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Start Over You searched for: Format Photographs Remove constraint Format: Photographs University Archives Record Group 29 — Papers of Faculty, Staff, and Associates Remove constraint University Archives Record Group: 29 — Papers of Faculty, Staff, and Associates

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863 - 1961 13.25 Linear Feet — 12500 Items

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

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James Cannon III papers, 1912 - 1974 4.6 Linear Feet — 4,500 Items

James Cannon III worked as an educator and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1960, serving as Dean of the Divinity School from 1951 to 1958. The Canon papers contain correspondence, manuscript drafts of sermons and publications, course materials, subject files, clippings, photographs, ephemera, and scrapbooks relating to the life and work of James Cannon III. Major subjects include biblical literature and the Bible as literature, religious education, missionary training, history of religion, Christianity, Buddhism, comparative religion, and the Cannon family, especially James Cannon, Jr. and James Cannon IV. English.

The Cannon papers were originally organized into three main files and arranged alphabetically within these files. Three series reflecting the original order were created: Personal files and family history, Writings, and Subject files. The Writings series was reorganized by type of writing into three subseries: Sermons, Articles, and Course materials. Some clippings files, reference materials, gradebooks, and duplicates were removed from the papers.

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Diskin Clay papers, 1962-2014 18 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Diskin Clay was on the Classics faculty at Duke University from 1990 to 2008. This collection of his professional papers includes correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus. There are also many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips.

The professional papers of classics professor Diskin Clay include correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus.

Also included in the collection are many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips. Clay's writings are also present in the form of short papers and drafts of longer works. There is one CD-ROM.

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Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.

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Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

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William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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Walter Gordy papers, 1935 - 1986 37.5 Linear Feet — 29,000 Items

Walter Gordy (1909-1985) was a James B. Duke Professor of Physics at Duke University. In his over thirty year career at Duke, he founded and directed the Duke Microwave Laboratory, and researched and published extensively. The Walter Gordy Papers include correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. Major subjects include microwave spectroscopy, microwave radar, the Duke Microwave Laboratory, Army research Office , Durham (ARO-D), and the Duke Department of Physics. English.

The collection includes correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. The materials date from approximately 1935 to 1986. Gordy's professional career, particularly his work at Duke, is well represented. Much of the material stems from his research in the Duke Microwave Laboratory. The correspondence in the collection is mainly professional. A few materials, such as trip souvenirs, represent Gordy's personal life.

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Irving Emery Gray (1897-1980) was chair of the Zoology Department at Duke University and helped establish the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. His interests included marine zoology and ecology, and biological adaptation. The Irving Emery Gray Papers include correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials about Gray's personal and professional life. Major subjects include the Zoology Department at Duke, marine biology, Arthur Sperry Pearse, and the National Science Foundation. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, notes, documents, slides, photographs, and other materials related to the professional career and personal life of Gray. His interests in education, zoology, biology, and ecology are represented. The collection features materials generated by his work as chair of the Zoology Department, records of the Duke University Marine Laboratory, copies of Gray's printed works, and correspondence with colleages. The first series, Personal and Family, contains correspondence and other materials related to Gray's personal life. The next series, Publications, Abstracts, and Other Writings, includes both Gray's own publications as well as those of his students. The third series, Zoology Department, Duke University, includes correspondence, minutes, memos and other materials related to Gray's administration of the department. The next series, Correspondence - Personal, Professional, contains correspondence arranged by both individual names and group affiliations. The Course Materials series documents the courses Gray taught, while the next series, Duke University Marine Laboratory - Beaufort, NC, documents Gray's work to establish a research laboratory. The following series, Lists, Keys, Charts, Graphs, Checklists, Bibliographies, includes a variety of reference materials. Field Trips contains notes and other information from Gray's research excursions, and Research Notes and Papers (Titled Folders) features the research used for Gray's publications. The following series, Research Notes and Papers (Unsorted) contains similar materials, but is unprocessed. The final series, Photographic Materials (Positives, Negatives, Slides) contains photographic material related to Gray's personal and professional life.

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Julia R. Grout papers, 1916 - 1984 0.75 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Julia Rebecca Grout (1898-1984) served as Chairman of the Women's Department of Health and Physical Education at Duke University from 1924 to 1964. The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. Topics include Grout's career and retirement; the history of physical education at Duke; comparisons of American and European physical education; physical education for women; Grout's travels to Southern Africa and Europe; and Grout's participation in the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium at Duke. English.

The Julia R. Grout Papers include correspondence, clippings, writings, printed matter, photographs, and other materials related to Grout's professional and personal interests. The papers are divided into four series. The Personal series includes Grout's resume, retirement materials, tributes to her, and documents related to her funeral. One of the retirement materials is a large bound volume of letters written to Grout by students and colleagues expressing their appreciation for her forty years of service at Duke. The second series, Correspondence, has a brief selection of letters related to Grout's professional career, her 1958 travels to Southern Africa, and work on the Dedication Committee of Baldwin Auditorium. The third series, Addresses and Writings, includes a variety of speeches, papers, and reports written by Grout over her career. Topics include the need for physical education for women, American physical education compared to that of Europe, and the history of physical education for women at Duke. Also included in this series are several speeches made by Grout at the retirement parties of other faculty and staff of the Woman's College. The final series, Professional Travels, documents Grout's international travels to Europe in 1938 and 1958, where she studied the physical education programs of Sweden, Holland, and Norway.