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Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been segregated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

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Charles DeWitt Watts papers, 1917-2004 and undated 13.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 7249 Items

Pioneering African American surgeon who was chief of surgery at Lincoln Hospital, clinical professor of surgery at Duke University, founder of Licoln Community Health Center, director of student health at North Carolina Central University, and vice president and medical director for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, all in Durham, N.C. Spanning the period of 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. There is material on the formation in 1901 of Lincoln Hospital, a medical care facility for African Americans in Durham, N.C.. and other items on the early 20th century history of Durham, but the bulk of the papers relate to the later half of the 20th century. Formats primarily consist of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials. It is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material in the Medical Records Series have been separated and are currently closed to use. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Spanning the dates 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. The bulk of the material dates from 1970 to 2000. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials, and is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material containing personally-identifiable medical information in the Medical Records Series has been separated from the other professional files and is currently closed to use.

Largest in the collection is the Professional Files Series, which primarily contains administrative documents related to Watts's career as a doctor, surgeon, and medical administrator for various private practices, hospitals, boards, and professional societies. Of particular note are files related to Watt's mentor, Dr. Charles Drew, the history of Lincoln Hospital, and the establishment of the Lincoln Community Health Center in 1970. The folders in the Medical Records Series have been segregated and are currently closed to use. The Community Relations Series concerns Watts's professional life outside of medicine, containing files related to his membership in churches and fraternal organizations, non-medically-related boards on which he served, his work with Durham, N.C. organizations, his interest in race relations, and honors awarded him. Also included are the papers of Constance Watts (wife), Lyda Merrick (mother-in-law), and Margaret Smith (a nurse in his office). Of special interest is a scrapbook about the Negro Braille Magazine (now the Merrick-Washington Magazine for the Blind), founded by Mrs. Merrick.

Some professional correspondence is also intermixed in the Personal Files Series, which contains papers related to Watts's family, friends, finances, education, and alumni activities. Of particular note is a transcript of Watts's oral history. Containing both professional and personal content, the Photographic Materials Series contains photographs, slides, and negatives. The bulk consists of portraits and snapshots of the Watts family. Of particular note are early photographs of Lincoln Hospital nursing students and staff members.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Robert Ward was a composer primarily of operas, instrumental works, and symphonic choral works. He won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his opera, The Crucible, which remains his best-known work. Ward served as Chancellor of the North Carolina School of the Arts and as a faculty member at Columbia and Duke Universities. His papers span from his time as a student at the Eastman School of Music in the 1930s to his final years composing in 2012. They include scores, music sketches, recordings, libretto drafts, correspondence, scrapbooks, research and information files, writings and speeches by and about Ward, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, and other materials that document his professional life and work as a composer.

The Robert Ward Papers have been divided into eight series: Biographical Materials, Correspondence, Operas, Instrumental Works, Vocal Works, Music Sketchbooks and Student Works, Music by Others, and Untitled Recordings. Biographical Materials consists of documents pertaining to Ward's work as a composer, including newspaper clippings, profiles, the composer's published writings and interviews, documents from the organizations with which he affiliated, events held in his honor, and certificates and awards he received. The Correspondence series primarily consists of professional communications between Robert Ward and several organizations. Ward's music has been divided into three series based on genre and arranged alphabetically by title of piece within each series: Operas, Instrumental Works, and Vocal Works. Materials for each composition may include scores, recordings, and publicity materials such as newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews. Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Ward, as well as manuscripts for some of his student works. Music by Others includes a variety of scores and recordings by other composers included in Ward's papers, the majority of which are recordings. Untitled Recordings comprises assorted media that contain no composition titles, although some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances.

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St. Philip's Episcopal Church was founded in 1878 in Durham, N.C. This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

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Advertising executive at several U.S. agencies, including McCann-Erickson, Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic Group, and Saatchi & Saatchi. Served as U.S. Ambassador to Slovakia during the Clinton Administration.

Collection spans 1946-2014 and contains correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, printed materials, memorabilia, audiovisual materials and other items pertaining to Spielvogel's career in advertising as well as his public service and community activities. Advertising agencies represented include Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic and Saatchi & Saatchi. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Jessie Vanderbilt McNamee was born in 1874 to a wealthy family residing in Staten Island, New York (Richmond County). In 1901 she married Charles Dewar Simons(1874-1922) and they had one child, Charles Dewar, Jr. Ms. Simons served as a volunteer ambulance driver with the Dongan Hills Motor Corps; helped found and served as the ranking member of the Richmond County chapter of the Red Cross Motor Corps during World War I; served as Vice President of the National Federated Workers for Disabled Soldiers; and was an active member of the Veteran Association of Women War Workers. Her travels throughout Europe during the 1920s and 1930s are documented in diaries, correspondence, and other materials in this collection. Ms. Simons was a friend and neighbor of Alice Austen, a noted photographer who also served in the Richmond County Motor Corps. The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Jay Rutherfurd papers, 1887-1995 8 Linear Feet — Approx. 2613 Items

Broadcast journalist, businessman, and resident of Palm Beach (Palm Beach Co.), Fla. These papers are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection also contains more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows. In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. These materials also document Jay Rutherfurd's trips to Morocco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as the social life of Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Florida.

The papers of Jay Rutherfurd are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection features more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows.

In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. The material also documents Rutherfurd's trips to Morroco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as social life in Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Fla.

Original audiovisual recordings are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be produced before contents can be accessed. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this material.

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Ralph Leslie Rusk papers, 1782-1981 30 Linear Feet — 25,276 Items

Professor of American Literature at Columbia University, 1925-1953. One of the founders of the journal American Literature. Married Clara Gibbs in 1915. The Ralph Leslie Rusk Papers span the years 1782-1981, and chiefly concern Rusk's teaching and research in American Literature, notably the life and letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The collection contains research papers and notebooks, and travel diaries related to Rusk's research and teaching; a large series of correspondence covering the years 1912-1963; teaching materials such as lecture notes; clippings files and articles related to Rusk's publications and related activities; many photographs; Rusk, Gibbs, and Emerson family papers; and papers relating to his wife, Clara Gibbs, including a scrapbook and wedding mementoes. Some of the papers and photographs refer to a period of time spent teaching in the Philippines, around 1912-1914. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Ralph Leslie Rusk Papers span the years 1782-1981, and chiefly concern Rusk's teaching and research in American Literature, notably the life and letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The collection contains research papers and notebooks, and travel diaries related to Rusk's research and teaching; a large series of correspondence covering the years 1912-1963; teaching materials such as lecture notes; clippings files and articles related to Rusk's publications and related activities; many photographs; Rusk, Gibbs, and Emerson family papers; and papers relating to his wife, Clara Gibbs, including a scrapbook and wedding mementoes. Some of the papers and photographs refer to a period of time spent teaching in the Philippines, around 1912-1914. The collection was originally arranged by additions, described below in more detail. Some boxes have been reordered to reflect a chronological or topical sequence, thus, some box numbers appear out of order.

The original collection (6-19-78) (32 items; dated 1939-1956) contains an essay on William Peterfield Trent, and 31 letters regarding Rusk’s academic activities. There are letters from Bliss Perry, Stanley T. Williams, Henry A. Pochmann, George C. D. Odell, Newton Arvin, John Erskine, Randall Stewart, Harry H. Clark, and Ernest E. Leisy.

The addition (9-25-85) (5982 items; dated 1880-1979) relates primarily to Rusk’s research for editing The Letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and his teaching. Rusk maintained journals and ledgers during research trips in Europe, where he retraced the travels of Ralph Waldo Emerson. There are photostatic copies of Emerson family letters, articles about Emerson and related topics, and a clippings file featuring reviews of Rusk’s book. In addition, Rusk’s lecture notes are held in three volumes, notebooks, and notecard files. There are also photographs, photograph albums, and letters (1912-1914) from the period Rusk spent as a professor at the University of the Philippines. These items including descriptions of the islands and culture. There are also miscellaneous items and scrapbooks.

The addition (12-18-85) (100 items; dated 1883-1980) contains an inventory and appraisal of Rusk’s private library now housed at Columbia University; as well as Clara Gibbs’ scrapbooks, correspondence, and various commencement invitations. There are also items related to their marriage, including her bride’s book, a wedding announcement, and their marriage certificate.

The addition (6-25-86) (16,920 items; dated 1782-1963) contains correspondence, clippings, travel diaries, and pictures for the Rusk and Gibbs families. The clippings refer to Rusk’s books THE LIFE OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, LETTERS OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, and THE LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE WESTERN FRONTIER. The correspondence pertains to Rusk’s research and teaching.

The addition (87-116) (12 items; dated 1941-1981) comprises official documents concerning the deaths of Rusk family members. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Burr L. Robbins papers, 1936-1975 and undated 2.1 Linear Feet — 1650 Items

Burr Lamberton Robbins was president of the General Outdoor Advertising Company (GOA). The Burr L. Robbins Papers span the years 1936-1975, and chiefly consist of three scrapbooks containing photographs, clippings, periodicals, memorabilia, and promotional materials. The majority of clippings are from advertising industry publications and Chicago newspapers. The loose materials section also includes administrative records. The collection primarily documents Robbins' career in outdoor advertising with the General Outdoor Advertising Company (GOA), and his involvement with professional advertising organizations, particularly the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA). Professional and outdoor advertising themes in the scrapbooks include Robbins' career advancement; his public speaking engagements on the role of advertising agencies in America; professional meetings and conferences; the history of GOA; outdoor advertising history; tension between citizens' groups and outdoor advertisers over billboard zoning; and legal decisions. The scrapbooks also touch on topics of personal interest to Robbins, including news about the Delevan Lake Improvement Association; Robbinswood Farm sheep; and family events. Photographs in the scrapbooks are primarily of professional meetings or conferences, or publicity events. Loose materials include items that were once part of the scrapbooks, and separate items. This section includes a notebook of 1942 photographs and papers about the 13th National Contest and Exhibit of Outdoor Advertising Art. Photographs of the three prizewinning posters, created by John DeLooy, Andrew Loomis, and Albert Staehle, are included in this notebook. Also in this section is a spiral-bound GOA publication, Image with Words, that documents a 1963 Chevrolet electric outdoor advertising campaign.

The Burr L. Robbins Papers span the years 1936-1975, and chiefly consist of three scrapbooks containing photographs, clippings, periodicals, memorabilia, and promotional materials. The majority of clippings are from advertising industry publications and Chicago newspapers. The loose materials section also includes administrative records. The collection primarily documents Robbins' career in outdoor advertising with the General Outdoor Advertising Company (GOA), and his involvement with professional advertising organizations, particularly the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA). Professional and outdoor advertising themes in the scrapbooks include Robbins' career advancement; his public speaking engagements on the role of advertising agencies in America; professional meetings and conferences; the history of GOA; outdoor advertising history; tension between citizens' groups and outdoor advertisers over billboard zoning; and legal decisions. The scrapbooks also touch on topics of personal interest to Robbins, including news about the Delevan Lake Improvement Association; Robbinswood Farm sheep; and family events. Photographs in the scrapbooks are primarily of professional meetings or conferences; advertising executives; or publicity events. Loose materials include items that were once part of the scrapbooks, and separate items. This section includes a notebook of 1942 photographs and papers about the 13th National Contest and Exhibit of Outdoor Advertising Art. Photographs of the three prizewinning posters, created by John DeLooy, Andrew Loomis, and Albert Staehle, are included in this notebook. Also in this section is a spiral-bound GOA publication, "Image with Words," that documents a 1963 Chevrolet electric outdoor advertising campaign.