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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Peter Storey papers, 1950-2014 9 Linear Feet — 11.9 Gigabytes — 5000 Items

South African Methodist Church leader and anti-apartheid activist. The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2006. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The Peter Storey Papers contain correspondence, datebooks, articles, lectures, sermons, committee and subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, videotapes, and electronic records. The collection documents Peter Storey's leadership and active involvement in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa, the South African Council of Churches, the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Gun Free South Africa, and other religious and anti-apartheid groups. Major subjects include Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, urban ministry, crisis intervention, and political violence and elections in South Africa. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2014. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

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This collection (20,700 items, 35.5 linear feet, 1937-1984, bulk 1970-1984) includes office files and correspondence, and records from various organizations, such as the Young Social Democrats and the Youth Institute for Peace in the Middle East. Of note are some materials on prominent socialists, including Eugene Debs, Norman Thomas, and Carl Gershman. There are also important periodicals and special publications from 1937-1968 documenting American labor history, the Jim Crow Era, and civil rights issues in the 1960s. (96-104)

Addition (39,851 items, 66.4 linear feet, 1950-1994, bulk 1980-1994) includes correspondence with local chapters; organizational files on Young Social Democrats clubs, benefits, national conventions, fund raising, the yearly Eugene V. Debs Award dinners, and membership (including membership cards); subject files on people (including Bayard Rustin), other leftist organizations (especially Socialist International), labor unions, and countries and regions (including South Africa, Poland, Spain, the Soviet Union, and Latin America); and publications and newspapers related to socialism. Material also includes 108 electronic computer files that have been migrated to the Special Collections server; 2 cloth banners and 3 plaques/awards; 351 black-and-white photographs; 8 color prints; 4 videocassettes; 243 audio cassette tapes; 2 digital audio tapes; and 4 phonograph records. (01-0079)

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Vernon L. Smith papers, 1938-2007 and undated 103.2 Linear Feet — 3.1 Gigabytes — Approximately 64,500 Items

Economist and faculty member at the University of Arizona specializing in experimental economics, price behavior, and game theory. The Vernon L. Smith Papers span the years 1938-2007, covering the majority of Smith's career as an economist in the United States, from his early collegiate work at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard through his professorship at the University of Arizona. Limited material also exists on consulting work and academic scholarship after he left the University of Arizona in 2002. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Electronic Files, Personal Files, Print Material, Professional Service, Research and Writings, and Teaching Material. Research topics include the development of a methodology for experimental economics; the implementation of experimental economics into the studies of asset trading, capital investment, game theory, environmental economics, price behavior, strategic decision making, and utilities; and economic decision-making, for which Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002.

The Vernon L. Smith Papers span the years 1938-2007, covering the majority of Smith's career as an economist in the United States, from his early collegiate work at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard through his professorship at the University of Arizona. Limited material also exists on consulting work and academic scholarship after he left the University of Arizona in 2002. The collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Electronic Files, Personal Files, Print Material, Professional Service, Research and Writings, and Teaching Material.

The bulk of the papers reside in the Research and Writings Series, which contains extensive files of Smith's research notes, reprints, and revisions of working papers by Smith and others with added annotations. Broadly speaking, the research files document important developments in experimental economics and Smith's seminal contributions to this field of study. Recurring topics in this series include the development of a methodology for experimental economics; the implementation of experimental economics into the studies of asset trading, capital investment, game theory, environmental economics (e.g., the allocation of natural resources such as water), price behavior, strategic decision making, and utilities; and the behavior toward as well as the psychology behind economic decisions, for which Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002. With his theories on behavioral and experimental economics, in part influenced by Leontief and Hurwicz, Smith analyzed the functioning of institutions and communication systems such as auctions, utility regulation and markets. An electronic version of Smith's History of Experimental Economic Science at the University of Arizona is in the electronic files which have been migrated to a library server. The extensive Print Material Series includes reprints of the journal articles by Smith on similar material, many of which are also available through the Duke Libraries general collections.

In addition to documenting Smith's work in theoretical economics, the Professional Service Series, Research and Writings Series and Teaching Material Series follow his professional activities primarily at the universities of Purdue, Brown, Massachusetts, and especially at Arizona; his role as the Research Director at the Economics Science Lab at the University of Arizona; his participation on various committees; his work with institutions such as the National Science Foundation, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization and the National Academy of Sciences; and his role as a consultant on utility regulation both domestically and internationally.

Finally, the Correspondence Series, contains primarily professional and academic correspondence concerning comments on his work by other economists; comments on other's work, dating from Smith's editorial work for several journals; and academic affairs, including recommendations and organizational letters for classes and seminars. Notable correspondence includes early exchanges with Paul Samuelson concerning Smith's graduate level work. In one folder of miscellaneous personal correspondence at the end of the series, a colleague speaks at length in several letters about the Cuban crisis and civil rights protests.

Detailed descriptions on the arrangement and content of each series can be found in the respective sections in this collection guide.

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Oracles and books on divination (01-045)(28 items, 1.8 linear feet; dated ca. 1970s-1990s and undated), including 17 decks of tarot and other cards, many enclosed in fabric or leather. Shore designed two of the decks, "The Earth Alliance Deck" and "The Earthrise Deck." Also includes sets of runes and I Ching coins, a pendulum, an edition of the I CHING, a rune book edited by Ralph Blum, and other printed material regarding the I CHING and tarot cards.

The addition (01-248) (5131 items, 19.2 linear feet; dated 1953-2000, bulk 1970s-ca. 1998) documents Shor's work on dreams. Includes 41 volumes of meditation and dream journals by Shore (1974-1999); other journals and dream documentation and interpretation by Shor and others; correspondence; and dream-related periodicals, including Dream Network Bulletin. There are also drafts of Shor's poems, short stories, essays, and dream handbooks (ca. 1953-2000), including Unexpected Gifts, Open Channel, Dreaming with Angels, Shared Dreaming, Dream Tool Kit: How to Remember and Encode Your Own Dreams, Small Gifts, and The Swan; records from the Dreamgate Shared Dreaming Project; notes on or from other dream-related workshops; 11 black-and-white and 3 color photographs; and 197 computer disks containing circa 9800 electronic documents.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2018 118.5 Linear Feet — 106.0 lin. ft.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

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The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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Olive Pierce photographs, 1960-2008 24.5 Linear Feet — 700 Items

Documentary photographer based in Rockland (Knox Co.), Maine. The Olive Pierce Photographs span the years 1960-2008. The collection is arranged into three series: Photographs, Manuscripts and Printed Material, and Electronic Material. Documentary black and white photographs taken by Pierce feature Maine life and landscapes from 1960-1993; daily life, political turmoil, and social conditions in urban Massachussetts neighborhoods; and life in Iraq in 1999 and 2003, as well as protests in the U.S. against that war. Also includes manuscript, print, and electronic material related to Pierce's published works and her career as a documentary photographer and teacher of photography.

The Olive Pierce Photographs span the years 1960-2004 and are arranged in three series: Photographs, Manuscripts and Printed Material, and Electronic Material. Documentary black and white photographic prints taken by Olive Pierce focus on New England life and landscapes from 1960-1993, and life in Iraq in 1999 and 2003, as well as protests in the U.S. against that war. The earliest body of Pierce's work (1960-1968) features landscapes and individuals in Maine. A second group of images from Maine assembled by the photographer date from 1963 to 1993. Other prints document social and political controversy in Cambridge, Massachusetts during the early 1970s; social life in the Jefferson Park neighborhood in Cambridge during the 1970s; teenage life in a Cambridge high school in the early 1980s; everyday life of a fisherman's family in Maine from the late 1980s to the early 1990s; the daily lives of Iraqi children in 1999 during the period of UN sanctions; and protests in the U.S. against the war in Iraq. Collection also includes Pierce's "On Teaching Photography" guide (1987); as well as a poster for the exhibition on war protests, "On the Bridge, A Community Speaks: Photographs by Olive Pierce"; a copy of the Fall 2004 issue of Vassar's alumni magazine, which contains a photo-story by Pierce; and a copy of the magazine Maine Times, which contains six photos by Pierce accompanying an article on Iraq war protests in the U.S. (September 2003). Other items include postcards featuring her images of Iraqi children, and proofs for several collections of Pierce's images accompanied by text written by her. The Olive Pierce Photographs were acquired as part of the Duke University Archive of Documentary Arts.