Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Oral histories (document genre) Remove constraint Format: Oral histories (document genre)

Search Results

collection icon
Thirty-four audio WAV files made from source digital audio tapes of interviews, primarily with participants in the Mississippi Freedom Project, from volunteers to organization leaders.

Thirty-four audio WAV files made from source digital audio tapes of interviews, primarily with participants in the Mississippi Freedom Project, from volunteers to organization leaders. The recordings were used for a Minnesota Public Radio documentary entitled "O Freedom Over Me," produced by John Biewen and Kate Cavett in 1994. In addition to interviews documenting the Project, Biewen and Cavett also talked to community leaders, educators, and activists regarding conditions for African Americans in Mississippi thirty years after Freedom Summer.

collection icon
On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes oral histories conducted by Duke student Don Yannella in 1985 leading to his thesis Race Relations at Duke University and the Allen Building Takeover. The collection includes the original interview tapes, transcripts of the some of the interviews, and use copies of several of the original recordings.

The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes materials collected by Duke student Don Yannella while writing his senior thesis in 1985. The oral histories offer first-hand accounts of and reactions to the Takeover from Duke students, staff, administrators, and members of the Durham community.

The interviews were recorded on cassette tapes, and these original tapes are in Box 1. Access copies and transcripts for many of the interviews are included; listening copies are in Box 2 and transcripts are in Box 3.

collection icon

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Materials, 1956-2018 and undated, bulk 1950-2018 100 Linear Feet — 1,337 analogue and digital audiovisual resources

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. The Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Collection is primarily comprised of audio and video recordings of programs and interviews produced by Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel for television and print, centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation, particularly in New York, from the mid-1970s to the present.

Spanning 1956 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1976 to 2018, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Collection documents the programs produced by a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection is comprised of over 1,300 items, including analogue and digital audio and video resources, stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's prolific output of books, educational programming, and interviews, as well as her work in historic preservation. Two hundred programs, including television interviews with notable artists, designers, and architects, and presentations by the Historic Landmarks Preservation Center, have been digitized by Duke University Libraries and are available on the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive on YouTube. Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions; and women's rights. Where resources are available on YouTube, links have been provided to the specific video. Audio resources are available through the Duke Digital Repository on request. While all master recordings are represented in this guide, the collection contains both copies of master recordings and elements that went in to creating the master recordings. For an inventory of copies and elements, contact Research Services.

collection icon

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

collection icon

Center for Documentary Studies, SNCC Legacy Project Critical Oral Histories Conference Interviews, 2016-2018, 2016-2018 260 Files — MP4 video files, JPEG image files, MP3 audio files, PDF text files, and plain text files. — 75 Gigabytes

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The 2016 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on "The Emergence of Black Power, 1964-1967," while the 2018 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The Critical Oral Histories Conference in 2016 and 2018 were an extension of the SNCC Legacy Project that placed SNCC veterans in conversation with scholars using primary source materials. The events were produced by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the SNCC Legacy Project. Series One contains the 2016 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the years 1964-1967, to discuss the emergence of "Black Power" as an ideological concept as well as political and economic framework. Participants included Charlie Cobb, Courtland Cox, Gloria House, Phil Hutchings, Jen Lawson, Charles McLaurin, Cleve Sellers, Shirley Sherrod, Karen Spellman, Judy Richardson, Maria Varela, Geri Augusto, Emilye Crosby, Worth Long, Hasan Jeffries, Betty Mae Fikes, Bertha O'Neal, John O'Neal, Michael Simmons, and Zoharah Simmons. Series Two contains the 2018 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with participants including Phillip Agnew, Geri Augusto, Rebecah Barber, Kenneth A. Campbell, Charles Cobb, Courtland Cox, Emilye Crosby, Amber Delgado, David (Dave) Dennis, Sr., Ajamu Dillahunt, Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Timothy (Tim) L. Jenkins, Edwin King, Dorie Ann Ladner, Jennifer Lawson, Danita Mason-Hogans, Miles McKeller-Smith, Charles McLaurin, Ambria McNeill, Aja Monet Bacquie, Janet Moses, Robert Moses, Edna Watkins Muhammad, Quinn Osment, Timothy B. Tyson, Hollis Watkins, and Curtis Wilkie.

collection icon
The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Charlie Cobb Interviews, 2012-2014 98 Files — 85 audio files (MP3), 13 document files (Microsoft Word) — 3.04 Gigabytes

Audio interviews and programs recorded by Charles E. Cobb, Jr., from 2012 to 2014, with members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and others around the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer and for research for Cobb's book, THIS NONVIOLENT STUFF'LL GET YOU KILLED: HOW GUNS MADE THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT POSSIBLE.

Audio interviews and programs recorded by Charles E. Cobb, Jr., from 2012 to 2014, with members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and others around the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer and for research for Cobb's book, THIS NONVIOLENT STUFF'LL GET YOU KILLED: HOW GUNS MADE THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT POSSIBLE. Transcripts are available for a portion of the interviews. Interviewees and speakers include: Shawn Leigh Alexander, Carol Anderson, Annie Pearl Avery, Willie Blue, Julian Bond, Simeon Booker, Taylor Branch, Fred Brooks, Patricia Ann Brooks, Dorothy Burlage, Jackie Byrd, Clayborne Carson, Hodding Carter, the Chinn Family, Purcell Conway, Mac Cotton, Courtland Cox, Connie Curry, Dave Dennis, John Dittmer, John Doar, Ivanhoe Donaldson, LC Dorsey, Myrlie Evers, George Greene, Carol Hallstrom, Vincent Harding, Jessie Harris, Don Harris, Bruce Hartford, Charles Jones, Lonnie King, Dorie Ladner, Bernard Lafayette, Jim Lawson, Worth Long, Deborah Well McCoy, Chuck McDew, Charles McLaurin, Leslie Mclemore, Bob Moses, Christopher Parker, Willie Peacock, Bernice Reagon, Willie Ricks, Reggie Robinson, Cleve Sellers,Charles and Shirley Sherrod, Jane Stembridge, Patricia Sullivan, Flukie Swarez, Corey Walker, and Hollis Watkins. Topics include: civil rights, SNCC, non-violence, guns, and the backgrounds of interview participants.

collection icon
Oral history and research collection forming the basis for Duke University undergraduate Chris D. Howard's 1983 senior honors thesis, including research notes and recorded interviews with political and civil rights leaders in Durham, North Carolina.

Collection contains Howard's research material for an honors thesis. There are fifteen envelopes of research notes, chronologically arranged. The notes concern the early history of Durham, from 1865 to the 1960s, and events related to the struggle for racial equality in Durham, N.C. The collection includes a set of 29 audiocassettes of oral interview recordings conducted by Howard, with local individuals such as Wense Grabarek, Vivian McCoy, Floyd McKissick, Conrad Pearson, Jake Phelps, Ben Ruffin, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and others who participated in, or witnessed this struggle. There are notes and outlines of these interviews (both those on cassette tapes and others conducted by telephone) and a list of persons interviewed by Howard, Also included are copies of two papers, written by other Duke students in 1972 and 1978, about the Civil Rights Movement in Durham, N.C. during the early 1960s. Forms part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

collection icon

Doris Duke Oral History collection, 1998-2009 8.7 Linear Feet — 400 Items

Established in September 2003, the Doris Duke Oral History Collection documents the testimonies of staff at Duke Farms, at Shangri La, and of close, personal friends of Doris Duke. At present, there are 35 interviews available for research. The oral histories covers the period 1998 to 2009, and is divided into 4 series: Duke Farms, Shangri La, Newport Restoration Foundation, and Administrative Records. Digital copies of the interviews and transcripts are available in the Rubenstein Library reading room. This collection is currently restricted and requires prior approval by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to use.

Established in September 2003, the Doris Duke Oral History Collection is part of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives which were donated to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The collection documents the testimonies of staff at Duke Farms, at Shangri La, and of close, personal friends of Doris Duke. At present, there are 35 interviews available for research.

The oral histories covers the period 1998 to 2009, and is divided into 4 series: Duke Farms, Shangri La, Newport Restoration Foundation, and Administrative Records. In most cases each interview has several components including the original recording of the interview on cassette tape, transcripts (which includes release form, correspondence, and verbatim, edited and final transcripts), and an access copy of both the transcript and interview. For a majority of the interviews, digital copies of the interviews and transcripts are available in the Rubenstein Library reading room.

This collection is currently restricted and requires prior approval by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to use.

collection icon

Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.