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Rosetta Reitz papers, 1929-2008 41 Linear Feet — 30,750 Items

Rosetta Reitz (1924-2008) was a business owner, stock broker, university lecturer, and writer on issues including food, feminism, women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians. She was also the founder and owner of Rosetta Records, a company most prominent in the 1980s that was dedicated to re-releasing historic recordings by female jazz and blues musicians. The Rosetta Reitz Papers address aspects of the entirety of Reitz's career, with the majority related to Rosetta Records and to Reitz's associated music research since the 1970s. The collection contains company documents, research notes, manuscripts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, photocopies, photographs, a variety of audio and moving image formats, as well as magazines and books.

The Rosetta Reitz Papers span the dates 1929-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period of the late 1970s through the 2000s. While the collection addresses aspects of the entirety of her career, the vast majority is related to Rosetta Records and Reitz's related music research. The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical Information, Rosetta Records Business Files, Presentations, Writings, Photographs, Posters, Audio and Moving Images, and Reference Materials.

The Biographical Information Series contains published and unpublished writings, correspondence, resume materials, and scrapbooks by and about Rosetta Reitz.

The Rosetta Records Business Files Series contains materials related to the founding of Rosetta Records in 1979 and its daily operations in the decades that followed, which primarily focus on the design and production of the company's catalog releases. Also of note are the files related to Reitz's involvement with Greta Schiller and Andrea Weiss in creating a documentary film on the International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

Print materials related to the many concerts, lectures, presentations, and courses that Reitz produced and/or taught on jazz, the blues, and other topics are found in the Presentations Series. Of note are the files related to Reitz's numerous presentations of "Shouters and Wailers", which was an evolving film-based lecture that Reitz delivered throughout the U.S. as well as overseas, that focused on female jazz and blues musicians.

The Writings Series contains manuscript drafts, research notes, and other materials related to Reitz's written works on food, feminism and women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians, including writing related to her grassroots advocacy for the creation of a US postage stamp honoring Bessie Smith.

The Photographs Series primarily contains 8x10 publicity photographs of various jazz and blues musicians, along with other candid photographs from Reitz's life and career.

Oversize promotional materials, primarily related to Reitz's film-based "Shouters and Wailers" presentations, but also related to individual female jazz and blues musicians, are located in the Posters Series.

The Audio and Moving Image Series contains all of the commercial releases by Rosetta Records in cassette, LP, and/or CD formats, including recordings featuring Ida Cox, Dorothy Donegan, Lil Green, the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, Valaida Snow, Rosetta Tharpe, Dinah Washington, Ethel Waters, Mae West, Georgia White, and others. It also contains audio recordings of the "Blues is a Woman" concerts, hosted by Carmen McRae, that Reitz produced for the Kool Jazz Festival and the Newport Jazz Festival in the early 1980s. Also a part of the series are VHS and 16mm film of musical performances by female jazz and blues musicians that originally aired on television and that Reitz compiled as a part of her ongoing research. Original audio and moving image materials are closed to listening and viewing. However, researchers can access the original artifacts for the purpose of reading liner notes and carrying out other text-based studies. Scanned images of all LP covers and liner notes are available in JPEG format on DVD 1 in Box 58. CD or DVD use copies, which are open to patron use, are available for some items and are noted below. Unless otherwise noted, use copies must be made for access to audio and moving image content.

The Reference Materials Series contains newspaper clippings, magazines, and books, primarily related to jazz and the blues, that Reitz drew upon in the course of her ongoing research and writing.

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St. Philip's Episcopal Church was founded in 1878 in Durham, N.C. This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

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Virginia lawyer and writer; ambassador to Italy from 1913-1919. The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927. Personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items (chiefly 1885-1920) relate to Page's legal and literary career; his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; and his interest in civic affairs, plantation life, social reform and race relations in the United States, particularly during and after Reconstruction; American politics and diplomacy, especially during World War I; and European travel. Many of his papers directly relate to his term as ambassador to Italy during World War I, from 1913 to 1919.

The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1880s to 1920. The papers include personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items, all relating to Page's legal and literary career. Topics include his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; his role in and perspective on American politics and foreign relations, particularly during World War II; travels in Europe; and his interest in civic affairs, social reform and race relationsin the United States, particularly during and following Reconstruction. Collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal and Financial Papers, Writings and Speeches, Diplomacy, Visual Materials, Personal Papers, and Clippings Two oversize newspapers are described in a series at the end of the finding aid.

In the Correspondence Series, the largest in the collection, letters prior to 1880 include personal correspondence from various members of the Page family, especially between Thomas Nelson Page, his mother, Elizabeth Burwell (Nelson) Page, and brother, Rosewell Page, who lived at the ancestral estate, "Oakland," in Hanover County, Virginia. Page describes his political activities in letters concerning the presidential campaigns of 1912 and 1916. Correspondence from this period also includes personal letters to members of the family describing new experiences in diplomatic life, and routine business correspondence. Significant correspondents in the series include C. F. Adams, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, J. C. Harris, William D. Howells, Robert Lansing, Robert T. Lincoln, Henry C. Lodge, Theodore Roosevelt, E. Root, J. M. Stoddart, and William H. Taft. For some of these individuals only one or two pieces of correspondence exist. Another set of correspondence, dated 1883-1912 and interfiled at the end of the correspondence series, comprises photocopies of letters (and a few other items, including a telegram, Christmas greeting, and obituary clipping on Henry Hobson) chiefly from Page to close friend Henry Wise Hobson (1858-1898), originally of Virginia, and to his wife Katherine. Notes: Originals for photocopies are in the donor's possession. The collection also includes two scrapbooks, found in the Personal Papers Series, containing cards and envelopes from distinguished persons. This series also houses documents related to Page's ties with the University of Virginia, personal reminiscences, various fragmentary notes, and a journal from 1863. Four folders of carbon copies of diplomatic dispatches from Page to the U.S. State Department and to President Woodrow Wilson, along with other papers related to his diplomatic activities, can be found in the Diplomacy Series. Another small group, the Legal and Financial Series, houses documents relating to Page's properties and other business affairs. The Writings and Speeches Series contains many manuscripts and drafts of political and literary speeches, memoirs, essays, and articles, but none of Page's major literary works. Several folders of materials in this series contain Page's detailed journalistic notes describing his trips in 1916 to the war fronts in Italy and France. Extensive folders of cuttings in the Clippings Series were taken from both American and Italian newspapers, and comprise a significant portion of the collection. The clippings refer to events in Page's career such as lyceum appearances, political appointments, and political speeches, both in the United States and in Italy. In addition, Page clipped articles referring to race relations in the United States, particularly in the South. The clippings also document national and global events during Page's years as an ambassador to Italy from 1913 to 1919, and provide rich background material for a study of United States foreign relations with Italy and other countries during World War I. There are also a few photographs in the Visual Materials Series, some of which depict scenes from wartime Italy.

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Thomas Thweatt Jones papers, 1757-1979 and undated 6.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 8100 Items

Physician and resident of Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families of North Carolina and Virginia (Dinwiddie County and other places). Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.); records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital in England during World War II (affiliated with the Duke School of Medicine); Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook and her journals of 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and a photograph album and other scrapbooks.

The Thomas Thweatt Jones papers consist of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, memoranda, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families history and genealogy.

Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.) students and faculty; personal correspondence; clippings and printed publications dealing with alcoholism and agathanasia, a term Dr. Jones adopted referring to a patient's right to die; records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital during World War II; Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook; a photograph album; journals of her 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and genealogical materials, including a sketch by Dr. Jones of his brother, Dr. Robert R. Jones, Jr., one of the original staff members of Duke Hospital. Robert Jones was killed in 1941 by a patient.

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Wesley Norwood Jones papers, 1912-1945 1 Linear Foot — 74 items

This collection contains two letters (1918-1919) from Wesley Norwood Jones to his son, Lt. William Bailey Jones, of the Field Artillery of the American Expeditionary Forces in France. There are also letters to and from S. B. Jones, a medical officer in the British West Indies. These letters are accompanied by ten photographs of victims of a recent smallpox epidemic. There are three letters (1938) from Dr. W. S. Parsons of Shanghai. He mentions the Sino-Japanese conflict and some of his personal experiences. Several letters are from William Bailey Jones, Jr., written while he was a soldier in WWII.

This collection also includes two volumes, the first of which is a scrapbook kept by the Jones family. The scrapbook contains clippings on the political activities and death of Thomas Jones Pence of Raleigh, who in 1912 was put in charge of publicity for the Democratic National Committee. There are also clippings on the deaths of Wesley N. Jones, his son William Bailey Jones, and Mrs. William N. Jones. William Bailey Jones was in training at Camp Jackson before he went overseas. The scrapbook contains a number of photographs of doughboys training there, of their movement around France, and of their being reviewed by Pershing and Roosevelt in Dec. 1918. Additionally, there are clippings about the senatorial campaign in 1930, in which Josiah W. Bailey, brother-in-law and partner of Wesley N. Jones, defeated Senator Simmons. At the end of the scrapbook is a pamphlet entitled How the War Came (June 15, 1917). The second volume is an unbound handbook of 1941 or 1942 for Bible teachers in the public schools of N.C.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

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William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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Rhodes scholar and lawyer of Asheville, N.C. Collection is divided into the following categories: Correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); Writings (1682-1965); Speeches (1896-1965); Miscellany (ca. 1908); Clippings (1792-1975); Printed materials (1865-1977); Volumes (1886-1954); Pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an Alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. Most of the material spans the years 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests; family correspondence and photographs; clippings; and scrapbooks. Cocke's many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; and travels in Europe. Some letters refer to Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew.

Collection reflects the varied interests of Cocke. It is divided into the following categories: correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); writings (1682-1965); speeches (1896-1965); miscellany (ca. 1908); clippings (1792-1975); printed materials (1865-1977); volumes (1886-1954); pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. The collection covers a wide variety of topics and time periods, but most of the material has dates in the span 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests. His many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; travels in Europe; Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew; publishing efforts; and a meeting with Lady Astor and the future King Edward VII. Other items include family letters; manuscripts by Cocke's mother, Nola, including "My Reminiscences of the Sixties (1861-1865)" about the Reconstruction era in Tenn.; clippings regarding a proposed N.C. constitution amendment requiring a literacy test for voter registrants in the 1860s; speeches by William Cocke, Sr., mayor of Asheville, N.C.; a guardian's account book later turned into a scrapbook; a large campaign scrapbook for Senate candidate Alton Asa Lennon; Cocke-Dilworth family photographs and many albumen prints of Europe. Topics in the alphabetical file include civic clubs; United World Federalists, Inc.; the attempt to establish the state of Franklin in what is now western N.C.; legal cases regarding horse stealing, a slave sale, and other topics; court reform in N.C. and the Bell Committee; and the Commission on International Cooperation under the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development.

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The Duke University Women's Department of Health and Physical Education began in about 1926 and merged with the Men's Physical Education Department in 1975. The Women's Department was responsible for providing required physical education courses, overseeing recreational and athletic activities, and providing a major in physical education. The Department had three chairmen during its existence: Julia R. Grout, Betty F. McCue, and Elizabeth C. Bookhout. The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records include correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. Major topics include the curriculum and administration of the department, student attitudes toward P.E., the attempt to build or renovate the gymnasium facility for women, the eventual merging of the Women's and Men's departments, and the effect of Title IX on women's athletics. English.

The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records consist of correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. The records are organized into two series: Alphabetical Files and Scrapbooks.

The alphabetical files primarily cover the period from the 1930s to 1975. Of note are photographs of women participating in physical education classes and sports; materials from the Women's Athletic Association and Women's Recreation Association; several surveys and reports from the 1960s and 1970s about women students' feelings and attitudes toward physical education; correspondence, estimates, and reports about the proposed building of a new facility for the department; correspondence and many reports which document the struggle with the administration to maintain the Department as a separate unit from the men's department in the 1970s; materials that discuss the effect of Title IX on women's sports and the growth of women's sports in the 1970s. Major figures include Julia R. Grout and Elizabeth C. Bookhout, both of whom served as Chairman of the department. The Alphabetical Files also include information on students who majored in physical education. In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

The Alphabetical Files are arranged by broad subjects: Addresses, Administration, Annual Reports, Budget, Correspondence, Curriculum, Departmental Studies and Reports, Facilities, History, Photographs, Publicity, Recreation, Staff Meetings, Task Force and Curriculum Committee Action, and Women's Athletics. Within each of these subsections, materials are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically. The original arrangement of the materials has been maintained as much as possible.

The Scrapbooks are compilations of photographs, clippings, programs, correspondence, and other memorabilia. There are three books which date from 1932 to 1975.