Collections

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Level Collection Remove constraint Level: Collection Format Machine-readable records Remove constraint Format: Machine-readable records Format Photographs Remove constraint Format: Photographs
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection

Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

Collection

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 654 boxes — 654 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

Collection

Bates Worldwide, Inc. records, 1934-2005 and undated 784 Linear Feet — 5.1 Gigabytes — Audiovisual objects in RL00090-SET-0001 are not included because they require Audiovisual processing before access!! — 336,000 Items

Bates Worldwide advertising agency (Bates) was established in 1940 by former executives of the Benton & Bowles agency. It grew to become one of the largest agencies in the U.S. until its demise in 2003. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by the Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century. The Bates Worldwide, Inc. Records spans the years 1934-2003 and includes correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients included Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The Bates Worldwide, Inc. ("Bates") Records span the years 1934-2003 and include correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century.

Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients include Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The collection is organized into ten series and one cumulative subject index--Client Files, Corporate Communications Department, Creative Department, Financial Records, Human Resources Department, Memorabilia, New Business, Print Books, Vertical Files and Audiovisual Materials. The Client Files Series includes research reports, storyboards and graphic designs for Bates' clients. The Corporate Communications Department Series includes company-wide memoranda, public relations policy manuals, and a large file of biographical sketches and photographs of Bates' executives, as well as news clippings and press releases relating to the company and its clients. The Creative Department Series primarily focuses on Bates' efforts to stimulate creativity throughout its worldwide offices through participation in internal and industry-wide advertising competitions. The Financial Records Series includes general ledgers and other accounting reports. The Human Resources Department Series includes employee benefits literature and information on company affairs including press releases and staff memoranda. The Memorabilia Series includes promotional clothing, games, office posters and awards. The New Business Series includes materials relating to requests for proposals from prospective clients. The Print Books Series contains material from over 100 albums of proof sheets and print advertisements from existing clients. The Vertical Files Series consists of an alphabetical file of general information collected to aid in various aspects of company operations. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains periodic review collections of advertising, video memoranda, speeches, retirement presentations and highlight compilations prepared for prospective clients and award show consideration. A Subject Cross-Reference Index at the end of the finding aid links materials pertaining to specific clients, corporations, events and policies scattered throughout the various subject series.

Some materials were received as electronic files. Disks were assigned consecutive numbers reflecting the order in which they were encountered. If a work has a corresponding or associated electronic file, the file is included in the container list. The contents of each disk have been migrated to the Special Collections server. Consequently, the contents of these disks are available only in correspondingly numbered electronic subdirectories. Consult a reference archivist for access to the electronic files.

Collection

David Richmond Gergen papers, 1964-1999 (bulk 1971-1992) 216.7 Linear Feet — 121,428 Items

Counselor, special advisor, director of communications, and speech writer to U.S. Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and Clinton. Gergen has also worked as a journalist, serving as Editor-at-large of U.S. News and World Report and as a regular analyst on the "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" and the "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer." A native of Durham, N.C., Gergen graduated from Yale University and the Harvard Law School and served for three-and-a-half years in the U.S. Navy. The collection includes materials from Gergen's career in politics as well as his journalism career. Among his political materials are presidential campaign materials for the 1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 elections; subject files; office memos; chronological files and telephone logs; daily planners; and legal and financial papers; as well as drafts and transcripts of Gergen's and other's speeches. The collection includes 86 black-and-white and color photographs, 16 audio cassettes; and 106 video cassettes. Other materials document his journalism career, including editorials, interoffice memos, and other U.S. News and World Report documents; financial and subject files relating to his work as an analyst on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour; speeches; correspondence, chronological files, and telephone logs; and financial papers. The addition contains 445 electronic computer files; 5 color and 40 black-and-white photographs; 16 slides; and 82 video cassettes; as well as 35 audio cassettes. The audio and video cassettes include interviews with Richard Nixon and Ross Perot.

This collection (74,159 items, dated 1964-1999) documents David Gergen's professional life as a speech writer, director of communications, and special counsel for U.S. Secretary of the Treasury William E. Simon and for Presidents Nixon, Ford, and Reagan. The materials include presidential campaign materials for the 1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 elections; subject files; office memos; chronological files and telephone logs; daily planners; and legal and financial papers; as well as drafts and transcripts of Gergen's and other's speeches. The collection includes 86 black-and-white and color photographs, 16 audio cassettes; and 106 video cassettes. (2000-0356)

The addition (47,269 items, dated 1987-1996) continues to document David Gergen's involvement in national politics, as both Counselor and Special Advisor to President Clinton from 1993 to 1995, and as a journalist. Materials include editorials, interoffice memos, and otherU.S. News and World Report documents; financial and subject files relating to his work as an analyst on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour; speeches; correspondence, chronological files, and telephone logs; and financial papers. The addition contains 445 electronic computer files; 5 color and 40 black-and-white photographs; 16 slides; and 82 video cassettes; as well as 35 audio cassettes. The audio and video cassettes include interviews with Richard Nixon and Ross Perot. (2000-0415)

Collection
Franco Modigliani was an economist, Nobel Prize winner, and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Collection contains correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings that documents the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials.

The Franco Modigliani Papers span the years 1936 to 2005, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2003. Through correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings, the papers document the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The most current items are a DVD recording of his memorial held at MIT in 2003, and a thesis by an Italian graduate student on Modigliani's macroeconomic views on the Italian and European economy, of the same year. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials. The collection is organized into the following series: Correspondence; Writings and Speeches; Teaching Materials; Professional Service; Engagements; Printed Materials; Personal Files; Audio and Visual Materials; and Electronic Formats. Oversize materials are described at the end of the collection guide.

Researchers will find ample documentation in the collection on Modigliani's work on the life-cycle hypothesis of savings, leading to the Nobel Prize in 1985. Other materials represent his work on topics and issues such as monetary policies, both domestic and foreign; pension trusts; public debt; econometric modelling; international finance and the international payment system; the effects of and cures for inflation; stabilization policies in open economies; and various fields of finance such as savings and investment, credit rationing, mortgages, the term structure of interest rates, and the valuation of speculative assets. Extensive documentation can also be found in the collection on Modigliani's key participation in the design of a large-scale model of the U.S. economy, called the MPS (an abbreviation deriving from collaborators MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Social Science Research Council), sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank, a model used by the U.S. government until the 1990s. Other documents reveal Modigliani's analyses of the forces of economics and politics in the United States as well as in Italy and the European Union as a whole. His views on various social issues, including the arms race, are found throughout the papers, especially in the many editorials and commentaries he wrote for newspapers and other publications. The materials in this collection reveal the high value that Modigliani placed on collaboration with other economists and with graduate students, with whom he exchanged letters, notes, and drafts of writings and commentary. Researchers examining the correspondence and writings will find the comments, replies, and writings of his many colleagues on the same range of topics. Significant correspondents or collaborators documented in the collection include European and American economists such as Albert Ando, with whom he collaborated on the MPS model, Mario Baldassarri, John Bossons, Jacques Drèze, Merton Miller, Paul Samuelson and James Tobin. Many other major economists of the twentieth century, as well as many political and academic individuals, are represented in smaller amounts of writings and correspondence.

In addition to illuminating Modigliani's distinguished academic career and his collaborative approach to teaching and research, the materials in this collection offer insights into how he contributed significantly throughout his life to European and United States economic growth and reform, through professional service as an analyst, advisor, and expert witness. Organizations that benefited from this work include the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Reserve Bank, the U.S. Congress, and the Treasury Department. Other organizations with whom Modigliani participated and corresponded and are represented in many series in the collection are the offices of the International Economic Association, the American Economic Review, the National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

The Correspondence Series, second largest in the collection, spans all of Modigliani's career, and consists chiefly of professional exchanges initiated by his colleagues in the U.S. and in many other countries. Many of the exchanges are in Italian, though most are in English. Numerous correspondents requested that Modigliani review their writings, and in most cases a draft of their manuscripts can be found in the folder, often accompanied by Modigliani's comments. The correspondence also contains more routine exchanges concerning student advising, academic committees, and activities related to Modigliani's non-academic service. There is very little personal or family correspondence in the collection, though there are some exchanges between Franco Modigliani and his son Andr, sociologist at the University of Michigan, and with his granddaughter Leah, a financial analyst with Morgan Dean Stanley Witter, with whom Modigliani collaborated on a formula for measuring stock risks.

The largest in the collection, the Writings and Speeches Series is subdivided into several subseries, the most extensive of which, the Research and Writings Subseries, contains a wealth of notes, data, subject files, and writings that underpinned and informed nearly all of Modigliani's most significant published works. These extensive files document the evolution of Modigliani's thought on a wide range of economic, social, and political topics, and the amount of materials in this series contributed by his colleagues serves to underscore Modigliani's collaborative approach to research and writing. As much as a third of the material is in Italian. Many of Modigliani's speeches and lectures given around the world, including his Nobel lecture on the life-cycle hypothesis of saving in 1985, can be found in the Speeches and Lectures Subseries. The Non-Academic Writings Subseries contains other writings by Modigliani directed chiefly at a popular audience, in the form of newspaper articles and editorials; while the Writings by Others Subseries houses individual writings, in both manuscript and published form, by Modigliani's colleagues that were not part of the Research and Writings files.

Modigliani spent the greater part of his professional life serving in a number of roles that helped shape the national economic policies in Europe, particularly in Italy, and the United States. The Professional Service Series documents Modigliani's work for various U.S. agencies and organizations. It includes materials from his work under the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), from about 1964 to 1983; these files include agendas, minutes, notes, correspondence, papers, and statistical output relating to FRB meetings and MPS Economic Model. Other files house information relating to his frequent Congressional testimony; his work with the International Economics Association during the seventies and eighties, including conference papers and programs, minutes from executive committee meetings, nominating committee reports, and correspondence; and his other periods of collaboration with the Central Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and others. Materials on Modigliani's lengthy service to Italian and other European governments can be found primarily in the Research and Writings Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series and the Correspondence Series.

The papers in the Teaching Materials Series document Modigliani's career as a professor of economics through lecture notes, syllabi, and some student papers, all filed in the Modigliani as Teacher Subseries. Materials derive chiefly from his tenure at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, although there are some materials from earlier appointments. There are some materials, chiefly class notes, from Modigliani's own student days in the United States in the Modigliani as Student Subseries.

The Personal Files Series is one of the smallest in the collection. It contains materials pertaining to Modigliani's life in Italy and his forced emigration to the United States in 1939, diplomas and honorary degrees, and a number of folders containing biographical information and articles honoring Modigliani's life and work.

Spanning several decades of internationally-recognized work and the awarding of a Nobel prize in 1985, the materials in the Engagements Series, though routine in nature, document the extent to which Modigliani spoke to academics and the ordinary public about issues in economics, via lectures, conferences, and interviews. Files in the Commitments Subseries include routine correspondence, travel arrangements and itineraries, and some writings related to the lecture or speech. The small Calendars Subseries contains appointment books and calendars dating from 1971 to 2003.

In addition to manuscript materials, the collection holds a great number of published writings. These are chiefly housed in the Printed Materials Series and take the form of reports, journals, books, and many reprints of articles. Most of the materials are written by Modigliani, but there are substantial numbers of publications by others in this series. Almost all of the few dozen bound publications originally found in the collection have been cataloged separately for the Duke online catalog and will be housed in the rare books and Perkins Library stacks. They can be accessed by searching the online catalog; a note in the record indicates their original link with these papers. Although nearly all of Modigliani's article-length published works are represented in this series, including early articles from the 1930s, some titles may not be present.

The Audio and Visual Materials Series serves as a repository for photographs, videocassettes, audiocassettes, microfilms, and a few CD-ROMs, which contain interviews, lectures, and speeches given by Modigliani, with a few including contributions by his colleagues. One CD-Rom contains the proceedings from a posthumous conference held in 2005 in remembrance of Modigliani. Family scrapbooks preserved on microfilm are made up of clippings, programs, and other memorabilia related to significant events in Modigliani's career. Use copies may need to be made of some items. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

Digital formats in the collection are grouped under the Electronic Formats Series (RESTRICTED), which contains correspondence, course materials, data, and drafts of writings and speeches. The contents of the disks have been migrated to the Special Collections server. A disk directory is available for use. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this series.

Collection
The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Leo Bogart papers, 1912-2005 and undated 59.4 Linear Feet — 52,259 Items

Leo Bogart was an applied sociologist and mass media expert who was Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau (NAB) from 1960-1989. In his career with the NAB, Bogart pioneered new methodologies in newspaper marketing research and led two major projects during the mid 1970s-1989 to bolster the ailing newspaper industry, the Newspaper Readership Project and the Future of Advertising Project. He was also a prolific author and public speaker, and published 195 articles and 14 books, and delivered over 150 speeches from 1943-2005. The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

Collection

Marshall T. Meyer papers, 1902-2004 and undated, bulk 1984-1993 63.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 48,900 Items

Online
Marshall T. Meyer was an activist rabbi who worked in Argentina during the period of the Dirty War/El Proceso (mid 1970s to mid 1980s). The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The collection contains extensive evidence of Meyer's activities and interests, especially those he engaged in during his tenure at Comunidad Bet el in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and then at B'nai Jeshurun in New York City. The files document Meyer's professional activities, including his often over-lapping roles as religious leader, scholar, and human rights activist. Much of the material in the collection reflects Meyer's devotion and commitment to a socially and politically engaged Conservative Judaism and his involvement with Jewish communities around the world. Meyer was particularly involved in calling attention to human rights violations and working with the victims of violent political oppression in South and Central America in the 1970s and 1980s and then in Palestine, Israel, and the Middle East in the 1990s. Meyer's extensive involvement and leadership in national and international religious, peace, and human rights organizations such as the World Council of Churches are also well-represented, as is his life-long association with his alma maters, Dartmouth College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

The Correspondence Series contains letters in English and Spanish written and received by Meyer (additional correspondence is also contained in Meyer's research files and electronic files). Significant correspondents include Louis Finkelstein, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Shalom Spiegel.

The Writings and Speeches Series holds Meyer's original compositions in English, Spanish, and Hebrew. These compositions include various literary genres (op-eds, newspaper articles, essays) as well as speeches, addresses, and sermons.

The Research Files Series is subdivided into four categories: Geographic, Organizations, People, and Subject. These files may contain correspondence, notes, printed material, writings, and ephemera. The most common themes that run through this series include human rights, Jewish life, rabbinic education, Latin American Jewry, the Middle East, and Argentina's "Disappeared." The Research Files Series displays a deeper level of intellectual involvement by Meyer (e.g. annotations on printed material, categorizing and filing, integration of correspondence)

The Printed Material Series includes newspapers, clippings, monographs, and serials that Meyer collected over the years. Subjects cover similar territory as the research files. Unlike the Research Files, this material is generally not annotated and was less organized.

The Teaching Material Series contains material from classes taught by Meyer.

The Personal Files Series includes material largely outside the scope of Meyer's professional work: photos, memorabilia, schoolwork, and appointment books.

Video and audio recordings of Meyer's engagements are found in the Audiovisual Material Series. These include lectures, speeches, interviews, television appearances, and religious services. Originals of video and audio tape are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of the material.

The Condolences Series contains cards and notes expressing sympathy on Meyer's death. Many of these contain testimonials and reminiscences of his role as rabbi and activist.

Finally, the Electronic Files Series contains transcriptions of documents authored by or related to Meyer, many of which overlap with the content of and the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Teaching Material, and Audiovisual Materials Series.

Collection
Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

Collection

Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007 184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items

Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

Collection
Attorney in Durham, N.C. His wife and son were also prominent N.C. lawyers. The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971. Collection includes Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling Everett's professional career, his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. In addition, transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the Special Collections file server.

The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971, centered around Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling in detail Everett's professional career beginning in Durham N.C., his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. Of particular interest are his discussions of legal cases and local politics. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. Transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the librar file server. Please contact Research Services for access to these files before coming to use the collection.

Collection

Stanley C. Marshall papers, 1944-2005 and undated 17.5 Linear Feet — 11625 Items

Stanley C. Marshall was a pioneer in the field of strategic market planning, and an educator, lecturer, and humanitarian. The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Client files include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Clients include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The collection is organized into four series: Personal Files, Client Files, Professional Files, and Audiovisual Materials.