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Philip Turner (1740-1815) was a noted surgeon from Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York. The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Items include correspondence with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, William Eustis, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Also includes materials on Turner's family. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Philip Turner Papers Collection spans from 1751 to 1858 and contains correspondence, military hospital returns, printed material, a logbook, and ledgers documenting Philip Turner's career as a surgeon in private practice in Norwich, Connecticut and New York, New York, in the Continental Army, and in the United States Army. Turner served in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, during which he was stationed at Fort Columbus, New York. Included are an extensive collection of military hospital returns from the Eastern Department of the Continental Army describing the state of the Army's sick and wounded and spanning the years 1777 to 1780. Also included is correspondence with George Washington, Tench Coxe, and William Eustis about the procurement of medical supplies and the organization of the Army's medical department during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. After the Revolutionary War, Turner felt that he had not received due compensation for his service, and the collection contains extensive correspondence relating to the decades-long effort of Turner and his heirs to receive this compensation from Congress. This correspondence includes letters to and from Thomas Jefferson, Henry Dearborn, John Morgan, William Shippen, and other prominent Americans. Additional correspondence, especially with Daniel Parker, Chief Clerk of the War Department, documents Turner's efforts to secure a commission during the War of 1812.

Also included in the collection are correspondence, financial and legal papers, and poetry relating to Turner's family. The majority of this series is addressed to or stems from John Turner and Nancy Turner, two of Philip Turner's children. Correspondents represented include Judith Sargent Murray, American essayist and advocate for women's rights, and her husband, John Murray. Some of the material is related to the efforts of John Turner and John Turner Wait (Philip Turner's grandson) to receive compensation for Turner's Revolutionary War service. The collection also includes a small hide-covered trunk bearing the initials A.T., possibly belonging to Turner's mother Ann.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.

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Ledger of an unknown merchant in New Bern, N.C. Transactions appear chronologically by account holder, and reflect the sale of general merchandise, such as cloth and clothing, food, rum, seed, pitch, tar, and turpentine. Accounts were settled with either cash or goods. Formerly known as Anonymous ledger C, 1767-1776.

Ledger of an unknown merchant in New Bern, N.C. Transactions appear chronologically by account holder, and reflect the sale of general merchandise, such as cloth and clothing, food, rum, seed, pitch, tar, and turpentine. Accounts were settled with either cash or goods.

Formerly known as Anonymous ledger C, 1767-1776.

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Mordecai Purcell papers, 1778-1901 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 520 Items

Quaker farmer, fruit-grower, and broom-maker from Frederick County, Virginia. The Mordecai Purcell papers span the years 1778-1901 and contain correspondence, bills, receipts, business and legal papers, and a ledger relating to Quaker farmer Mordecai Purcell, his brother, John Purcell, and the Cather family (John Purcell married Adaline J. Cather), living in Virginia.

The Mordecai Purcell papers span the years 1778-1901 and contain correspondence, bills, receipts, business and legal papers, and a ledger relating to Quaker farmer Mordecai Purcell, his brother, John Purcell, and the Cather family (John Purcell married Adaline J. Cather).

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Estridge family papers, 1779-1901 3.0 Linear Feet — 6 volumes in 5 boxes

The Estridge family owned The Hill, Lower Estridge's, and Bramble estates in St. Kitts, West Indies, as early as 1660 and through the nineteenth century. They originally hailed from Wiltshire, England. The collection consists of six volumes of plantation records, mainly account and expense books, as well as a scrapbook compiled by Henry Whatley Estridge collecting clippings from his father, George Estridge, and images of St. Kitts from 1896.

Collection consists of six plantation volumes: five account books (1779-1827) and one scrapbook compiled by H.W.E. (Henry Whatley Estridge) around 1901.

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Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; approximately 3,516 items

Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) was a lawyer, sheriff, and plantation owner from Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Hicks and of his son, David S. Hicks, planter, lawyer, land agent, and judge in the same locality. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, economic conditions in Virginia, and the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co. Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation on the Red River, Arkansas, after 1837. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons at New Orleans during 1852. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D.J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, John W. Paup, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (died 1858), lawyer and planter of Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons in New Orleans during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks, the papers dated after 1858 are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns African American congressmen in the South and his hatred for them amidst fears of a "Negro supremacy." Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad Company.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, seem to have into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff in Virginia. These are chiefly in the form of account and ledger books.

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Alpheus Augustus Hurst papers, 1816-1950 2 Linear Feet — 1340 Items

Ledgers (hard back and composition book), legal documents, family correspondence, almanacs, advertisements, and pamphlets.

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Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

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Andrew J. Fleming papers, 1833-1840 1.2 Linear Feet — 4 Items

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Collection contains a ledger, a daybook, a cashbook, and an account book relating to a firm involved in the importation and sale of sugar, molasses, coffee, tea, corn, and other products. The books record shipment of goods from various ports in the West Indies and the South. Craven Ashford may have been a business partner. Several items are laid in.

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Edmund Snare papers, 1836-1867 0.8 Linear Feet — 4 items

Edmund Snare was a physician and resident of Huntingdon (Huntingdon Co.), Pennsylvania. Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare.

Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. One soldier was from New York, one from Illinois, and one was an African American with the 32d Regt. U.S. Colored Troops. Entries recorded the soldier's name, home town, regiment and immediate commanding officer, as well as the attorney representing the soldier in his petition. Sometimes the battle in which the injury was received is mentioned, including Antietam, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor; other notes mention men who were captured and sent to Confederate prisons, including Andersonville. Snare then provided a detailed medical description of the injury or wound and any resulting damage. Several of the men had contracted diseases while on duty, such as typhoid or tuberculosis, had sustained hernias or were sidelined by rheumatism, but most of the men suffered gunshot wounds or injuries from cannon fire. In the margins Snare recorded his estimates for awarding a pension, according to guidelines set by the Pension Office. Some of the soldiers were examined annually or biennially over the course of three years, to reassess their continued eligibility.

The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare. This Edmund Snare of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and New York, sold goods such as coffee, flour, wine, tea, dried fruit, and Cuban tobacco, among other items, and purchased goods from a variety of firms. Includes an alphabetical listing of his customers; along with records of expenditures, invoices, and sales; and tabulations of profits, primarily between May and July 1836. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection.