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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Dan Kirsch papers, 1975-2004 19.1 Linear Feet — 10,840 Items

Activist, community organizer, and theater director. Executive director of Charlotte's Lesbian and Gay Community Center. He also founded One Voice, a gay, lesbian and gay-affirmative chorus in Charlotte, NC, and OutCharlotte, an annual cultural festival that celebrated LGBT culture through theater, dance, music, visual art, film and video. Collection documents the activities of Dan Kirsch and his work with various North Carolina gay and lesbian organizations. Organizations represented in the collection include One Voice, the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board, PELAG, Time Out Youth, OutCharlotte, NC Pride, and The Lesbian and Gay Community Center of Charlotte.

Accession (2005-0037) (21 boxes) documents the activities of N.C. gay and lesbian organizations. Includes correspondence, newsletters, programs, flyers, and organizational material from One Voice; organizational material, correspondence, programs, invitations, minutes, registration records, financial records (bulk 1994) from Music & Message, the Gala Choruses Leadership Conference (Sept. 2-4, 1994 in Charlotte); correspondence, newsletters, clippings, financial records (1993-1996), minutes, and administrative records for the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board; fund raising material for the AIDS fund raiser Heart Strings (June 15, 1992), and Pelag benefit Our Family Celebration (Oct. 12, 1991); and files, promotional materials, newsletters, clippings, minutes, and financial records about a N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride event, 1994. Also included are posters, t-shirts, 14 VHS video tapes, 1 CD-Rom, 50 photographs, and 25 slides.

Accession (2007-0079) (1600 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2002) contains organization files and correspondence for Time Out Youth, an organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; financial and organizational files for OutCharlotte (1995-1998); NC Pride files; conference materials; and clippings from local publications including the Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing, and The Leader. Also included are 2 CD-Rs containing audio clips of interviews, 15 Hi8 video cassettes, 9 VHS tapes, 4 audio cassettes, and photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0173) (2500 items; 3.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2004) includes materials from the planning and construction of The Lesbian and Gay Community Center in Charlotte, NC. Also includes The Center program files, administrative materials, board meeting minutes, publicity, and volunteer information.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

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Elizabeth York papers, 1970-1998 1.5 Linear Feet — 900 Items

Musician and music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

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Hannah L. Schmitt was a camper at Michigamme girls camp in Michigamme, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula. Schmitt was born in Toledo, Ohio. Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing.

Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing. Places visited mentioned are Baldy, Pequaming, Sand Island, and Flat Island. Almost all of the images have captions written by Schmitt; several of them were later inked in color. There is also a photograph of the Hebard's Mill at Pequaming, Michigan, the mill that Ford Motor Company purchased in 1923. Photographs on several pages in the back of the album are of Schmitt family members, and were taken outside of the camp. A number of the images were developed by a Michigan company named "Forster's-Calumet." In addition to the photographs, the album contains some manuscript items, including notes, poetry, a Western Union Telegram (regarding Schmitt's relationship with a West Point Cadet), along with a 7-page story that represents each camper and staff member as clouds at dawn.

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Kate Millett papers, 1912-2002, bulk 1951-2001 93 Linear Feet — 198 boxes; 29 oversize folders

The Kate Millett papers document Millett's life and activities as feminist writer, theorist, and artist, teacher, and global activist, based in New York City. They also document the 20th century women's movement, feminist theory, as well as feminism and women's rights around the globe, especially in France, Italy, and the Middle East. There are many files of correspondence with family, partners, friends, writers, artists, and activists, including significant exchanges with Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Alix Kates Shulman, Yoko Ono, and Gloria Steinem. Annotated manuscripts and other items related to her major publications are present. Topics in these works include prison systems; mental institutions; psychiatry, medications, and mental health; torture and imprisonment; politics, gender, and sexuality; and mother/daughter relationships. Subject files contain research on these topics, as well as materials on abortion, feminism, organizations, the arts, gay rights, and Millett's diagnosis of bipolar disorder, involuntary clinical treatments, and subsequent involvement in anti-psychiatry activism. Additional series relate to writings by other authors; Millett's work as a visual artist and her New York State artists' colony; and her student years and teaching. Other formats in the collection include electronic records, chiely writings; many recordings of interviews, lectures, speeches, art openings, and conversations; photographs; artwork, including drawings, sculptures, and installation components; and print materials such as articles, cards, clippings, fliers, magazine issues, and posters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Kate Millett provide rich documentation of Millett's activities as a feminist activist, artist, and author of numerous works, including Sexual Politics, whose publication established her as one of the founding 20th century feminists. Other works for which supporting materials exist are The Loony-bin Trip, Flying, and The Basement.

Seen in a broader context, Millett's papers provide important documentation of the history of the feminist movement and feminist theory in the United States, including the history of the National Organization for Women. Materials in the collection also cover feminism and the social conditions for women around the globe, especially in France, Italy, and the Middle East - most notably Iran, where Millett traveled in 1979-1980.

The earliest dates in the collection, 1912 and 1928, refer respectively to an early family photograph, and historical resources used when writing the book A.D.. The bulk of the materials span her adult life from the 1950s through the early 2000s.

The collection content reflects the intensely personal nature of much of Millett's work and the frequent fusion of her personal, political, and professional interests, strongly evident in the many files of personal and literary correspondence, including significant exchanges with Ti-Grace Atkinson, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Cynthia McAdams, Yoko Ono, Alix Kates Shulman, Gloria Steinem, and many other activists, writers, artists, friends, partners, and family.

Additional series include writings by other authors; papers documenting Millett's work as an artist and instructor; files relating to her New York State farm and artists' colony; materials from Millett's student years, including her thesis which led to the book, Sexual Politics; and scripts and other papers relating to Millett's little-known documentary film, Three Lives (a copy of the film also exists in the collection). Other materials document her relationship with her mother during the last years of her mother's life, also the topic of her book, Mother Millett. Subject files relate to Millett's involvement with the gay and lesbian communities, her research on prisons and torture, and her diagnosis with bipolar disorder and subsequent involvement in anti-psychiatry activism. There are also extensive printed materials such as serial issues, articles, clippings, posters, fliers, mainstream and grassroots newsletters, event programs, and manifestos.

Audiovisual materials, many available through digital access copies, include audio and video recordings of Millett's lectures, speeches, and many conversations with activists, friends, and family. There are also many photographs, slides, and negatives documenting Millett's activities and the people in her life.

Rounding out the visual components of the collection are over 250 pieces of Millett's artwork created by Millett, who was also involved in the Fluxus art movement. Predominant formats include ink drawings, calligraphy, and graphic prints. There are also sculptures and other three-dimensional works, some of which formed part of an installation representing events that surrounded the murder of Sylvia Likens, also the subject of Millett's book, The Basement. A full inventory of the artwork is available in this collection guide.

Electronic formats include some correspondence, book drafts, and other writings. These files are included in the inventory under the appropriate series. The electronic files have been migrated to a library server; please contact the Rubenstein Library for access.

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Kay Leigh Hagan papers, 1955-2012 27 Linear Feet — 21,375 items

Kay Leigh Hagan is a writer, teacher, and feminist. Much of her early career focused on raising women's consciousness by teaching how to recognize various forms of internalized oppression in private classes she called "Feminars". In addition to her writing and teaching, this collection documents Hagan's many public speaking appearances and workshops, including those at womyn's music festivals (1988-2000). Her published works include Fugitive Information: Essays from a Feminist Hothead (1993), Internal Affairs: A Journal Keeping Workbook for Self-Intimacy (1990), Prayers to the Moon: Exercises in Self-Reflection (1991), and Vow: The Way of the Milagro (2003) with photographer Richard Downing. She was also the editor of Women Respond to the Men's Movement: A Feminist Collection (1992), and co-author of A Peculiar Alchemy (2007), a centennial history of the School for Advanced Research, with Nancy Owen Lewis. She has been active in Atlanta, Georgia, where she was affiliated with Forrest Avenue Consortium (later Nexus Contemporary Art Center) and Charis Books & More; and Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the School for Advanced Research, among other organizations.

Collection consists of art objects, artists' books, video recordings, audio recordings, research files, drafts of published works, writings, journals and correspondence, materials documenting Hagan's political activism and private teaching, materials documenting her work with the School for Advanced Research, and graphic materials.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

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Lenora Greenbaum Ucko papers, 1966-2013 7 Linear Feet — 4220 Items

Professor of anthropology, sociology, and social work, who founded StoriesWork, a non-profit organization in Durham, N.C. that advocates Therapeutic Storytelling, or the use of folk story analysis for empowering abused women. Collection consists of several separate accessions and includes Ucko's travel diaries; teaching and course materials; transcripts of Ucko's publications, including her book, Endangered Spouses; correspondence; Russian genalogy; materials from the Henry Zvi Ucko Memorial Exhibit, "What We Brought with Us," which featured personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s; and other materials from Ucko's position at the Museum of the Jewish Family in the late 1990s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2006-0015) consists primarily of files, lectures, and papers for classes taught by Ucko; files pertaining to cross-cultural communications prepared for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center; 20 labeled color slides; and travel diaries from Sierra Leone, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Senegal, Pakistan, and Holland.

Addition (2007-0015) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1973-1994) contains typescripts and promotional material for articles and books including Endangered Spouses; course materials including files, papers, and class rosters; correspondence; and one audiocassette. Also included are materials from a study of Russian genealogy by students at Aldephi University directed by Ucko.

Addition (2007-0066) (200 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1996-1998) contains slides, photographs, oral histories on audiocassettes, 1 VHS videocassettes, printed and other materials all concerning a 1996 exhibit Lenora Ucko curated in honor of her late husband, Henry Zvi Ucko. The exhibit was entitled "What We Brought with Us", an exhibit about the personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s. The exhibit was first at Duke University and then moved to the NC Museum of History in Raleigh.

Addition (2011-0063) (900 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2002) largely consists of materials from Ucko's involvement in the Museum of the Jewish Family. Museum materials include programming pamphlets and advertising, exhibitions, budget materials, grant applications, Board of Directors correspondence and meeting minutes, newsletters, mission and by-laws, and other materials from the operation of the organization, primarily dated 1997-1998. Other items in this addition include some of Ucko's correspondence, her research on museums and memory, and some StoriesWork materials.

Addition (2013-0052) (75 items; .1 lin. ft.; dated 1975, 1981-1982, 2004, 2006, 2008-2009, 2013) includes a research paper and notes on Israeli absorption centers as well as newsletters and pamphlets for StoriesWork. Other items in this addition include pamphlets and flyers advertising Ucko's research consulting business, a program for a 1975 production of All in the Family at the University of Maryland Munich campus (Ucko served as faculty advisor), and a 2013 resume.

The Lenora Greenbaum Ucko Papers were acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.