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Diskin Clay papers, 1962-2014 18 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Diskin Clay was on the Classics faculty at Duke University from 1990 to 2008. This collection of his professional papers includes correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus. There are also many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips.

The professional papers of classics professor Diskin Clay include correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus.

Also included in the collection are many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips. Clay's writings are also present in the form of short papers and drafts of longer works. There is one CD-ROM.

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Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies records, 1966-2014 245 Linear Feet — 6.9 Megabytes — 18 floppy disks with 1228 files; 3 .mp4 video files

The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies (JCPES) is a nonprofit American research and public policy institution, or think tank, founded in 1970 to aid black elected officials in creating effective policy and successfully serve their constituents. The collection includes subject files, writings, publications, photographs, audiovisual materials, and electronic records pertaining to JCPES events, programs, and projects especially of concern to African Americans in the late 20th century. Collection acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection is comprised of administrative records for the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, and includes correspondence, memoranda, budgets, funding reports, publications, policy research studies, conference materials, photographs, audiovisual media, and electronic records. Areas of study include healthcare, HIV/AIDS, minority business, television violence, young fathers, education, and minority community representation.

Among its many publications, JCPES published FOCUS magazine from 1972 to 2011, which covered national issues for an audience largely comprised of black elected officials (BEOs). The collection also includes oral histories of Joint Center founders and influencers, interview transcripts, an extensive history of JCPES, materials from the The Joint Center South Africa office which provided post-Apartheid political assistance activities, and original Southern Regional Council publications.

Other materials include interviews/oral histories with founders Louis Martin, educator Kenneth B. Clark who was the first African American president of the American Psychological Association; and McGeorge Bundy, who served as United States National Security Advisor to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson on foreign and defense policy from 1961 through 1966. Interviews and transcripts that add historical perspective to African American issues are conversations with Southern black mayors; African American architect and social activist Carl Anthony; and Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine.

Conferences included forums, roundtables, and speeches from notable figures, elected officials, and congressional members including Maya Angelou, Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Edward Brooke, Ron Brown, Carol Moseley Braun, George H.W. Bush, Barbara Bush, Henry Cisneros, Shirley Chisholm, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Charles Diggs, John Hope Franklin, Jesse Jackson, Maynard Jackson, Valerie Jarrett, Barbara Jordan, Vernon Jordan, Jack Kemp, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Barack Obama, Colin Powell, Charles Rangel, Ronald Reagan, Kasim Reed, Condoleezza Rice, Susan Rice, Donna Shalala, Rodney Slater, Doug Wilder, and Andrew Young. Joint Center historical notes compiled by Darlene Clark Hine are included, as well as Juan Williams' historical publication The Joint Center: Portrait of a Black Think Tank. The files and speeches of Joint Center past presidents Eddie N. Williams; Togo West, Jr.; Ralph Everett, Esq.; and past vice president Eleanor Farrar add insight to the Joint Center's mission of illuminating concerns and trends affecting 20th century African Americans to the legislative influencers most able to effect change.

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Kristin Bedford photographs, 1930s-2018 10 Linear Feet — 15 boxes — 172 photographic prints; approximately 75 related items

Kristin Bedford is a photographer based in Los Angeles. The 172 color photographs taken by Bedford from 2012 to 2018, derive from three projects: "Be Still: A Storefront Church in Durham," which consists of images of African American worshippers and their pastor in Durham, North Carolina; "The Perfect Picture," images from the multi-racial Peace Mission Movement religious community, founded by Father and Mother Divine in the 1930s, and the community's estate, Woodmont, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Bedford's latest work, "Cruise Night," a photographic essay on the lowrider community in Los Angeles, California. The "Perfect Picture" prints are accompanied by a variety of related materials (1930s-1990s), including movement publications and print ephemera, historical photographs, a CD of sermons, memorabilia, and other items; materials in this project speak to race relations in the 20th century, the civil rights movement, and African American religious culture. All three projects include a set of large color inkjet exhibit prints as well as a duplicate set of smaller handling prints, and an essay written by the photographer for each project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work in the Kristin Bedford collection derives from three projects undertaken by Bedford from 2012 to 2018. The images explore three very different communities in the United States: two religious communities and their expressions of beliefs and faith, one in North Carolina and one in Pennsylvania, and the culture and identity of Mexican American lowriders in Los Angeles.

The project titled "Be Still: A Storefront Church in Durham" offers portraits of an African American community of worshippers of the Apostolic Deliverance Rebirth Outreach Ministries, in Durham, North Carolina. Images show the congregation as well as their church building.

"The Perfect Picture" project documents the daily lives of the remaining members of the International Peace Mission Movement, a multi-racial religious community founded by Father Divine in New York State in the 1930s, and was photographed at the community's estate, "Woodmont," near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The project title, "Perfect Picture," refers to Father Divine's use of photography as an analogy for creating a perfect life of faith and unity. The color inkjet photographs are accompanied by a variety of related materials (1930s-1990s): publications, photographs, some correspondence, a CD of sermons, memorabilia, and other items. The "Perfect Picture" project offers insights into race relations in the United States; African American religion; religious life in New York State and Pennsylvania; the 20th century civil rights movement; and the utopian philosophies of U.S. religious communities in the 20th century.

The "Cruise Nights" project, undertaken by Bedford in 2014, gives insights into the lowrider community of Los Angeles. The photographs are intense color close-ups of customized car exteriors and interiors, their drivers and passengers, and the lowriders cruising down expansive Los Angeles boulevards; the images emphasize not only the lowriders and their cars, but also the interplay of self-expression, gender, and photography.

All three projects include a set of large color inkjet exhibit prints as well as a duplicate set of smaller 11x17 or 13x19 inch handling prints for research use. A short essay for each project written by the photographer is included in each box of handling prints.

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019 22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Meredith Tax papers, 1956-2016 125 Linear Feet — 213 boxes

Meredith Tax is a feminist writer and organizer who has been active since the 1960s. This large collection of her papers includes many files of records documenting her activism in feminism and her role in founding feminist organizations; drafts and manuscripts of her writings, music, and art; personal and professional correspondence; research materials; and subject files. Organizations well represented include Bread and Roses; Women's WORLD; CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and the International PEN Women's Writers Committee, as well as many other materials on other organizations. There are also 89 audio cassettes and a few VHS tapes and optical media containing Tax's research interviews as well as interviews with Tax. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The Meredith Tax papers include materials from the activist organizations she was involved with, as well as drafts and manuscripts of her written work, some personal correspondence, teaching materials, and audio/visual materials.

The largest group of materials at over 130 boxes documents Tax's long career as an activist, beginning with her involvement in Boston's Bread and Roses, a socialist-feminist collective through her continued work with Women's WORLD, a global free speech network Tax cofounded in 1994 to fight gender-based censorship. Other organizations Tax was involved in are also well documented in the collection, including CARASA (Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse); PEN American Center Women's Committee; and International PEN Women's Writers Committee. Smaller amounts of material come from Tax's work with the October League, Chicago Women's Liberation Union, National Writers' Union, and the West Side Community School, as well as other organizations. These materials include committee and board materials, events files, conferences, and many files of organizational notes and records.

Tax's work as a writer, including books, both fiction and nonfiction, articles, essays, and speeches as well as songs, is represented in the Writings, Speeches, and Songs series. The Correspondence series includes both personal and professional correspondence. The Subject Files were created by Tax for research related to her activism and her writing.

Finally, there are 89 audiocassettes, 53 of which contain Tax's research interviews and 36 of which contain interviews with Tax, readings by Tax and board meetings. Other interviews are on several VHS videocassettes and optical discs.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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New Day Films archive, 1968-2018 44.5 Linear Feet — 73 boxes; 36 film reels; 798 digital files

The New Day Films archive represents the activities of a feminist film-maker run cooperative founded in 1971, and spans the history of the organization to the present day. Materials include: analog elements as well as digital files for many of the cooperative's films dating from 1971 to the present; files assembled by individual co-founders Liane Brandon, Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, and Amalie R. Rothschild; correspondence between co-op members; records relating to film production and distribution; steering committee and annual meeting minutes; policies and other guidelines; reports on activities; fund-raising proposals; film sales and rental receipts; press mentions, articles, posters and other publicity; publications about New Day films such as brochures, catalogs, and magazines; and some photographs of events and members. Topics range widely and include women's studies, multiculturalism and diversity; social and political history; gender and socialization; media, culture; the environment; mental health; parenting and family; and global concerns. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The New Day Films archive represents the activities of the feminist film-maker run cooperative founded in 1971, and spans the history of the organization to the present day. Their ground-breaking films about the lives of women were among the earliest of the emerging women's movement. Materials include: files assembled by individual co-founders Liane Brandon, Jim Klein, Julia Reichert, and Amalie Rothschild; correspondence between co-op members; records relating to film production and distribution; steering committee and annual meeting minutes; conference call minutes; policies and other guidelines; reports on activities; fund-raising proposals; film rental receipts; press articles, posters and other publicity; publications about New Day films such as pamphlets, catalogs, and magazines; and photographs of events and members.

Analog elements and digital versions for many of the co-founder's films form an important part of the collection and relate to these seminal feminist film titles: Woo Who? May Wilson (Rothschild, 1969);Sometimes I Wonder Who I Am (Brandon, 1970); Anything You Want to Be (Brandon, 1971); Growing up Female (Klein, Reichert, 1971); Betty Tells Her Story (Brandon, 1972); It Happens to Us (Rothschild, 1972); Nana, Mom, and Me (Rothschild, 1974); and Not So Young Now As Then (Brandon, 1974). Another central piece of the collection are the 214 born-digital film files representing 103 filmmakers who form the New Day cooperative.

Topics explored in the New Day films and other materials range widely, and include but are not limited to: women's studies; multiculturalism and diversity; social and political histories; gender and socialization; media culture; the environment; mental health; parenting and family; and global concerns such as immigration and labor.

The materials in this collection were donated by Liane Brandon and Amalie R. Rothschild, and were acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.