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All of the Above records, [2005]-2020 0.5 Linear Feet — 13.2 Gigabytes

All of the Above (AOTA) is an annual theatrical production comprised of monologues written, performed by, and directed by Duke women about Duke life. The All of the Above records contain programs, scripts, list of participants, a directors manual titled "Making all of the Above," and two mini DV digital videocassettes of the 2008 production.

The All of the Above records contain programs, scripts, list of participants, a directors manual titled "Making all of the Above," and two mini DV digital videocassettes of the 2008 production. In 2019, All of the Above began including digital video files of the performances.

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The Jazz Loft Project Records consist of the research and administrative records of author Sam Stephenson's Jazz Loft Project, which documented the events and inhabitants -- including W. Eugene Smith, Hall Overton, and David X. Young -- of 821 6th Avenue, New York City, in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The records include the tapes of an extensive oral history project conducted by Stephenson from 1998 to 2010, general research and administrative notes, logs describing the content of the audio recordings W. Eugene Smith made at the loft, and original audio recordings of Hall Overton's compositions.

The Jazz Loft Project Records include administrative documents, audio and video recordings, and collected research associated with key participants and events in the history of the Jazz Loft building, located at 821 Sixth Avenue in New York City. The collection includes significant documentation of the jazz music scene in New York from 1955-1971, and the life and work of photographer W. Eugene Smith, composer Hall F. Overton, and jazz musician Thelonious Monk. Also of note are materials that document the collection of oral histories, the design and implementation of exhibitions, and conservation reports on audio recordings all related to the Jazz Loft Project. Items in the collection range from 1950 to 2012, with the bulk being created between 2002 and 2009.

A majority of materials in this collection consist of the project's financial and logistical documentation, oral history interviews in print, audio, and video formats, audio reel analysis notes, and biographical/historical articles. Examples of these types of documentation include correspondence, book drafts, promotional materials for exhibitions and events, research notes, and interview transcripts.

The collection contains 824 audiovisual items, including microcassettes, audiocassettes, VHS videocassettes, ¼-inch audio reels, DVDs, CDs, mini-DV videocassettes, and digital audio tapes (DAT). The bulk of this media is associated with oral history interviews, events and exhibitions, and research related to the Jazz Loft Project, but there are also items tangentially related to the Project, such as commercial music recordings, recordings of concerts and performances, original recordings of Hall Overton's opera Huck Finn, and published documentary footage related to W. Eugene Smith and other artists.

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R. Wensell Grabarek papers, 1963-2013 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box containing mini-dv tapes, DVDs, and a hard drive.

Collection consists of 11 DVDs, 9 mini-dv videocassettes, one hard drive, and 12 video files primarily associated with interviews of former Durham, North Carolina mayor R. Wensell Grabarek, from 2004 to 2013, in which Grabarek details his career and participation in desegregating Durham in the early 1960s.

The collection consists of DVDs and video files primarily associated with interviews of former Durham, North Carolina mayor R. Wensell Grabarek (1963-1971). In 2004, Grabarek was interviewed by Steven Channing for his film, Durham: A Self-Portrait (2007); in 2011, historian and author Tim Tyson interviewed Grabarek, in a conversation initiated by Phail Wynn, Duke University's Vice President of Durham and Regional Affairs; in February 2013, Angela Hampton, the host of Heart of Carolina Perspectives on local ABC affiliate WTVD, sat down with Grabarek to discuss the events of May 1963 and their impact on the desegregation of Durham; and in July 2013, Craig Breaden and Kirston Johnson of the Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library interviewed Mr. Grabarek for an oral history to accompany the donation of his papers to the Rubenstein Library. In addition to these interviews, there is a copy of the May 24, 1963 episode of the CBS News program Eyewitness to History, profiling civil rights efforts in North Carolina and featuring a segment on Durham and Wense Grabarek.

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Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ("Miss Baker") and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC.

Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ('Miss Baker') and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC. The conference celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick") was one of the primary institutions of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 from student meetings led by Baker and held at Shaw. Some of the original student members were organizers of sit-ins at segregated lunch counters in the southern United States. Its purpose then was to coordinate the use of nonviolent direct action to attack segregation and other forms of racism.

SNCC played a leading role in the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party over the next few years. In the later part of the 1960s, SNCC focused on Black Power, and then fighting against the Vietnam War. In 1969, SNCC officially changed its name to the Student National Coordinating Committee to reflect the broadening of its strategies.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.

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Terry Sanford and the New South records, 2000-2005 5.5 Linear Feet — 5 banker boxes, 1 cassette box

Terry Sanford and the New South, a documentary by filmmaker Thomas Lennon, examines Sanford's governorship in North Carolina during the Civil Rights movement and his vision of a New South. Sanford was governor of North Carolina, 1961-1965, and also served as President of Duke University, 1969-1985. This accession (2009-0169) (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of Terry Sanford and the New South, as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. The finished documentary, Terry Sanford and the New South, can be viewed through NCLive, http://media.nclive.org/play_video.php?vid=383.

This collection (5.0 lin. ft.; 2000 items; dated 2000-2005) includes digital videotapes and duplicates from the production of "Terry Sanford and the New South," as well as research notes, production notes and timelines, an index of filed images, and subject files for images used in the film. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Vincent Cianni photographs, 1983-2012 21.5 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — 668 items

Vince Cianni is a documentary photographer based in Newburgh, New York. The Berlin series features photographs of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall, and the reunification of Germany in 1990. The Poughkeepsie Mall and the Providence House Men's Shelter series both document urban culture and decay in the 1980s. The Weddings Series contains photographs from weddings (including some transgender) from the mid-1980s. The Brooklyn project features images and recorded interviews from Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore, which relates to Hispanic American roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, mid-1990s. Cambodian kickboxing culture is explored in another set of photographs taken in 2004. The last series offers a set of oral history interviews of gays in the military, also related to a photobook by Cianni. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises photographs from six bodies of documentary work by Vince Cianni, New York-based photographer and author. Subjects focus chiefly on American culture, exploring wedding rituals, skateboarding and youth culture, urban decay, street photography, shopping mall society, men in shelters, and gays in the military. There is also a series on kickboxing in Cambodia, and a large set of oral history interviews with gay men and women in the U.S. military. Most of the prints are gelatin silver, but there are also some in color.

Accession 2007-0072 houses a series of 224 black-and-white photographs depicting roller blade and Hispanic American youth street culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, taken by Cianni during the 1990s and into 2001. Fifteen of the prints appear in Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side (2001); and 68 prints are unpublished. Photographs are captioned and signed on the back. Also included are photographs of urban life in the Bronx, NY; and from the baby shower (Queens, NY) and wedding (Fairborn, OH) of a young couple who appear in other images from this series. Finally, the series houses the maquette for Cianni's book (version 1, 2000), and the printer's dummy (versions 2-3, 2001-2004).

Accession 2007-0200 contains 65 black-and-white prints and photographic collages of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Berlin, 1990. Prints range from 8x10 to 16x24 and are captioned and signed on back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0048 contains prints from the Poughkeepsie Mall Series (Poughkeepsie, NY, 1980s) and the Providence House Men's Shelter Series (Newburgh, NY, 1983). Forty-four black-and-white photographic prints: one 5 5/8 x 8 ½; one 5 7/8 x9; and forty-two 11x14 prints. Poughkeepsie Mall series: twenty-two 11x14 prints, 1980s. The images depict youth culture, African American culture, and urban decay.

Accession 2008-0300 contains 184 prints of weddings, including some transexual weddings, taken by Cianni during the 1980s. This series includes Cianni's MFA project, Wedding Rituals, a group of twenty-four 20x24 prints and one 16x20 print. Photographs in this series are in both color and black-and-white; many are captioned and signed on the back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0303 contains an additional 23 8x10 duotone and gelatin silver prints from Cianni's book We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side. These prints include portraits and other images of Hispanic American youth roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York during the mid-1990s.

Accession 2009-0243 houses forty-two black-and-white photographs of Muay Thai style of kickboxing competition in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 2004: thirty-six 8x10 prints and six 16x20 prints.

Accession 2010-0187 includes forty-seven 8x10 black-and-white prints from the We Skate Hardcore series. The gelatin silver prints are signed on verso and date 1995-2003, with bulk dates 1995-1997.

In addition, the collection contains digital video, stills, and image scans, and oral history recordings, all relating to his documentary photobooks We skate hardcore and Gays in the military. Original media formats are closed to use. Most files have been mounted to the library server; for access, please contact the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.