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The Duplex Advertising Company. Billboard Images and Records spans the period 1964-1993 and documents the outdoor advertising work of this company in the central Texas area, primarily through photographs, negatives and slides of billboards. Many of the images are in color. A large number of the images are of national campaigns advertised in central Texas, as well as billboards, signs and posters of local Texas business services. In addition, a handful of articles written by R. V. Miller, Jr. for a number of publications, as well as other printed material and miscellaneous items from the Duplex Advertising Company, are present. Some of these articles, along with the images themselves, provide examples of commercial art and design in the outdoor advertising arena. The collection includes outdoor advertising images from national clients such as Kentucky Fried Chicken, Chevrolet, Coca Cola, Coors, Wendy's, Hardee's, and Taco Bell, and Texas clients such as Lone Star and Pearl beers.

Related materials may be found in other outdoor advertising collections, including the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Archives, the Garrett Orr Papers, the Howard Scott Papers, the John Paver Papers, the John E. Browning Papers, the R.C. Maxwell Co. Records, and the Strobridge Collection.

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The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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The Durham Traditional Arts Survey was conducted in the early 2000s as part of the Document Durham project within the Community Programs department at the Center for Documentary Studies. Participants consisted of folklorists and photographers who traveled through Durham County, attempting to document the diversity of various communities by focusing on traditional artists within those communities. One outcome of the DTAS was the Home Made Visible: Durham 2002 exhibition, which highlighted Durham traditional arts and crafts. Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Literacy Through Photography records, 1990-2009 4.8 Linear Feet — 2800 Items

The Duke University Center for Documentary Studies Literacy Through Photography Records comprise negatives, contact sheets, and written work (generally handwritten or printed observations, comments, stories, poems, drawings) documenting school children’s views of their community, Durham, NC. The materials would be useful to those interested in visual culture, the psychogeography of children, and Durham history, society and living environment, as well as those interested in pedagogy and developing an arts-based curriculum in public schools. The units collected and organized in the Records are LTP class projects, sorted first by format, then chronologically.

Along with the physical negatives, contact sheets, and writings transferred to the Rubenstein Library in 2002, LTP coordinators provided detailed supplementary information about the compilation, organization, and selection process of the collection, as well as a finding aid in the form of an Excel database. The Excel file is a master database of individual student projects organized by year, and sortable by other variables; the database is accessible electronically at the Rubenstein Library. A print copy of the database and other supporting documentation is also available in the RMBSCL inventory file, and should be consulted by patrons using this collection.

The collection also includes 56 exhibit-quality color prints of LTP in Tanzania include images of children learning to use digital cameras, demonstrating their literacy skills, and exhibiting their projects. Also includes images of some volunteers, LTP staff, and Tanzanian teachers.

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Peter Goin photographs, 1987-2006 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — Approximately 1451 items

Collection consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The images depict altered and artificial landscapes featuring beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers, prescribed burns and reforestation sites, zoos, an abandoned town, and other places. They were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, Tennessee, and Nevada. The project resulted in a book, Humanature (1996) and an exhibit. Image formats include 16x20 inch exhibit-quality color prints, accompanied by negatives, black-and-white work prints, and book illustration prints. Research, correspondence, and other publication materials are also included in the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

Collection chiefly consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The exhibit-quality color prints (16x20 inches) and black-and-white work prints (chiefly 8x10) feature images taken Goin from 1991-1992 while he was Artist-In-Residence at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. They depict altered and artificial landscapes such as beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers and dams, managed forests, a scale model of a river, zoos, an abandoned town (Ellenton, S.C.), and other places. In these settings, people can be seen replanting trees, building ditches, hunting, or simply surveying their surroundings. Other formats include negatives, two slides, and book illustration prints. The collection also includes research, correspondence, publicity, and other materials deriving from the book Humanature.

The images were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, and Tennessee. Locations in North Carolina include Durham, the NC Zoological Park, Duke Forest, the Carnivore Preservation Trust, Outer Banks beaches, the Chatooga and Nantahala Rivers, and the Appalachian mountains near Highlands. There is also one image from Nevada. A selection was published in Goin's book, Humanature, published by University of Texas Press in 1996, and the project also generated a traveling exhibit of the same name.

A group of copy prints included in the collection were used illustrate Goin's book. These are historic images from the 1930s through the 1980s, many taken to document the work of state-run programs. As with Goin’s own work, they also show human-altered landscapes such as reforestation sites, canals, beach erosion replanting sites, and others. A few images appear to be from the 1950s and are of schoolchildren in Aiken, South Carolina. Other locations include Durham, N.C.’s Duke Forest, the Colorado River, beaches, and western deserts.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

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Pat Finelli photographs, 1962-1970 and undated 4.5 Linear Feet — 2600 Items

Pat Finelli (1927-1970) was a free-lance commercial photographer in New York during the 1960s who worked for a number of New York advertising agencies, including J. Walter Thompson, Compton, and Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauf & Ryan. The Pat Finelli Photographs span the years 1962-1970 and include photographs, negatives, slides, transparencies and print advertisements that document Finelli's work for advertising agencies including J. Walter Thompson and Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauf & Ryan. Companies featured include BMW, First National City Bank, Ford, Lederle, Mack, Mercury outboard, Pet and Procter & Gamble. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Pat Finelli Photographs span the years 1962-1970 and include photographs, negatives, slides, transparencies and print advertisements that document Finelli's work for advertising agencies including J. Walter Thompson and Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauf & Ryan. Companies featured include BMW, First National City Bank, Ford, Lederle, Mack, Mercury, Pet and Procter & Gamble.

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Gaess Outdoor was a family-owned outdoor advertising company founded in the 1930s in northern New Jersey, serving the New Jersey-Metropolitan New York market. It was acquired in 1997 by Universal Outdoor, a subsidiary of Clear Channel Communications, Inc. The Gaess Outdoor Advertising Photographs collection spans the decades of the 1950s and 1960s and includes black-and-white photographs and negatives of painted and blank billboard structures, locations, proposed locations and competitors' billboards. Clients include Budweiser (Anheuser-Busch), Cities Service (Citgo), Gulf Oil, Schaefer and Schlitz. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Gaess Outdoor Advertising Photographs collection spans the decades of the 1950s and 1960s and includes black-and-white photographs and negatives of painted and blank billboard structures, locations, proposed locations and competitors' billboards. Clients include Budweiser (Anheuser-Busch), Cities Service, Gulf Oil, Schaefer and Schlitz.

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Wunderman Archives, 1946-2010 and undated 520 Linear Feet — 354,000 Items

Wunderman is a direct marketing and behavior-oriented marketing communications firm founded in 1958 as Wunderman Ricotta & Kline. It is currently a subsidiary of the Young & Rubicam agency. The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox.