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Ben E. Douglas, Sr. (1895-1981) was a politician, developer, and mayor of Charlotte, N.C. from 1935-1941. Collection contains three folders of correspondence with friends, family, business associates, and political figures; clippings; a small amount of printed material; addresses and writings; and over 100 photographs, including 22 autographed photographs of such notables as Gen. John Pershing, Eddie Rickenbacker, Gov. Luther Hodges, Eddie Cantor, and Gene Autry. There is relatively little material relating to Douglas' service as mayor, however, there are some items that refer to his failed Congressional campaign of 1956. Also included are three scrapbooks showing the development of N.C. during the period from 1953-955, when Douglas was Director of the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development, nine volumes of Douglas Airport studies and plans, and three boxes of papers relating to his work on the Airport Advisory Committee, including meeting minutes, letters, memos, clippings, reports, and airport plans.

Collection contains three folders of correspondence with friends, family, business associates, and political figures; clippings; a small amount of printed material; addresses and writings; and over 100 photographs, including 22 autographed photographs of such notables as Gen. John Pershing, Eddie Rickenbacker, Gov. Luther Hodges, Eddie Cantor, and Gene Autry. There is relatively little material relating to Douglas' service as mayor, however, there are some items that refer to his failed Congressional campaign of 1956. Also included are three scrapbooks showing the development of N.C. during the period from 1953-955, when Douglas was Director of the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development, nine volumes of Douglas Airport studies and plans, and three boxes of papers relating to his work on the Airport Advisory Committee, including meeting minutes, letters, memos, clippings, reports, and airport plans.

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Duncan McLaurin papers, 1779-1932 and undated, bulk 1822-1872 2.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,800 Items

Duncan McLaurin was a farmer, teacher, lawyer, and state legislator of Richmond County, North Carolina. Correspondence, bills, receipts, legal and other papers, and printed matter (1822-1872), of McLaurin and members of his family. McLaurin's papers (mainly 1822-1850) relate to economic conditions in North Carolina, South Carolina, and the U.S. in general; the development of infrastructure and education in North and South Carolina; the Civil War; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections from 1832 to 1848. Civil War topics include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi). A large amount of correspondence from relatives in Mississippi (circa 1830-1867) concerns frontier conditions, slavery, politics, agricultural and labor problems, sectionalism and nationalism in Mississippi, Reconstruction conditions, and family affairs. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. Includes an atlas with a list of slaves circa 1864 written on the flyleaf.

Personal and political correspondence, legal papers, bills and receipts, and printed material comprise the papers of Duncan McLaurin (1787-1872). Correspondence, including many letters from friends and relatives who migrated to Mississippi, discusses the forced removal of the Choctaw Indians; wars with tribes in Georgia and Alabama; economic conditions, especially the panics of 1837 and 1857; the Bank of the United States; banks and currency; cotton production, markets, and prices. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. There are also references to the annexation of California; land prices and speculation; the growth of religious denominations in Mississippi and Louisiana; the development of schools in Mississippi, Georgia, and North Carolina, and of Wake Forest Institute (Wake Forest, North Carolina), and Union Seminary (Richmond, Virginia); the temperance movement; the early development of railroads, roads, and canals in North Carolina; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections, 1832-1848.

Civil War topics in the correspondence include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), and Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi); economic conditions and Reconstruction government in Mississippi; and difficulties with sharecroppers and debtors.

Legal papers consist of deeds, contracts, wills, court orders, and, after 1850, papers pertaining to the wardship of his sister, Isabel Patterson, and her children after her mental breakdown. Miscellaneous printed items include an atlas, 1835, with a list of slaves dating from the end of the war written on the flyleaf; a memorial to the North Carolina state legislature from the Society of Friends, 1832; a reply to President Jackson's proclamation on nullification; a report of the treasurer of the University of North Carolina to the trustees, 1839; a report of the Merchants Bank of New Bern, the Bank of the State of North Carolina, and the Bank of Cape Fear, 1838; a North Carolina Republican campaign circular, 1873; The Prison News, Raleigh, North Carolina, for March 1, 1932; and other various items.

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McCoy-Love Family papers, 1774-1970 and undated 12.3 Linear Feet — circa 9,210 Items

Asheville, N.C. residents. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Assoc. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There are a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

The papers of this Asheville, North Carolina family span the years 1774-1970. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the development of parks in the Appalachia region, particularly the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and activities relating to the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Association. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There is a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

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The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the founding and development of N.C. Mutual in Durham, N.C., and contribute to the historic record on African American businesses and entrepreneurship in the South and in the United States. Dating from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items created from 1920 to 2008, the material covers nearly every aspect of N.C. Mutual's operations, management, and milestones. There are corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements; reports; surveys; memos; legal and financial papers; original life insurance policies; training material; programming and outreach files; many ephemera and artifacts; and thousands of historical photographs of staff and their families, offices, buildings, and Durham scenes. Significant businessmen represented in the papers include founders John Merrick and Aaron Moore; and presidents Bert Collins, Joseph Goodloe, William Kennedy Jr., William Kennedy, III, Charles C. Spaulding, Asa T. Spaulding, and current president James H. Speed. The collection is especially rich in print material, including many issues of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for its assemblage of material on United States African American history, including much information on other companies, and public relations material dating from the earliest years to present times, including advertising ephemera, advertising campaigns, and other related items. Other materials document NCM's outreach to the African American community throughout its history to counter racism, unemployment, and diseases by means of public health programs, church affiliations, mentoring, and scholarship programs. Over one hundred selected digitized photographs and a few documents are also available online. Acquired and curated jointly by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records and History Center and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The records in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the history of the oldest currently active African American insurance company in the United States. The materials date from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items dating from 1898 to 2008, and cover nearly all aspects concerning the operation, management, and milestones of NC Mutual (NCM). The archive comprises corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements, reports, surveys, and memos; legal and financial files; original life insurance policies and other documents; advertising, internal and external publications, pamphlets, posters, and other print material; training material; many historic photographs; public relations and outreach material; memorabilia; and audiovisual recordings. The bulk of the collection concerns the company's home office in Durham, N.C. but there is a significant amount of material that relates to NCM district offices located throughout the United States, particularly in the South, as well as records that refer to other related organizations such as insurance companies and financial institutions.

The collection contributes significantly to documentation on the history of African American businesses in the United States, particularly in the South, and on the socioeconomic status of African Americans in the South in the 20th century. There is also valuable information on public health issues affecting 20th-century African Americans and public health programming created by NC Mutual as well as other agencies. In addition, through company records and many ephemeral publications such as obituaries, the collection offers detailed documentation of the work status and personal lives of the company's many employees and their life insurance customers, predominantly African American women and men.

The collection is rich in print materials, and includes nearly complete runs of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for public relations materials dating from the earliest years to the mid-2000s, including advertising ephemera, materials related to advertising campaigns, and other items. Additionally, there are records of NCM's extensive community outreach such as public health, mentoring, and scholarship programs, and documents relating to the company's ties with Durham's churches such as White Rock Baptist, and with other organizations such as Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

Corporate office files form the bulk of the collection, covering nearly every aspect of the company's operations and activities from its founding in 1898. There are extensive correspondence files as well as meeting notes and minutes, many legal and financial reports, and surveys of the insurance industry. Materials relating to a published history of NCM written by one of its presidents, William Kennedy Jr., are located in the Office of the Presidents Series. Company presidents represented most substantially in the files include: William Kennedy Jr. (1952-1958), Asa T. Spaulding (1959-1967), Joseph Goodloe (1968-1972), William Kennedy III (1972-1990), and Bert Collins (1990-2003). Earlier and later presidents and leaders, including founders Merrick and Moore, and presidents C.C. Spaulding and James Speed are also represented in smaller amounts of material. Personnel records are also present and are closed to use until 2074, 75 years after the date of most recent record.

Among the several thousand photographs in the collection, hundreds date from the first decades following the company's founding, and offer important and vivid historical evidence concerning NCM's history, its employees and their families, and the history of Durham, N.C. Many are oversize, and feature twenty panoramic photographs of conventions and other events from the early to mid-20th century. The collection also contains photographs of founders Merrick and Moore and their families, NC Mutual office buildings throughout its history, and many large photographic portraits of senior administration from the earliest years to the mid-2000s. Other photos capture employees at banquets and conventions throughout the company's history; some large sets of images from the early to mid-20th century document employee's homes as well. From the historic photographs and other images not represented in the collection, NCM created a permanent exhibit in its home office's "Heritage Hall" commemorating the company's history; these exhibit images, panels, and labels are also preserved in this collection.

Acquired and jointly curated by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records, and History Center, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.