from the 1920s-1940s. Also includes financial ledgers; scrapbooks of Newsom's newspaper real estate advertisements; notebooks in shorthand; various Newsom family estate papers; and a poem by Newsom, "To the Men of the Golden Star," read by him at a World War I memorial service held at Trinity College (1919). The collection contains few records of Newsom's tenure as an official of Trinity College and Durham County. (02-102)

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Edmund Snare papers, 1836-1867 0.8 Linear Feet — 4 items

Edmund Snare was a physician and resident of Huntingdon (Huntingdon Co.), Pennsylvania. Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare.

Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. One soldier was from New York, one from Illinois, and one was an African American with the 32d Regt. U.S. Colored Troops. Entries recorded the soldier's name, home town, regiment and immediate commanding officer, as well as the attorney representing the soldier in his petition. Sometimes the battle in which the injury was received is mentioned, including Antietam, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor; other notes mention men who were captured and sent to Confederate prisons, including Andersonville. Snare then provided a detailed medical description of the injury or wound and any resulting damage. Several of the men had contracted diseases while on duty, such as typhoid or tuberculosis, had sustained hernias or were sidelined by rheumatism, but most of the men suffered gunshot wounds or injuries from cannon fire. In the margins Snare recorded his estimates for awarding a pension, according to guidelines set by the Pension Office. Some of the soldiers were examined annually or biennially over the course of three years, to reassess their continued eligibility.

The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare. This Edmund Snare of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and New York, sold goods such as coffee, flour, wine, tea, dried fruit, and Cuban tobacco, among other items, and purchased goods from a variety of firms. Includes an alphabetical listing of his customers; along with records of expenditures, invoices, and sales; and tabulations of profits, primarily between May and July 1836. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection.

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Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; approximately 3,516 items

Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) was a lawyer, sheriff, and plantation owner from Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Hicks and of his son, David S. Hicks, planter, lawyer, land agent, and judge in the same locality. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, economic conditions in Virginia, and the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co. Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation on the Red River, Arkansas, after 1837. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons at New Orleans during 1852. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D.J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, John W. Paup, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (died 1858), lawyer and planter of Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons in New Orleans during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks, the papers dated after 1858 are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns African American congressmen in the South and his hatred for them amidst fears of a "Negro supremacy." Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad Company.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, seem to have into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff in Virginia. These are chiefly in the form of account and ledger books.

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Effinger & Aiken account books, 1895-1920 3 Linear Feet — 358 Items

The wholesale firm of Effinger & Aiken, located in Baltimore, Maryland, supplied consumer goods to stores in cities and rural towns from Maryland to Florida during the early 1900s. The collection includes eight business account books of Effinger & Aiken together with roughly 350 related business correspondence and papers. The account books document the firm's sale and shipping of goods such as crockery, glassware, wooden items, hardware, tools, and building materials throughout the southern Atlantic states. Each of two leather-bound ledgers begins with an alphabetical index listing the customer and internal accounts recorded within the ledger and their corresponding page numbers. The related business correspondence and papers, which chiefly document the firm's difficulties with debt collection, are loosely inserted in these ledgers near the associated customer accounts. Four cloth-bound daybooks record customer names with itemized purchase and/or payment transactions each day. The daybook with entries from 1895 to 1896 most likely does not pertain to the transactions of Effinger & Aiken. One small, cloth-bound account book records, in tabular form, amounts "Collect," "Cash," "Credit," and "Wholesale" for each day of the month from June 1905 to July 1920; and another small, cloth-bound account book records daily collections from 1906 to 1907.

The collection includes eight business account books of Effinger & Aiken, a wholesale firm located in Baltimore, Maryland, together with roughly 350 related business correspondence and papers. The account books document the firm's sale and shipping of goods such as crockery, glassware, wooden items, hardware, tools, and building materials throughout the southern Atlantic states. Each of two leather-bound ledgers begins with an alphabetical index listing the customer and internal accounts recorded within the ledger and their corresponding page numbers. The related business correspondence and papers, which chiefly document the firm's difficulties with debt collection, are loosely inserted in these ledgers near the associated customer accounts. Four cloth-bound daybooks record customer names with itemized purchase and/or payment transactions each day. The daybook with entries from 1895 to 1896 most likely does not pertain to the transactions of Effinger & Aiken. One small, cloth-bound account book records, in tabular form, amounts "Collect," "Cash," "Credit," and "Wholesale" for each day of the month from June 1905 to July 1920; and another small, cloth-bound account book records daily collections from 1906 to 1907.

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Estridge family papers, 1779-1901 3.0 Linear Feet — 6 volumes in 5 boxes

The Estridge family owned The Hill, Lower Estridge's, and Bramble estates in St. Kitts, West Indies, as early as 1660 and through the nineteenth century. They originally hailed from Wiltshire, England. The collection consists of six volumes of plantation records, mainly account and expense books, as well as a scrapbook compiled by Henry Whatley Estridge collecting clippings from his father, George Estridge, and images of St. Kitts from 1896.

Collection consists of six plantation volumes: five account books (1779-1827) and one scrapbook compiled by H.W.E. (Henry Whatley Estridge) around 1901.

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John Allen Sharpe papers, 1877-1981 and undated 2.25 Linear Feet — approx. 540 Items

John Allen Sharpe was a Duke alumnus who served as editor of the ROBESONIAN newspaper from 1947-1982. Collection includes correspondence, clippings, and photographs, along with business records for S. A. Edmund & Co.

Collection contains papers related to Sharpe's work as editor. Also includes personal correspondence during the periods Sharpe was a Duke student (1928-1932) and a member of the U.S. Army Air Force (1940s), as well as letters from his wife written while she was on a tour of Europe in 1951, and letters from Sharpe to his parents. There are several copies of the ROBESONIAN, along with postcards, family photographs, and a few published works. In addition, there is a ledger and other records, dated 1887-1892, for S. A. Edmund & Co, a business located in the Lumberton area. A letter and 23 other pages, all undated, containing political speeches hand copied and laid-in to the ledger.

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Mordecai Purcell papers, 1778-1901 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 520 Items

Quaker farmer, fruit-grower, and broom-maker from Frederick County, Virginia. The Mordecai Purcell papers span the years 1778-1901 and contain correspondence, bills, receipts, business and legal papers, and a ledger relating to Quaker farmer Mordecai Purcell, his brother, John Purcell, and the Cather family (John Purcell married Adaline J. Cather), living in Virginia.

The Mordecai Purcell papers span the years 1778-1901 and contain correspondence, bills, receipts, business and legal papers, and a ledger relating to Quaker farmer Mordecai Purcell, his brother, John Purcell, and the Cather family (John Purcell married Adaline J. Cather).

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Ledger of an unknown merchant in New Bern, N.C. Transactions appear chronologically by account holder, and reflect the sale of general merchandise, such as cloth and clothing, food, rum, seed, pitch, tar, and turpentine. Accounts were settled with either cash or goods. Formerly known as Anonymous ledger C, 1767-1776.

Ledger of an unknown merchant in New Bern, N.C. Transactions appear chronologically by account holder, and reflect the sale of general merchandise, such as cloth and clothing, food, rum, seed, pitch, tar, and turpentine. Accounts were settled with either cash or goods.

Formerly known as Anonymous ledger C, 1767-1776.

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The Treasurer is an officer of the University whose duties have included supervision of contracts, relations with the Duke Endowment, and management of the Bursar's Office, student loans, and investments. The position of Treasurer is established by the By-laws of the University. In 1995, the Treasurer's post was taken up by the chief financial and administrative officer, the Executive Vice President. The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence to and from individuals who served the University as Treasurer and the subject files they created while in office, including grants and contracts but also ledger and account books. The collection ranges in date from 1893-ongoing.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence to and from individuals who served the University as Treasurer and the subject files they created while in office, including grants and contracts. There are a handful of photographs of Highland Hospital in Asheville, N.C. in addition to legal papers such as wills and deeds of gift. Oversize materials include many account and ledger books for the early-mid part of the 20th century. One of the many benefits of this collection is official paperwork that pertains to many artifacts/collections the University has obtained as gifts from individuals such as Doris Duke and the Trent family. The collection ranges in date from 1893-ongoing.

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Philip Turner (1740-1815) was a noted surgeon from Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York. The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Items include correspondence with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, William Eustis, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Also includes materials on Turner's family. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Turner served in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, during which he was stationed at Fort Columbus, New York. Included are an extensive collection of military hospital returns from the Eastern Department of the Continental Army describing the state of the Army's sick and wounded and spanning the years 1777 to 1780. Also included is correspondence with George Washington, Tench Coxe, and William Eustis about the procurement of medical supplies and the organization of the Army's medical department during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. After the Revolutionary War, Turner felt that he had not received due compensation for his service, and the collection contains extensive correspondence relating to the decades-long effort of Turner and his heirs to receive this compensation from Congress. This correspondence includes letters to and from Thomas Jefferson, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Additional correspondence, especially with Daniel Parker, Chief Clerk of the War Department, documents Turner's efforts to secure a commission during the War of 1812.

Also included in the collection are correspondence, financial and legal papers, and poetry relating to Turner's family. The majority of this series is addressed to or stems from John Turner and Nancy Turner, two of Philip Turner's children. Correspondents represented include Judith Sargent Murray, American essayist and advocate for women's rights, and her husband, John Murray. Some of the material is related to the efforts of John Turner and John Turner Wait (Philip Turner's grandson) to receive compensation for Turner's Revolutionary War service. The collection also includes a small hide-covered trunk bearing the initials A.T., possibly belonging to Turner's mother Ann.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Robert C. Poindexter papers, 1836-1871 1 Linear Foot — 29 items, 3 vols.

Robert C. Poindexter (d. 1885) was a merchant in eastern Yadkin County for many years. His general store at East Bend was listed in Branson's North Carolina Business Directory for 1867, 1869, 1872, and 1884. He and his store are also mentioned in William E. Rutledge, Jr.'s, An Illustrated History of Yadkin County (Yadkinville, 1965) in the section on East Bend. In 1857 Poindexter was listed in D. D. T. Leech's Post Office Directory as the postmaster at Red Plains.

Three account books, 1836-1860, are from Poindexter's mercantile businesses. At least two different partnerships are represented. There are some uncertainties about the exact locations and number of his stores. These ambiguities and the difficulties in identifying the volumes will require some explanation. All of the business activity took place in the eastern section of Yadkin County, the area of East Bend in the northeast, Huntsville in the southeast, and Red Plains in between. Red Plains, a locality no longer in existence, was close to present-day Enon (Rutledge, P. 77).

The earliest account book has two distinct sections. It was first used as Daybook, 1836, for a general store at Huntsville. The entries (135 pp.) date during January 22-September 20, 1836. The ownership of this store is not known. Notable customers included Col. Richard C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Thomas L. Clingman. The Clingmans, Poindexters, Puryears, and Jarratts were related, and all figure in this collection and also in the Jarratt-Puryear Family Papers. Tyre Glen was a customer, and this department also has a collection of his papers. There was a post office in the store, for there are many entries for postage. At that time Richard C. Puryear was postmaster at Huntsville.

The account book that includes the Daybook, 1836, was subsequently used as the Ledger, 1843-1848 (353 pp.), by the mercantile firm of Poindexter and Martin whose ownership has been identified through various notations. The initials "P and M" appear on the spine of the volume. An account on pp. 334-335 is labeled "Poindexter and Martin Bills." This account was continued from pp. 30-31 where it was labeled "R. C. Poindexter and T. S. Martin." The first entry in their account was on Nov. 1, 1843, for a large amount of goods purchased from "P and P" according to an inventory. The Ledger's accounts begin in Nov., 1843, so that it is clear that Poindexter and Martin began business in that month, probably as the successor of an earlier firm named "P and P." A note was given to J. H. P. for a large sum, so one of the earlier owners was probably J. H. Palmer. Various accounts have entries for settlements with "P and M" (pp. 37, 38) and "T. S. M." (pp. 33, 46, etc.). Poindexter worked in the store, for his account (p. 303) contains entries for annual wages.

The location of the general store represented by the Ledger, 1843-1848, is unclear. It was not at Huntsville, for there are too many scattered entries such as "cr. by charging on Books at Huntsville," "Cr. by Cash at Huntsville," "settled at Huntsville," etc. (pp. 117, 148, 178, 184, 195, 218, 244, etc.). These entries also suggest that the firm did have a store at Huntsville. Robert C. Poindexter eventually had a store at East Bend. However, this ledger was not kept at East Bend. That town did not have a post office until 1849, and numerous entries in many accounts show that the store included a post office. There are extensive accounts for Richard C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Tyre Glen.

Poindexter and Martin opened a new ledger in 1847, for many accounts were noted as continued there (pp. 65, 147, etc.). Some accounts in the Ledger, 1843-1848, remained active into 1848. Thereafter, later entries as late as 1855 were usually settlements of inactive accounts not continued into the later ledger.

The mercantile firm of A. P. and R. C. Poindexter had a general store at Red Plains, a village near Enon. The Daybook, 1857-1858, belonged to that store. Many pages are labeled "Red Plains." Identification of the store's and the volume's owners is supplied by a bill of 1856-1857 filed in the Financial Papers. The bill is a statement for purchases made by John D. Hedgcock and William Hedgcock at Red Plains from A. P. and R. C. Poindexter. The transaction for May 2, 1857, on the bill is also entered in the Daybook. The entries (66 pp.) in the Daybook date from April 30, 1857, to March 26, 1858.

On Sept. 26, 1860, the partnership of A. P. and R. C. Poindexter was dissolved, and the Daybook includes an account (4 pp.) for the division of property.

The back pages of the Daybook were used, probably by R. C. Poindexter, to record other financial matters. There are 10 1/2 pages, 1862-1863, of alphabetical lists of names followed by three columns for recording numbers of persons in the family, pounds, and value. These pages also include a short account for the receipt of large quantities of salt. It is apparent that these lists are for the distribution and rationing of salt. Salt was scarce, and the state set up factories, purchased salt, and sold it to the people. These accounts may relate to that effort. Since the number of persons in each family is recorded, these lists serve as a partial census. Unfortunately, many pages are missing. The Financial Papers also include a salt distribution list.

Another list (7 pp.) in the Daybook includes columns for names, acreage, location of acreage, and value. This list was apparently for taxation. The Financial Papers include a notice of March 20, 1863, that R. C. Poindexter and two others were appointed assessors for East Bend District for the listing of lands and slaves. Thus, this list is an informal tax list. Unfortunately, many pages are missing. Presumably this list dates from 1863 or later, and tax lists are unavailable for Yadkin County during 1863-1872 according to Draughon and Johnson's North Carolina Genealogical Reference (p. 452).

The Ledger, 1850-1860 (557 pp.), is identified as belonging to A. P. and R. C. Poindexter, because entries can be traced into it from their Daybook, 1857-1858. An example is a purchase by A. P. Poindexter that was entered in the Daybook on June 2, 1857, and later carried to his account in the Ledger (p. 542). However, the Ledger's account for Poindexter includes many transactions that are not in this Daybook from Red Plains. This circumstance and references in the Ledger to East Bend suggest that the firm had stores in more than one place - Red Plains, East Bend, and perhaps elsewhere. There are numerous references such as: "cr. by work at East Bend and here" (p. 364); "Amount on Book kept by R. C. P. at East Bend" (p. 488); "cr. by work at East Bend" (p. 450); "cr. by settlement, this and our East Bend book" (p. 541); etc. (pp. 427, 437, 478).

The location at which the Ledger was kept is not certain except that it was not at East Bend. The location may have been Red Plains. R. C. Poindexter was postmaster there in 1857, and his account in the Ledger was quite active then. There are references (p. 542) to transactions "at Huntsville" and "at Yadkinville," so the Ledger was not kept at either of those places. Of course, the Ledger may have been a central one into which the business of more than one store was entered, and that would make its location difficult to determine. Accounts for R. C. Puryear, Isaac Jarratt, and Tyre Glen are not prominent in this volume.

The Ledger, 1850-1860, was begun in 1850 with many accounts continued from an "Old Book." Thus, the firm existed before 1850 and had at least one earlier ledger. The accounts indicate that the store's activity ceased by early 1858. Later entries are for settlements of accounts. No accounts were marked as continued in a later ledger. This situation squares with the 1860 account in the Daybook, 1857-1858, for the dissolution of the partnership.

Transactions for postage (pp. 425, 426, 454) are rare unlike the situation in the Ledger, 1843-1848. Either the post office was not in the store, or other books were kept for postal matters.

The nine items, 1856-1871 and undated, in the Financial Papers include stray accounts for the stores, a salt distribution and rationing list of ca. 1862-1863, the notice of R. C. Poindexter's appointment as an assessor, etc.

The Miscellany includes 19 small squares of colored cotton cloth that were found between pages 387-388 of the Ledger, 1850-1860. The fabric was probably of a type used for dresses. There are six different designs. The designs are printed rather than woven. The fabric is in excellent condition. Its age is uncertain.

The Printed Material contains a clipping of 1852 with an advertisement for the Statesville Female Academy.

1 vol. added, 10-28-83. This volume is A. P. and R. C. Poindexter's Ledger, 1848-1850, from their general store. Accounts in this ledger, referred to as the "old book," are marked as continued in the "new book" which is their Ledger, 1850-1860, that was cataloged earlier as part of this collection. Entries can be traced from the older book into the newer one. Since Ledger, 1848-1850 (172 pp.), opens many accounts in Sept., 1848, without any references to an earlier ledger, that date must have been the start of this partnership, the earlier one having been Poindexter and Martin. A. P. and R. C. Poindexter began a new ledger in 1850, but they continued to use the old one for some accounts. For that reason Ledger, 1848-1850, includes some later transactions as well as settlements of accounts. The primary use of the volume, however, occurred during 1848-1850. A. P. and R. C. Poindexter's names appear in this volume (p. 83, page before p. 1, etc.) as recipients of payments. The pages after p. 165 are missing. There are accounts for Isaac Jarratt and Tyre Glen. Postage payments are very scattered. Customers paid their bills not only with money and promissory notes but also with goods and services.

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Sauer, Farrell, & Co. was a cigar manufacturing company located in Suffield, Connecticut, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Collection of ledgers, account books, order forms, and other ephemera relating to the sale and purchase of cigars by Sauer, Farrell, & Co., Cigar Manufacturers. Materials range in date from the 1870s through the early 1900s, and it is believed that the cigar company may have changed names throughout that period. The centerpiece of the collection is a specimen book of sample cigar box labels, created by the lithographers Heppenheimer & Maurer around 1878. The specimen book includes about 115 leaves, with labels affixed on each side of the leaf; the label colors range from two colors to multiple colors per label. Account books document cigar production, purchase, and sales information. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection of ledgers, account books, order forms, and other ephemera relating to the sale and purchase of cigars by Sauer, Farrell, & Co., Cigar Manufacturers. Materials range in date from the 1870s through the early 1900s, and it is believed that the cigar company may have changed names throughout that period. The centerpiece of the collection is a specimen book of sample cigar box labels, created by the lithographers Heppenheimer & Maurer around 1878. The specimen book includes about 115 leaves, with labels affixed on each side of the leaf; the color ranges from two colors to multiple colors per label. Account books document cigar production, purchase, and sales information. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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St. Katherine's Hospital was founded in 1147 in London, England. Originally situated near the Tower of London, it was relocated to Regent's Park in 1825 and became a residential almshouse for the poor. Collection consists primarily of draft account books and rent account books for tenants of St. Katherine's, and two reports by Royal Commissions about St. Katherine's Hospital.

The St. Katherine's Hospital records consist of account books and other financial, administrative, and legal records for the Royal Hospital of St. Katherine's of London during the last half of the 19th century, that offer many details on its properties, tenants, staff, grounds, and expenses. The draft account books itemize the rental of properties to tenants and the rent charged and received, as well as stipends paid to staff and other expenses. Other financial and legal records include a will, various internal reports, and the earliest item, a receipt (1849) from the Sailor's Home for a certain individual's upkeep and allowance. The rent account books cover items such as rent, taxes, and construction supplies for material upkeep, among others. Also included are two reports published in 1866 and 1871 by Royal Commissions who conducted an assessment and audit of St. Katherine's Hospital, with detailed reports on the condition and extent of its tenant farms, gardens, school, and buildings, and with maps of the hospital grounds. Finally, three pieces of correspondence from the 1870s pertain to financial and legal transactions.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.