Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Peter Storey papers, 1950-2014 9 Linear Feet — 11.9 Gigabytes — 5000 Items

South African Methodist Church leader and anti-apartheid activist. The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2006. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2014. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

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This collection (20,700 items, 35.5 linear feet, 1937-1984, bulk 1970-1984) includes office files and correspondence, and records from various organizations, such as the Young Social Democrats and the Youth Institute for Peace in the Middle East. Of note are some materials on prominent socialists, including Eugene Debs, Norman Thomas, and Carl Gershman. There are also important periodicals and special publications from 1937-1968 documenting American labor history, the Jim Crow Era, and civil rights issues in the 1960s. (96-104)

Addition (39,851 items, 66.4 linear feet, 1950-1994, bulk 1980-1994) includes correspondence with local chapters; organizational files on Young Social Democrats clubs, benefits, national conventions, fund raising, the yearly Eugene V. Debs Award dinners, and membership (including membership cards); subject files on people (including Bayard Rustin), other leftist organizations (especially Socialist International), labor unions, and countries and regions (including South Africa, Poland, Spain, the Soviet Union, and Latin America); and publications and newspapers related to socialism. Material also includes 108 electronic computer files that have been migrated to the Special Collections server; 2 cloth banners and 3 plaques/awards; 351 black-and-white photographs; 8 color prints; 4 videocassettes; 243 audio cassette tapes; 2 digital audio tapes; and 4 phonograph records. (01-0079)

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Vernon L. Smith papers, 1938-2007 and undated 103.2 Linear Feet — 3.1 Gigabytes — Approximately 64,500 Items

Economist and faculty member at the University of Arizona specializing in experimental economics, price behavior, and game theory. The Vernon L. Smith Papers span the years 1938-2007, covering the majority of Smith's career as an economist in the United States, from his early collegiate work at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard through his professorship at the University of Arizona. Limited material also exists on consulting work and academic scholarship after he left the University of Arizona in 2002. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Electronic Files, Personal Files, Print Material, Professional Service, Research and Writings, and Teaching Material. Research topics include the development of a methodology for experimental economics; the implementation of experimental economics into the studies of asset trading, capital investment, game theory, environmental economics, price behavior, strategic decision making, and utilities; and economic decision-making, for which Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002.

The Vernon L. Smith Papers span the years 1938-2007, covering the majority of Smith's career as an economist in the United States, from his early collegiate work at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard through his professorship at the University of Arizona. Limited material also exists on consulting work and academic scholarship after he left the University of Arizona in 2002. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Electronic Files, Personal Files, Print Material, Professional Service, Research and Writings, and Teaching Material.

The bulk of the papers reside in the Research and Writings Series, which contains extensive files of Smith's research notes, reprints, and revisions of working papers by Smith and others with added annotations. Broadly speaking, the research files document important developments in experimental economics and Smith's seminal contributions to this field of study. Recurring topics in this series include the development of a methodology for experimental economics; the implementation of experimental economics into the studies of asset trading, capital investment, game theory, environmental economics (e.g., the allocation of natural resources such as water), price behavior, strategic decision making, and utilities; and the behavior toward as well as the psychology behind economic decisions, for which Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002. With his theories on behavioral and experimental economics, in part influenced by Leontief and Hurwicz, Smith analyzed the functioning of institutions and communication systems such as auctions, utility regulation and markets. An electronic version of Smith's History of Experimental Economic Science at the University of Arizona is in the electronic files which have been migrated to a library server. The extensive Print Material Series includes reprints of the journal articles by Smith on similar material, many of which are also available through the Duke Libraries general collections.

In addition to documenting Smith's work in theoretical economics, the Professional Service Series, Research and Writings Series and Teaching Material Series follow his professional activities primarily at the universities of Purdue, Brown, Massachusetts, and especially at Arizona; his role as the Research Director at the Economics Science Lab at the University of Arizona; his participation on various committees; his work with institutions such as the National Science Foundation, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization and the National Academy of Sciences; and his role as a consultant on utility regulation both domestically and internationally.

Finally, the Correspondence Series, contains primarily professional and academic correspondence concerning comments on his work by other economists; comments on other's work, dating from Smith's editorial work for several journals; and academic affairs, including recommendations and organizational letters for classes and seminars. Notable correspondence includes early exchanges with Paul Samuelson concerning Smith's graduate level work. In one folder of miscellaneous personal correspondence at the end of the series, a colleague speaks at length in several letters about the Cuban crisis and civil rights protests.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections in this collection guide.

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Oracles and books on divination (01-045)(28 items, 1.8 linear feet; dated ca. 1970s-1990s and undated), including 17 decks of tarot and other cards, many enclosed in fabric or leather. Shore designed two of the decks, "The Earth Alliance Deck" and "The Earthrise Deck." Also includes sets of runes and I Ching coins, a pendulum, an edition of the I CHING, a rune book edited by Ralph Blum, and other printed material regarding the I CHING and tarot cards.

The addition (01-248) (5131 items, 19.2 linear feet; dated 1953-2000, bulk 1970s-ca. 1998) documents Shor's work on dreams. Includes 41 volumes of meditation and dream journals by Shore (1974-1999); other journals and dream documentation and interpretation by Shor and others; correspondence; and dream-related periodicals, including Dream Network Bulletin. There are also drafts of Shor's poems, short stories, essays, and dream handbooks (ca. 1953-2000), including Unexpected Gifts, Open Channel, Dreaming with Angels, Shared Dreaming, Dream Tool Kit: How to Remember and Encode Your Own Dreams, Small Gifts, and The Swan; records from the Dreamgate Shared Dreaming Project; notes on or from other dream-related workshops; 11 black-and-white and 3 color photographs; and 197 computer disks containing circa 9800 electronic documents.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2018 118.5 Linear Feet — 106.0 lin. ft.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

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The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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Olive Pierce photographs, 1960-2008 24.5 Linear Feet — 700 Items

Documentary photographer based in Rockland (Knox Co.), Maine. The Olive Pierce Photographs span the years 1960-2008. The collection is arranged into three series: Photographs, Manuscripts and Printed Material, and Electronic Material. Documentary black and white photographs taken by Pierce feature Maine life and landscapes from 1960-1993; daily life, political turmoil, and social conditions in urban Massachussetts neighborhoods; and life in Iraq in 1999 and 2003, as well as protests in the U.S. against that war. Also includes manuscript, print, and electronic material related to Pierce's published works and her career as a documentary photographer and teacher of photography.

The Olive Pierce Photographs span the years 1960-2004 and are arranged in three series: Photographs, Manuscripts and Printed Material, and Electronic Material. Documentary black and white photographic prints taken by Olive Pierce focus on New England life and landscapes from 1960-1993, and life in Iraq in 1999 and 2003, as well as protests in the U.S. against that war. The earliest body of Pierce's work (1960-1968) features landscapes and individuals in Maine. A second group of images from Maine assembled by the photographer date from 1963 to 1993. Other prints document social and political controversy in Cambridge, Massachusetts during the early 1970s; social life in the Jefferson Park neighborhood in Cambridge during the 1970s; teenage life in a Cambridge high school in the early 1980s; everyday life of a fisherman's family in Maine from the late 1980s to the early 1990s; the daily lives of Iraqi children in 1999 during the period of UN sanctions; and protests in the U.S. against the war in Iraq. Collection also includes Pierce's "On Teaching Photography" guide (1987); as well as a poster for the exhibition on war protests, "On the Bridge, A Community Speaks: Photographs by Olive Pierce"; a copy of the Fall 2004 issue of Vassar's alumni magazine, which contains a photo-story by Pierce; and a copy of the magazine Maine Times, which contains six photos by Pierce accompanying an article on Iraq war protests in the U.S. (September 2003). Other items include postcards featuring her images of Iraqi children, and proofs for several collections of Pierce's images accompanied by text written by her. The Olive Pierce Photographs were acquired as part of the Duke University Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Mark Perlman papers, 1952-2002 62.7 Linear Feet — 38,450 Items

The papers of university professor and economist Mark Perlman span the dates 1952-1994, with most of the papers being dated between 1967 and 1989. The papers consist chiefly of professional correspondence to and from Perlman, indexes to these letters and a small number of subject files, but include none of his personal papers. The collection documents Perlman's career as an economist and author at Cornell, Johns Hopkins, and the University of Pittsburgh and reflects his interest in work arbitration, trade unions, and the economics of public health. Among correspondents are many noted economists, including Moses Abramovitz, Martin Shubik, and Martin Bronfenbrenner. While many of the letters are personal in nature, others contain considerable information about Perlman's work, particularly in the years around the publication of his works Judges in Industry: A Study of Labor Arbitration in Australia (1954) and Spatial, Regional, and Population Economics: Essays in Honor of Edgar M. Hoover (1972). Additional correspondence relates to the publication of the Journal of Economic Literature.

The correspondence during Perlman's early years at Cornell includes letters in which Perlman and his friends and colleagues discuss their work, their students, and academic life. These early letters also contain travel arrangements for a trip to Australia in connection with his book Judges in Industry and information regarding Perlman's research for the book.

During Perlman's years at Johns Hopkins (1955-1964), much of the correspondence between him and his colleagues concerned Perlman's writings on work arbitration and trade unions. It was during this period that Perlman's interest was drawn to the economics of public health, and his correspondence reflects this through dialogue with other economists and statisticians as well as through inquiries regarding his research and replies from organizations providing requested information. Correspondence also includes letters concerning academic administrative matters, such as recommendations for students and fellow faculty members.

The Journal of Economic Literature correspondence consists of correspondence relating to the publication of the journal, of which Perlman was the founder and editor from 1968 through 1981. The early letters contain information about the formation of the journal. While many letters concern subscription matters, others contain discussion of particular articles, and some have manuscripts attached.

A small series of Subject Files includes correspondence with printers who worked with Perlman on the publication of his monographic works as well as on the Journal of Economic Literature; Perlman's teaching material (including course outlines, syllabi, and tests); a file on seminars established at the University of Pittsburgh to address topics of interest to the cultural life and economy of the city; correspondence with the American Economic Association in Nashville, Tennessee; and printed material and research papers submitted to a conference of which Mark Perlman was on the Program Committee. The conference, entitled "Human Resources, Employment, and Development," was held in Mexico in 1980.

Addition (acc# 1997-0208)(1500 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1991-1996) contains professional correspondence for 1995, an alphabetical index for all letters 1991-1996, and numerical indexes for correspondence during each year from 1991 to 1996.

Addition (acc# 1999-0188)(1200 items, 3 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) contains incoming and outgoing correspondence for 1996 and 1997, arranged in numerical order as assigned by Perlman. It also includes a chronological index for 1996-1997 correspondence, and an alphabetical index for letters dated 1991-1997.

Addition (acc# 2000-0098)(750 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1998) includes professional correspondence from 1998 and a printout of the numerical index for correspondence of that year. Also includes electronic numerical indexes for correspondence 1994-1999. Computer files have been migrated to the electronic records server.

Addition (acc# 2001-0071)(1000 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1999) is comprised of primarily personal and professional correspondence from 1999, with frequent reference to Perlman's writings and lectures and to other economists and their views. Also included on paper and as 6 electronic documents are correspondence indexes: a chronological index for 1999 and alphabetical indexes for the years 1991-1999. All indexes contain summaries of each letter's contents. The computer files have been migrated to the electronic records server. A container list was not created for this accession.

Addition (acc# 2002-0119)(750 items, 1.2 linear feet; dated 1991-2001) contains primarily personal and professional correspondence from 2000-2001. Also includes on paper and as 6 electronic documents an alphabetical index of correspondence for 1991-2001 with summaries of each letter's contents. A container list was not created for this accession.

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Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007 184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items

Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

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Primarily consists of Executive Board and Sector and Advisory Groups correspondence, memoranda, and meeting records; financial and planning documents, including grant applications; and workshop, seminar, and presentation materials that document the organization's activities to raise awareness of and promote action on the causes of poverty in N.C. Also includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, and other writings by the executive director, J. Gordon Chamberlin; telephone logs and appointment books; various printed material concerning poverty in NC; 11 audio and 15 videocassettes; 134 black-and-white and 10 color prints; 10 color negatives; and 8 data cartridge tapes. (02-234)

The 2006 addition (2006-0055)(600 items, 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1986-2004) contains correspondence, meeting records, publications, and other documents generated by the North Carolina Poverty Project and the Poverty Coalition. Also included is an oversize 7 panel Poverty Display.

The 2007 addition (2007-0023)(3300 items, 4.4 lin. ft.; dated 1982-2003) contains documents related to the executive board including correspondence, financial documents, and planning documents; tax information; documents related to conferences and business trips; photocopies and clippings of articles related to poverty from the New York Times and other newspapers (1986-2001); and lists of library holdings of poverty books at Southeastern universities.

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Franco Modigliani was an economist, Nobel Prize winner, and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Collection contains correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings that documents the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials.

The Franco Modigliani Papers span the years 1936 to 2005, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2003. Through correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings, the papers document the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The most current items are a DVD recording of his memorial held at MIT in 2003, and a thesis by an Italian graduate student on Modigliani's macroeconomic views on the Italian and European economy, of the same year. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials. The collection is organized into the following series: Correspondence; Writings and Speeches; Teaching Materials; Professional Service; Engagements; Printed Materials; Personal Files; Audio and Visual Materials; and Electronic Formats. Oversize materials are described at the end of the collection guide.

Researchers will find ample documentation in the collection on Modigliani's work on the life-cycle hypothesis of savings, leading to the Nobel Prize in 1985. Other materials represent his work on topics and issues such as monetary policies, both domestic and foreign; pension trusts; public debt; econometric modelling; international finance and the international payment system; the effects of and cures for inflation; stabilization policies in open economies; and various fields of finance such as savings and investment, credit rationing, mortgages, the term structure of interest rates, and the valuation of speculative assets. Extensive documentation can also be found in the collection on Modigliani's key participation in the design of a large-scale model of the U.S. economy, called the MPS (an abbreviation deriving from collaborators MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Social Science Research Council), sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank, a model used by the U.S. government until the 1990s. Other documents reveal Modigliani's analyses of the forces of economics and politics in the United States as well as in Italy and the European Union as a whole. His views on various social issues, including the arms race, are found throughout the papers, especially in the many editorials and commentaries he wrote for newspapers and other publications. The materials in this collection reveal the high value that Modigliani placed on collaboration with other economists and with graduate students, with whom he exchanged letters, notes, and drafts of writings and commentary. Researchers examining the correspondence and writings will find the comments, replies, and writings of his many colleagues on the same range of topics. Significant correspondents or collaborators documented in the collection include European and American economists such as Albert Ando, with whom he collaborated on the MPS model, Mario Baldassarri, John Bossons, Jacques Drèze, Merton Miller, Paul Samuelson and James Tobin. Many other major economists of the twentieth century, as well as many political and academic individuals, are represented in smaller amounts of writings and correspondence.

In addition to illuminating Modigliani's distinguished academic career and his collaborative approach to teaching and research, the materials in this collection offer insights into how he contributed significantly throughout his life to European and United States economic growth and reform, through professional service as an analyst, advisor, and expert witness. Organizations that benefited from this work include the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Reserve Bank, the U.S. Congress, and the Treasury Department. Other organizations with whom Modigliani participated and corresponded and are represented in many series in the collection are the offices of the International Economic Association, the American Economic Review, the National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

The Correspondence Series, second largest in the collection, spans all of Modigliani's career, and consists chiefly of professional exchanges initiated by his colleagues in the U.S. and in many other countries. Many of the exchanges are in Italian, though most are in English. Numerous correspondents requested that Modigliani review their writings, and in most cases a draft of their manuscripts can be found in the folder, often accompanied by Modigliani's comments. The correspondence also contains more routine exchanges concerning student advising, academic committees, and activities related to Modigliani's non-academic service. There is very little personal or family correspondence in the collection, though there are some exchanges between Franco Modigliani and his son Andr, sociologist at the University of Michigan, and with his granddaughter Leah, a financial analyst with Morgan Dean Stanley Witter, with whom Modigliani collaborated on a formula for measuring stock risks.

The largest in the collection, the Writings and Speeches Series is subdivided into several subseries, the most extensive of which, the Research and Writings Subseries, contains a wealth of notes, data, subject files, and writings that underpinned and informed nearly all of Modigliani's most significant published works. These extensive files document the evolution of Modigliani's thought on a wide range of economic, social, and political topics, and the amount of materials in this series contributed by his colleagues serves to underscore Modigliani's collaborative approach to research and writing. As much as a third of the material is in Italian. Many of Modigliani's speeches and lectures given around the world, including his Nobel lecture on the life-cycle hypothesis of saving in 1985, can be found in the Speeches and Lectures Subseries. The Non-Academic Writings Subseries contains other writings by Modigliani directed chiefly at a popular audience, in the form of newspaper articles and editorials; while the Writings by Others Subseries houses individual writings, in both manuscript and published form, by Modigliani's colleagues that were not part of the Research and Writings files.

Modigliani spent the greater part of his professional life serving in a number of roles that helped shape the national economic policies in Europe, particularly in Italy, and the United States. The Professional Service Series documents Modigliani's work for various U.S. agencies and organizations. It includes materials from his work under the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), from about 1964 to 1983; these files include agendas, minutes, notes, correspondence, papers, and statistical output relating to FRB meetings and MPS Economic Model. Other files house information relating to his frequent Congressional testimony; his work with the International Economics Association during the seventies and eighties, including conference papers and programs, minutes from executive committee meetings, nominating committee reports, and correspondence; and his other periods of collaboration with the Central Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and others. Materials on Modigliani's lengthy service to Italian and other European governments can be found primarily in the Research and Writings Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series and the Correspondence Series.

The papers in the Teaching Materials Series document Modigliani's career as a professor of economics through lecture notes, syllabi, and some student papers, all filed in the Modigliani as Teacher Subseries. Materials derive chiefly from his tenure at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, although there are some materials from earlier appointments. There are some materials, chiefly class notes, from Modigliani's own student days in the United States in the Modigliani as Student Subseries.

The Personal Files Series is one of the smallest in the collection. It contains materials pertaining to Modigliani's life in Italy and his forced emigration to the United States in 1939, diplomas and honorary degrees, and a number of folders containing biographical information and articles honoring Modigliani's life and work.

Spanning several decades of internationally-recognized work and the awarding of a Nobel prize in 1985, the materials in the Engagements Series, though routine in nature, document the extent to which Modigliani spoke to academics and the ordinary public about issues in economics, via lectures, conferences, and interviews. Files in the Commitments Subseries include routine correspondence, travel arrangements and itineraries, and some writings related to the lecture or speech. The small Calendars Subseries contains appointment books and calendars dating from 1971 to 2003.

In addition to manuscript materials, the collection holds a great number of published writings. These are chiefly housed in the Printed Materials Series and take the form of reports, journals, books, and many reprints of articles. Most of the materials are written by Modigliani, but there are substantial numbers of publications by others in this series. Almost all of the few dozen bound publications originally found in the collection have been cataloged separately for the Duke online catalog and will be housed in the rare books and Perkins Library stacks. They can be accessed by searching the online catalog; a note in the record indicates their original link with these papers. Although nearly all of Modigliani's article-length published works are represented in this series, including early articles from the 1930s, some titles may not be present.

The Audio and Visual Materials Series serves as a repository for photographs, videocassettes, audiocassettes, microfilms, and a few CD-ROMs, which contain interviews, lectures, and speeches given by Modigliani, with a few including contributions by his colleagues. One CD-Rom contains the proceedings from a posthumous conference held in 2005 in remembrance of Modigliani. Family scrapbooks preserved on microfilm are made up of clippings, programs, and other memorabilia related to significant events in Modigliani's career. Use copies may need to be made of some items. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

Digital formats in the collection are grouped under the Electronic Formats Series (RESTRICTED), which contains correspondence, course materials, data, and drafts of writings and speeches. The contents of the disks have been migrated to the Special Collections server. A disk directory is available for use. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this series.

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Collection consists primarily of television commercials, although it includes some radio commercials, which were entered for Mobius awards presented in 1971-1999. Most of the collection is divided into two main series, North America and International. Commercials are judged by product type/category as well as budget size. Also included are brochures and press releases which describe the award process ca. 1970s-1990s (98-156 box 68). There are compilation tapes documenting the award-winning entries for 1990-1997 (98-156 box 69). (Accessions 1997-0101: 12,237 items, 850.5 linear feet, dated 1984-1991, undated; 1998-0156: 1500 items, 105 linear feet, dated 1971-1997; 1999-0152: 1200 items, 112.5 linear feet, dated 1997-1998). An encoded container list has not been created for these additions. Please consult the paper finding aids located in the repository.

The addition (1999-0440) (1100 items, 117 linear feet; dated 1998) consists entirely of videotaped television commercial entries for Mobius awards presented in 1999; the commercials aired in 1998. The collection is divided into two main series: North American and International. The tapes are then ordered according to product type/category (105 in all) ranging from automotive, children's products, commercial products, food, home care, set design, talent, and others. The entries document what ad agencies feel are their best works from the U.S. and abroad.

The addition (2001-0156) (1373 items, 88 linear feet; dated 2000) consists of 1072 videotaped television commercial entries for Mobius awards, most likely presented in 2000. The collection is divided into two main series: North American and International. In addition there are 285 cassettes and 16 reel-to-reel audiotapes containing radio advertising entries, also divided into North American and International categories. The entries document what ad agencies feel are their best works from the U.S. and abroad.

The addition (2002-0187) (816 items, 31 linear feet; dated 2001) consists of videotaped television commercial entries for the 2001 Mobius Awards. The collection is divided into two main series: North American and International. The video cassettes are mainly BetacamSP. There are also 176 audiocassettes containing radio commercials and 13 electronic documents on 7 CD-ROMs. Each entry is assigned a code that indicates the category in which it was entered in the competition.

The addition (2004-0103) (705 items; 27 linear feet; dated 2002) consists of videotaped television commercial entries for the 2002 Mobius Awards. The collection is divided into two main series: North American and International. The video cassettes are mainly VHS and BetacamSP. There are also 119 CD-ROMs. Eight audiocassettes contain radio commercials. Each entry is assigned a code that indicates the category in which it was entered in the competition.

Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Marshall T. Meyer papers, 1902-2004 and undated, bulk 1984-1993 63.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 48,900 Items

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Marshall T. Meyer was an activist rabbi who worked in Argentina during the period of the Dirty War/El Proceso (mid 1970s to mid 1980s). The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The collection contains extensive evidence of Meyer's activities and interests, especially those he engaged in during his tenure at Comunidad Bet el in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and then at B'nai Jeshurun in New York City. The files document Meyer's professional activities, including his often over-lapping roles as religious leader, scholar, and human rights activist. Much of the material in the collection reflects Meyer's devotion and commitment to a socially and politically engaged Conservative Judaism and his involvement with Jewish communities around the world. Meyer was particularly involved in calling attention to human rights violations and working with the victims of violent political oppression in South and Central America in the 1970s and 1980s and then in Palestine, Israel, and the Middle East in the 1990s. Meyer's extensive involvement and leadership in national and international religious, peace, and human rights organizations such as the World Council of Churches are also well-represented, as is his life-long association with his alma maters, Dartmouth College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

The Correspondence Series contains letters in English and Spanish written and received by Meyer (additional correspondence is also contained in Meyer's research files and electronic files). Significant correspondents include Louis Finkelstein, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Shalom Spiegel.

The Writings and Speeches Series holds Meyer's original compositions in English, Spanish, and Hebrew. These compositions include various literary genres (op-eds, newspaper articles, essays) as well as speeches, addresses, and sermons.

The Research Files Series is subdivided into four categories: Geographic, Organizations, People, and Subject. These files may contain correspondence, notes, printed material, writings, and ephemera. The most common themes that run through this series include human rights, Jewish life, rabbinic education, Latin American Jewry, the Middle East, and Argentina's "Disappeared." The Research Files Series displays a deeper level of intellectual involvement by Meyer (e.g. annotations on printed material, categorizing and filing, integration of correspondence)

The Printed Material Series includes newspapers, clippings, monographs, and serials that Meyer collected over the years. Subjects cover similar territory as the research files. Unlike the Research Files, this material is generally not annotated and was less organized.

The Teaching Material Series contains material from classes taught by Meyer.

The Personal Files Series includes material largely outside the scope of Meyer's professional work: photos, memorabilia, schoolwork, and appointment books.

Video and audio recordings of Meyer's engagements are found in the Audiovisual Material Series. These include lectures, speeches, interviews, television appearances, and religious services. Originals of video and audio tape are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of the material.

The Condolences Series contains cards and notes expressing sympathy on Meyer's death. Many of these contain testimonials and reminiscences of his role as rabbi and activist.

Finally, the Electronic Files Series contains transcriptions of documents authored by or related to Meyer, many of which overlap with the content of and the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Teaching Material, and Audiovisual Materials Series.

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Stanley C. Marshall papers, 1944-2005 and undated 17.5 Linear Feet — 11625 Items

Stanley C. Marshall was a pioneer in the field of strategic market planning, and an educator, lecturer, and humanitarian. The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Client files include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The Stanley C. Marshall Papers span the years 1944-2005 and include client files, speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, advertising and civic awards, photographs, slides, audiocassettes and audiotapes, videocassettes and videotapes, motion picture film reels, and digital audio tape that document Marshall's career as a strategic marketing planner and consultant, as well as his involvement with humanitarian projects. The collection reflects Marshall's work for advertising and marketing firms, including Lando, Marsteller Advertising, and his own company, Stanley Marshall, Inc. Clients include 3M, Black Box, Delta Dental Plan, General Electric, International Management Center, PPG, Pure Industries (Stackpole), Scott Fetzer (Berkshire Hathaway), Sony, United Jewish Foundation, and Westinghouse. Also documented are Marshall's activities with public service and educational organizations that include UNICEF, the Conflict Resolution Center, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED, a project of the Urban League of Pittsburgh), the Network of International Business Schools (NIBS), and the Penn Technical Institute (a junior college, now part of the Pittsburgh Technical Institute). A significant portion of the files relate to businesses and institutions in the Pittsburgh, Pa., area.

The collection is organized into four series: Personal Files, Client Files, Professional Files, and Audiovisual Materials.

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Collection (02-197) contains primarily presentations and reports in videotape and paper format made to and at World Partner Council meetings (1996-1997). Also includes Andy Fenning's files of reports and manuals in paper, video, slide, and digital format prepared for or received at management meetings, a "Transformation" seminar (1997), and other speeches and presentations. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History.

The addition (02-194) consists of material gathered from office of Andy Fenning upon his departure from JWT, but representing the work of many people and JWT offices. Contains material related to MindShare (the media collaboration between JWT and the Ogilvy and Mather agency), and information and examples from the rollout and early days of the Thompson Total Branding approach. Comprises primarily an assortment of videotapes, 1978-2000, including showreels, historical reels, commercial spots, interviews, meetings, and other segments. Also includes a small number of files containing speeches, reports, presentations, and other materials.

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Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. It is headquartered in New York. Collection includes correspondence, track listings, transcriptions, and other printed materials, audio and video cassettes (Betacam SP, VHS and Umatic), DAT, optical media (CDs, DVDs. etc.), 16mm film reels, phonograph records, and computer media. JWT management events documented in the collection include Cannes and Effies Awards submissions, Epcot, Executive Committee, Worldwide Creative Council, speeches and presentations by top managers as well as interviews undertaken as part of an oral history project at JWT. Offices represented include North America, Europe, Great Britain, India, Asia and Latin America. Main companies include California Lottery, Chase & Sanborn, Chevron, Del Taco, Diageo, Diamond Trading Company (DeBeers), Domino's, Ford, HSBC, Jenny Craig, JetBlue, Kaiser Permanente, Kimberly-Clark, Kodak, Kraft, Lipton, Macy's, Mexicana Airlines, Standard Brands, Trailways, Warner-Lambert, Weight Watchers and Wyeth. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection includes correspondence, track listings, transcriptions, and other printed materials, audio and video cassettes (Betacam SP, VHS and Umatic), DAT, optical media (CDs, DVDs. etc.), 16mm film reels, phonograph records, and computer media. JWT management events documented in the collection include Cannes and Effies Awards submissions, Epcot, Executive Committee, Worldwide Creative Council, speeches and presentations by top managers as well as interviews undertaken as part of an oral history project at JWT. Offices represented include North America, Europe, Great Britain, India, Asia and Latin America. Main companies include California Lottery, Chase & Sanborn, Chevron, Del Taco, Diageo, Diamond Trading Company (DeBeers), Domino's, Ford, HSBC, Jenny Craig, JetBlue, Kaiser Permanente, Kimberly-Clark, Kodak, Kraft, Lipton, Macy's, Mexicana Airlines, Standard Brands, Trailways, Warner-Lambert, Weight Watchers and Wyeth. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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This collection (94-110) (27,000 items, 50 linear feet, dated 1908-1989) consists mostly of vertical files, including office newsletters, speeches and writings, publications, training and planning documents from Chicago and other JWT offices. There are also 78 reels of microfilm of Chicago office ads prior to 1970, as well as significant collections of proof files especially pertaining to major clients like Kraft, Quaker Oats, and Schlitz. In addition, the collection holds several hundred "Aber Reports" dating between 1950-1971, which were market research summations of various product categories. A container list for this accession follows below.

Subsequent additions (96-169, 99-130, 99-239) (8514 items; dated 1970-1998) contain an item-level index to the massive library of research reports maintained by JWT's Chicago Office. Materials are arranged in alphabetical order; the largest alphabetical run is by company name. There are also cards for "X" and "AV" reports, general research reports, and an index to JWT People Profiles. Also included are printed proceedings from international symposia on magazine readership research for 1981, 1983, 1985, 1988, and 1991, including copies of some of the previously unpublished papers and related printed material (1998). These materials reveal the lengths to which advertisers go to gain insight into consumer thinking. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising and Marketing History. A container list for accession 99-130 follows below.

Addition (01-110) (70 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated [1980s]) consists of about 70 color slides depicting people, events, and locations within the company's Chicago offices.

Addition (02-0188) (397 items, 8.7 linear feet; dated 1980-2000 and undated) comprises primarily information on and examples of Thompson Total Branding (TTB), including in the US, England, Jamaica, and Asia. TTB began in 1996 and is JWT's method for addressing client marketing needs. Also includes copies of earlier methodologies, the T-Plan and Thompson Way; employee manuals; training material; J. Walter University intern/trainee manual (2000); information about the Lintas, McCann-Erickson, and Ogilvy and Mather agencies; material from JWT's World Partners Council meetings (Italy, 1995; Mexico, 1997) and marketing seminars held in the agency's Asia-Pacific region; six 3/4" U-matic SP and 11 VHS videocassettes, mainly of presentations and training material (1980s-1990s); 1 audiocassette; 47 color slides; and 208 electronic documents on 2 CD-ROMs. A container list for this accession follows below.

Several accessions of the JWT Chicago Office Records were completely or partially deaccessioned at the request of the JWT Chicago and returned to the JWT Record Center. These involved proprietary research in which the clients still retained an interest. The accessions involved were: 95-016 (10 boxes); 95-015 (7 boxes); 95-018 (2 boxes); 95-017 (1 box); and 99-0130 (28 boxes). For further information, contact Research Services.

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Leonid Hurwicz papers, 1911-2008 and undated 150 Linear Feet — Approx. 200,000 Items

Leonid Hurwicz (1917-2008) was Regents' Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Minnesota and recipient of the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science for his work on mechanism design. The bulk of the Leonid Hurwicz papers span the years 1930-2008, covering his entire career as an economist, from his early work in the 1940s and 1950s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Chicago, and the Cowles Commission, until his death in 2008. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials, Professional Service, Research and Writings (about 70% of the collection), and Teaching Materials. Though there are correspondence, legal, financial, and other papers relating to Hurwicz's forced migration to the United States, there have been no items discovered documenting his training as an economist at the University of Warsaw or at the London School of Economics in the 1930s. The majority of the collection focuses on Hurwicz's work after 1970, most notably his collaborations with Stanley Reiter, Kenneth Arrow, Don Saari, Thomas Marschak and Marcel Richter.

The bulk of the Leonid Hurwicz Papers span the years 1930-2008, covering his entire career as an economist in the United States, from his early work at MIT, the University of Chicago and the Cowles Commission until his death while Emeritus Professor at the University of Minnesota. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials, Professional Service Series, Research and Writings, and Teaching Materials. Though there are correspondence, legal, financial, and other papers documenting his migration to the United States, there have been no items discovered that document his training as an economist at the University of Warsaw or at the London School of Economics. The majority of the collection focuses on Hurwicz's work after 1970, most notably his collaborations with Stanley Reiter, Kenneth Arrow, Don Saari, Thomas Marschak and Marcel Richter.

Though there is a significant amount of personal and professional correspondence, the majority of the papers reside in the 142 boxes of the Research and Writings Series, which contains extensive files of Hurwicz's research notes, reprints, and revisions of working papers by Hurwicz and others with added annotations. The research files document important developments in postwar mathematical economics and Hurwicz's seminal contributions to this field of study.

Recurring subjects in Research and Writings include Cowles-style econometrics; the stability of general equilibrium; the integrability of demand functions; the study of monopolies and oligopolies, as well as socialized systems; decision-making under ambiguity; the second welfare theorem; the applications of game theory to economic, social and political issues; and the development of mechanism design, for which Hurwicz was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2007. With his theories on mechanism design (including the notion of incentive-compatibility), Hurwicz analyzed the functioning of institutions and communication systems such as banking, auctions, and privatized markets, and compared political systems such as socialism and capitalism.

In addition to documenting Hurwicz's work in theoretical economics, the collection also follows his professional activities at the University of Minnesota, both as a teacher and as an active member of the Economics Department, his participation on various committees, and his work with institutions such as the Cowles Commission, RAND corporation, the National Science Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in evidence is Hurwicz's interest in the development of foreign economies, with an emphasis on East Asia, Russia, and Eastern Europe. His numerous travels and presentations during his career as well as his continuous relations with European and Asian economists are documented chiefly in the Professional Service Series. Finally, the Printed Materials Series as well as the Research and Writings Series offer a significant amount of works by others documenting the development of recent economics. Many are heavily annotated by Hurwicz.

Electronic files which were readable have been transferred to the electronic records server. They consist chiefly of word processing documents containing drafts of Informational Efficiency, which Hurwicz co-authored with Reiter in the late 1990s. A use copy of original electronic files must be made before contents can be accessed; please contact Research Services before coming to use this material.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections in this collection guide.

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Josephine Humphreys papers, 1946-1993 and undated 27.7 Linear Feet — 11,900 Items

The collection documents Humphreys' professional life as an author. It contains correspondence between Humphreys and other writers and editors; business contracts with Viking Press and others for her publications and for movie rights; handwritten and typed manuscripts and proofs for her books Dreams of Sleep, Rich in Love, and Fireman's Fair, as well as typescripts of works by other authors (including Robb Forman Dew and Louise Erdrich); reviews of her own work as well as reviews written by Humphreys of others' works; and information detailing her speaking engagements and interviews. In addition, the collection contains clippings of reviews and interviews, photographs and negatives (16 black-and-white, 4 color, and 23 negatives); audiotapes from a "Women in Literature" series in which Humphreys participated; and 10 electronic files of book manuscripts, especially Dreams of Sleep, originally on computer disks and now migrated to the electronic records server. Also included are books inscribed to Humphreys and seven scrapbooks containing additional correspondence regarding her work as well as reviews.

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The collection consists largely of professional papers including subject and research files, correspondence, and writings. Materials pertain to Hulka's involvement in the education, promotion, innovation, and application of women's and reproductive health. Specific topics include laparoscopy, abortion rights, contraception, professional organizations, medical procedures, and educational materials. The collection also includes examples of medical instruments (some of which were developed and patented by Hulka), especially a variety of international IUDs and other forms of contraception including the eponymous "Hulka clip." Also contains drawings and photographs of surgical procedures; educational and presentation slides; blueprints of medical instruments; and correspondence and essays provided by colleagues and students. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

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History of Political Economy records, 1967-2011 128.9 Linear Feet — 16,000 Items

Collection (1998-0229, 1998-0450, 1998-0455, 1999-0318, 1999-0365, 2000-0152, 2000-0184) (11950 items, 109.6 lin. ft.; dated 1967-1999) contains the files of published and unpublished manuscripts on the history of economics, arranged for the most part in chronological groupings and then alphabetically by author, along with referees' comments and editors' correspondence.

The addition (2001-0018) (100 items, 0.3 lin. ft.; dated 1995-1998) contains 23 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence.

The addition (2001-119) (450 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2000) comprises files of published and rejected manuscripts. There is also information pertaining to the founding of the journal.

The addition (2001-0180) (200 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2001) contains rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2001-0194) (150 items, 1.0 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2001) contains 40 manuscripts accepted for publication and their associated correspondence. Five manuscripts included machine-readable records.

The addition (2001-0261) (525 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1994-1999) contains correspondence related to published and unpublished articles, primarily for volume 32. Includes 1 electronic document received on one floppy disk.

The addition (2002-0172) (1500 items, 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2002) comprises correspondence related to articles published in volumes 31.4, 33.2, and 34.2 as well as rejected articles. There are also folders related to HOPE conferences (1997-1999).

The addition (2003-0140) (130 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2003) includes published manuscripts for the Spring and Fall 2003 issues, as well as rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2003-0186) (375 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2003) consists of records for issues 32.1, 32.2, 34.1, 34.3, 34.4, and 35.1, including published and rejected manuscripts, and correspondence.

The addition (2004-0100) (250 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2004) consists of files containing rejected manuscripts, primarily from 2002-2003, along with related correspondence and readers' reports.

The addition (2006-0059) (1875 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains files of unpublished and rejected manuscripts with related correspondence and peer reviews; and files of accepted manuscripts for issues 36.2, 36.3, 36.4, 37.2, and 37.4.

The addition (2007-0163) (950 items; 1.4 lin. ft.; dated 2003-2006) contains files of articles submitted for publication and correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions related to these articles. Also included are submissions that were rejected from publication.

The addition (2007-0164) (450 items; 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 2005-2006) includes manuscripts, revisions, and correspondence for articles published in issues 39.4 and 40.1; and rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0265) (750 items; 1 lin. ft.; dated 2008) includes correspondence, manuscripts, and revisions for articles published in issues 40.1 and 40.2; also rejected manuscripts.

The addition (2008-0315) (900 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2008) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.1 and 41.2.

The addition (2009-0167) (800 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2009) includes rejected manuscripts and accepted articles for issues 41.3 and 41.4.

The addition (2010-0085) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2010) includes accepted and rejected manuscripts from issues 42.3.

The addition (2010-0124) (100 items; 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2010) includes correspondence between HOPE editors and authors regarding accepted articles for issue 42.4

The addition (2011-1007) (200 items; 0.5 lin. ft.; dated 2011-2012) includes accepted articles and papers for issues 43.3, 43.4, and 44.1.

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Stanley Hauerwas is a Duke Divinity School professor. Collection contains personal and professional materials documenting Hauerwas's career as an ethicist, professor, and scholar at the Duke University Divinity School and School of Law. Includes correspondence, lectures, professional engagement files, committee work, drafts, publications, and other assorted materials. Collection is closed pending processing.

Letters to Hauerwas (28,403 items, 52.25 linear feet; dated 1972-2000) from Paul Ramsey discussing points of theology and Christian ethics; correspondence, addresses and writings, clippings, and notes relating to Hauerwas's work as a Christian ethicist; a copy of Ramsey's work Speak Up for Just War or Pacifism that contains an epilogue by Hauerwas, and Ramsey's letters to Hauerwas regarding the completion of the book; other papers on the ethical questions surrounding the issue of Christianity and war; 19 essays on Ramsey by various authors; and subject files focusing on conferences, workshops, topical subject areas, and writings and speeches by Hauerwas and others. There is also correspondence regarding the work of students and colleagues; university committees; events; publications; reviews of Dispatches from the Front; and miscellaneous materials. Container lists exist for a portion of this material. (88-017, 89-035, 95-111, 98-419, 99-003, 00-296, 00-333)

The addition to the collection (2001-0138) (939 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1991-1999) includes professional correspondence and recommendations for graduate students he mentored; drafts and finished essays by Hauerwas, his colleagues, graduate students, and those published in The Hauerwas Reader (Duke University Press, 2001); and materials relating to Hauerwas' conference attendance (ca. 1991-1999). There are also 39 electronic documents originally on three 3.5" diskettes and migrated to the electronic records server. A container list was not created for this accession.

The addition to the collection (2001-0181)(2175 items, 3.4 linear feet; dated 1993-1999) comprises primarily incoming and copies of outgoing correspondence with students, former students, and colleagues, including drafts of essays. Also includes material on conferences Hauerwas attended.

The addition (2002-0236) (3325 items, 5.2 linear feet; dated 1962-2002) is comprised of Hauerwas' lectures and course materials, professional correspondence, printed material, and reviews of his publications. Also includes his graduate student and event files.

The addition (2003-0116) (2175 items, 3.4 linear feet; dated 1990-2003) is chiefly comprised of incoming professional correspondence, including commentary on the religious aspects of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001; also includes recommendations written by Hauerwas; drafts and finished essays by Hauerwas and others; and correspondence, essays, and other materials relating to conferences Hauerwas attended.

The addition (2003-0144) (3150 items, 5.0 linear feet; dated 1992-2003) contains mainly essays received by or written by Hauerwas; as well as incoming and outgoing correspondence with former students, colleagues and others.

Additions (2007-082 and 2007-083)(2100 items, 2.8 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2003) contains files related to former students and colleagues, as well as information about conferences. The files primarily include correspondence, drafts of essays, doctoral exams, and recommendations.

The addition (2008-0123) (13500 items; 19 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2005) contains subject files, correspondence and other professional files collected while Sarah Freedman was Hauerwas' assistant.

Addition (2009-0094) (2 items; 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2006 and no date) contains two DVDs with programs by Hauerwas: the inaugural Will D. Campbell lecture series on Faith and Social Justices (2006) and "Why Religious Diversity is a Bad Idea," from the Chicago Sunday Evening Club.

Additions (2009-0272 and 2009-0273) (7200 items; 9.6 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2008) include travel materials, research and writings, and coursework and student correspondence from 2002-2006. Also includes reactions and press from Hauerwas's Time Magazine award (2001) and a manuscript of his book 'Hannah's Child' (summer 2008).

Addition (2012-0039) (3.0 lin. ft.) contains speaking/travel files, student files, correspondence, and writings. Arranged alphabetically within sub-series.

Addition (2012-0108) (3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1990-2001) contains Hauerwas's writing files, including some editorial correspondence and notes, arranged alphabetically by title.

Addition (2019-0074) (6.2 lin. ft.; dated 1981-2018) contains primarily travel and lecture files, along with reviews, biographical information, correspondence, research files, and contracts.

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David Richmond Gergen papers, 1964-1999 (bulk 1971-1992) 216.7 Linear Feet — 121,428 Items

Counselor, special advisor, director of communications, and speech writer to U.S. Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and Clinton. Gergen has also worked as a journalist, serving as Editor-at-large of U.S. News and World Report and as a regular analyst on the "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" and the "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer." A native of Durham, N.C., Gergen graduated from Yale University and the Harvard Law School and served for three-and-a-half years in the U.S. Navy. The collection includes materials from Gergen's career in politics as well as his journalism career. Among his political materials are presidential campaign materials for the 1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 elections; subject files; office memos; chronological files and telephone logs; daily planners; and legal and financial papers; as well as drafts and transcripts of Gergen's and other's speeches. The collection includes 86 black-and-white and color photographs, 16 audio cassettes; and 106 video cassettes. Other materials document his journalism career, including editorials, interoffice memos, and other U.S. News and World Report documents; financial and subject files relating to his work as an analyst on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour; speeches; correspondence, chronological files, and telephone logs; and financial papers. The addition contains 445 electronic computer files; 5 color and 40 black-and-white photographs; 16 slides; and 82 video cassettes; as well as 35 audio cassettes. The audio and video cassettes include interviews with Richard Nixon and Ross Perot.

This collection (74,159 items, dated 1964-1999) documents David Gergen's professional life as a speech writer, director of communications, and special counsel for U.S. Secretary of the Treasury William E. Simon and for Presidents Nixon, Ford, and Reagan. The materials include presidential campaign materials for the 1972, 1976, 1980, and 1984 elections; subject files; office memos; chronological files and telephone logs; daily planners; and legal and financial papers; as well as drafts and transcripts of Gergen's and other's speeches. The collection includes 86 black-and-white and color photographs, 16 audio cassettes; and 106 video cassettes. (2000-0356)

The addition (47,269 items, dated 1987-1996) continues to document David Gergen's involvement in national politics, as both Counselor and Special Advisor to President Clinton from 1993 to 1995, and as a journalist. Materials include editorials, interoffice memos, and otherU.S. News and World Report documents; financial and subject files relating to his work as an analyst on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour; speeches; correspondence, chronological files, and telephone logs; and financial papers. The addition contains 445 electronic computer files; 5 color and 40 black-and-white photographs; 16 slides; and 82 video cassettes; as well as 35 audio cassettes. The audio and video cassettes include interviews with Richard Nixon and Ross Perot. (2000-0415)

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Attorney in Durham, N.C. His wife and son were also prominent N.C. lawyers. The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971. Collection includes Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling Everett's professional career, his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. In addition, transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the Special Collections file server.

The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971, centered around Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling in detail Everett's professional career beginning in Durham N.C., his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. Of particular interest are his discussions of legal cases and local politics. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. Transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the librar file server. Please contact Research Services for access to these files before coming to use the collection.

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Robin Chandler Lynn Duke papers, [ca. 1930]-2009 56.2 Linear Feet — 81747 Items

Robin Chandler Lynn Duke held office or was active in a number of organizations including Population Action International, the National Abortion Rights Action League, The Packard Foundation, the Draper World Population Fund, and several major corporations. Married to Ambassador Angier B. Duke. Collection (22100 items, dated 1942-2000) contains items related to Duke's extensive involvement in abortion rights, family planning, and population studies organizations. Series within the collection include correspondence, clippings, writings, publications, miscellaneous, photographs, and subject files. A substantial amount of correspondence from Duke was written to members of the U.S. House and Senate, and was written by Duke in her capacity as National Chair of Population Action International. Books and pamphlets report on population studies, child education, family planning, violence against women, and international education. Organizations represented in the collection include Population Action International, the Draper World Population Fund, Planned Parenthood, NARAL (National Abortion Rights Action League), "The Anatomy of Hate" conference, and the National Abortion Federation.

Collection (22100 items, dated 1942-2000) contains items related to Duke's extensive involvement in abortion rights, family planning, and population studies organizations. Series within the collection include correspondence, clippings, writings, publications, miscellaneous, photographs, and subject files. A substantial amount of correspondence from Duke was written to members of the U.S. House and Senate, and was written by Duke in her capacity as National Chair of Population Action International. Books and pamphlets report on population studies, child education, family planning, violence against women, and international education. Organizations represented in the collection include Population Action International, the Draper World Population Fund, Planned Parenthood, NARAL (National Abortion Rights Action League), "The Anatomy of Hate" conference, and the National Abortion Federation.

Additional organizations represented include the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Promise Keepers, Rockefeller Foundation, Center for Gender Equality, Harvard School of Public Health, Friends of Art and Preservation in Embassies, Institute of International Education, International Flavors and Fragrances, National Mother's Day Committee, and the National Park Foundation.

Other parts of the collection deal more directly with Duke personally and with her husband. Files relate to social events and awards ceremonies, the Congressional campaign of 1977, and a number of other organizations concerned with her activities or her husband's ambassadorships. There is also information concerning the National Wildflower Research Center, the Council of American Ambassadors, the United Nations and other organizations; as well as information related to a white house dinner; speeches; articles about Duke; an appointment book; and personal files.

A number of other scrapbooks contain photos and other items from the time when Duke served as a fashion editor.

The addition (7089 items, 11.10 linear feet, dated ca. 1930-2001) comprises correspondence, subject files, articles and newspaper clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, photograph albums, and printed materials that primarily describe conferences attended and trips taken by Duke, focusing on the organizations in which she was actively involved. Also includes incoming and outgoing correspondence; files on fundraising dinners and meetings; and Angier Biddle Duke's typescript journal entries, "For the Record" (1981-1985), composed while visiting a number of countries. Also includes 71 black-and-white prints, 236 color prints, 780 color negatives, and 2 fabric bags. (01-147)

The addition (3250 items, 7.3 linear feet, dated 1960-2000) contains primarily correspondence, reports, speeches, newspaper clippings, printed material, and miscellaneous items related to Robin Duke's ambassadorship to Norway and her activism in major organizations for population control, including NARAL and Planned Parenthood. There are 5 videocassette tapes, including "JFK--A Time Remembered;" as well as 37 black-and-white and 5 color photographs, including a photograph album of a visit to Marrakech. The collection also contains diplomas, awards, and several commemorative photos/drawings signed by Lady Bird Johnson. (01-155)

The addition (2000-0341) (2175 items, 3.4 linear feet; dated 1991-2000 and undated, bulk 1998-2000) contains correspondence, notes, information packets, two videocassette tapes, one CD-RW containing 15 electronic audio file and printed material from meetings Duke attended. Also includes correspondence, speech notes, two black-and-white photographs, and information packets relating to the Albert Lasker Public Service Award Duke won in 1991. There is one additional black-and-white group photograph taken at a lecture.

The addition (2002-0162) (2400 items, 4.0 linear feet; dated [ca. 1990]-2002) contains primarily reports, printed material, correspondence, and 1 black-and-white and 12 color photographs related to Duke's activism in various organizations, including Friends of Art and Preservation in Embassies and the US-Japan Foundation (1990-2001). Also includes correspondence, orientation packets, talking points, and reports received or used by Duke as ambassador to Norway (2000-2001).

The addition (2002-0311) (750 items, 1.6 linear feet) comprises miscellaneous materials relating to Duke's numerous involvements, including personal and professional correspondence, meeting and event information, organizational files, newspaper clippings, reports, and printed material. A container list was not created for this addition.

The addition (2003-0096) (1500 items, 2.2 linear feet) contains correspondence and other materials related to Duke's activism in organizations including F.A.P.E., A.S.F., I.R.C., and the U.N. Association (1983-2003); and documents related to her position as Ambassador to Norway (2000-2001). Also includes files about parties and other events, and a small amount of personal correspondence.

The addition (2003-0268) (500 items, 1.4 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2003) contains business correspondence and other materials related to Duke's activism in NARAL, UNESCO, and Population Action International. Also includes a small amount of personal correspondence and 2 VHS tapes, "Packing the Courts: The Battle over President Bush's Judicial Appointments" and "Access Denied: US Family Planning Restrictions in Zambia".

The addition (2005-0060) (3390 items, 5.4 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2005) comprises correspondence, printed material, and board meeting packets related to Duke's activism. Also includes a transcript of oral history interviews conducted by Smith College, and 3 VHS videocassettes.

The addition (2005-0120) (697 itmes, 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1992-2005) comprises personal and professional correspondence; board meeting packets related to Duke's activism in a wide variety of organizations.

The addition (2006-0054) (576 items; 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1969-2006 and undated) contains correspondence (1993-2006); and other materials related to Duke's activism. There are also 2 CD-ROMs, printed material, clippings, and invitations to luncheons and dinner parties.

The addition (2006-0062) (1025 items; 1.6 lin. ft.; dated 1962-2006 and undated) comprises correspondence, invitations, speeches, printed material, and ephemera related to Duke's activism in organizations (1983-2006). There are also materials that once formed a photo album/scrapbook, with 27 black-and-white photos of the Dukes as well as interior and exterior photos documenting their remodeling of Blair House, the presidential guest quarters, in Washington, DC (undated, probably 1962); invitations; and correspondence (1962-1968), including letters from Jackie Kennedy, Lady Bird Johnson, and others.

The addition (2006-0092) (1025 items; 1.6 lin. ft.; dated 1962-2006 and undated) contains clippings, periodicals and reference works, as well as meeting guides, conference materials, correspondence and other materials regarding Duke's political, charitable and ambassadorial activities. There is also one DVD and two black-and-white copies of family photos.

The addition (2007-0014) (1500 items; 2.4 lin. ft.; dated 1962-2006) contains correspondence, including letters from Jackie Kennedy and Lady Bird Johnson; menus and programs for United States Presidential luncheons and dinners; documentation, pamphlets, and files from councils and organizations; a diploma for Angier Biddle Duke from Duke University; speeches; printed materials; and newspaper clippings.

The addition (2007-0087) (675 items; 0.9 lin. ft.; dated 1964-2007) contains correspondence, photographs, speech transcripts, and conference materials from Duke's charitable and political organizations.

The addition (2007-0194) (675 items; 0.9 lin. ft; dated 2000-2007) contains correspondence, charitable committee and meeting materials, and a New York Look Book featuring Duke and her fashion sense. This collection has been interfiled with Addition (2007-0087).

The addition (2008-0116) (600 items; 0.8 lin. ft; dated 2007-2008) includes conference ephemera and other materials from Duke's involvement in charities and political activities; miscellaneous materials and correspondence; and publications from various international organizations.

Addition (2009-0168) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1960s-2009) includes correspondence, board meeting publications from Duke's various charities and organizations, letters from prominent people, and miscellaneous materials such as newspaper clippings and photographs.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 654 boxes — 654 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Patricia Murphy Derian papers, 1962-2008 and undated 15.3 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,175 Items

Patricia Murphy Derian is an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), a bureau of the executive branch created in 1977 during the Carter Administration. The papers of Patricia M. Derian cover the years 1962-2007 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning international human rights, and to a lesser extent, civil liberties and women's rights. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; interviews; memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights to the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Topics include U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights. Derian's papers include subject files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as smaller files on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, and civil rights movements in the U.S., especially in Mississippi. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Patricia Murphy Derian papers cover the years 1962-2008 and document Derian's involvement and interventions concerning human rights and civil liberties in the U.S. and worldwide. Derian was an activist, organizer, researcher, and served as the first Assistant Secretary of State for Bureau for Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA), created in 1977 by President Jimmy Carter. The collection comprises Derian's personal notes; correspondence with state officials, friends and human rights activists; unclassified State Department documents; reports; travel information; posters (located in the Oversize Material); interviews (both audio-visual and printed); memorabilia; and news clippings. These and other materials provide valuable insights into the history of human rights activism and major cases of human rights violations from the early 1970s up to the second term of the George W. Bush administration. The collection is arranged into five series: Carter Administration - 1980 Campaign and Employment, Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau, Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work, Countries, and Audiovisual Material. A final group houses oversize material. The scope of Derian's papers is extensive, covering the history of human rights movements and national policies and politics since the early 1970s in Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. U.S. foreign and military policies, repercussions of those policies, and documentation of disappearances, torture and other forms of violation of human rights are documented extensively in the Department of State Human Rights (HR) and Humanitarian Affairs (HA) Bureau Series, and in the large Countries Series, which brings together Derian's files on Argentina, El Salvador, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, South Korea, Vietnam, and Middle Eastern countries, as well as a grouping on sixteen other countries. Many of these country files cover several decades of information and analysis. Especially significant are documents concerning U.S.-El Salvador and U.S.-Argentina relations during the 1970s and 1980s. Other topics in the collection include women's rights, women in public office, civil liberties in the U.S., and the human rights work of foundations such as the Carter-Menil Human Rights Foundation and Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Foundation.

The Carter Administration - 1980 Carter-Mondale Campaign and Employment series includes materials concerning the organization of the 1980 Carter-Mondale election campaign; it also documents employment procedures for Derian's position at the White House.

The Post-Carter Administration Human Rights Work series is arranged into five subseries. The Human Rights Organizations subseries documents Derian's post-Carter administration human rights work in connection with various organizations, NGO's and research institutes. The Symposia and Conferences subseries comprises programs, proceedings, and papers presented at conferences and symposia attended by Derian. The General Files subseries contains subject files assembled by Derian that address broad human rights matters, including some materials on civil rights movement in Mississippi, human rights during the Reagan administration, and human rights violations around the world, including torture, murder, and kidnappings. The Prizes and Awards subseries covers the materials concerning Derian's work on committees of various foundations advocating the improvement of human rights conditions worldwide. The Miscellaneous Files subseries contains materials such as articles, dissertation monographs, reports, correspondence, political posters, and news clippings which refer to diverse issues such as humans rights and the Bush administration, the women's rights movement, U.S. foreign policy, and evaluation of the political and human rights situation in various Latin American countries.

Recordings of Patricia Derian's public speeches, interviews and excerpts from political protests in Argentina are housed in the Audiovisual Series. The Oversized Material grouping houses large items removed from files throughout the collection. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Lesbian feminist choral group established in the Durham-Raleigh-Chapel Hill area (N.C.) in 1983. The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2010. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, they also include some color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweatshirts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Common Woman Chorus records contain material dating from 1985 to 2015 relating to the group's musical and fund-raising activities. The records primarily comprise sheet music, concert programs, publicity, correspondence, and administrative records. Although the records contain mostly print material, a few color photographs, audiocassettes, videos, electronic word documents, t-shirts, and sweathirts are also included. Use copies of original audiovisual recordings will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Common Sense Foundation records, 1983-2008 and undated 19 Linear Feet — Approximately 11,625 Items

Progressive policy think-tank based in North Carolina. Spanning the years 1983 to 2008, the Common Sense Foundation (CSF) Records contain manuscript, print, audiovisual, and electronic materials related to the foundation's administration and work on various policy initiatives, which include the death penalty, taxation and economic justice, the environment, gay rights, health care, testing in public schools and other education issues, the tobacco industry, and North Carolina politics. The collection primarily contains clippings, reports, administrative documents, and correspondence, including emails, and is organized into the following series: Administrative Files, Audiovisual Materials, Board of Directors, Photographs, Printed Materials, Research Files, Staff Files, and Website. The largest group of materials relates to CSF's research on public policy. Several thousand electronic files in the collection have been migrated to a library server. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Spanning the years 1983 to 2008, the Common Sense Foundation Records contain manuscript, print, audiovisual, and electronic materials related to CSF's administration and work on various policy initiatives, which include the death penalty, taxation and economic justice, the environment, gay rights, health care, testing in public schools and other education issues, health care, the tobacco industry, and North Carolina politics, and many other civil rights issues. The collection primarily contains clippings, reports, administrative documents, and correspondence, including emails, and is organized into the following series: Administrative Files, Audiovisual Materials, Board of Directors, Photographs, Printed Materials, Research Files, Staff Files, and Website. The largest group of materials relates to CSF's research on public policy. Thousands of electronic files representing materials related to the series in the collection have been migrated to a library server. Files must be screened for confidential material before use can be granted.

Several series focus on the administration of the foundation. In addition to documenting the foundation's bylaws and history, the Administrative Files Series contains documents related to CSF's finances and membership, sponsorship of events, strategic planning, and personnel. Related material can also be found in the Staff Files Series. The administration and strategic plan of the foundation is also treated in the Board of Directors Series (closed until 2020), which contains minutes of board meetings and information about board members. The Photographs Series houses images of CSF events.

Other series document the foundation's policy initiatives. The Printed Materials Subseries contains copies of works published by CSF, clippings of articles written by CSF staff, and publications on related topics printed by other organizations. Organized by topic, the Research Files Series contains files related to the foundation's research and organizing work, principally on the death penalty, economic issues, fair testing in public schools, North Carolina politicians, and health care. Primarily containing clippings and reports, this series also includes letters written by incarcerated people to CSF, and includes the foundation's survey of lawyers who represented death row inmates. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains videocassettes related to CSF's policy initiatives and that document foundation-sponsored events. CSF's presence on the internet is documented in the Website Series, which contains both policy and administrative material.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Thomas Chapin papers, 1870s-1999, bulk 1979-1999 84.9 Linear Feet — 28,117 Items

The collection (100 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1979-1998) contains audio cassettes and compositions by Thomas Chapin, as well as clippings, programs, memorial messages, and other items about him. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of audio cassettes before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-355)

The addition to the collection (60 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1981-1999) includes published materials on Chapin or featuring his music. There are publicity materials; scrapbook items, such as programs or clippings; articles about Chapin from the internet and elsewhere; copies of original scores; compact discs; phonograph records; genealogical information, and other biographical information about him and his trio. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of sound recordings before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-0467)

The addition to the collection (15300 items, 29.40 linear feet; dated 1870s-1998, bulk 1980-1997) comprises primarily correspondence; financial records; scrapbooks, graphic materials (98 color photographs, 1 color slide, 6 black-and-white photographs, 24 black-and-white negatives, 17 contact sheets, 1 print, 1 watercolor, and 2 chalk drawings), posters, and other materials detailing Chapin's musical career, especially performances of the Chapin Trio; notebooks and appointment books; and musical scores by Chapin and others. Also includes recordings on 17 reel-to-reel tapes, 8 CDs, and 5 audiocassette tapes of performances by Chapin and others; 3 electronic computer files; and 24 small musical instruments of plastic and metal. (01-0157)

The addition (2002-0281 and 2003-0125; 12,657 items, 50.5 linear feet) consists primarily of studio and demo recordings of Chapin's music on audiocassette, vinyl, and reel-to-reel tape. Also contains a number of collages by Chapin, documenting another of his forms of expression; personal items, especially photographs and correspondence, reflecting his close relationships with family and friends; videos and film reels of recording sessions, tours, and other events, including Chapin's memorial service; sheet music and music books; clothing and hats; 3 hand instruments; performance posters; and business items.

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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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Leo Bogart papers, 1912-2005 and undated 59.4 Linear Feet — 52,259 Items

Leo Bogart was an applied sociologist and mass media expert who was Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau (NAB) from 1960-1989. In his career with the NAB, Bogart pioneered new methodologies in newspaper marketing research and led two major projects during the mid 1970s-1989 to bolster the ailing newspaper industry, the Newspaper Readership Project and the Future of Advertising Project. He was also a prolific author and public speaker, and published 195 articles and 14 books, and delivered over 150 speeches from 1943-2005. The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

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Feminist and author. The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection. Multiple additions have been added since the collection was processed; these are represented at the end of this finding aid.

The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection.

The Writings Series is central to the collection, and is correspondingly substantial, comprising over half of the papers. It includes drafts, research, correspondence and publicity related to such novels as Small Victories, Upstate, Matron of Honor, and Straight Man, her memoir Passion and Prejudice, the writing and production of the plays The Awakening and The Death of Henry Flagler as well as poetry and many short, personal essays. The Poetry Series consists of individual poems, while compendiums of poetry are in the Writings Series. Many of Bingham's writings (including poems, novels, short stories, plays and essays) exist as electronic files and are available to researchers. These files are listed in the Poetry and the Writings Series. The Diaries and Notebooks Series contains material spanning her entire life -- from her adolescence in Louisville, Kentucky in the 1940s to her experiences living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and contain many ideas for writings and references to the process of writing. The Correspondence Series also spans the same period of time, and contains family correspondence spanning many decades, as well as literary and personal correspondence between Bingham and such well-known authors, activists and artists as Judy Chicago and Gloria Steinem. The smaller Speeches Series houses writings by Bingham for public engagements, and in addition to contributing to a portrait of Bingham as a writer, documents her explication of feminist issues relating to women in the corporate world, in publishing, and women in history.

Bingham, born into a prominent Louisville, Ky. family that owned The Louisville Courier-Journal, worked for the newspaper as book page editor, 1982-1985. She also took an active seat on the board of the Bingham Enterprises, which was responsible for The Courier-Journal and other media corporations in the Louisville area. Bingham's desire to sell her shares in the stock in the newspaper resulted in the sale of The Courier-Journal in 1986. The Bingham family and the break-up of the Bingham Enterprises were the subject of at least four books ( The Binghams of Louisville, House of Dreams, The Patriarch and Bingham's Passion and Prejudice) and much media attention. Materials concerning this aspect of Bingham's life can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers Series and Subject Files Series. Audiovisual materials in the Audiotapes and Videotapes Series document aspects of Bingham's career and life through interviews and other events.

NOTE: This collection also contains numerous additions that have not been processed. For descriptions of later additions, please see below or consult the library's online catalog.

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The Behind the Veil Oral History Project was undertaken by Duke University's Lyndhurst Center for Documentary Studies in 1990. It seeks to record and preserve the living memory of African-American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950.

The Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South Records span the years 1940-1997 (bulk 1993-1997) and are comprised chiefly of interviews recorded on cassette tapes. The 1260 interviews, 1993-1997, in this collection cover a number of topics related to African-American life in the 20th century with a focus on the age of southern segregation. The collection includes interviews with people from Albany, Ga.; Fargo, Ark.; Birmingham and Tuskegee, Ala.; Charlotte, Durham, Enfield, New Bern and Wilmington, N. C.; LeFlore County, Miss.; Memphis, Tenn.; Muhlenburg County, Ky.; New Iberia and New Orleans, La.; Norfolk, Va.; Columbia, Orangeburg, St. Helena, and Summerton, S. C.; and Tallahassee, Fla. In addition to interviews conducted specifically for the Behind the Veil project, the collection includes six interviews from the James City Historical Society, Craven County, N.C. as well as eight interviews conducted by Paul Ortiz in Tallahassee, Fla., in the summer of 1997 as part of his dissertation research.

The collection includes duplicate sets of approximately 1700 interview tapes. The Master Tapes Series is closed except for appropriate use by authorized staff from the Behind the Veil project and the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The Use Tapes Series contains copies of the tapes for use by researchers. The Printed Materials Series provides biographical information about informants, interview agreement forms, proper names sheets, and brief summaries (one-three pages) of each of the 1260 interviews. Also included are some personal papers, the earliest of which is dated 1940. The Transcripts Series currently includes unverified transcripts of 314 interviews in the collection. These transcripts are also available as electronic documents. A disk directory log exists. Contact Research Services staff for more information. More transcripts will be available each semester.

The Behind the Veil collection will eventually include approximately 5100 photographs and slides. This Visual Materials Series will contain items donated by informants and others in the communities where Behind the Veil field-workers conducted interviews. The vast majority of these pictures show family and community members at home or at special events. A smaller number portray buildings and other local places. Images of political events are notably rare in the collection. We also anticipate the eventual addition of the Behind the Veil project's papers, which will be held as the Administrative Files Series.

Behind the Veil interviewers were provided with a list of Interview Questions before they entered the field. Although most interviews in the collection do not follow the list question by question, the list provides a useful research guide to the type of inquiry many interviews follow. The list of questions is included as an appendix in this guide. Frequently discussed topics include family history, local neighborhoods, educational background, employment history, religious institutions, experiences of segregation, local political activities, civic organizations and activities, black-owned businesses and local culture. Behind the Veil informants represent a number of occupational groups, including domestic workers, educators, homemakers, health professionals, manufacturing workers, miners, ministers, political figures, professionals and servicemen.

Database:

A Behind the Veil Database, created by Alex X. Byrd, will soon accompany the collection. The fields included are in two categories: Informant and Circumstance of Interview. The Informant fields are Last Name, First Name, Middle or Maiden Name, Sex, Zip Code, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Principal Occupations. The Circumstance of Interview fields are Date of Interview, Location of Interview, Processing Subseries, and Interviewers. The other fields are: was the informant part of a group interview?; has the interview been transcribed?; if part of a group interview, under whose name is the material filed?; number of tapes for interview.

Consult reference staff concerning the availability of the database.

The addition (acc# 2001-0183)(100 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) includes a course syllabus, interviews of African-American North Carolinians on cassette tapes, some student self-evaluations, contracts, indices, and transcript excerpts. The area most represented is Durham, N.C. Students were to aim for insight into how African-Americans built communities during an age of racial oppression. The interviews include much information about family history and social and community issues.

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Robert Bausch papers, ca. 1968-1999 4.9 Linear Feet — 3408 Items

This collection documents the professional and creative life of writer and teacher Robert Bausch. Materials include handwritten, typed, and electronic (computerized) drafts of published and unpublished novels and essays, including The Gypsy Man, On the Way Home, Almighty Me, For God's Sake, and A Hole in the Earth; galleys and corrected proofs of his published novels; incoming andoutgoing correspondence--including copies of electronic mail--with writers, editors, readers,students, and family; a few typescripts of works by others; book and movie contracts and royalty statements; andaudiocassette tapes of Bausch's class discussions and readings by authorsGeorge Garrett, Bausch, and Bausch's twin brother Richard Bausch.

(15 tapes) (2500 manuscript items) (31 disks) (893 computer files)

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William J. Baumol Papers, 1928-2013 130 Linear Feet — 5.74 Gigabytes

William J. Baumol (1922-2017) was an economist and worked as a professor of economics at Princeton University and New York University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, his collaborations and professional affiliations, and his work as a painter and sculptor.

The William Baumol papers document his career as an economist and artist. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, including his research on the cost disease, unbalanced growth, productivity growth, entrepreneurship, increasing returns and international trade, anti-trust policy, contestable markets, market structure, macroeconomic theory, and interest rate and monetary theory, among other topics. Baumol's research and writings on the economics of the arts, undertaken and co-authored with his wife Hilda, are included in the collection.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communication with prominent economists such as Maurice Allais, Gary Becker, Alan Blinder, George Dantzig, Robert Dorfman, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Ralph Gomory, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, John Hicks, Ursula Hicks, Samuel Hollander, Nicholas Kaldor, Harold Kuhn, Abba Lerner, Jacob Marschak, Don Patinkin, Lionel Robbins, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Ralph Turvey, Jacob Viner, and Edward Wolff, among others. Of note is Baumol's longtime collaboration with, and extensive support received from, Sue Anne Batey Blackman.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Baumol's leadership roles at the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics at New York University, as well as his extensive expert witness and consulting activities for the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Joint Economic Committee, and the Senate Judiciary Committee, among others. Baumol's consulting was often done through the companies Alderson and Sessions, Mathematica, and Consultants in Industry Economics. His notable expert witness testimonies revolved around regulation in telecommunications (particularly the ATT monopoly), airline ticket prices and sales practices, pricing of railroad freight shipping, and other topics.

Materials from Baumol's teaching at Princeton and New York University, departmental, and committee work are included in the collection. The collection also contains samples of Baumol's artwork, including sketches and paintings.

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Bates Worldwide, Inc. records, 1934-2005 and undated 784 Linear Feet — 5.1 Gigabytes — Audiovisual objects in RL00090-SET-0001 are not included because they require Audiovisual processing before access!! — 336,000 Items

Bates Worldwide advertising agency (Bates) was established in 1940 by former executives of the Benton & Bowles agency. It grew to become one of the largest agencies in the U.S. until its demise in 2003. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by the Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century. The Bates Worldwide, Inc. Records spans the years 1934-2003 and includes correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients included Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The Bates Worldwide, Inc. ("Bates") Records span the years 1934-2003 and include correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century.

Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients include Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The collection is organized into ten series and one cumulative subject index--Client Files, Corporate Communications Department, Creative Department, Financial Records, Human Resources Department, Memorabilia, New Business, Print Books, Vertical Files and Audiovisual Materials. The Client Files Series includes research reports, storyboards and graphic designs for Bates' clients. The Corporate Communications Department Series includes company-wide memoranda, public relations policy manuals, and a large file of biographical sketches and photographs of Bates' executives, as well as news clippings and press releases relating to the company and its clients. The Creative Department Series primarily focuses on Bates' efforts to stimulate creativity throughout its worldwide offices through participation in internal and industry-wide advertising competitions. The Financial Records Series includes general ledgers and other accounting reports. The Human Resources Department Series includes employee benefits literature and information on company affairs including press releases and staff memoranda. The Memorabilia Series includes promotional clothing, games, office posters and awards. The New Business Series includes materials relating to requests for proposals from prospective clients. The Print Books Series contains material from over 100 albums of proof sheets and print advertisements from existing clients. The Vertical Files Series consists of an alphabetical file of general information collected to aid in various aspects of company operations. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains periodic review collections of advertising, video memoranda, speeches, retirement presentations and highlight compilations prepared for prospective clients and award show consideration. A Subject Cross-Reference Index at the end of the finding aid links materials pertaining to specific clients, corporations, events and policies scattered throughout the various subject series.

Some materials were received as electronic files. Disks were assigned consecutive numbers reflecting the order in which they were encountered. If a work has a corresponding or associated electronic file, the file is included in the container list. The contents of each disk have been migrated to the Special Collections server. Consequently, the contents of these disks are available only in correspondingly numbered electronic subdirectories. Consult a reference archivist for access to the electronic files.

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ARLIS/SE was founded in 1974 as a chapter within the Southern Region of the Art Libraries Society of North America. The collection includes chapter correspondence, bylaws, annual reports, membership lists, photographs, conference materials, LoPresti Awards (for excellence in art publication), and financial records. Scattered throughout are materials and correspondence related to the national organization. There are 20 electronic files on one floppy disk that have been migrated to the electronic records server. There are 20 black-and-white photographs and two transparencies.

The collection includes chapter correspondence, bylaws, annual reports, membership lists, photographs, conference materials, LoPresti Awards (for excellence in art publication), and financial records. Scattered throughout are materials and correspondence related to the national organization. There are 20 electronic files on one floppy disk that have been migrated to the electronic records server. There are 20 black-and-white photographs and two transparencies.

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Primarily records of the American Economic Review, (Accession 2001-0118) specifically journal office files consisting of correspondence, manuscript, book review, and referee files (1969-1998). There are also records for the organization (1886-1984) and for its Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP 1972-1993), including histories, reports, minutes, statistics, as well as membership, account, conference, board member, miscellaneous, and newsletter or editorial office files. Some CSWEP material is also present as 371 machine-readable records. There is a small set of journal office records for the Journal of Economic Literature (1975, 1984-1994 and undated). In addition, there are 50 black-and-white photographs of former association presidents, a 39"x10" black-and-white group photograph taken at an unidentified meeting, 48 rolls of microfilm from the various journals (mostly AER), 63 microfiche of Journal of Economic Literature correspondence ([1968]-1980), and 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes.

Addition (2001-0082) (4000 items, 9.6 linear feet; dated 1998-1999) includes records for the American Economic Review, including correspondence and referee files for rejected and withdrawn articles (1998), accepted articles (1999), and papers and proceedings (1999).

Addition (2002-0215) (21000 items, 33.4 linear feet; dated 1999-2001) contains records for the American Economic Review, including editorial correspondence, referee reports, and manuscripts for rejected articles (1999-2000) and accepted articles (March-December 2001) and papers and proceedings (2000-2001). Also includes 37 electronic documents on one floppy disk.

The collection consists of 15 additional accessions dating from 2003 to 2008 with over 200 additional boxes. These additions have not been processed, but are available for research with permission from the American Economic Association. Please consult the Preliminary Description of Unprocessed Collection (below) for details.

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North Carolina affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union, founded in 1965 and based in Raleigh. The records of the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU of N.C.) date from the 1960s to the mid-2000s. The collection is organized into the following series: ACLU Historical Files, Executive Director Files, Legal Program, Audiovisual Material, and Print Material. The files primarily focus on the investigation and prosecution of cases related to civil rights, public education relating to civil liberties, and lobbying for civil liberties and human rights. Materials include correspondence files from the Excecutive Director's office and other units in the ACLU of N.C., thousands of case files; administrative files on cases, operations, and attorney's activities; lobbying and subject files; and printed matter and other records relating to outreach and public education activities. There are also some a/v materials and electronic files. Topics include: the civil rights and legal status of legally under-represented groups such as juveniles and high school students, prisoners, gays, and immigrants; education and academic freedoms; religious freedom and separation of church and state; freedom of expression (including desecration of the flag); racial inequalities and injustices; reproductive rights; women's rights; police misconduct and the legality of search procedures; drug testing and the decriminalization of drugs; voting rights, including issues surrounding reapportionment; and workers' rights, including unionization. There are also files on the Ku Klux Klan, Confederate displays, and right-wing organizations. Many of these issues span decades of ACLU involvement. Researchers consulting case files and any other materials should be aware of privacy laws that govern the publication and use of these records. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The records of the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU of NC) span forty years, from its inception in the early 1960s to its activities in the mid-2000s. The files provide documentation on nearly all aspects of the organization's operations, primarily focusing on the investigation of cases related to civil rights and many related issues, the legal prosecution of cases, public education relating to civil liberties, and lobbying for civil liberties and human rights. Materials include correspondence files from the Excecutive Director's office and other units in the ACLU of NC, beginning from the earliest years; thousands of case files dating from 1969 through the mid-2000s; the legal assistant's files on cases, operations, and attorney's activities; lobbying and subject files; and printed matter and other records relating to the ACLU-NC's outreach and public education activities. There are also some slides related to arts cases, videocassette and audiocassette recordings, and electronic files. Commonly recurring social and legal issues to which the ACLU of NC dedicated its efforts and resources include but are not limited to: the civil rights and legal status of legally under-represented groups such as juveniles and high school students, prisoners, gays, and immigrants; education and academic freedoms; religious freedom and separation of church and state; freedom of expression (including desecration of the flag); racial inequalities and injustices; reproductive rights; women's rights; police misconduct and the legality of search procedures; drug testing and the decriminalization of drugs; voting rights, including issues surrounding reapportionment; and workers' rights, including unionization. There are also many files on the Ku Klux Klan, Confederate displays, and right-wing organizations in NC

The collection is open to use. However, researchers consulting case files and any other materials in this collection should be aware of privacy laws that govern the publication and use of these records, especially in the case of third party information. Most personal names have been removed from case file titles in this web-accessible collection guide. The full version is available only to on-site researchers.

The Legal Program Series, the largest series in the collection at 260 boxes, chiefly consists of court case and other investigations files, and were created and maintained by the branch of the ACLU of NC called the North Carolina Legal Foundation. The files were marked variously as coming from the Office of the Legal Counsel or the Legal Program. These files were kept in their original order, which was generally chronological, though there are many overlapping series and fragmented sequences, some of which are alphabetical. When possible, the nature of the case or investigation is noted in a few words for each entry; keyword searching is the best means to discover names or topics (e.g., "parental consent,""prayer,""1st Amendment,""employee,""free speech," etc.).

Files in the Executive Director Office Series (90 boxes) refer to meetings, annual ACLU national conferences, litigation and political action strategizing, fundraising, and membership, and contain many individual legislative and court case files maintained by the Executive Director's Office (who at times in the ACLU of NC's history also served as the Legal Director). Extensive research and "issues" files, as they were often called, found both in the Legal Program and Executive Office Series, were most often used to support the case and investigative work, and therefore cover topics similar to the case files. Other subject files reflect the Executive Director's efforts to learn about issues relating to other affiliates of the ACLU.

Smaller but significant components of the collection include the Audiovisual Material Series, housing videocassettes and audio recordings, and the Print Material Series, which houses publications, clippings, reports, and other print material created by the ACLU of NC as well as material from other organizations. A nearly complete run of the ACLU of NC's newsletter, Liberty, can be found here, as well as multiple issues from such publications as Prison Law Monitor, Veteran's Advocate, and Youth Law News. Other publications are filed by topic. Many press releases, clippings, and files related to media relations are found in the Executive Director Office Series, and to a lesser extent in the Legal Program Series.

Researchers interested in the earliest history of the ACLU of NC should consult the small Historical Files Series which contains a 1970 history of the organization written by Daniel Pollitt and George Scheer, as well as copies of the original founding documents of incorporation, board and legal foundation meeting minutes from the 1960s to the 1980s, and other files. More complete files of early correspondence, meetings, and legal cases dating from the 1960s and 1970s can be found in other series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Kathy Acker papers, 1972-1997 and undated 21.0 Linear Feet — 0.03 Gigabytes

The papers of Kathy Acker, 1975-1996 and undated, are comprised, for the most part, of manuscript drafts of her novels, short stories, and other miscellaneous writings ranging from early works such as The Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula (1975) to her last novel Pussy, King of the Pirates (1996). Described as a cyberpunk author and performance artist, Acker's novels question the strictures of female sexuality and the power of language.