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Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

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Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers papers, 1970-2019 60.0 Linear Feet — 53 boxes; 9 oversize folders — 7 Gigabytes — 1296 files

Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers are professors in Duke University's Department of Religion. Throughout their careers, they have conducted archeological digs in relation to their interest in biblical and Judaic studies. The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations the pair conducted in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s. The materials in the collection include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, maps, and records; notecards; photographs (including slides, prints, and negatives), almost all black-and-white; a few audiovisual items; clippings; some administrative and correspondence files; coins; and drawings of sites and artifacts. There are many electronic files, some of which represent items not present in the collection. Topics include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations conducted by the Meyers and their teams in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s, as well as materials related to later publications about their work. Formats include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, and records; maps; notecards; photographs (including many slides, prints, and negatives); coins; news clippings; a few video and audio recordings; some administrative and correspondence files; and many drawings of sites and artifacts. There are also electronic records, most of which are black-and-white scans of photographs, negatives, and field notebooks, and drawings, many of these, but not all, are scans of items located in the collection.

Topics represented by the materials include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and many photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

Materials have been kept in the binders and folders in which they were received. The collection is organized by accession number, but materials in separate accession number groups are intrinsically connected.

The addition (A2003-30) includes binders from an archeological dig in Gush Halav, and Arabic and Jewish coins from the Meiron and Khirbet Shema digs.

Accessions from 2010 and 2017 include materials from archeological digs in Nabratein, Meiron, Gush Halav, and Khirbet Shema.

The accessions from 2019 include materials from digs in Khirbet Shema, Gush Halav, Nabratein, Meiron, and Sepphoris, among other materials. Also received in 2019 are over 1200 digital files from the Sepphoris site, which have been migrated to a library server.

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Diskin Clay papers, 1962-2014 18 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Diskin Clay was on the Classics faculty at Duke University from 1990 to 2008. This collection of his professional papers includes correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus. There are also many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips.

The professional papers of classics professor Diskin Clay include correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus.

Also included in the collection are many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips. Clay's writings are also present in the form of short papers and drafts of longer works. There is one CD-ROM.

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Theodore W. "Ted" Minah, was the Director of Duke University Dining Halls from 1946-1974. Over his 28 years at Duke, Minah worked hard to serve the best quality food at as low a price as possible without incurring deficit to the University. By his retirement in 1974, Minah had transformed the dining halls at Duke University from a small operation to an operation of 12 dining halls serving approximately 15,000 meals per day. Materials in the collection include administrative records, work and purchase orders, food pricing, menus, financial and statistical reports, job descriptions, survey results, banquet logs, blueprints, union handbooks, black and white and color photographs, and other materials documenting the activities of the Duke University Dining Halls and the Director of Dining Halls.

The Theodore W. "Ted" Minah records and papers span the years 1941-1975, with the bulk of the materials ranging from 1946-1974. The collection is arranged into three series: Administrative Records, 1945-1975, Articles and Speeches, 1941-1975 and Correspondence, 1945-1974. Administrative Records are further arranged into three subseries: Blueprints, Daily Banquet Logs, and General Administrative Records.

Materials in the collection include administrative records, correspondence, work and purchase orders, food pricing, menus, financial and statistical reports, job descriptions, survey results, banquet logs, blueprints, union handbooks, black and white and color photographs, and other materials documenting the activities of both the Duke University Dining Halls and the Director of Dining Halls, as well as well as Ted Minah's affiliations with professional associations.

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Walter Gordy papers, 1935 - 1986 37.5 Linear Feet — 29,000 Items

Walter Gordy (1909-1985) was a James B. Duke Professor of Physics at Duke University. In his over thirty year career at Duke, he founded and directed the Duke Microwave Laboratory, and researched and published extensively. The Walter Gordy Papers include correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. Major subjects include microwave spectroscopy, microwave radar, the Duke Microwave Laboratory, Army research Office , Durham (ARO-D), and the Duke Department of Physics. English.

The collection includes correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. The materials date from approximately 1935 to 1986. Gordy's professional career, particularly his work at Duke, is well represented. Much of the material stems from his research in the Duke Microwave Laboratory. The correspondence in the collection is mainly professional. A few materials, such as trip souvenirs, represent Gordy's personal life.

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Otto Meier, Jr., records and papers, 1931 - 1979 20.5 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

Otto Meier, Jr., (1908-1979), professor emeritus of electrical engineering, taught at Duke University from 1934 to 1975. Meier's specialties were electrical machinery and control, illumination, explosives, nucleonics, and experimental nuclear physics. Meier was active in the Southeastern Electric Exchange; the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca. 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975); and the Engineers Club (Durham, N.C.). Meier was a consultant engineer with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab and helped to plan the facility. The collection contains correspondence, lecture and course notes, photographs, reports, minutes, newsletters, slides, lantern slides, black-and-white negatives, and other materials pertaining to professional organizations, regional utilities, faculty and university affairs, curriculum, and other subjects related to the College of Engineering, engineering student organizations, and the domestic use of nuclear power. English.

The Otto Meier, Jr., Records and Papers is divided into eight major series: Personal and Biographical Files; General Subject Files; Duke University; School of Engineering; Organizations; Papers and Articles; Photos and Slides; and the records of the Tau Beta Pi.

The Personal and Biographical Files Series contains Meier's Ph.D. thesis; texts of his lectures and addresses; materials documenting conferences he attended; and materials used on his trips as a Duke University Admissions Office representative to regional high schools. Also, in this series are very extensive files on the courses Meier taught at Duke. These files include detailed notes, projects, tests, solutions to test questions, and course evaluations.

The General Subject Files mainly contain correspondence, memoranda, and reports that document Meier's committee work at Duke. There is considerable material on the Faculty Club and on ROTC, and a minor amount on early computers at Duke. There are documents (agendas, papers, and programs) that deal with the activities of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a regional utilities group, whose meetings Meier frequently attended.

The Duke University Series consists mainly of minutes and memoranda of the University Council/Academic Council (1953-1973); the Graduate Faculty and its executive committee; the University Faculty (1953-1973); and the University Faculty Council/Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (1967-1972). One binder contains minutes, correspondence, reports, and budgets of the Duke University Church and its Board (1953-1956). There are several folders of University memoranda on a variety of topics (1935-1942).

The School of Engineering Series contains the minutes and related papers of the School of Engineering, known as the College of Engineering until 1966. It includes materials from the Engineering Administrative Council (1968-1974), Engineering Faculty (1953-1974), and the Engineering Faculty Council (1947-1974). In some cases the accounts and comments are more detailed than those in the published minutes. This series also has general information on topics such as administrators; articles and papers by Duke University faculty and students; the Board of Visitors; the engineering building, former faculty, and research and development.

The Dept. of Electrical Engineering is an important subseries within the School of Engineering Series. It contains files on curriculum (1953-1954), minutes of the graduate faculty (1963-1964), and "status reports" from the years 1957, 1962, and 1967. This includes compilations of staff rosters, course descriptions, vitae, and available facilities. There is a sizeable collection of folders entitled "Staff," (1953-1954), that contain minutes of the electrical engineering faculty meetings, memoranda, reports, and other papers on general policies.

The Organizations Series contains correspondence, newsletters, minutes of regional conferences for twenty different organizations. The largest collections concern the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); and the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975). There are also extensive materials from the Durham, N.C., Engineers Club (ca. 1944-1974), in which Meier was an active member. Some organizations are represented by only a few items retained by Meier. There are two folders on Phi Beta Kappa at Duke (1962) and Sigma Xi (ca. 1939-1974).

The Papers and Articles Series includes addresses and papers given by others at various engineering conferences in the 1950-1960s. Of note are the papers from the Southeastern Electric Exchange on technical, electrical, and electronics subjects. Included are speeches by officials of utility companies on nuclear power in its early days.

The Photographs and Slides Series illustrates the life of engineering students in the 1930s; the engineering building (Southgate) and laboratory on East Campus; West Campus; and the construction of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. There are lantern slides that contain diagrams of nuclear particle processes, schematics for a Van de Graaff accelerator, and photographs of the installation of the 4MeV Van de Graaff in the nuclear facility of the Physics Dept. There are also 3 and 1/2 inch x 5 inch slides for a presentation on "Electric Power Utilities - Trends and Nuclear Outlook."

The slides are fragile. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

The Tau Beta Pi Series contains material from the North Carolina Gamma Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national engineering honorary, established at Duke University on Jan. 10, 1948. The material contains banquet initiation programs (1949-1970), correspondence, bulletins, and printed material on the history, purpose, constitution, and other aspects of Tau Beta Pi. It includes two large bound volumes, "Book of the Chairman of the Advisory Board," (1948-1950, 1950-1958). There is also a large amount of material on the National Convention of 1960. Access to Boxes 17-18 is RESTRICTED: Student Records.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

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Joseph C. Wetherby papers, 1930 - 1976 4.6 Linear Feet — 5500 Items

Joseph Cable Wetherby served as Associate Professor of English at Duke University from 1947-1976. The papers consist of correspondence, printed matter, speeches, clippings, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, and writings. Major subjects include the teaching of English to international students at Duke, broadcasting and the development of the WDBS radio station at Duke University, and the Duke University Debate Team, which Wetherby coached for over 20 years. English.

The Wetherby Papers contain printed material (including pamphlets, brochures, flyers, programs, speeches, and clippings), correspondence, minutes, memoranda, teaching aids and other teaching materials, student papers, photographs, research notes, writings, and other papers. Inclusive dates for the collection are ca. 1930 to 1976, with the bulk of material from 1947 to 1976.

These papers chiefly reflect Wetherby's interest in three major areas: teaching English as a foreign language, broadcasting, and debating. In the first category falls material on grammar and enunciation (including numerous exercises, tests, and other teaching aids), speech and hearing pathology, and a small number of administrative papers dealing with the teaching of English to international students at Duke University. In the area of broadcasting, there are clippings, course descriptions, lecture material, and printed material on the history of radio and television; its methods, principles, and policies; legal status; government policies affecting broadcasting; and audience and market research. Wetherby also kept clippings, printed matter, and copies of speeches on communications and broadcasting in general, as well as on specialized topics such as TV violence and cigarette advertising.

Files concerning the history of Duke University include materials on a proposed FM station for the campus (1957-1968), as well as selected student papers on such topics as broadcasting at Duke, the Vigil of 1968, and the Associated Students of Duke University in a conflict with WDBS. There are also a number of selected student papers on various aspects of communications, broadcasting, and the persuasive speaking.

There is a card file on members of the Debate Team with their records by opponent and tournament, and a small amount of material (correspondence, records, circulars, a telegram) on the West Point National Tournament for 1962 to 1964.

Useful information regarding a significant incident early in Wetherby's tenure as debate coach will be found in William King, "Not fit to debate? National debate topic on Communist China gets hackles up," in the Duke Alumni Register, vol. 65, no. 2, Nov.- Dec. 1978. The article deals with Wetherby's defense of the right of collegiate debaters to argue this sensitive topic in 1954, at the height of the McCarthy era. Wetherby appeared on the "See It Now" program of Edward R. Murrow on CBS Television.

Wetherby coached three teams from Duke University which appeared on national television on the "College Bowl" series, in 1955, 1960, and 1968. Some materials in the collection deal with the logistics of these teams' travel and appearances, and on the operation of the telecasts.

Gathered in separate folders as well as scattered throughout the collection is a large amount of printed material in the form of brochures, handbooks, pamphlets, newsletters, and copies of speeches. Included is material from organizations like the National Association of Broadcasters, the Federal Communications Commission, the Southern Speech Association (later the Southern Speech Communication Association), and the Speech Communication Association. The collection from the Southern Speech Association and its successor organization includes a consecutive run of programs for annual conventions from 1951 to 1976. The material on the Speech Communication Association includes consecutive issues from 1968 to 1976 of Free Speech, a newsletter of this organization's Commission on Freedom of Speech.

During the 1960s, Wetherby frequently was sent to regional high schools to promote Duke University to prospective students.

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Ellwood S. Harrar papers, 1928 - 1975 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Ellwood S. Harrar served as a Professor of Wood Technology at Duke University from 1936 to 1974, and as Dean of the Duke University School of Forestry from 1957 to 1967. He researched and published extensively on forestry and dendrology. The Ellwood S. Harrar Papers contain documents related to his interests in the lumber industry and wood production. As a Dean, he participated in the planning for the new Biological Sciences Building and frequently corresponded with contractors and vendors regarding its construction. The materials in the collection are primarily correspondence, but it also includes academic papers, biographical sketches, and photographs, among other materials. Major subjects include the U.S. wood industry, wood technology, and forest research. Major correspondents include the Navy Bureau of Ships, Swift and Company, J.P. Perry, J. George Harrar, and the Brunswick Pulp Research Fund. English.

Collection includes correspondence, papers, photographs, and other documents related to Ellwood S. Harrar's career as a professor of forestry and Dean of the School of Forestry at Duke University. It is organized into the following series: Series 1, Personal, 1928-1975; Series 2, Duke University, 1951-1974; and Series 3, Correspondence, 1946-1974.

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Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.