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Frederic B.M. Hollyday papers, 1818-1982, bulk 1860s-1946 2 Linear Feet — Approx. 298 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor of German history in the Department of History at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists chiefly of letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War; letters and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, with enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic; and papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, including family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938. In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke; genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogical information, a diary in typescript, and legal papers, of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

Collection consists chiefly of three main groups of papers. The first comprises letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War. The second contains correspondence and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, contain enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic. The third group comprises the papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, and includes family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938.

In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke as well as an agenda for the meetings of the Academic Council on the same issue. Correspondents include: Edwin H. Cady; Jay Luvaas, Professor of History at Allegheny College and Ph.D. graduate at Duke; Roger Marshall, Special Assistant to President Sanford; Terry Sanford, President of Duke University; and Richard L. Watson, Jr., Acting Chairman of the History Department.

Other papers in the collection include genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogy, diary in typescript, legal papers and other documents of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

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A native of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, Margaret Taylor Smith attended Duke University from 1943-1947. After graduating with a degree in sociology, Smith and her husband relocated to Birmingham, Michigan. Smith raised four children while taking an active part in her community through volunteer work and leadership. Smith's work as a research associate studying family life became the basis for a 1987 book, Mother, I Have Something to Tell You. Smith served as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations. In addition, Smith continues her commitment to Duke University by holding leadership positions on multiple boards, by acting as a founding member and chair of the Council on Women's Studies, and by enabling the creation of the Sarah W. and George N. Taylor Endowment Fund for women's leadership and the Margaret Taylor Smith Endowed Directorship for Women's Studies. The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research on American families, specifically relationships between mothers and children, that resulted in the publication of a book, Mother I Have Something To Tell You; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research that resulted in the publication of a book; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. Smith's original folder titles were retained. Smith, an avid note taker, often recorded information on the exterior of folders and manila envelopes. These folders were retained and appear in the collection. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Duke University Series comprises materials related to Smith's leadership and professional voluntarism at the university, including correspondence, event planning notes, meeting minutes, endowment information, and speeches.

The Mother, I Have Something To Tell You Series documents the publication of the 1987 book, authored by Jo Brans, based on Smith's sociological research that describes how mothers deal with children who display untraditional behavior. Specifically, Smith researched American families whose children challenged social and sexual mores during the 1960s and 1970s. The series contains correspondence, drafts, speeches, and Smith's research related to the book, including the mothers' subject files, which typically contain written transcripts of Smith's interviews with the women, both with and without Smith's notes, questionnaires and sociological data, and audiocassette recordings of the interviews. Original audio recordings are closed to research. Use copies need to be created before contents can be accessed.

Materials related to Smith's social and family life are located in the Personal Papers Series, which primarily comprises correspondence with family, friends, and some professional associates, but also includes photographs, newspaper clippings, ephemera from Smith's days as an undergraduate at Duke University, and her father's World War I diary.

The Professional Voluntarism Series contains materials documenting Smith's professional activities, including awards, correspondence, speaking engagements, subject files, voluntarism, and philanthropy. The series particularly highlights Smith's work as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations; her volunteer work with the Junior League; and her interest in ethics and ethical dilemmas.

Later Additions have not been processed. Accession (2010-0066) contains email correspondence. Accession (2010-0135) includes addition research materials, correspondence, proposals, and other miscellaneous notes. Accession (2010-0164) includes correspondence regarding the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture; the Duke University Women's Studies department; Smith's Class of 1947 and their reunions; and other miscellaneous materials and notes.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.