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Irving Emery Gray (1897-1980) was chair of the Zoology Department at Duke University and helped establish the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. His interests included marine zoology and ecology, and biological adaptation. The Irving Emery Gray Papers include correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials about Gray's personal and professional life. Major subjects include the Zoology Department at Duke, marine biology, Arthur Sperry Pearse, and the National Science Foundation. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials related to the professional career and personal life of Gray. His interests in education, zoology, biology, and ecology are represented. The collection features materials generated by his work as chair of the Zoology Department, records of the Duke University Marine Laboratory, copies of Gray's printed works, and correspondence with colleages. The first series, Personal and Family, contains correspondence and other materials related to Gray's personal life. The next series, Publications, Abstracts, and Other Writings, includes both Gray's own publications as well as those of his students. The third series, Zoology Department, Duke University, includes correspondence, minutes, memos and other materials related to Gray's administration of the department. The next series, Correspondence - Personal, Professional, contains correspondence arranged by both individual names and group affiliations. The Course Materials series documents the courses Gray taught, while the next series, Duke University Marine Laboratory - Beaufort, NC, documents Gray's work to establish a research laboratory. The following series, Lists, Keys, Charts, Graphs, Checklists, Bibliographies, includes a variety of reference materials. Field Trips contains notes and other information from Gray's research excursions, and Research Notes and Papers (Titled Folders) features the research used for Gray's publications. The following series, Research Notes and Papers (Unsorted) contains similar materials, but is unprocessed. The final series, Photographic Materials (Positives, Negatives, Slides) contains photographic material related to Gray's personal and professional life.

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James Cannon III papers, 1912 - 1974 4.6 Linear Feet — 4,500 Items

James Cannon III worked as an educator and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1960, serving as Dean of the Divinity School from 1951 to 1958. The Canon papers contain correspondence, manuscript drafts of sermons and publications, course materials, subject files, clippings, photographs, ephemera, and scrapbooks relating to the life and work of James Cannon III. Major subjects include biblical literature and the Bible as literature, religious education, missionary training, history of religion, Christianity, Buddhism, comparative religion, and the Cannon family, especially James Cannon, Jr. and James Cannon IV. English.

The Cannon papers were originally organized into three main files and arranged alphabetically within these files. Three series reflecting the original order were created: Personal files and family history, Writings, and Subject files. The Writings series was reorganized by type of writing into three subseries: Sermons, Articles, and Course materials. Some clippings files, reference materials, gradebooks, and duplicates were removed from the papers.

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Joseph C. Wetherby papers, 1930 - 1976 4.6 Linear Feet — 5500 Items

Joseph Cable Wetherby served as Associate Professor of English at Duke University from 1947-1976. The papers consist of correspondence, printed matter, speeches, clippings, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, and writings. Major subjects include the teaching of English to international students at Duke, broadcasting and the development of the WDBS radio station at Duke University, and the Duke University Debate Team, which Wetherby coached for over 20 years. English.

The Wetherby Papers contain printed material (including pamphlets, brochures, flyers, programs, speeches, and clippings), correspondence, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, writings, and other papers. Inclusive dates for the collection are ca. 1930 to 1976, with the bulk of material from 1947 to 1976.

These papers chiefly reflect Wetherby's interest in three major areas: teaching English as a foreign language, broadcasting, and debating. In the first category falls material on grammar and enunciation (including numerous exercises, tests, and other teaching aids), speech and hearing pathology, and a small number of administrative papers dealing with the teaching of English to international students at Duke University. In the area of broadcasting, there are clippings, course descriptions, lecture material, and printed material on the history of radio and television; its methods, principles, and policies; legal status; government policies affecting broadcasting; and audience and market research. Wetherby also kept clippings, printed matter, and copies of speeches on communications and broadcasting in general, as well as on specialized topics such as TV violence and cigarette advertising.

Files concerning the history of Duke University include materials on a proposed FM station for the campus (1957-1968), as well as selected student papers on such topics as broadcasting at Duke, the Vigil of 1968, and the Associated Students of Duke University in a conflict with WDBS. There are also a number of selected student papers on various aspects of communications, broadcasting, and the persuasive speaking.

There is a card file on members of the Debate Team with their records by opponent and tournament, and a small amount of material (correspondence, records, circulars, a telegram) on the West Point National Tournament for 1962 to 1964.

Useful information regarding a significant incident early in Wetherby's tenure as debate coach will be found in William King, "Not fit to debate? National debate topic on Communist China gets hackles up," in the Duke Alumni Register, vol. 65, no. 2, Nov.- Dec. 1978. The article deals with Wetherby's defense of the right of collegiate debaters to argue this sensitive topic in 1954, at the height of the McCarthy era. Wetherby appeared on the "See It Now" program of Edward R. Murrow on CBS Television.

Wetherby coached three teams from Duke University which appeared on national television on the "College Bowl" series, in 1955, 1960, and 1968. Some materials in the collection deal with the logistics of these teams' travel and appearances, and on the operation of the telecasts.

Gathered in separate folders as well as scattered throughout the collection is a large amount of printed material in the form of brochures, handbooks, pamphlets, newsletters, and copies of speeches. Included is material from organizations like the National Association of Broadcasters, the Federal Communications Commission, the Southern Speech Association (later the Southern Speech Communication Association), and the Speech Communication Association. The collection from the Southern Speech Association and its successor organization includes a consecutive run of programs for annual conventions from 1951 to 1976. The material on the Speech Communication Association includes consecutive issues from 1968 to 1976 of Free Speech, a newsletter of this organization's Commission on Freedom of Speech.

During the 1960s, Wetherby frequently was sent to regional high schools to promote Duke University to prospective students.

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Julia R. Grout papers, 1916 - 1984 0.75 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Julia Rebecca Grout (1898-1984) served as Chairman of the Women's Department of Health and Physical Education at Duke University from 1924 to 1964. The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. Topics include Grout's career and retirement; the history of physical education at Duke; comparisons of American and European physical education; physical education for women; Grout's travels to Southern Africa and Europe; and Grout's participation in the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium at Duke. English.

The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. The papers are divided into four series. The Personal series includes Grout's resume, retirement materials, tributes to her, and documents related to her funeral. One of the retirement materials is a large bound volume of letters written to Grout by students and colleagues expressing their appreciation for her forty years of service at Duke. The second series, Correspondence, has a brief selection of letters related to Grout's professional career, her 1958 travels to Southern Africa, and work on the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium. The third series, Addresses and Writings, includes a variety of speeches, papers, and reports written by Grout over her career. Topics include the need for physical education for women, American physical education compared to that of Europe, and the history of physical education for women at Duke. Also included in this series are several speeches made by Grout at the retirement parties of other faculty and staff of the Woman's College. The final series, Professional Travels, documents Grout's international travels to Europe in 1938 and 1958, where she studied the physical education programs of Sweden, Holland, and Norway.

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Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.

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Newman Ivey White papers, 1915 - 1948 7.9 Linear Feet — 5,500 Items

Newman Ivey White was an educator and Percy Bysshe Shelley scholar. He served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1948. The papers include correspondence, lectures, research materials, including notecards, copies of letters, manuscripts, and photographs along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. Most of the material reflects his work on Shelley and the English Romantic poets; a small amount of reprints and lectures concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other scholars of the English poets; correspondents include T. J. Wise, Frederick L. Jones, and George L. Kittredge. H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw wrote to congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf regard the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents comment on conditions in Europe during World War II. English.

Correspondence, lectures, research materials, including photostatic copies of letters, manuscripts, and graphics, along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. There is little in the collection that relates to Prof. White's early career. Most of the material appears to have been collected in the course of his work on the English Romantic poets; a small amount of material, comprising reprints and lectures, concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other students of the English poets; subjects of the letters include differing opinions and disputes over the interpretation of events in Shelley's life. Other correspondents, among them H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw, congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf concern the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents make comments about conditions in Europe during World War II.

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Otto Meier, Jr., records and papers, 1931 - 1979 20.5 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

Otto Meier, Jr., (1908-1979), professor emeritus of electrical engineering, taught at Duke University from 1934 to 1975. Meier's specialties were electrical machinery and control, illumination, explosives, nucleonics, and experimental nuclear physics. Meier was active in the Southeastern Electric Exchange; the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca. 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975); and the Engineers Club (Durham, N.C.). Meier was a consultant engineer with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab and helped to plan the facility. The collection contains correspondence, lecture and course notes, photographs, reports, minutes, newsletters, slides, lantern slides, black-and-white negatives, and other materials pertaining to professional organizations, regional utilities, faculty and university affairs, curriculum, and other subjects related to the College of Engineering, engineering student organizations, and the domestic use of nuclear power. English.

The Otto Meier, Jr., Records and Papers is divided into eight major series: Personal and Biographical Files; General Subject Files; Duke University; School of Engineering; Organizations; Papers and Articles; Photos and Slides; and the records of the Tau Beta Pi.

The Personal and Biographical Files Series contains Meier's Ph.D. thesis; texts of his lectures and addresses; materials documenting conferences he attended; and materials used on his trips as a Duke University Admissions Office representative to regional high schools. Also, in this series are very extensive files on the courses Meier taught at Duke. These files include detailed notes, projects, tests, solutions to test questions, and course evaluations.

The General Subject Files mainly contain correspondence, memoranda, and reports that document Meier's committee work at Duke. There is considerable material on the Faculty Club and on ROTC, and a minor amount on early computers at Duke. There are documents (agendas, papers, and programs) that deal with the activities of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a regional utilities group, whose meetings Meier frequently attended.

The Duke University Series consists mainly of minutes and memoranda of the University Council/Academic Council (1953-1973); the Graduate Faculty and its executive committee; the University Faculty (1953-1973); and the University Faculty Council/Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (1967-1972). One binder contains minutes, correspondence, reports, and budgets of the Duke University Church and its Board (1953-1956). There are several folders of University memoranda on a variety of topics (1935-1942).

The School of Engineering Series contains the minutes and related papers of the School of Engineering, known as the College of Engineering until 1966. It includes materials from the Engineering Administrative Council (1968-1974), Engineering Faculty (1953-1974), and the Engineering Faculty Council (1947-1974). In some cases the accounts and comments are more detailed than those in the published minutes. This series also has general information on topics such as administrators; articles and papers by Duke University faculty and students; the Board of Visitors; the engineering building, former faculty, and research and development.

The Dept. of Electrical Engineering is an important subseries within the School of Engineering Series. It contains files on curriculum (1953-1954), minutes of the graduate faculty (1963-1964), and "status reports" from the years 1957, 1962, and 1967. This includes compilations of staff rosters, course descriptions, vitae, and available facilities. There is a sizeable collection of folders entitled "Staff," (1953-1954), that contain minutes of the electrical engineering faculty meetings, memoranda, reports, and other papers on general policies.

The Organizations Series contains correspondence, newsletters, minutes of regional conferences for twenty different organizations. The largest collections concern the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); and the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975). There are also extensive materials from the Durham, N.C., Engineers Club (ca. 1944-1974), in which Meier was an active member. Some organizations are represented by only a few items retained by Meier. There are two folders on Phi Beta Kappa at Duke (1962) and Sigma Xi (ca. 1939-1974).

The Papers and Articles Series includes addresses and papers given by others at various engineering conferences in the 1950-1960s. Of note are the papers from the Southeastern Electric Exchange on technical, electrical, and electronics subjects. Included are speeches by officials of utility companies on nuclear power in its early days.

The Photographs and Slides Series illustrates the life of engineering students in the 1930s; the engineering building (Southgate) and laboratory on East Campus; West Campus; and the construction of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. There are lantern slides that contain diagrams of nuclear particle processes, schematics for a Van de Graaff accelerator, and photographs of the installation of the 4MeV Van de Graaff in the nuclear facility of the Physics Dept. There are also 3 and 1/2 inch x 5 inch slides for a presentation on "Electric Power Utilities - Trends and Nuclear Outlook."

The slides are fragile. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

The Tau Beta Pi Series contains material from the North Carolina Gamma Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national engineering honorary, established at Duke University on Jan. 10, 1948. The material contains banquet initiation programs (1949-1970), correspondence, bulletins, and printed material on the history, purpose, constitution, and other aspects of Tau Beta Pi. It includes two large bound volumes, "Book of the Chairman of the Advisory Board," (1948-1950, 1950-1958). There is also a large amount of material on the National Convention of 1960. Access to Boxes 17-18 is RESTRICTED: Student Records.

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Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

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Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

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Robert R. Wilson papers, 1921 - 1975 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Robert Renbert Wilson served as a professor of political science at Duke University from 1925 to 1975. He also acted as chair of the Dept. of Political Science (1934-1948), Director of Graduate Studies (1937-1947, 1949-1966), lecturer in the Law School (1948-1966), and chair of the Commonwealth Studies Center (1959-1966) at Duke University, and as an adviser on commercial treaties to the U.S. State Department. The Robert R. Wilson Papers primarily consist of correspondence, but the collection also contains writings, teaching materials, subject files, and photographs. Major subjects include American politics and government, treaties, international law, political theory, and the American Journal of International Law. English.

The Robert R. Wilson papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Writings, Courses, Subject Files, and Photographs. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence dealing with Wilson's speaking engagements, professional associations, books and publications, and students and colleagues in law and political science at Duke and at institutions across the United States. Major correspondents include the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Dept. of State, the American Journal of International Law, the Commonwealth Studies Center, and university presses. Writings include articles, book reviews, addresses, and other pieces written by Wilson about obligatory arbitration, treaties, African American suffrage, international law, public law, international organization, World War II, the British Commonwealth, the United Nations, and U.S. foreign relations. The Courses series includes syllabi, exams, class case studies, and other materials relating to Wilson's classes in American politics and government, and in international law. Subject Files include reports, articles written about Robert R. Wilson, students' evaluations of Wilson's courses, and other materials. Photographs include a group photo of the Intercollegiate Model Disarmament Conference (Bucknell University, Dec. 4-6, 1931); an unidentified, undated group photo; and an unidentified, undated portrait of a female subject.