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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014

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39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items
Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Allen Building Takeover collection, 1969-2002

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1 Linear Foot — 1 box
On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of Black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a Black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for Black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements; flyers; publications; correspondence; handouts; reports; transcripts; ephemera; clippings; a bibliography; photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969) and the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969); and items related to student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject Files series includes color photographs taken inside the building, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), and items relating to student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover; they are accompanied by the original color negatives. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrances of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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Alumni Affairs records, 1851 - 2005

30 Linear Feet
The Office of Alumni Affairs at Duke University administers the Duke Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization serving over 120,000 alumni and former students of Duke University, in addition to thousands of parents and friends of the university. Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter. English.

Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter.

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Alvin A. Achenbaum papers, 1948-2011 and undated

117 Linear Feet — 80,000 Items
Market researcher and advertising executive who worked at several agencies; partner in a consulting practice under several names; lecturer and author of marketing textbooks. The Alvin A. Achenbaum Papers span the years 1948-2011 and document Achenbaum's career in advertising (with Grey Advertising, J. Walter Thompson and Backer Spielvogel Bates agencies) and marketing consulting (as a partner in Alvin Achenbaum Associates, Canter Achenbaum Heekin, and Achenbaum Bogda Associates). Collection includes writings and speeches, correspondence, photographs, research reports and related materials. Clients represented include 7-Eleven, American Red Cross, AT&T, Block Drug, Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Chrysler, Dairy Queen, Dentsu, Franklin Mint, General Foods, GTE, Hallmark, Honda, Integrity Music, Kayser-Roth, Kia, K-Mart, Miller Brewing, MTA, Nationwide, Nestlé, Nissan/Datsun, PCA, Pfizer, Philip Morris, Quaker Oats, Revlon, Ryerson Tull, Seagram, Toyota, U.S. Dept. of Defense, and Warner-Lambert. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Alvin A. Achenbaum Papers span the years 1948-2011 and document Achenbaum's career in advertising (with Grey Advertising, J. Walter Thompson and Backer Spielvogel Bates agencies) and marketing consulting (as a partner in Alvin Achenbaum Associates, Canter Achenbaum Heekin, and Achenbaum Bogda Associates). Collection includes writings and speeches, correspondence, photographs, research reports and related materials. Clients represented include 7-Eleven, American Red Cross, AT&T, Block Drug, Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Chrysler, Dairy Queen, Dentsu, Franklin Mint, General Foods, GTE, Hallmark, Honda, Integrity Music, Kayser-Roth, Kia, K-Mart, Miller Brewing, MTA, Nationwide, Nestlé, Nissan/Datsun, PCA, Pfizer, Philip Morris, Quaker Oats, Revlon, Ryerson Tull, Seagram, Toyota, U.S. Dept. of Defense, and Warner-Lambert.

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American Dance Festival Photographic Materials collection, circa 1930-2008

19.4 Linear Feet
The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987

18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes
Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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Bailey Daniel Webb papers, 1845-2003 and undated, bulk 1950s-2003

9.5 Linear Feet
Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been separated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020

654 boxes — 654 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.
Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Bates Worldwide, Inc. records, 1934-2005 and undated

784 Linear Feet — 5.1 Gigabytes — Audiovisual objects in RL00090-SET-0001 are not included because they require Audiovisual processing before access!! — 336,000 Items
Bates Worldwide advertising agency (Bates) was established in 1940 by former executives of the Benton & Bowles agency. It grew to become one of the largest agencies in the U.S. until its demise in 2003. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by the Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century. The Bates Worldwide, Inc. Records spans the years 1934-2003 and includes correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients included Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The Bates Worldwide, Inc. ("Bates") Records span the years 1934-2003 and include correspondence, corporate policy manuals, photographs, publications, graphic designs, print advertisements, electronic records and videocassettes that document the activities of this major global advertising agency over the course of its corporate life. Bates began as a simple proprietorship, but as the company grew its organizational structure took on different forms: a partnership, then a corporation before becoming a publicly traded transnational entity, and finally becoming a subsidiary in a global holding company. From the 1970s on, Bates' growth and international expansion was fueled by a long series of mergers, partnerships and acquisitions that continued until the company was itself acquired, first by Saatchi & Saatchi and later by the WPP Group. Materials in the collection relate to Bates' permutations into a variety of corporate entities, including Ted Bates & Co., Ted Bates, Inc., Backer Spielvogel Bates, and Bates Worldwide, Inc., along with its subsidiaries (such as Campbell-Mithun and Kobs and Draft) and parent organizations (Cordiant Communications Group, Saatchi & Saatchi). Thus, the collection provides a window into the larger corporate culture of mergers, consolidations, acquisitions and takeovers that led to the formation of giant transnational advertising conglomerates and marked a profound shift in the landscape of the advertising industry during the late 20th century.

Bates built its early reputation as an advertising agency with a particular talent for promoting pharmaceutical products (Carter's Pills, Anacin analgesics) and common household goods (Mars candies, Wonder bread, Palmolive soap, Colgate dental cream). Advertising policies developed around a philosophy Bates called the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), which informed an imperative to identify and promote a single, unique and compelling reason for consumers to use any given product or service. As the company grew into a global business, USP evolved into more complex forms, including the Bates Brand Wheel. Major clients include Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co., Carter-Wallace Corporation, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Hyundai America, the Joint Recruiting Advertising Program of the combined U.S. Armed Services, M&M/Mars Inc., Miller Brewing Company, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy and Wendy's International. There is also some information on the company's founder, Ted Bates, as well as on Rosser Reeves, Bates' first copy writer and the chief architect of the USP concept.

The collection is organized into ten series and one cumulative subject index--Client Files, Corporate Communications Department, Creative Department, Financial Records, Human Resources Department, Memorabilia, New Business, Print Books, Vertical Files and Audiovisual Materials. The Client Files Series includes research reports, storyboards and graphic designs for Bates' clients. The Corporate Communications Department Series includes company-wide memoranda, public relations policy manuals, and a large file of biographical sketches and photographs of Bates' executives, as well as news clippings and press releases relating to the company and its clients. The Creative Department Series primarily focuses on Bates' efforts to stimulate creativity throughout its worldwide offices through participation in internal and industry-wide advertising competitions. The Financial Records Series includes general ledgers and other accounting reports. The Human Resources Department Series includes employee benefits literature and information on company affairs including press releases and staff memoranda. The Memorabilia Series includes promotional clothing, games, office posters and awards. The New Business Series includes materials relating to requests for proposals from prospective clients. The Print Books Series contains material from over 100 albums of proof sheets and print advertisements from existing clients. The Vertical Files Series consists of an alphabetical file of general information collected to aid in various aspects of company operations. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains periodic review collections of advertising, video memoranda, speeches, retirement presentations and highlight compilations prepared for prospective clients and award show consideration. A Subject Cross-Reference Index at the end of the finding aid links materials pertaining to specific clients, corporations, events and policies scattered throughout the various subject series.

Some materials were received as electronic files. Disks were assigned consecutive numbers reflecting the order in which they were encountered. If a work has a corresponding or associated electronic file, the file is included in the container list. The contents of each disk have been migrated to the Special Collections server. Consequently, the contents of these disks are available only in correspondingly numbered electronic subdirectories. Consult a reference archivist for access to the electronic files.

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Bates Worldwide, Inc. records, 1934-2005 and undated 784 Linear Feet — 5.1 Gigabytes — Audiovisual objects in RL00090-SET-0001 are not included because they require Audiovisual processing before access!! — 336,000 Items

Bedinger and Dandridge Family papers, 1752-2000

30 Linear Feet — 13,000 Items
Bedinger and Dandridge families of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York. Collection consist of journals, correspondence, poems, reviews, and other papers of the Bedinger, Dandridge, Washington, Henry Clay, and Adam Stephen families, of Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio; and of the Cornwall, Lawrence, Mitchell, Walter Bowne, and Rufus King Southgate families, of Connecticut, Maine, and New York primarily created or collected by Caroline Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The papers fall into six classes: journals and fragments of journals of Danske Dandridge (1864-1909), Henry Bedinger (1830s), and Daniel Bedinger (1811); correspondence and material on Kentucky and the northern Shenandoah Valley during the Revolutionary period; family correspondence, genealogies, and memoirs used in writing the Bedinger family history; papers of Henry Bedinger, the American Minister to Denmark in the 1850s; poems, reviews and literary correspondence of Danske Dandridge, and poems and prose of her father, Henry Dandridge, and of her daughter, Serena Catherine Dandridge; and horticultural writings of Danske Dandridge.

Collection includes the correspondence and papers of five generations of families from Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York chiefly created or collected by Carolina Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The primary portion of the collection is made up of the personal and family papers of Danske Dandridge (1858-1914), a writer and horticulturist. From 1866 to her marriage in 1877, Danske Dandridge's correspondence is concerned with social life in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and with family matters. Her literary correspondence begins in the early 1880s and continues until the year of her death. Correspondents include John Esten Cooke, Edmund C. Stedman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Thomas W. Higginson. There are sustained exchanges of letters with William Hayes Ward, editor of The Brooklyn Independent which published much of her work; with the poet Lizette Woodworth Reese of Baltimore; and Margaretta Lippincott. Material on gardening begins to appear in the papers for the 1890s and includes a large number of letters and eleven notebooks.

Danske Dandridge's family correspondence continues with here sister Mrs. J. F. B. (Mary Bedinger) Mitchell, and her brother, Henry Bedinger IV, as well as with her numerous cousins.

Correspondence of Adam Stephen Dandridge (1844-1924) reflects his career in the West Virginia House of Representatives and his business as a seller of farm machinery.

Correspondence and papers of Serena Katherine (Violet) Dandridge, daughter of Danske and Adam Stephen Dandridge, bear on her career as an illustrator for the zoologist Hubert Lyman Clark, and reflect her interest in women's suffrage and the Swedenborgian Church. There are also twelve volumes of her writings in manuscript.

Correspondence and papers of Danske Dandridge's father, Henry Bedinger Dandridge III, include letters on literary subjects from Thomas Willis White, Philip Pendleton Cooke, and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; papers from his years as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849; records of his service, 1853-1858, first as a consul and then as minister of the United States in Sweden and in particular his negotiation of the treaty with Sweden in 1857; and his notebooks containing poems and comments on social life in Virginia.

Letters of Caroline B. (Lawrence) Bedinger, mother of Danske Dandridge, to her husband's family in the South and her relatives in New York concern her experience as a young woman in Washington, D.C., and Virginia; her stay in Copenhagen; the Civil War experiences of her husband's family and her own; family life; and the education of her children.

The collection contains a large number of transcripts made by Danske Dandridge from originals in the possession of various branches of her family, including the Swearingens, Shepherds, Morgans, Rutherfords, Worthingtons, Washingtons, Kings, Brownes, and Lawrences for the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. There are also copies of letters and documents from the Lyman C. Draper manuscripts at the University of Wisconsin. Essentially, they are the papers of three brothers, George Michael Bedinger (1756-1843), Henry Bedinger II (1753-1843), and Daniel Bedinger (1761-1818), and their descendants and connections. Among the many subjects discussed are Indian warfare and conditions on the Virginia frontier; descriptions of the events of the Revolution; trading in salt and fur; experiences of Americans held prisoner by the British during the Revolution; flour milling in the Potomac valley; trade and transport of farm commodities; travel on the Mississippi to New Orleans, 1811-1812; James Rumsey and the development of the steamboat; the settling of Kentucky and Ohio, descriptions of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Baltimore at various times from 1800 to 1860; antebellum social life, South and North; and extensive comments on politics through 1860, particularly on the opposition to Federalism and the early Democratic-Republican Party.

Description taken from Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (1980).

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Ben Rosen papers, 1936-2006 and undated, bulk 1945-1991

65 Linear Feet — 7500 Items
Ben Rosen is an American graphic designer and visual communications consultant. Rosen worked as a designer for J. Gordon Carr and Associates and the Blaine Thompson Company before founding his own firm, Ben Rosen Associates, in 1952, which specialized in corporate identity programs. Rosen is the author of three books on on graphic design and typography: Type and Typography (1963); The Corporate Search for Visual Identity (1970); and Digital Type Specimens (1991). The Ben Rosen Papers span the years 1936 to 2006, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945 through 1991, and document Rosen's sixty-year career in graphic design and visual communications consulting. The collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, graphic design and printed materials, sketches, presentation boards, photographs, and slides, that document design concepts and programs (corporate logos, letterhead, packaging, industrial design, promotion) Rosen developed, through his firm, Ben Rosen Associates, for clients including American Loose Leaf, CCMI McGraw-Hill, Equitable Life Assurance, Exxon/Esso, Food Fair Stores, IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, North American Reinsurance, Philip Morris, Richardson-Vicks, Russ Berrie, and Tishman Realty and Construction. The collection also includes manuscripts and published editions of Rosen's books on graphic design and typography, and touches on several of Rosen's commmemorative projects, including a President Kennedy memorial, a United Nations 20th Anniversary book, and Rosen's submission to the World Trade Center Memorial design competition.

The Ben Rosen Papers span the years 1936 to 2006, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945 through 1991, and document Rosen's sixty-year career in graphic design and visual communications consulting. The collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, graphic design and printed materials, sketches, presentation boards, photographs, and slides, that document design concepts and programs (corporate logos, letterhead, packaging, industrial design, promotion). Rosen developed corporate visual identity programs and packaging designs, first as an employee of J. Gordon Carr and Associates and the Blaine Thompson Company, and later through his own firm, Ben Rosen Associates, for clients including American Loose Leaf, CCMI McGraw-Hill, Equitable Life Assurance, Exxon/Esso, Food Fair Stores, IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, North American Reinsurance, Philip Morris, Richardson-Vicks, Russ Berrie, and Tishman Realty and Construction. The collection also includes manuscripts and published editions of Rosen's books on graphic design and typography: Type and Typography (1963); The Corporate Search for Visual Identity (1970); and Digital Type Specimens (1991); and touches on several of Rosen's commmemorative projects, including a memorial for President John F. Kennedy, a United Nations 20th Anniversary book, and Rosen's submission to the World Trade Center Memorial design competition.

The collection is organized into five series: Personal Files, Writings, Business Files, Client Files, and Photographic Materials. The Personal Files Series includes original student drawings and sketches from Rosen's years at Cranbrook and Pratt, and later artwork; World War II materials, primarily relating to Rosen's proposed plan to the British government for the conversion of U.S. military bases into postwar British housing; and limited biographical material. The Writings Series contains articles on package design and visual communications by Rosen and others; manuscripts, published volumes, and promotional materials for Rosen's books; and unpublished book concepts and manuscripts. The Business Files Series includes administrative records, new business presentations, reference files and scrapbooks of creative output from several advertising and graphic design firms where Rosen was an employee or partner. The Client Files Series consists primarily of visual communications design work for a number of clients, and materials relating to several commemorative projects. The Photographic Materials Series contains negatives, photographs, and slides documenting some of Rosen's designs.

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Beth York papers, 1968-2015

9.0 Linear Feet
Musician and academic music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985. Also includes materials documenting academic career including research, teaching, publishing, and grant administration.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Accession 2018-0113 consists of materials documenting York's academic career as a music therapist, including her M.A. thesis, university evaluations and a tenure portfolio, teaching materials, research materials, conference materials, presentations, correspondence, workshop materials, a performance piece called Finding Voice, grant materials, and music therapy workshop materials.

York also co-edited a number of issues of the lesbian feminist quarterly Sinister Wisdom, which are included in the collection, as are production materials, drafts, and correspondence related to those issues. Also included are issues of the women's periodicals Hotwire and Paid My Dues.

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Caribbean Sea Migration collection, 1959-2014

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3 Linear Feet — 600 Items
Materials from (or related to) the migration by sea of Cubans, Dominicans, and Haitians, including the refugee camp for Cuban and Haitian rafters that existed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, largely dating from 1991-1996. Collection includes camp newspapers and artwork created by refugees held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba; materials from the U.S. Coast Guard and other military sources, such as newspapers written in Haitian Creole, photocopies of camp rules and refugee intake procedures, and a transcript from an introductory video shown to refugees arriving at the camps; magazines and media coverage of refugee situations, including some material on Elián González; photographs and slides of refugees, Coast Guard personnel, and conditions in the camps in Cuba. Refugees arriving in Miami are included as are photographs of the work of the Guantanámo Refugee Assistance and Services Program in Miami and in the camps in Guantánamo Bay.

Materials include newspapers, artwork, clippings, U.S. military publications aimed at camp residents, camp notes, reports, and photographs from a variety of sources. Newspapers are one of the largest formats within the collection, which includes the complete run of éxodo, a newspaper with color issues printed from November 1994-September 1995 from Camps Kilo and Charlie Village in the Guantánamo Bay camps; issues of El Bravo, El Balsero, and El Futuro from 1994-1995; Sa K'pase, N'ap Boule, and Qué Pasa, newspapers printed by the U.S. military in Creole and Spanish and designed for Haitian and Cuban refugees at the camps; as well as newspaper clippings and some magazine issues covering the refugee crisis of 1994-1995 and the plight of Caribbean refugees in general.

Photographs are another significant component of the collection. U.S. Coast Guard photographs and slides of rafters and rescuers date from 1980 to the 1990s or 2000s, and are accompanied by photocopies from the U.S. Coast Guard's Historian Office detailing refugees assistance as early as 1959. The collection also includes unsorted and largely unlabeled photographs from the camps; those that are labeled date from 1994.

Other materials in the collection include some refugee artwork, publications about Cuba, a folder of Cuba information including some materials on Elián González, and other ephemera mentioning Cuban refugees. In addition, 8 CDs with photographs and other materials have been transferred to Duke's ERM server and are in the custody of the Electronic Records archivist.

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Carl Spielvogel papers, 1946-2014 and undated

12 Linear Feet
Advertising executive at several U.S. agencies, including McCann-Erickson, Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic Group, and Saatchi & Saatchi. Served as U.S. Ambassador to Slovakia during the Clinton Administration.

Collection spans 1946-2014 and contains correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, printed materials, memorabilia, audiovisual materials and other items pertaining to Spielvogel's career in advertising as well as his public service and community activities. Advertising agencies represented include Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic and Saatchi & Saatchi. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Center for Documentary Studies Neighborhoods Project records, 1997-2004 and undated

3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1000 Items
The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Charles DeWitt Watts papers, 1917-2004 and undated

13.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 7249 Items
Pioneering African American surgeon who was chief of surgery at Lincoln Hospital, clinical professor of surgery at Duke University, founder of Lincoln Community Health Center, director of student health at North Carolina Central University, and vice president and medical director for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, all in Durham, N.C. Spanning the period of 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. There is material on the formation in 1901 of Lincoln Hospital, a medical care facility for African Americans in Durham, N.C.. and other items on the early 20th century history of Durham, but the bulk of the papers relate to the later half of the 20th century. Formats primarily consist of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials. It is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material in the Medical Records Series have been separated and are currently closed to use. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Spanning the dates 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. The bulk of the material dates from 1970 to 2000. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials, and is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material containing personally-identifiable medical information in the Medical Records Series has been separated from the other professional files and is currently closed to use.

Largest in the collection is the Professional Files Series, which primarily contains administrative documents related to Watts's career as a doctor, surgeon, and medical administrator for various private practices, hospitals, boards, and professional societies. Of particular note are files related to Watt's mentor, Dr. Charles Drew, the history of Lincoln Hospital, and the establishment of the Lincoln Community Health Center in 1970. The folders in the Medical Records Series have been separated and are currently closed to use. The Community Relations Series concerns Watts's professional life outside of medicine, containing files related to his membership in churches and fraternal organizations, non-medically-related boards on which he served, his work with Durham, N.C. organizations, his interest in race relations, and honors awarded him. Also included are the papers of Constance Watts (wife), Lyda Merrick (mother-in-law), and Margaret Smith (a nurse in his office). Of special interest is a scrapbook about the Negro Braille Magazine (now the Merrick-Washington Magazine for the Blind), founded by Mrs. Merrick.

Some professional correspondence is also intermixed in the Personal Files Series, which contains papers related to Watts's family, friends, finances, education, and alumni activities. Of particular note is a transcript of Watts's oral history. Containing both professional and personal content, the Photographic Materials Series contains photographs, slides, and negatives. The bulk consists of portraits and snapshots of the Watts family. Of particular note are early photographs of Lincoln Hospital nursing students and staff members.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Dan Kirsch papers, 1975-2004

19.1 Linear Feet — 10,840 Items
Activist, community organizer, and theater director. Executive director of Charlotte's Lesbian and Gay Community Center. He also founded One Voice, a gay, lesbian and gay-affirmative chorus in Charlotte, NC, and OutCharlotte, an annual cultural festival that celebrated LGBT culture through theater, dance, music, visual art, film and video. Collection documents the activities of Dan Kirsch and his work with various North Carolina gay and lesbian organizations. Organizations represented in the collection include One Voice, the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board, PELAG, Time Out Youth, OutCharlotte, NC Pride, and The Lesbian and Gay Community Center of Charlotte.

Accession (2005-0037) (21 boxes) documents the activities of N.C. gay and lesbian organizations. Includes correspondence, newsletters, programs, flyers, and organizational material from One Voice; organizational material, correspondence, programs, invitations, minutes, registration records, financial records (bulk 1994) from Music & Message, the Gala Choruses Leadership Conference (Sept. 2-4, 1994 in Charlotte); correspondence, newsletters, clippings, financial records (1993-1996), minutes, and administrative records for the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board; fund raising material for the AIDS fund raiser Heart Strings (June 15, 1992), and Pelag benefit Our Family Celebration (Oct. 12, 1991); and files, promotional materials, newsletters, clippings, minutes, and financial records about a N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride event, 1994. Also included are posters, t-shirts, 14 VHS video tapes, 1 CD-Rom, 50 photographs, and 25 slides.

Accession (2007-0079) (1600 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2002) contains organization files and correspondence for Time Out Youth, an organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; financial and organizational files for OutCharlotte (1995-1998); NC Pride files; conference materials; and clippings from local publications including the Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing, and The Leader. Also included are 2 CD-Rs containing audio clips of interviews, 15 Hi8 video cassettes, 9 VHS tapes, 4 audio cassettes, and photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0173) (2500 items; 3.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2004) includes materials from the planning and construction of The Lesbian and Gay Community Center in Charlotte, NC. Also includes The Center program files, administrative materials, board meeting minutes, publicity, and volunteer information.

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Davis Family papers, 1876-2007 and undated, bulk 1924-2004

4 Linear Feet — 1500 Items
The Davis family, originally of Hampton, Virginia, is a prominent African-American family whose members include authors, journalists, photographers, filmmakers, composers, and educators who have made significant contributions to American history and culture. The collection includes photograph albums, loose photographs, and writings documenting the history of the African American Davis family in Hampton, Virginia from the 1930s to the 1950s as well as family members at later points; it also includes materials related to family history and genealogy that span the period from 1876 to the 1920s. Family members featured within the collection include William Roscoe Davis, Andrew Davis, Arthur P. Davis, Sr., Georgia Campbell Neal, Willie Louise Barbour Davis, Collis H. Davis, Sr., Georgia Louise Davis, Jennie Crosby Davis, Collis H. Davis, Jr., Thulani Davis, Anthony Davis, and Charles Sumner Stone, Jr. (Chuck). Educational institutions attended by family members and documented in the collection include Colby College, Fryeburg Academy, George P. Phenix School, and the Hampton Institute.

The Davis Family Papers span the years 1876 to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1924 to 2004, and are arranged into three series of photograph albums, loose photographs, and family papers that document the personal histories of members of the African American Davis family. Of the albums in the Photograph Albums Series, four were created by Louise Davis and one was assembled by Georgia Campbell Neal, Louise's grandmother. Louise Davis's photograph album dating from 1947-1949 contains snapshots that pertain to her stay at Fryeburg Academy and at the Encampment for Citizenship summer program. Her 1949-1953 photograph album documents student life at Colby College in Maine. Many images in the Photographs Series were taken by Billie Davis and by Louise Davis, who were particularly interested in photography, but some were contributed by others, including Reuben Burrell of Hampton Institute. Subjects include members of the Davis family and their friends, both at special events and in everyday home and school life in Hapmton, Virginia from the 1930s to the 1950s. The family papers found in the Writings Series consist of correspondence, documents, and published articles related to Davis family members. These include magazine features on Louise Davis from 2001 and 2004, as well as photocopies of Louise Davis's many articles written for major East Coast newspapers and other publications. Materials related to Thulani Davis include photocopies of her articles for the Village Voice and the San Francisco Sun Reporter, and reviews of her books. Papers related to Anthony Davis include reviews and feature articles on his performance and composition career including his operas X, The Life and Times of Malcolm X, Under the Double Moon, Tania, Amistad, and Wakonda's Dream. Genealogical materials include a photocopy of a handwritten draft of Georgia Campbell Neal's autobiography, reports on several of the Davis family reunions in the 1990s, as well as detailed family trees of the Davis and Stone families.

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Dawn Langley Simmons papers, 1848-2001, 2012-2014 and undated, bulk 1969-2000

19.7 Linear Feet — 18,350 Items
Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Diskin Clay papers, 1962-2014

18 Linear Feet — 14 boxes
Diskin Clay was on the Classics faculty at Duke University from 1990 to 2008. This collection of his professional papers includes correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus. There are also many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips.

The professional papers of classics professor Diskin Clay include correspondence, writings, teaching files, and research materials. Topics include Greek literature, especially poetry; Greek philosophy; and archaeology in Greece; specific topics relate to Oenanda, an ancient Greek city in Turkey, to the writings of Xenophon, Diogenes, and the poetry of Archilocus.

Also included in the collection are many slides of Greece, as well as from Italy and Paris, France, taken during research and archaeology trips. Clay's writings are also present in the form of short papers and drafts of longer works. There is one CD-ROM.

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Duke Photography Faculty and Staff photographs, circa 1960s-2003

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21 Linear Feet
The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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Duke University Anniversaries collection, 1937 - 2000

15 Linear Feet — 12500 Items
Duke University has celebrated anniversaries of two major founding events: the establishment of continuous education at Brown's Schoolhouse in Randolph County, N.C., in 1838, and the creation of the Duke Endowment, which transformed Trinity College into Duke University in 1924. As a result, the institution commemorated the 100th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1938/1939, the 50th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1974/1975, the 150th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1988/1989, and the 75th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1999/2000. The Duke University Anniversaries Collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed matter, programs, speeches, a sound recording, a diary, acknowledgements from other institutions, a time capsule, and other materials relating to events commemorating the beginnings and founding of Duke University. Major subjects include events planning, fund raising, Duke University, Trinity College (Randolph Co., N.C. and Durham, N.C.), Normal College (Randolph Co., N.C.), Union Institute (Randolph Co., N.C.), and Brown's Schoolhouse (Randolph Co., N.C.). English.

The Duke University Anniversaries Collection is divided into four series, arranged by anniversary. 50th Anniversary (1924-1974) of the founding of Duke University series includes correspondence, planning materials, programs, meeting minutes, financial statements, printed matter, and clippings created by the 50th Anniversary Steering and Advisory Committees. Materials range in date from 1973 to 1975. The 75th Anniversary (1924-1999) of the founding of Duke University series includes logos, a commemorative mailing cancellation stamp, a press release, and a sound recording of a speech given by John Koskinen on the Y2K conversion. Materials range in date from 1999 to 2000.

The 100th Anniversary (1838-1938) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes printed materials, correspondence, Centennial Fund records, a diary, publications, invitation lists, congratulations from other institutions, and several complete packets of centennial celebration materials. Also included is a time capsule, labeled: "1939-2039. A collection of items presented to the President of Duke University at the Centennial Celebration, April 22, 1939; not to be opened until the occasion of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the institution." Materials range in date from 1937 to 1939. Finally, the 150th Anniversary (1838-1988) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes articles, printed matter, correspondence, clippings, subject files, photographs, programs, and financial materials. Major subjects include Sesquicentennial Celebration planning and events, the historical marker for Brown's Schoolhouse, and the plaque and maintenance of the Trinity College Memorial Gazebo in Randolph County. Materials range in date from 1988 to 2000 (bulk 1988-1989). The collection also includes a program from the Centennial Celebration of the relocation of Trinity College to Durham, 1992.

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Duke University Museum of Art records, 1962 - 2002

17.5 Linear Feet — approx. 14,000 Items
The Duke University Museum of Art opened to the public in 1969, in a renovated science building on the University's East Campus. In 1998, Duke alumnus Raymond D. Nasher donated funds to support construction of a new art museum at Duke University, the Nasher Museum of Art, set to open in 2005. Collection includes correspondence, administrative files, financial records, exhibit catalogs and publicity material, fund-raising files, clippings, photographs, and related records. Major subjects include the opening of the Museum of Art, the Brummer Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Art, and exhibits. Materials range in date from 1962 to 2002. English.

Collection includes correspondence, administrative files, financial records, exhibit catalogs and publicity material, fund-raising files, clippings, photographs, and related records. Major subjects include the opening of the Museum of Art, the Brummer Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Art, and exhibits. Materials range in date from 1962 to 2002.

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Eleanor Elliott papers, 1768-2006 and undated (bulk 1951-2006)

55 Linear Feet — 40,500 Items
Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

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Elizabeth Hargrave papers, 1977-2010

3.7 Linear Feet — 1576 Items
Elizabeth Hargrave is an Episcopal lay woman and multi-issue activist who served as the Chair of the Davidson County (N.C.) Commissioners, the N.C. Council of Churches Committee for Equal Rights, and Episcopal Diocese of N.C. Collection contains religious and activist conference and workshop materials, printed materials, clippings, a campaign T-shirt, one audiocassette, photographs, Davidson County (N. C.) Commissioner campaign materials, Charlotte Women's Political Caucus materials, and files related to public education in North Carolina. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection (2007-0120)(1500 items, 3.4 lin. ft.; dated 1977-1989) contains religious and activist conference and workshop materials, printed materials, clippings, a campaign T-shirt, one audiocassette, photographs, Davidson County (N. C.) Commissioner campaign materials, Charlotte Women's Political Caucus materials, and files related to public education in North Carolina. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2011-0109)(2 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2010) comprises materials related to the celebration of the North Carolina Council of Churches' 75th anniversary. Includes a copy of Hargrave's remarks and a sheet of digital photographs.

Addition (2010-0186)(1 item, 0.1 lin. ft.; undated) T-shirt,

Addition (2013-0031) (75 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1987-1990) comprises comprises organizing documents from a feminist group in the Triad, subject files on pay equity, women's health care, reproductive rights, and an academic paper.

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Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers papers, 1970-2019

60.0 Linear Feet — 53 boxes; 9 oversize folders — 7 Gigabytes — 1296 files
Eric M. and Carol L. Meyers are professors in Duke University's Department of Religion. Throughout their careers, they have conducted archeological digs in relation to their interest in biblical and Judaic studies. The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations the pair conducted in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s. The materials in the collection include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, maps, and records; notecards; photographs (including slides, prints, and negatives), almost all black-and-white; a few audiovisual items; clippings; some administrative and correspondence files; coins; and drawings of sites and artifacts. There are many electronic files, some of which represent items not present in the collection. Topics include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

The collection contains extensive materials related to several major excavations conducted by the Meyers and their teams in Israel from the 1970s to the 1990s, as well as materials related to later publications about their work. Formats include binders and notebooks of field notes, charts, and records; maps; notecards; photographs (including many slides, prints, and negatives); coins; news clippings; a few video and audio recordings; some administrative and correspondence files; and many drawings of sites and artifacts. There are also electronic records, most of which are black-and-white scans of photographs, negatives, and field notebooks, and drawings, many of these, but not all, are scans of items located in the collection.

Topics represented by the materials include 20th century archaeology and practices; the Sepphoris, Meiron, Khirbet Shema, Nabratein, and Gush Halav excavation sites in Israel, including maps and many photographs of the sites; Jewish and Arabic artifacts such as coins and pottery; other ancient artifacts; and religious and biblical studies as they relate to archaeology.

Materials have been kept in the binders and folders in which they were received. The collection is organized by accession number, but materials in separate accession number groups are intrinsically connected.

The addition (A2003-30) includes binders from an archeological dig in Gush Halav, and Arabic and Jewish coins from the Meiron and Khirbet Shema digs.

Accessions from 2010 and 2017 include materials from archeological digs in Nabratein, Meiron, Gush Halav, and Khirbet Shema.

The accessions from 2019 include materials from digs in Khirbet Shema, Gush Halav, Nabratein, Meiron, and Sepphoris, among other materials. Also received in 2019 are over 1200 digital files from the Sepphoris site, which have been migrated to a library server.

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Falkener Family papers, 1893-2001

9 Linear Feet — 7000 Items
African-American family based in Greensboro (Guildford Co.), North Carolina. Waldo C. Falkener served on the Greensboro City Council from 1959-1963. His wife, Margaret, was also politically active. The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener, and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, including photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Later accessions include clippings, correspondence, and other materials documenting the political careers of the Falkeners. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. The council minutes include committee reports (finance, public works, transportation, and real estate committees), as well as ordinances, laws, memoranda, and letters. Meeting notes are arranged by date, spanning 1959-1966. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. Some correspondence relates to the life of Falkener's father, Henry Hall Falkener, also an active politician and public school teacher. Documents span beyond Falkener's death in 1992 up until 2001, including obituaries and memorial material. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, George H. Falkener, Henry Hall Falkener, Madge Z. Mitchell Falkener, and Margaret E. Falkener. Materials include photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Printed materials consist largely of those published by the Greensboro City Council, including annual budget reports, personel reviews, and handbooks. The collection includes newspaper articles about Falkener's civic services and letters of appreciation (1972, 1979), as well as materials related to the successful campaign to name a Greensboro elementary school after Falkener and his father (2001).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Floyd Millard Riddick papers, 1909-2000

43.3 Linear Feet — 43.8 lin. ft.

The Floyd Millard Riddick Papers, 1909 to 2000, (bulk 1950-1983), consist of correspondence, writings and speeches, printed material, senate documents, photographs, and organizational papers documenting Riddick's career as the Assistant Parliamentarian, Parliamentarian, and Parliamentarian Emeritus of the United States Senate. The Correspondence Series includes correspondence to and from senators, presidents, and other political figures concerning the rules and procedures of the United States Senate.

Between 1937 and 1947, some of the letters in the Correspondence Series relate to social conditions and political events in Germany before, during, and after World War II. Riddick, who resided in Germany during 1937 and 1938, maintained correspondence with friends and associates during this period. The letters provide insight into the ways in which the rise of National Socialism and the War affected this group of friends. Among the letters from Riddick's acquaintances in Germany is one giving an account of Krystallnacht; several from a young Jewish woman who wanted Riddick to assist her in obtaining admission to the United States as a student; and a few from a man who became a German soldier. A scrapbook and Riddick's personal diary (Miscellaneous Series) add further commentary on pre-war Germany.

Early in his senatorial career, Riddick was actively involved and interested in the organization and procedures guiding Congress. He began publishing books on parliamentary procedure in 1941, and by his retirement in 1974 he was honored for his dedication to congressional procedures and named Parliamentarian Emeritus. Considered to be the authority on parliamentary procedure, Riddick continues to edit and republish Senate Procedure: Precedents and Practices. The Writings and Speeches Series consists primarily of notes, drafts, proofs, and copies of Riddick's published works and of notes for speeches made by Riddick. The Senate Activities Series contains material pertaining to Senate committees and task forces of which Riddick was a member. Agendas, pamphlets, and correspondence pertaining to other organizations of which Riddick was a member comprise the Organizational Records Series. This series includes papers relating to practicums on parliamentary issues held by Riddick for members of the American Institute of Parliamentarians.

Photographs of Riddick, his acquaintances, and his associates, many of whom were prominent political figures, make up the Picture Series. The Printed Material Series contains clippings, pamphlets, programs, and congressional documents pertaining to or of interest to Riddick. The Miscellaneous Papers Series includes an assortment of materials including awards Riddick received, documents relating to his trip to Germany, a diary (with transcription), scrapbooks kept by Riddick, and retirement tributes.

The addition (2007-0165) (50 items; 0.9 lin. ft.; 1928-2000) consists of Riddick's publications about parliamentary procedure; obituaries and other remembrances addressed to Riddick's wife upon his death; his high school diploma; and several VHS tapes, audiocassettes, and a mini-VHS cassette containing interviews and presentations by Riddick about his role as the Senate Parliamentarian.

The addition (2008-0179) (100 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; 1933-1992) contains publications, academic materials, clippings, correspondence, and miscellaneous materials, including a copy of the Senate Resolution 443 that declared Riddick to be the Parliamentarian Emeritus of the U.S. Senate. This addition has been interfiled with Accession (2007-0165).

The addition (2014-0073) (140 items; 0.2 lin. ft; 1937-2007) contains publications, biographical materials, clippings, correspondence, two print materials, photographs, and several miscellaneous drafs and documents. Publications include Riddick's descriptions of general Senate procedures and protocol,including those during impeachment. The bulk of the photographs, correspondence, and clippings are from the end of Riddick's life (1980-2000).

The addition (2017-0039) (0.5 lin. ft.; 1937-1997 and undated) includes documents pertaining to the American Institute of Parlimentarians, correspondence from Duke University, manuscript drafts (including a few pages of Riddick's remininscences of President Richard M. Nixon), and photographs from President Jimmy Carter's inaugeration.

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Frances Klein papers, 1929-2002

0.5 Linear Feet — 375 items
Frances Klein (b. October 19, 1915) is a female jazz musician who began her career in the early 1930s. She played trumpet in a number of jazz bands, most notably the all-female bands led by Irene Vermillion and Ina Ray Hutton. The collection contains materials compiled by Klein from throughout her musical career, consisting of clippings, posters, programs, and photographs of Klein and many other contemporary musicians.

The Frances Klein Papers contains materials compiled by Klein that relate to her career as a jazz trumpet player. The collection contains newspaper clippings, concert programs, and other promotional materials related to Klein's musical career from 1933 to 2002, including items from her time with bands led by Irene Vermillion and Ina Ray Hutton along with advertisements for Klein's own bands. Additionally, the collection includes photographs and images primarily related to Klein's musical career. These photographs include candid images and a large number of publicity shots from contemporary colleagues of Klein, including Irene Vermillion and Ina Ray Hutton.

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Franco Modigliani papers, 1936-2005 and undated, bulk 1970s-2003

89 Linear Feet — 62,105 Items
Franco Modigliani was an economist, Nobel Prize winner, and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Collection contains correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings that documents the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials.

The Franco Modigliani Papers span the years 1936 to 2005, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2003. Through correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings, the papers document the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The most current items are a DVD recording of his memorial held at MIT in 2003, and a thesis by an Italian graduate student on Modigliani's macroeconomic views on the Italian and European economy, of the same year. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials. The collection is organized into the following series: Correspondence; Writings and Speeches; Teaching Materials; Professional Service; Engagements; Printed Materials; Personal Files; Audio and Visual Materials; and Electronic Formats. Oversize materials are described at the end of the collection guide.

Researchers will find ample documentation in the collection on Modigliani's work on the life-cycle hypothesis of savings, leading to the Nobel Prize in 1985. Other materials represent his work on topics and issues such as monetary policies, both domestic and foreign; pension trusts; public debt; econometric modelling; international finance and the international payment system; the effects of and cures for inflation; stabilization policies in open economies; and various fields of finance such as savings and investment, credit rationing, mortgages, the term structure of interest rates, and the valuation of speculative assets. Extensive documentation can also be found in the collection on Modigliani's key participation in the design of a large-scale model of the U.S. economy, called the MPS (an abbreviation deriving from collaborators MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Social Science Research Council), sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank, a model used by the U.S. government until the 1990s. Other documents reveal Modigliani's analyses of the forces of economics and politics in the United States as well as in Italy and the European Union as a whole. His views on various social issues, including the arms race, are found throughout the papers, especially in the many editorials and commentaries he wrote for newspapers and other publications. The materials in this collection reveal the high value that Modigliani placed on collaboration with other economists and with graduate students, with whom he exchanged letters, notes, and drafts of writings and commentary. Researchers examining the correspondence and writings will find the comments, replies, and writings of his many colleagues on the same range of topics. Significant correspondents or collaborators documented in the collection include European and American economists such as Albert Ando, with whom he collaborated on the MPS model, Mario Baldassarri, John Bossons, Jacques Drèze, Merton Miller, Paul Samuelson and James Tobin. Many other major economists of the twentieth century, as well as many political and academic individuals, are represented in smaller amounts of writings and correspondence.

In addition to illuminating Modigliani's distinguished academic career and his collaborative approach to teaching and research, the materials in this collection offer insights into how he contributed significantly throughout his life to European and United States economic growth and reform, through professional service as an analyst, advisor, and expert witness. Organizations that benefited from this work include the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Reserve Bank, the U.S. Congress, and the Treasury Department. Other organizations with whom Modigliani participated and corresponded and are represented in many series in the collection are the offices of the International Economic Association, the American Economic Review, the National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

The Correspondence Series, second largest in the collection, spans all of Modigliani's career, and consists chiefly of professional exchanges initiated by his colleagues in the U.S. and in many other countries. Many of the exchanges are in Italian, though most are in English. Numerous correspondents requested that Modigliani review their writings, and in most cases a draft of their manuscripts can be found in the folder, often accompanied by Modigliani's comments. The correspondence also contains more routine exchanges concerning student advising, academic committees, and activities related to Modigliani's non-academic service. There is very little personal or family correspondence in the collection, though there are some exchanges between Franco Modigliani and his son Andr, sociologist at the University of Michigan, and with his granddaughter Leah, a financial analyst with Morgan Dean Stanley Witter, with whom Modigliani collaborated on a formula for measuring stock risks.

The largest in the collection, the Writings and Speeches Series is subdivided into several subseries, the most extensive of which, the Research and Writings Subseries, contains a wealth of notes, data, subject files, and writings that underpinned and informed nearly all of Modigliani's most significant published works. These extensive files document the evolution of Modigliani's thought on a wide range of economic, social, and political topics, and the amount of materials in this series contributed by his colleagues serves to underscore Modigliani's collaborative approach to research and writing. As much as a third of the material is in Italian. Many of Modigliani's speeches and lectures given around the world, including his Nobel lecture on the life-cycle hypothesis of saving in 1985, can be found in the Speeches and Lectures Subseries. The Non-Academic Writings Subseries contains other writings by Modigliani directed chiefly at a popular audience, in the form of newspaper articles and editorials; while the Writings by Others Subseries houses individual writings, in both manuscript and published form, by Modigliani's colleagues that were not part of the Research and Writings files.

Modigliani spent the greater part of his professional life serving in a number of roles that helped shape the national economic policies in Europe, particularly in Italy, and the United States. The Professional Service Series documents Modigliani's work for various U.S. agencies and organizations. It includes materials from his work under the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), from about 1964 to 1983; these files include agendas, minutes, notes, correspondence, papers, and statistical output relating to FRB meetings and MPS Economic Model. Other files house information relating to his frequent Congressional testimony; his work with the International Economics Association during the seventies and eighties, including conference papers and programs, minutes from executive committee meetings, nominating committee reports, and correspondence; and his other periods of collaboration with the Central Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and others. Materials on Modigliani's lengthy service to Italian and other European governments can be found primarily in the Research and Writings Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series and the Correspondence Series.

The papers in the Teaching Materials Series document Modigliani's career as a professor of economics through lecture notes, syllabi, and some student papers, all filed in the Modigliani as Teacher Subseries. Materials derive chiefly from his tenure at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, although there are some materials from earlier appointments. There are some materials, chiefly class notes, from Modigliani's own student days in the United States in the Modigliani as Student Subseries.

The Personal Files Series is one of the smallest in the collection. It contains materials pertaining to Modigliani's life in Italy and his forced emigration to the United States in 1939, diplomas and honorary degrees, and a number of folders containing biographical information and articles honoring Modigliani's life and work.

Spanning several decades of internationally-recognized work and the awarding of a Nobel prize in 1985, the materials in the Engagements Series, though routine in nature, document the extent to which Modigliani spoke to academics and the ordinary public about issues in economics, via lectures, conferences, and interviews. Files in the Commitments Subseries include routine correspondence, travel arrangements and itineraries, and some writings related to the lecture or speech. The small Calendars Subseries contains appointment books and calendars dating from 1971 to 2003.

In addition to manuscript materials, the collection holds a great number of published writings. These are chiefly housed in the Printed Materials Series and take the form of reports, journals, books, and many reprints of articles. Most of the materials are written by Modigliani, but there are substantial numbers of publications by others in this series. Almost all of the few dozen bound publications originally found in the collection have been cataloged separately for the Duke online catalog and will be housed in the rare books and Perkins Library stacks. They can be accessed by searching the online catalog; a note in the record indicates their original link with these papers. Although nearly all of Modigliani's article-length published works are represented in this series, including early articles from the 1930s, some titles may not be present.

The Audio and Visual Materials Series serves as a repository for photographs, videocassettes, audiocassettes, microfilms, and a few CD-ROMs, which contain interviews, lectures, and speeches given by Modigliani, with a few including contributions by his colleagues. One CD-Rom contains the proceedings from a posthumous conference held in 2005 in remembrance of Modigliani. Family scrapbooks preserved on microfilm are made up of clippings, programs, and other memorabilia related to significant events in Modigliani's career. Use copies may need to be made of some items. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

Digital formats in the collection are grouped under the Electronic Formats Series (RESTRICTED), which contains correspondence, course materials, data, and drafts of writings and speeches. The contents of the disks have been migrated to the Special Collections server. A disk directory is available for use. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this series.

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Frank and Anne Warner papers, 1899-2000 and undated bulk 1933-1985

12 Linear Feet — 4934 Items
Anne and Frank Warner were folklorists and folk song musicians. The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials from as early as 1899 to as late as 2000, documents the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north.

The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials dating from 1899 to 2000, is a record of the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture and African-American music traditions, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north. The bulk of the materials date from the 1930s through the 1980s, and are organized into six series: Correspondence; Subject Files; Folk Materials; Writings; Audiovisual Materials; and Prints and Negatives. Through handwritten correspondence with a wide variety of folk singers and musicians, subject files, printed materials, film, video, photographs, and the Warners' own studio albums of folk songs, these materials document early methods for recording and collecting songs - the 20th century development of American ethnomusicology. Moreover, as an invaluable resource for studies in traditional American folk life, the collection also includes field audio recordings and photographs of folk singers, songwriters, and musicians in their element, at home with their families, singing and playing their instruments. Notable individuals referred to in the Warner Collection include: William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Bill Doerflinger, Lena Bourne Fish, ("Yankee") John Galusha, David Grimes (of the Philco Corporation), Wayland Hand, Rena and Nathan Hicks, Buna Vista and Roby Monroe Hicks, Ray Hicks, Peter and Beryl Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Bessie and Frank Proffitt, Carolyn Rabson, Carl Sandburg, Pete Seeger, Charles K. ("Tink") Tillett and family, and Charles L. Todd. The Warners were actively involved with a number of organizations, among them: the American Folklore Society, the Country Dance and Song Society of America, Duke University, the Library of Congress, the Newport Folk Foundation, the New York State Historical Association, and the YMCA. The Warners published a number of essays concerning traditional American folk culture and music in Think Weekly, the Appalachian Journal, Country Dance and Song, the Long Island Forum, A Celebration of American Family Folklore, and Come for to Sing. In addition to these, Ann Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs in the Frank and Anne Warner Collection, 1984, remains the authoritative compendium of the Warners' research in and collection of traditional American folk music.

The Warners' personal and professional relationships with various people and organizations can be traced through materials in the Correspondence Series, 1934-1985. Significant exchanges with the American Folklore Society, the Library of Congress, with William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Wayland Hand, Alan Lomax, Carl Sandburg, and Pete Seeger are extensively documented in the files. More correspondence can be found elsewhere in the collection - organized topically in the Subject Series, and according to correspondents' names in the Folk Materials Series.

The Subject Files Series, 1899-1984, houses documentary materials that give a wider context to the Warners' life and work. This series includes information about the Warners' genealogies, Frank Warner's work with youth and his career in the YMCA, material germane to the lawsuit that developed over the song "Tom Dooley," information on and clips about various performances and recordings, and other materials.

The Folk Materials Series, 1938-1982, contains correspondence between the Warners and many of the traditional American folk singers and musicians that they visited; for some of the individuals there is more information than correspondence alone. This series is organized by state, city or region, and then individual or family, for example: North Carolina, Appalachia, Rena and Nathan Hicks. The states represented are: North Carolina, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and West Virginia. The Warners' correspondence with both Rena and Nathan Hicks and Bessie and Frank Proffitt comprise the most extensive files. The series materials provide essential documentation for understanding the communities and the world views of the musicians.

The Writings Series, 1938-1985, contains a variety of materials, including documents that the Warners published in journals dedicated to folk life; grant applications; materials germane to the production and publication of Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs; words to recorded and unrecorded folk songs in the collection, including some songs by Frank Warner; and Anne Warner's hand-written field research journals and notebooks.

An extensive collection of songs, interviews, and other recordings on audio tape reels, cassette tapes, phonograph albums, and compact discs are housed in the Audiovisual Materials Series, 1940-2000. Several motion picture films and video tape recordings also document the Warners' work and performances. Many of the items in the Audiovisual Materials Series are documented in written form in the Writings Series, including the sound recordings of folk songs and interviews collected in the Library of Congress master tapes, and which are not included in Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs.

The Prints and Negatives Series, 1933-1969, extends the Warner collection's scope to include photographic images as well. There are 239 black and white prints, which are arranged alpha-numerically into lots from Lot 1 through Lot 9E. Within the lots, the prints are identified by number. In the pictures, the Warners have captured images of many traditional American folk musicians and singers. The Warners themselves appear frequently throughout the collection. The photographic documentation of the Warners' travels contains pictures of folk singers and their homes and families, including: Nathan, Roby Monroe, Buna Vista, Ray and Linzy Hicks; Lena Bourne Fish; Bessie and Frank Proffitt; the Tillett family; Louis Solomon; and Carl Sandburg.

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Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995

112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items
Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

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Gene Federico papers, 1918-2003 and undated bulk 1951-1991

20.5 Linear Feet — 3800 Items

The Gene Federico Papers span the years 1918-2003, with the bulk of the collection dating 1951-1991. The collection documents Federico's sixty years as a pioneering leader in advertising and graphic design, and contains materials from a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, advertisements proofs and clippings, graphic design and printed materials, posters, sketches/sketchbooks, photographs, negatives, and videotapes. In addition to limited personal and biographical material, the collection primarily documents Federico's creative output as a graphic designer, art director, and advertising executive at agencies including Grey Advertising, Doyle Dane Bernbach, Douglas D. Simon, Benton & Bowles, Warwick & Legler, and as a principal at Lord Geller Federico Einstein; the collection has limited material relating to the specific agencies for which he worked. The collection also documents Federico's extensive freelance and exhibition work throughout his career (most notably the "Love of Apples" and "24-Page Book" designs), in addition to his later consulting work for Brouillard Communications. Client advertisements and graphic design materials compose the majority of the collection. Significant clients represented include: Christian Dior; Elektra Records; Elizabeth Arden; Goldman Sachs; IBM; L'Aiglon Apparel; Lady Pepperell; Napier; The New Yorker; and Woman's Day. Though an art director throughout most of his career, Federico contributed significantly to the graphic design and typographical components of advertising. Through clear and innovative integration of design and typographical components, Federico pioneered the use of visual puns in advertisements, and emphasized clarity of message over design complexity. The collection will be of particular value to researchers interested in developments in print advertising and typographical design since World War II. The collection is organized into six series which focus on Federico's contributions to advertising and graphic design: Professional Files, Personal Files, Graphic Design, Advertising Campaigns, Photographs and Negatives, and Videocassettes.

The Professional Files Series includes business correspondence, professional writings, award/exhibit materials, press clippings and industry publications, in addition to limited files on the Art Directors Club of New York City and Lord Geller Federico Einstein. The Personal Files Series includes biographical and family materials; memorabilia documenting Federico's years as a student at Abraham Lincoln High School and Pratt Institute; World War II materials, including U.S. Army publications/posters produced by Federico and four sketchbooks; and original artwork (drawings, sketches, prints) not related to Federico's professional design and advertising work. The Graphic Design Series documents Federico's extensive graphic design work, including announcements and cards, book and record cover designs, calendars, design concepts, illustrations, letterhead, posters, transparencies, and typographic materials, as well as materials by other artists and designers. The Advertising Campaigns Series includes advertisement clippings and proofs, concepts and sketches, and client reports, representing over one hundred clients in a variety of industries. (Series contains a renowned example of Federico's use of visual puns: a 1953 Woman's Day advertisement - "She's got to Go Out to get Woman's Day " - which features a woman on a bicycle, the wheels of which form the "O"s in "Go Out.") The Photographs and Negatives Series includes both black & white and color images of Federico's advertising and graphic design work, Federico and his associates in a business setting, and a limited selection of personal and family photographs. The Videocassettes Series includes seven videotapes of commercials, short films, and memorial tributes documenting Federico's career in graphic design and advertising. Large-format materials (clippings, proofs, sketches, posters) have been removed from their original series location and relocated to Oversize Materials.

Other materials related to this collection may be found in the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives: Competitive Advertisements Collection and Corporation Vertical Files. For materials relating specifically to the advertising agency Benton & Bowles, consult the D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles Advertisements and Archives. Materials relevant to Lord Geller Federico Einstein and advertising strategy may be found in the Arthur Einstein Papers. For materials relating to Brouillard Communications and Doyle Dane Bernbach Advertising, see the Thomas F. Garbett Papers. Materials relevant to IBM advertising may be found in the Edgar Hatcher Papers.

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Gertrude Duby Blom exhibit photographs, 1941-2004 and undated

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9 Linear Feet — Approx. 420 items
Gertrude Duby Blom (1901-1993) was a Swiss-born journalist, anthropologist, and environmental activist who documented the cultures of indigenous Mayan people in the jungle highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. Collection comprises 71 black-and-white exhibit prints featuring images taken by Gertrude Duby Blom between 1941 and 1979 in the highland jungles and towns of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The photographs were printed in 1982 by Barry Norris, Blom's close friend and collaborator, for a traveling exhibition that opened in 1984 in New York City. The landscapes and portraits depict the cultural and ecological environments inhabited by individuals and groups of indigenous Maya, predominantly the Lacandon; there are also images of Latino immigrants to the region, chiefly lumber industry workers and their families, and other townspeople in San Cristobal. Scenes from camps and towns portray mealtimes, hunting and gathering expeditions, agricultural customs, religious ceremonies, folk Catholicism and its rituals, classrooms, medical clinics, and street scenes. Later images attest to the destruction of native ecosystems and the rapidly changing culture of the indigenous peoples. The matted gelatin silver prints vary in size from 11x14 to 22x22 inches; there is also one 26x26 inch matted print. Accompanying the photographs are project correspondence, notes, publicity, and other materials (1983-20043) documenting the collaboration between Alex Harris, documentary photographer from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and individuals in Mexico and the U.S., which resulted in a major exhibit, "People of the forest: photographs of the Maya by Getrude Blom," launched in 1984, and the publication of "Gertrude Blom: bearing witness" (1984). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 71 black-and-white exhibit prints featuring images taken by anthropologist, activist, and journalist Gertrude Duby Blom between 1941 and 1979 in the highland jungles and towns of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The photographs were printed in 1982 by Barry Norris, Blom's close friend and collaborator, for a major exhibition of her work that opened in 1984 in New York City.

The landscapes and portraits taken by Blom depict the cultural and ecological environments inhabited by indigenous Maya, predominantly the Lacandon, but also neighboring Tzotzil and Tzeltal; there are also images of Latino immigrants to the region, chiefly lumber industry workers and their families, and other townspeople in San Cristobal. Scenes from camps and towns portray mealtimes, hunting and gathering expeditions, agricultural customs, religious ceremonies, folk Catholicism and its rituals, classrooms, medical clinics, and street scenes. Later images attest to the destruction of native ecosystems and the rapidly changing culture of the indigenous peoples. The matted gelatin silver prints vary in size from 11x14 to 22x22 inches; there is also one 26x26 inch matted print.

Accompanying the photographs are files of project correspondence, notes, publicity, and other materials (1983-2004) documenting the collaboration between Alex Harris, documentary photographer of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and individuals in Mexico and the U.S., which resulted in a major international traveling exhibit, "People of the forest: photographs of the Maya by Getrude Blom," launched in 1984, and the publication of a book of essays and images, "Gertrude Blom: bearing witness" (1984), edited by Alex Harris and Margaret Sartor.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Hans Horst Meyer papers, 1831-1943, 2004 and undated

8 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — approx. 201 items — Approximately 201 items
Hans Horst Meyer was a pharmacologist and scientist on the faculty of the University of Vienna in the early 20th century. The papers are mostly in German, and consist of Meyer's professional correspondence; diplomas and awards; a few professional writings; an autograph book with signatures and correspondence of notable scientists and others; genealogical papers relating to his attempts in the late 1930s to document his family's ancestry; several volumes, including a family Bible and a diary of his son Arthur's first six years of life; and professional and personal photographs. There are two photographs of neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (Boston), inscribed to Meyer (1914 and 1929), and a sketch by Cushing. There are a few letters from family members, one of which describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany. An addition to the collection consists of a few letters, photographs, negatives, and other memorabilia relating to Meyer's son, Arthur W. Meyer, personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, and Arthur's son Horst, who became a physicist at Duke University. The Hans Horst Meyer papers form part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers, mostly in German, document pharmacologist and scientist Hans Horst Meyer's career and personal life, and consist of personal and professional correspondence; written pieces; genealogical documents; diplomas, medals, and awards; a Bible and other assorted volumes; professional and personal photographs; and an autograph album.

The certificates and medals were received by Meyer between 1901 and 1937, and come from a variety of international scientific organizations, such as the New York Academy of Medicine, the Royal Society of Physicians in Budapest, and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. Meyer also received the German Order of the Red Eagle and honorary citizenship of the city of Vienna. Also included is a small group of letters and printed materials relating to honors received by Meyer, as well as a reprint of Meyer's chapter in the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie.

Of note are two portrait photographs of pioneer neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1914 and 1929), both inscribed to Hans Horst Meyer, and a warm letter from Cushing to Meyer's son Arthur, a physician. A sketch of a spongioblast, attributed to Cushing, rounds out this group.

The personal papers include a group of official documents, identity and voting cards, and correspondence with parishes and German officials, attesting to Meyer's efforts from about 1938 to 1939 to document his family's religious heritage and obtain a new German identity card, possibly in order to leave the country. Meyer died in Vienna in 1939 while his application was still under review. Also among the personal papers are a few letters from family members, one of which, dated October 6, 1939, describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany.

Meyer's personal papers are accompanied by a German bible, a volume of poetry and quotations, and a journal in which Meyer recorded his son Arthur's first six years of life. There are also photographs of Hans Horst Meyer with various family members: his wife Doris, shortly after marriage, his sons Arthur and Kurt, his daughter-in-law Lotte, and grandchildren.

The autograph album contains 147 autographs and letters of well-known and lesser-known Germans, most of whom lived in the 19th century. Included are a letter each from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller, and Clara Schumann, a postcard from Johannes Brahms, and the autographs of many individuals, including Henrik Ibsen and Charles Dickens.

An addition to the collection consists of personal memorabilia, including photographs, glass slides, and a few letters, relating to Hans Horst Meyer's son Arthur, and his close relationship as personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, until Arthur's suicide in 1933. The letters are addressed to (Johannes) Horst Meyer, Arthur's small son, who eventually became a physicist, emigrated to the U.S., and joined the faculty of Duke University.

With the exception of the autograph album, originally in the holdings of the Rubenstein Library general collections, the Meyer papers were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Henry Haberman papers, 1945-2002 and undated

10 Linear Feet — 3000 Items
Henry Haberman (1917-2008) was a New York-based advertising and travel photographer and artist. The Henry Haberman Papers span the years 1945-2002 and include photographs, slides, negatives and print advertisements that document Haberman's work as a photographer in the advertising, fashion and travel fields. Companies represented include Armstrong floors, Bausch & Lomb, B.F. Goodrich, British American Tobacco (Lucky Strike), Cannon, Chatham blankets, Cover Girl (Noxell), DuPont, First National City Bank, General Electric, New York Telephone, Northeast Air, Pepsi, R.J. Reynolds and Shaefer beer. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Henry Haberman Papers span the years 1945-2002 and include photographs, slides, negatives and print advertisements that document Haberman's work as a photographer in the advertising, fashion and travel fields. Companies represented include Armstrong floors, Bausch & Lomb, B.F. Goodrich, British American Tobacco (Lucky Strike), Cannon, Chatham blankets, Cover Girl (Noxell), DuPont, First National City Bank, General Electric, New York Telephone, Northeast Air, Pepsi, R.J. Reynolds and Shaefer beer.

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Heraldo Muñoz papers, 1963-2013 and undated

8.2 Linear Feet — 16 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approximately 5800 items
Chilean politician, diplomat, author, and ambassador to the United Nations. Spanning the period of 1963 to 2013, the Heraldo Muñoz Papers contain materials related to Muñoz's work as a researcher and diplomat, and his role in the Chilean Socialist Party. Primarily consisting of handwritten notes, correspondence, reports, policy documents, printed materials, and electronic files, the collection emphasizes Chilean domestic and international politics from 1970 to 2010 (including the 1973 coup and the Pinochet dictatorship) and the United Nations' (UN) work on sanctions, counter-terrorism, and peacebuilding from 2003 to 2013. The collection is organized into the following series: Charles Horman Case Files, Chile - Domestic Politics; Chile - Foreign Policy; Correspondence and Clippings; International Work; Memorabilia; Photographs; and Commission of Inquiry. The largest group of materials relate to Muñoz's work at the UN.

Spanning the period of 1963 to 2013, the Heraldo Muñoz Papers contain materials related to Muñoz's work as a researcher and diplomat, and his role in the Chilean Socialist Party. Primarily consisting of handwritten notes, correspondence, reports, policy documents, printed materials, and electronic files, the collection emphasizes Chilean domestic and international politics from 1970 to 2010 (including the 1973 coup and the Pinochet dictatorship) and the United Nations' (UN) work on sanctions, counter-terrorism, and peacebuilding from 2003 to 2010. The collection is organized into the following series: Charles Horman Case Files; Chile - Domestic Politics; Chile - Foreign Policy; Correspondence and Clippings; International Work; Memorabilia; Photographs; and Commssion of Inquiry.

Largest in the collection is the International Work Series, which primarily contains notes, reports, and speeches from Muñoz's work at the UN. Organized into subseries on UN Reform, the UN Security Council, and other materials, the bulk of this documentation relates to Muñoz's chairmanship of the Al-Qaeda and Taliban Sanctions Committee (1267 Committee) from 2003 to 2004. The Charles Horman Case Files Series primarily contains photocopies of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests by the Horman family and the responsive documents produced by U.S. agencies regarding the murder of US journalist Charles Horman during the 1973 military coup in Chile. Muñoz obtained these documents from Horman's widow Joyce as part of his research for In the Dictator's Shadow. The Chile - Domestic Politics Series contains correspondence, internal Socialist Party documents, and materials produced by the opposition prior to the 1988 plebiscite on extending the rule of dictator Augusto Pinochet. The Chile - Foreign Policy Series contains documents and correspondence related to Muñoz's work in the Lagos campaign and administration, and as ambassador to the OAS, Brazil, and the UN. Particularly noteworthy are documents related to Pinochet's arrest in the UK. Programs, invitations, and passes mostly related to Muñoz's international work make up the Memorabilia Series. Containing both print and electronic documents, the Photographs Series also primarily depicts Muñoz's work at the UN through publicity shots and snapshots. The Writings and Research Series contains Muñoz's research, speeches, articles, and notes on Augusto Pinochet, U.S. and Chilean politics, and international governance. Although much of Muñoz's correspondence is integrated into the series to which it relates, the Correspondence and Clippings Series spans his professional career. Noteworthy correspondents include: Ricardo Lagos, Pascal Lamy, Thomas F. MacLarty III, Condoleezza Rice, Barbara Walters, and Timothy E. Wirth.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Herbert Scarf papers, 1951-2015

33 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — .684 Megabytes — 3 floppy disks with 11 files (one disk unreadable)
Herbert Scarf (1930-2015) was an economist and mathematician, and worked as a professor of economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, and operations research. Includes a small group of electronic files; computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files. Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

The Herbert Scarf Papers document his career as an economist and mathematician. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the computation of economic equilibrium and fixed points, stability of general equilibrium, the core of many-person games and its relation to general equilibrium, integer programming, and problems of production with indivisibilities. Much of Scarf's work serves as the basis for applied general equilibrium models, and as a precursor to modern computational and simulation approaches to economics.

The collection also documents Scarf's collaboration and communications with prominent economists and mathematicians such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Ralph Gomory, Terje Hansen, Werner Hildenbrand, Tjalling Koopmans, Harold Kuhn, Lloyd Shapley, John Shoven, Martin Shubik, John Whalley, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Scarf's leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and other organizations; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the economics, operations research, and applied mathematics programs at Yale University.

Includes a small group of electronic files originally on floppy disks created in the 1980s, which have been migrated to a library server. Computations and other technical data contained in these files may be available in the form of printouts in the collection's research files.

Acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive at Duke University.

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Herbert Scarf papers, 1951-2015 33 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — .684 Megabytes — 3 floppy disks with 11 files (one disk unreadable)

Indivisible: Stories of American Community records, 1999-2002, 1988-2002, bulk 1999-2002

14.2 Linear Feet — 7250 items
The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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International Monitor Institute records, 1986-2006

530 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,100 Items
The non-profit agency International Monitor Institute (IMI) operated between 1993 and 2003, primarily to assist international war-crimes tribunals by collecting, indexing and organizing visual evidence of violations of international human rights law. The International Monitor Institute Records span the dates 1986-2006, and primarily comprise audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations around the world. Countries represented include: Burma (Myanmar), Bosnia and Hercegovina, Cambodia, Kuwait, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Thailand. Includes master and use copies of approximately 6000 videocassettes and 100 audio tapes and audiocassettes. The video and audio material is indexed by an extensive database developed by IMI which includes keywords, air dates, segment producer, segment title, and in some cases, transcripts and stills from the video. There are also many photographs and slides taken in the same regions, depicting destruction in areas of conflict, forced labor, refugees and refugee camps, and protests. The majority of the photos were taken on the Burma/Thai border, in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and refugee camps in Rwanda. Finally, there are extensive organizational records, including an extensive database of the audiovisual components. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

Note: The video and audio tape holdings of the Interntional Monitor Institute records are described in separate finding aids. A large portion of these tapes, particularly that section dealing with the Balkans, is not yet processed. Inventories are currently available for the following sections:

Burma Tapes, circa 1990-2002

Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes, 1992-1999

The International Monitor Institute Records span the dates 1986-2006, and primarily consist of audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations around the world. Countries represented include: Burma (Myanmar), Bosnia and Hercegovina, Cambodia, Kuwait, Iraq, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Thailand. Includes master and use copies of approximately 6000 videocassettes and 100 audio tapes and audiocassettes. The video and audio material is indexed by an extensive database developed by IMI which includes keywords, air dates, segment producer, segment title, and in some cases, transcripts and stills from the video. There are also six boxes of photographs and slides taken in the same regions, depicting destruction in areas of conflict, forced labor, refugees and refugee camps, and protests. The majority of the photographs, almost all color snapshots, were taken on the Burma/Thai border, in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and refugee camps in Rwanda. One set of seven folders are images taken by staff of the Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children (now known as the Women's Refugee Commission). There are other images that come from United Nations organizations, including the International Refugee Commission. Finally, organizational records from the offices of IMI comprise a significant amount of the materail in this collection, including an extensive database of the audiovisual components and transcripts from war crimes tribunals.

Addition (2007-0070) (approx. 4000 items, 120 linear ft.; dated 1990-2002) contains master and use copies of videocassettes related to human rights violations around the world.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Jacqueline End papers, 1965-2012 and undated

3 Linear Feet — 900 Items
Advertising copy writer and creative executive for a number of agencies, including: Doyle Dane Bernbach; Wells Rich Greene; Foote, Cone & Belding; TBWA/Chiat/Day. Primarily examples of creative work, including print advertisements and proofs, design layouts and sketches, photographs, correspondence and printed materials. Non-paper formats include audiotape, videocassettes, audio cassettes, DAT, CD-R and DVD-R. Clients represented include Absolut, Ascencia (Bayer), Bali and Wonderbra (now part of Hanes family of brands), K-Mart, L'Oreal, Nivea, Ralston Purina, Ricoh, Sara Lee, Sega, Trojan (Church & Dwight) and Volkswagen. Agencies represented include Doyle Dane Bernbach, Foote Cone & Belding, Forman End Dolleck, Kaplan Thaler, TBWA/Chiat/Day and Wells Rich Greene. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Jacqueline End Papers span the years 1965-2012 and consist primarily of examples of End's creative work, including print advertisements and proofs, design layouts and sketches, photographs, correspondence and printed materials that document her advertising career with a number of agencies, including Doyle Dane Bernbach, Foote Cone & Belding, Forman End Dolleck, Kaplan Thaler, TBWA/Chiat/Day and Wells Rich Greene. Non-paper formats include audiotape, videocassettes, audio cassettes, DAT, CD-R and DVD-R. Clients represented include Absolut, Ascencia (Bayer), Bali and Wonderbra (now part of Hanes family of brands), K-Mart, L'Oreal, Nivea, Ralston Purina, Ricoh, Sara Lee, Sega, Trojan (Church & Dwight) and Volkswagen.

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James T. Sears papers, 1918-2011 and undated, bulk 1950-2004

138 Linear Feet — 317 boxes — 86,700 Items
Educator, gay rights activist, and author of many works on sexuality, identity, and sex education, and the history of homosexuality and the gay rights movement in the United States. The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2011, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004. The papers are arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers; and Oversize Material. The Research and Writings series is divided into subseries for major works by Sears, as well as subseries for other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals. Formats include but are not limited to correspondence, research files, writings, interviews, recordings, serials and newspapers, photographs, and diaries. The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), both early activists for gay rights. Taken as a whole, the collection offers a deep and rich source of information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative; the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society.

The James T. Sears Papers span the dates 1918-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period between 1950 and 2004, and are arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Material; Other Activities; Personal Papers; Photographic Material; Professional Papers; the largest series, Research and Writings; Jack Nichols Papers Series; and Oversize Material, which contains chiefly newspapers and other large-format serials. The Research and Writings series, the largest in the collection, is divided into subseries for each of Sears' major works; in addition, there are other large subseries for Sears' other writings and editorial work, research files, and a small set of writings by other individuals.

The collection documents the career and life of a gay rights activist, educator, and author who has performed ground-breaking research on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, and the teaching of human sexuality in the classroom. The evolution and publication of Sears' major book-length works, articles, and other editorial work is fully documented in this collection in the form of drafts, correspondence, recorded and transcribed oral histories, many research files, and a wide variety of images and recordings. Sears' professional papers contain teaching and course materials as well as files on publicity, speeches, and other activities. Sears also worked as a journal and book editor, thus the collection houses various iterations of authors' accepted work along with Sears' line edits and final publications. Many electronic files accompanied the research, writing, and teaching files; these have been archived on the library's server. An extensive collection of audiovisual materials includes videos, sound recordings, and other media either assembled through Sears' research and teaching activities, or acquired from other sources (note: original recordings are closed to use; unless otherwise noted, listening or viewing copies must be made for research access).

The collection also houses the personal papers of Hal Call (1917-2000) and Jack Nichols (1938-2005), authors and early activists for gay rights. These two large sub-collections contain writings, correspondence, research files, diaries, audiovisual material (separated and removed to the Audiovisual Series), and photographs.

Taken as a whole, the James T. Sears Papers offer a rich source of primary documents and information on gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture in the United States, especially in the South, and its representation in literature and in the press, both positive and negative. The collection also provides extensive documentation on the history of the gay rights movement in the U.S. and abroad, including the evolution of organizations such as the Mattachine Society and related gay movement publications; sexuality studies in the U.S. and teaching sexuality in primary and secondary classrooms; gays in the military; drag queen, lesbian, and bisexual communities; and many other topics relevant to sexual identity in society. The collection also include anthropological field notes of Sears' extensive research and travels in the Philippines related to sexualities and sex education.

Consent forms signed by individuals whose interviews or images were recorded for possible use in publications are sometimes filed with other records relevant to that publication; oftentimes, however, permissions may have been filed in the Research Permissions Subseries box in the Research and Writings Series, or have not been located in the collection. Researchers wishing to publish information on individuals represented in the Sears Papers must have in hand the consent forms, or obtain permission from the individuals.

For more details on the contents and arrangement of individual series or subseries in the Sears Papers, see the series and subseries descriptions that follow.

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J. B. Fuqua papers, 1929-2006 and undated

70.9 Linear Feet — 53,000 Items
Businessman, philanthropist, and chairman of The Fuqua Companies and Fuqua Enterprises. The J.B. Fuqua Papers span the years 1929-2006. The collection is separated into two divisions according to place of origin: Fuqua's business office and his home office. The office files document Fuqua Industries and The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University, and include annual reports, reading files and general business papers, as well as clippings, periodicals, and copies of articles about J. B. Fuqua and his businesses. The home office files primarily document Fuqua's early career and contain files for the various businesses he acquired. A large component of video cassette recordings chiefly contain speeches and programs related to Fuqua and the Duke University Fuqua School of Business.

The J. B. Fuqua Papers span the years 1929 to 2006, with the bulk of the collection dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. The collection is separated into two divisions according to place of origin: files from Fuqua's business office and his home office. The office files document Fuqua Industries and The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University (founded by J.B. Fuqua), and include annual reports, reading files and general business papers, as well as clippings, periodicals and copies of articles about J. B. Fuqua and his businesses, and some photographs. The home office files primarily document Fuqua's early career and contain many files containing financial records and other materials pertaining to the various businesses he acquired. Fuqua owned several media outlets, including a television station, thus, a large group of materials contain correspondence, applications, and other business materials regarding Fuqua's media ventures and interactions with the Federal Communications Commission. A large component of video recordings chiefly relate to business programs with which Fuqua was involved, and the history of the Duke University Fuqua School of Business; many contain recordings of Fuqua's speeches. The original videos seem to have had a numerical identification system which was not recorded in this inventory. A small but significant group of videocassettes documents the development of Fuqua's program for managers in the former Soviet Union. There are also a number of scrapbooks and photographs, including publicity shots of Fuqua. Although Fuqua was active in Georgia politics, serving in the Georgia House of Representatives and the Georgia Senate, there appear to be relatively few records in the collection relating to this area of his life other than materials on Jimmy Carter and his family and some correspondence from other politicians.

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Joan Preiss papers, 1970-2006

54 Linear Feet — 40,500 Items
Community and labor movement organizer in Durham, N.C.; chair of the Triangle Friends of the United Farm Workers; board member of the National Farm Worker Ministry; member of the Farmworker Ministry Commission, N.C. Council of Churches. Accession (2009-0279) (40,500 items; 54.0 lin. ft.; dated 1970-2006) includes Preiss's personal papers as well as organizational records from her role in the Triangle Friends of the United Farm Workers (TFUFW), the National Farmworker Ministry (NFWM), the Farmworker Ministry Commission, and the AFL-CIO's Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC). Each of these organizations worked to improve the lives of farmworkers through unionizing, educating the public about the origins of food, and pressuring farms and companies through boycotts, petitions, and publicity. Includes materials from UFW campaigns and boycotts that Preiss helped organize in Durham, such as Campbell's, Gallo wines, Prime mushrooms, strawberries, California grapes, and Mt. Olive pickles. Includes publications and photographs from visits from labor organizers such as Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta. Also present are materials from labor issues such as pesticide use, migrant education, the H-2 Workers program, child labor, slavery, and farmworker health.

Materials in this collection represent both Joan Preiss's personal papers as well as organizational materials from the various groups that she worked with throughout her career. Heavily represented are the activities of the Triangle Friends of the United Farm Workers, which Preiss managed from her house in Durham, N.C. Materials from the TFUFW include meeting minutes, administrative files, publicity and flyers, newsletters, and other miscellaneous papers. Preiss's own organizational notes and agendas are heavily mixed in with official materials from the organization, reflecting the large role that she played in its activities. The majority of files center around the TFUFW's various campaigns and boycotts, which included California grapes, Gallo wine, Prime brand mushrooms, Driscoll and other brands of strawberries, Campbell's products, Red Coach lettuce, and Mt. Olive pickles. Of these, the largest amount of material appears to be from the Mt. Olive boycott, presumably because it lasted for about five years and was one of the last boycotts that Preiss participated in. Materials from these boycotts include leaflets, news clippings, flyers, posters, petitions, endorsements, and photographs of TFUFW members (including Preiss) demonstrating and distributing literature at area grocery stores, frequently wearing costumes or tiaras to draw attention. Along with protesting to the companies themselves, TFUFW frequently targeted the sellers of boycotted products, resulting in a plethora of material about various North Carolina grocery stores and supermarket chains, including Kroger, Wellspring/Whole Foods, Harris Teeter, and Food Lion. Preiss's correspondence with store owners and managers, copies of customer petitions, and information about the various chains are present in the collection. In a similar vein are the materials regarding Duke University's participation (or lack thereof) in both the Red Coach lettuce and the Mt. Olive pickle boycotts, and the Preiss's lobbying towards both students and Duke administration to stop selling and serving boycotted products.

Other labor advcocacy groups are also well-represented in the collection, and frequently the materials from different organizations are mixed together, as Preiss worked with each of them. The Farm Labor Organizing Committee was another organizer of consumer boycotts and protests, and TFUFW activities were often in support of FLOC's goals. FLOC was heavily involved in the Mt. Olive pickle boycott. Also included in the collection are administrative and organizational materials from the National Farm Worker Ministry, such as board meetings, conferences, and publications. In addition, Preiss was very involved in the Farmworker Ministry Committee, and its publications, newsletters, and meeting minutes are also present in the collection.

Aside from boycotting products, these labor groups were active in attempting to improve working conditions for farm workers, through petitions, educating the public through publications and protests, lobbying for legal protection, and marching and organizing to gain attention from the media. Farmworker issues heavily represented in the collection include the use of pesticides and its harmful effects on farm workers and consumers; the H-2A program, undocumented workers, and the abuse of immigrants on North Carolina farms; the attempts to establish a North Carolina anti-slavery law; child labor, particularly of migrant children; occupational safety and hazards in agriculture; violence towards farmworkers attempting to unionize; and obtaining fair contracts for farmworkers to prevent employer abuse. Material formats for documenting these campaigns include newspaper clippings, brochures and leaflets, copies of proposed laws, reports from farm bureaus and other government authorities, and other administrative files such as meeting minutes. Along with Preiss's local organizations, she frequently received updates on these issues from national groups like the UFW, and those newsletters and correspondence are present in the collection as well.

Along with her involvement in different local and national labor organizations, the collection also reflects Preiss's interests in the city of Durham. Although materials from her community involvement in Durham revitalization, Duke Campus Ministry, political campaigns, community health, and human rights issues are not overwhelmingly large, they are substantive enough to offer insights into her activities outside of (or in parallel to) the labor movement.

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Jock Elliott papers, 1945-2005 and undated, bulk 1961-1982

12.6 Linear Feet — 9450 Items
John Jock Elliott was an executive with Ogilvy & Mather (O&M) during 1960-1982, including tenure as Chairman of O&M U.S. and O&M International. In addition, Elliott was an author, collector and philanthropist. The Jock Elliott Papers cover the years 1945-2005, with the bulk of materials dating from 1961-1982, the period during which Elliott served as an executive with Ogilvy & Mather (O&M) advertising agency. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, corporate annual reports, programs, speeches and photographs related to company meetings and events. The collection also includes videocassettes and memorabilia commemorating meetings and special events; materials relating to Eleanor Elliott and David Ogilvy; information on affirmative action hiring programs; as well as some speeches and correspondence from the period 1945-1959 when Elliott worked for the Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn (BBDO) advertising agency. Companies represented in the collection include Shell Oil, Du Pont Men's Wear and Trans World Airlines (TWA).

The Jock Elliott Papers cover the years 1945-2005, with the bulk of materials dating from 1961-1982, the period during which Elliott served as an executive with Ogilvy & Mather (O&M) advertising agency. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, corporate annual reports, programs, speeches and photographs related to company meetings and events. The collection also includes videocassettes and memorabilia commemorating meetings and special events; materials relating to Eleanor Elliott and David Ogilvy; information on affirmative action hiring programs; as well as some speeches and correspondence from the period 1945-1959 when Elliott worked for the Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn (BBDO) advertising agency. Companies represented in the collection include Shell Oil, Du Pont Men's Wear and Trans World Airlines (TWA).

Note for clarification: Ogilvy & Mather (O&M) was co-founded by David Ogilvy in 1948. Originally called Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather (OBM), in 1953 the company name was shortened to Ogilvy & Mather (O&M). Both entities are present in this collection.

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John Hicks papers, 1950-2015

30 Linear Feet
John Hicks was a jazz pianist, composer, and educator professionally active in music since the 1960s. The John Hicks Papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks; a variety of personal files documenting his history in music; and a large collection of audio and moving image materials containing concerts, rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks.

The John Hicks Papers span the dates of 1950 through 2015, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1980s and 1990s. The papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks or Elise Wood; and personal files, including business records, press materials, photographs and correspondence. Also included is a large collection of audio and moving image materials, consisting chiefly of concert recordings of Hicks from the 1980s through the 2000s, but also containing rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks. There are audio and moving image materials in audio cassette, LP, CD, VHS, Betamax, and DVD formats.

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Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies records, 1966-2014

245 Linear Feet — 6.9 Megabytes — 18 floppy disks with 1228 files; 3 .mp4 video files
The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies (JCPES) is a nonprofit American research and public policy institution, or think tank, founded in 1970 to aid black elected officials in creating effective policy and successfully serve their constituents. The collection includes subject files, writings, publications, photographs, audiovisual materials, and electronic records pertaining to JCPES events, programs, and projects especially of concern to African Americans in the late 20th century. Collection acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection is comprised of administrative records for the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, and includes correspondence, memoranda, budgets, funding reports, publications, policy research studies, conference materials, photographs, audiovisual media, and electronic records. Areas of study include healthcare, HIV/AIDS, minority business, television violence, young fathers, education, and minority community representation.

Among its many publications, JCPES published FOCUS magazine from 1972 to 2011, which covered national issues for an audience largely comprised of black elected officials (BEOs). The collection also includes oral histories of Joint Center founders and influencers, interview transcripts, an extensive history of JCPES, materials from the The Joint Center South Africa office which provided post-Apartheid political assistance activities, and original Southern Regional Council publications.

Other materials include interviews/oral histories with founders Louis Martin, educator Kenneth B. Clark who was the first African American president of the American Psychological Association; and McGeorge Bundy, who served as United States National Security Advisor to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson on foreign and defense policy from 1961 through 1966. Interviews and transcripts that add historical perspective to African American issues are conversations with Southern black mayors; African American architect and social activist Carl Anthony; and Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine.

Conferences included forums, roundtables, and speeches from notable figures, elected officials, and congressional members including Maya Angelou, Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Edward Brooke, Ron Brown, Carol Moseley Braun, George H.W. Bush, Barbara Bush, Henry Cisneros, Shirley Chisholm, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Charles Diggs, John Hope Franklin, Jesse Jackson, Maynard Jackson, Valerie Jarrett, Barbara Jordan, Vernon Jordan, Jack Kemp, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Barack Obama, Colin Powell, Charles Rangel, Ronald Reagan, Kasim Reed, Condoleezza Rice, Susan Rice, Donna Shalala, Rodney Slater, Doug Wilder, and Andrew Young. Joint Center historical notes compiled by Darlene Clark Hine are included, as well as Juan Williams' historical publication The Joint Center: Portrait of a Black Think Tank. The files and speeches of Joint Center past presidents Eddie N. Williams; Togo West, Jr.; Ralph Everett, Esq.; and past vice president Eleanor Farrar add insight to the Joint Center's mission of illuminating concerns and trends affecting 20th century African Americans to the legislative influencers most able to effect change.

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Jomo Joka Omowale papers, 1969-2008

25 Linear Feet — Approximately 18,750 items
Jomo Joka Omowale, born as Cleveland McKinley Davis and also known as Eric Thompson, is a parolee in North Carolina who spent much of his life imprisoned in New York and Virginia. He was a leader of the Attica prison riot in 1971. Collection includes court transcripts, legal papers and correspondence, court documents, photographs, press coverage and clippings, and internal prison policies and procedures from Omowale's many years in various prisons. Cases include armed robbery in Virginia, the Attica riots and subsequent trials, three trials regarding a police shooting in Brooklyn, and a murder of a drug dealer in Virginia. Omowale was convicted in the final case, and his pursuit of parole in Virginia following the elimination of parole in the 1990s is another significant component of the collection. Other materials include prisoner poetry and writings, personal correspondence between Jomo and his family, prisoner poetry, Attica Brothers Legal Defense materials, and court documents regarding a White Panther Party trial in 1970. Also includes hundreds of mugshots from New York. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive (Duke University).

Collection includes legal documentation and court transcripts from Omowale's various trials, including Attica-related trials and the subsequent lawsuits brought by the Attica Brothers. Also represented are court cases from his armed robbery conviction in Virginia Beach; his repeated murder trials in New York regarding police shootings (and his lawsuits against New York following his acquittal from those shootings); and his murder conviction in Virginia in 1985. Also included are many materials from his wife and attorney, Elizabeth Gaynes, particularly regarding his legal defense in those trials as well as her attempts to gain his parole in Virginia in the 1990s and 2000s.

Other materials in the collection include personal correspondence between Omowale and Elizabeth Gaynes, as well as correspondence between him and other family members, in particular his daughter, Emani. Other correspondence exists between him and other Attica Brothers, regarding the Attica trials and the lawsuits that followed. Photographs, particularly of mugshots, are another significant component of the collection. The remainder of the materials are prison writings; publicity and press coverage of Jomo Joka Omowale's many court cases; news clippings about him, parole, and other related topics; and miscellaneous documents collected by Omowale during his time in prison.

Acquired as part of Duke University's Human Rights Archive.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Account Files, 1885-2008 and undated, bulk 1920-1995

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400 Linear Feet — 28,0000 Items
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The JWT Account Files spans the years 1885-2007, with the bulk of materials covering 1920-1995. It is an artificially-created collection of information about client accounts held by the JWT and provides information about JWT's management of its advertising campaigns. Additionally, the files document deliberations about such topics as media selection; markets and marketing; and target audience for individual advertising campaigns. The bulk of the materials, especially the older records, document clients managed by JWT's New York Office, but the work of other offices is also represented, including: Atlanta Office (Marine Corps); Chicago Office (Oscar Mayer, Kraft); Detroit Office (Ford); and San Francisco Office (Sprint). The collection includes account histories; research reports; memoranda; correspondence; printed material; clippings; brochures and pamphlets; product labels and packaging designs; original artwork and advertising proofs; slides; photographs; audiocassettes and videocassettes. Clients represented include Eastman Kodak; Ford; Ford Dealer Association; R.T. French; General Cigar; Hamm's beer; Handy Andy; International Banana Association; IBM; Kellogg; Kraft; Quaker Oats; U.S. Marine Corps; US Sprint; Warner Lambert; White Castle; and the 1964 World's Fair. More limited materials are available for other significant JWT clients, including: Burger King; Champion Spark Plug; Domino's Pizza; Lever Brothers; Northern Telecom; Oscar Mayer; Rolex; Standard Brands; and Scott Paper. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The JWT Account Files spans the years 1885-2008, with the bulk of materials covering 1920-1995. It is an artificially-created collection of information about client accounts held by the JWT and provides information about JWT's management of its advertising campaigns. Additionally, the files document deliberations about such topics as media selection; markets and marketing; and target audience for individual advertising campaigns. The bulk of the materials, especially the older records, document clients managed by JWT's New York Office, but the work of other offices is also represented, including: Atlanta Office (Marine Corps); Chicago Office (Oscar Mayer, Kraft); Detroit Office (Ford); and San Francisco Office (Sprint). The collection includes account histories; research reports; memoranda; correspondence; printed material; clippings; brochures and pamphlets; product labels and packaging designs; original artwork and advertising proofs; slides; photographs; audiocassettes and videocassettes. Clients represented include Eastman Kodak; Ford; Ford Dealer Association; R.T. French; General Cigar; Hamm's beer; Handy Andy; International Banana Association; IBM; Kellogg; Kraft; Quaker Oats; U.S. Marine Corps; US Sprint; Warner Lambert; White Castle; and the 1964 World's Fair. More limited materials are available for other significant JWT clients, including: Burger King; Champion Spark Plug; Domino's Pizza; Lever Brothers; Northern Telecom; Oscar Mayer; Rolex; Standard Brands; and Scott Paper.

Materials relating to client accounts for which only a limited amount of information is available are arranged into a Small Files Series. Following the Small Files, there are account records for thirty individual clients.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Bertram Metter papers, 1908-2000 and undated, bulk 1953-1989

8.7 Linear Feet — 3250 Items
Bertram Metter worked for over thirty years as an advertising and marketing executive, most notably as a copywriter, creative director, and Vice Chairman at J. Walter Thompson USA (JWT). In in early years at JWT, Metter worked as a direct response specialist for the Ford Motor Company direct marketing operation. He also served as a primary on the Ford account, during which time he directed print and television promotion for Ford and played a key role in the launching of several new car models. The Bertram Metter Papers span 1908 to 2000, with the bulk of the collection dating 1953 through the late 1980s. Collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, newspaper and magazine clippings, sheet music, printed materials, photographs, and photostats. In addition to materials for the Ford Motor Company, the collection documents Metter's work for other major clients, including the Pepsi-Cola Company (Mexico) and Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. Bulk of the collection consists of advertising and marketing research, client reports and correspondence, promotional materials, and other professional files. Also contains materials related to Metter's later work as a consultant and author, including drafts of an unpublished book manuscript entitled Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson, a chronicle of his career at JWT.

The Bertram Metter Papers span 1908 to 2000, with the bulk of the collection dating 1953 through the late 1980s. The collection includes materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, newspaper and magazine clippings, sheet music, printed materials, photographs, and photostats, that document Metter's thirty years in advertising and marketing, with a focus on his career as a copywriter, creative director, and Vice Chairman at J. Walter Thompson USA (JWT). The collection provides a record of Metter's early work as a "direct response specialist" for the Ford Motor Company direct marketing operation, and other roles on the Ford account (Metter directed print and television promotion for Ford and played a key role in the launching of several new car models). In addition to Ford materials, the collection documents Metter's work for other major clients, including the Pepsi-Cola Company (Mexico) and Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. While the bulk of the collection consists of advertising and marketing research, client reports and correspondence, promotional materials, and other professional files, the collection also contains materials related to Metter's later work as a consultant and author, including drafts of an unpublished book manuscript entitled "Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson," a chronicle of his career at JWT.

The collection is organized into four series: Professional Files, Writings, Ford Motor Company Account Files, and Other Clients.

The Professional Files Series contains JWT office (non-client) files, memoranda, and publications; industry publications and press clippings; overviews of Metter's professional biography; and limited files on Metter's consulting work for Ross Roy Advertising. The Writings Series contains Metter's writings on the advertising industry; bulk of series is composed of an unpublished book manuscript entitled "Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson," comprised primarily of chapter drafts and research. The Ford Series, the largest series in the collection, includes materials relating to the launch and promotion of new models (Escort, Maverick, Mustang, Olympic, Pinto, Thunderbird, and Torino); marketing research and strategic reports; Ford direct mail materials and newsletters; television commercial scripts and storyboards; advertisement clippings and headlines; reproduction prints of early photographs of the Model T from the Ford Archives, Henry Ford Museum; photostats promoting the Ford Erika; and photocopies of sheet music of Ford songs from the early twentieth century. The Other Clients Series includes materials relating to general marketing research; new business acquisition; and promotional campaigns for clients other than Ford, including Firestone, Liggett & Myers, and Pepsi-Cola (Mexico). Large-format materials have been removed from their original series location and relocated to Oversize Materials.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. London Office. records, 1920s-2005 and undated

600 Linear Feet — 450,000 Items
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The London Office first opened in 1926, and was JWT's first international office and the first international office of any American advertising agency. Consists primarily of account files, Knowledge Center subject files, books and publications, general office files, and the papers of some executives. Major clients represented include DeBeers; Elida Gibbs; Gallaher Tobacco; Guinness; Kellogg's; Kodak; Kraft; Nestlé; Rowntree; Scott Paper; SmithKline Beecham; Unilever; and Warner-Lambert. Includes photographs and slides; scrapbooks; videocassettes; scripts to commercials; and proof sheets of printed advertisements. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.
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J. Walter Thompson Company. New business records, 1924-2007 and undated, bulk 1980-1989

88.0 Linear Feet
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the largest and oldest enduring advertising companies in the United States. The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) New Business Records span the years 1924-2006, with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-1989. The collection combines the records of the New Business Departments of JWT's major U.S. offices: New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, and San Francisco, and includes presentations, memoranda, case histories, market research, and profiles of companies, industries, market segments, products and product categories. Topics addressed include the youth market, financial services marketing, food and grocery marketing, feminine hygiene and other personal products, and product branding. The collection includes photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, DVDs. Over 300 companies are represented in the collection, including Alitalia, Baskin-Robbins, Bell Atlantic, Circuit City, Eastern Airlines, Eyelab, Frito-Lay, Goodyear, Häagen-Dazs, HBO, Hyatt Hotels, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Kodak, Kraft, Miller Beer, Morgan Stanley, Nabisco, Nestlé, Prudential, Schering-Plough, and the U.S. Navy. Many of the companies represented in the collection subsequently became clients of JWT, so there is some correlation between this collection and the JWT Account Files collection. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, & Marketing History.

The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) New Business Records span the years 1924-2007, with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-1989. The collection combines the records of the New Business Departments of JWT's major U.S. offices: New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, and San Francisco, and includes presentations, memoranda, case histories, market research, and profiles of companies, industries, market segments, products and product categories. Topics addressed include the youth market, financial sservices marketing, food and grocery marketing, feminine hygiene and other personal products, and product branding. The collection includes photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, DVDs. Over 300 companies are represented in the collection, including Alitalia, Baskin-Robbins, Bell Atlantic, Circuit City, Eastern Airlines, Eyelab, Frito-Lay, Goodyear, Häagen-Dazs, HBO, Hyatt Hotels, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Kodak, Kraft, Miller Beer, Morgan Stanley, Nabisco, Nestlé, Prudential, Schering-Plough, and the U.S. Navy. Many of the companies represented in the collection subsequently became clients of JWT, so there is some correlation between this collection and the JWT Account Files collection.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Peter A. Schweitzer papers, 1916-2005 and undated

18 Linear Feet — 12,000 Items
Established in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. Peter A. Schweitzer was an executive with JWT in the New York and Detroit offices, serving as Chief Executive Officer of the agency 2001-2004. Collection spans the years 1916-2005 with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-2000 and includes texts for speeches and presentations, correspondence and other administrative records, printed materials, photographs and slides, and audiovisual materials (audio and video cassettes, CDs and DVDs) that primarily document Schweitzer's career as an executive, especially with JWT's Detroit Office. Companies represented in the collection include Brouillard Communications, Burger King, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Nestlé, Rolex, and Unilever. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection spans the years 1916-2005 with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-2000 and includes texts for speeches and presentations, correspondence and other administrative records, printed materials, photographs and slides, and audiovisual materials (audio and video cassettes, CDs and DVDs) that primarily document Schweitzer's career as an executive, especially with JWT's Detroit Office. Companies represented in the collection include Brouillard Communications, Burger King, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Nestlé, Rolex, and Unilever.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Rena Bartos papers, 1960-2003 and undated bulk 1975-1991

28 Linear Feet — 11625 Items
Rena Bartos worked as a marketing researcher, advertising executive, and consultant from 1960 to 1998. She directed research at the McCann Erickson advertising agency and held the position of Senior Vice President at the J. Walter Thompson Company before forming her own marketing consulting firm, The Rena Bartos Company. A pioneer in the field of marketing to women and an advocate for older adult consumers, Bartos was the recipient of numerous prestigous marketing and advertising industry awards, including the Matrix and Effie Awards. The Rena Bartos Papers consists of speeches and presentations, publications, research, and correspondence related to Bartos' career in the marketing research divisions of McCann Erickson and the J. Walter Thompson Company, spanning the years 1960-1998, with the bulk of the contents from 1975-1991. Other items in the collection include video and audio copies of speeches and presentations by Bartos, a brief history of the J. Walter Thompson Company, as well as drafts of articles and manuscripts.

The Rena Bartos Papers span the years 1960-1998, with the bulk of the material dating from 1975 to 1991. The collection documents Bartos' career through speeches and presentations, publications, correspondence, research files, slides, photographs and videotapes, while in positions at McCann Erickson, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT), and The Rena Bartos Company. Major topics include marketing to under-represented groups, the role of women in advertising, and Bartos' efforts to promote marketing towards women and "over forty-nine" adults. The collection is organized into five series and two indexes: Speeches and Presentations; Correspondence; Publications; Research Files; Audiovisual Materials; an Alphabetical List of Publications; and an Alphabetical List of Speech Titles

The Speeches and Presentations Series includes reading copies or scripts from speeches and presentations given by Bartos during her career. Dominant themes include the role of women in advertising, marketing to underrepresented groups such as women and people in Latin America and India, and the psychological aspects of advertising. In addition, the series includes the slides and graphics Bartos used in her speeches, as well as press clippings from her various speaking engagements.

The Correspondence Series includes business correspondence, mailings and solicitations from Bartos' career in marketing research, as well as correspondence with JWT executives, including Don Johnston and Thomas Sutton. The series also contains correspondence between Bartos and the various publishers of her written works.

The Publications Series includes copies of the articles written by Bartos for scholarly and trade publications such as The Harvard Business Review, the Journal of Advertising Research, Marketing Review, and Marketing and Research Today, either from the original periodical or in pre-print form.

The Research Series includes an extensive collection of newspaper and periodical clippings and other resources used by Bartos as supporting materials for her speaking engagements, articles, and books.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes audio and visual recordings of promotional works for marketing campaigns, including The Moving Target. In addition, this series also includes tapes of speeches and interviews given by Bartos, some of which relate to the published article "The Founding Fathers of Advertising Research."

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J. Walter Thompson Company. W. Lee Preschel papers, 1964-2001 and undated

6.6 Linear Feet — About 4950 Items
The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT), founded in 1864, is one of the largest and oldest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. W. Lee Preschel founded JWT Venezuela in 1964 and served as President of JWT Latin America from 1980-1987. Preschel also acted as Interim Director-Manager of JWT Italy in 1968, served on the JWT Board of Directors beginning in 1980, and became the chairman of the Latin America-Asia Pacific region in 1987. He was named Advertising Personality of the Year in 1987 by the Venezuelan Federation of Advertising Agencies. The W. Lee Preschel Papers span the years 1964-2001 and document Preschel's career as president of the J. Walter Thompson Company's Latin American operations. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, speeches, presentations, reports, newsletters, clippings, photographs, conference programs and agendas, awards, publications, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and audiovisual materials. Major correspondents include Denis Lanigan and Don Johnston, among others within the company. Clients mentioned include Ford, Kellogg's, Kodak, Draft, Lever, Pond's, Warner-Lambert, R.J. Reynolds/Nabisco, Burger King, and Banco Mercantil y Corpoven. The collection contains materials in English and Spanish, with the majority of the materials in Spanish.

The W. Lee Preschel Papers span the years 1964-2001 and document Preschel's career as president of the J. Walter Thompson Company's Latin American operations. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, speeches, presentations, reports, clippings, photographs, conference programs and agendas, awards, publications, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and audiovisual materials. Major correspondents include Denis Lanigan and Don Johnston, among others within the company. Clients mentioned include Ford, Kellogg's, Kodak, Draft, Lever, Pond's, Warner-Lambert, R.J. Reynolds/ Nabisco, Burger King, and Banco Mercantil y Corpoven. The collection contains materials in English and Spanish, with the majority of the materials in Spanish.

The collection is organized into three series: Personal Files, Administrative Files, and Audiovisual Materials. The Personal Files Series documents the personal and professional achievements of Preschel, and provide secondary biographical information through a number of industry publications. The series also includes two scrapbooks, compiled by Preschel, documenting his dismissal from and subsequent return to JWT in 1987. The Administrative Files Series documents various aspects of Preschel's career with JWT and includes correspondence, memoranda, speeches, presentations, reports, clippings, photographs, conference programs and agendas, company newsletters and other publications, and memorabilia. The Audiovisual Materials Series includes audiocassettes and VHS videocassettes. Audiocassettes contain recordings of presentations at two conferences attended by Preschel. Large-format materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Relocated items have been replaced in the Detailed Description of the Collection by dummy folders enclosed in brackets.

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Kate Millett papers, 1912-2002, bulk 1951-2001

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93 Linear Feet — 198 boxes; 29 oversize folders
The Kate Millett papers document Millett's life and activities as feminist writer, theorist, and artist, teacher, and global activist, based in New York City. They also document the 20th century women's movement, feminist theory, as well as feminism and women's rights around the globe, especially in France, Italy, and the Middle East. There are many files of correspondence with family, partners, friends, writers, artists, and activists, including significant exchanges with Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Alix Kates Shulman, Yoko Ono, and Gloria Steinem. Annotated manuscripts and other items related to her major publications are present. Topics in these works include prison systems; mental institutions; psychiatry, medications, and mental health; torture and imprisonment; politics, gender, and sexuality; and mother/daughter relationships. Subject files contain research on these topics, as well as materials on abortion, feminism, organizations, the arts, gay rights, and Millett's diagnosis of bipolar disorder, involuntary clinical treatments, and subsequent involvement in anti-psychiatry activism. Additional series relate to writings by other authors; Millett's work as a visual artist and her New York State artists' colony; and her student years and teaching. Other formats in the collection include electronic records, chiely writings; many recordings of interviews, lectures, speeches, art openings, and conversations; photographs; artwork, including drawings, sculptures, and installation components; and print materials such as articles, cards, clippings, fliers, magazine issues, and posters. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Kate Millett provide rich documentation of Millett's activities as a feminist activist, artist, and author of numerous works, including Sexual Politics, whose publication established her as one of the founding 20th century feminists. Other works for which supporting materials exist are The Loony-bin Trip, Flying, and The Basement.

Seen in a broader context, Millett's papers provide important documentation of the history of the feminist movement and feminist theory in the United States, including the history of the National Organization for Women. Materials in the collection also cover feminism and the social conditions for women around the globe, especially in France, Italy, and the Middle East - most notably Iran, where Millett traveled in 1979-1980.

The earliest dates in the collection, 1912 and 1928, refer respectively to an early family photograph, and historical resources used when writing the book A.D.. The bulk of the materials span her adult life from the 1950s through the early 2000s.

The collection content reflects the intensely personal nature of much of Millett's work and the frequent fusion of her personal, political, and professional interests, strongly evident in the many files of personal and literary correspondence, including significant exchanges with Ti-Grace Atkinson, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Cynthia McAdams, Yoko Ono, Alix Kates Shulman, Gloria Steinem, and many other activists, writers, artists, friends, partners, and family.

Additional series include writings by other authors; papers documenting Millett's work as an artist and instructor; files relating to her New York State farm and artists' colony; materials from Millett's student years, including her thesis which led to the book, Sexual Politics; and scripts and other papers relating to Millett's little-known documentary film, Three Lives (a copy of the film also exists in the collection). Other materials document her relationship with her mother during the last years of her mother's life, also the topic of her book, Mother Millett. Subject files relate to Millett's involvement with the gay and lesbian communities, her research on prisons and torture, and her diagnosis with bipolar disorder and subsequent involvement in anti-psychiatry activism. There are also extensive printed materials such as serial issues, articles, clippings, posters, fliers, mainstream and grassroots newsletters, event programs, and manifestos.

Audiovisual materials, many available through digital access copies, include audio and video recordings of Millett's lectures, speeches, and many conversations with activists, friends, and family. There are also many photographs, slides, and negatives documenting Millett's activities and the people in her life.

Rounding out the visual components of the collection are over 250 pieces of Millett's artwork created by Millett, who was also involved in the Fluxus art movement. Predominant formats include ink drawings, calligraphy, and graphic prints. There are also sculptures and other three-dimensional works, some of which formed part of an installation representing events that surrounded the murder of Sylvia Likens, also the subject of Millett's book, The Basement. A full inventory of the artwork is available in this collection guide.

Electronic formats include some correspondence, book drafts, and other writings. These files are included in the inventory under the appropriate series. The electronic files have been migrated to a library server; please contact the Rubenstein Library for access.

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Kay Leigh Hagan papers, 1955-2012

27 Linear Feet — 21,375 items
Kay Leigh Hagan is a writer, teacher, and feminist. Much of her early career focused on raising women's consciousness by teaching how to recognize various forms of internalized oppression in private classes she called "Feminars". In addition to her writing and teaching, this collection documents Hagan's many public speaking appearances and workshops, including those at womyn's music festivals (1988-2000). Her published works include Fugitive Information: Essays from a Feminist Hothead (1993), Internal Affairs: A Journal Keeping Workbook for Self-Intimacy (1990), Prayers to the Moon: Exercises in Self-Reflection (1991), and Vow: The Way of the Milagro (2003) with photographer Richard Downing. She was also the editor of Women Respond to the Men's Movement: A Feminist Collection (1992), and co-author of A Peculiar Alchemy (2007), a centennial history of the School for Advanced Research, with Nancy Owen Lewis. She has been active in Atlanta, Georgia, where she was affiliated with Forrest Avenue Consortium (later Nexus Contemporary Art Center) and Charis Books & More; and Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked with Los Alamos National Laboratory and the School for Advanced Research, among other organizations.

Collection consists of art objects, artists' books, video recordings, audio recordings, research files, drafts of published works, writings, journals and correspondence, materials documenting Hagan's political activism and private teaching, materials documenting her work with the School for Advanced Research, and graphic materials.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Laura "Tibbie" Roberts papers, 1811-2011 and undated

4.5 Linear Feet — 2933 items
Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

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Lenora Greenbaum Ucko papers, 1966-2013

7 Linear Feet — 4220 Items
Professor of anthropology, sociology, and social work, who founded StoriesWork, a non-profit organization in Durham, N.C. that advocates Therapeutic Storytelling, or the use of folk story analysis for empowering abused women. Collection consists of several separate accessions and includes Ucko's travel diaries; teaching and course materials; transcripts of Ucko's publications, including her book, Endangered Spouses; correspondence; Russian genalogy; materials from the Henry Zvi Ucko Memorial Exhibit, "What We Brought with Us," which featured personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s; and other materials from Ucko's position at the Museum of the Jewish Family in the late 1990s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2006-0015) consists primarily of files, lectures, and papers for classes taught by Ucko; files pertaining to cross-cultural communications prepared for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center; 20 labeled color slides; and travel diaries from Sierra Leone, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Senegal, Pakistan, and Holland.

Addition (2007-0015) (750 items, 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 1973-1994) contains typescripts and promotional material for articles and books including Endangered Spouses; course materials including files, papers, and class rosters; correspondence; and one audiocassette. Also included are materials from a study of Russian genealogy by students at Aldephi University directed by Ucko.

Addition (2007-0066) (200 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1996-1998) contains slides, photographs, oral histories on audiocassettes, 1 VHS videocassettes, printed and other materials all concerning a 1996 exhibit Lenora Ucko curated in honor of her late husband, Henry Zvi Ucko. The exhibit was entitled "What We Brought with Us", an exhibit about the personal items taken by German Jews who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s. The exhibit was first at Duke University and then moved to the NC Museum of History in Raleigh.

Addition (2011-0063) (900 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2002) largely consists of materials from Ucko's involvement in the Museum of the Jewish Family. Museum materials include programming pamphlets and advertising, exhibitions, budget materials, grant applications, Board of Directors correspondence and meeting minutes, newsletters, mission and by-laws, and other materials from the operation of the organization, primarily dated 1997-1998. Other items in this addition include some of Ucko's correspondence, her research on museums and memory, and some StoriesWork materials.

Addition (2013-0052) (75 items; .1 lin. ft.; dated 1975, 1981-1982, 2004, 2006, 2008-2009, 2013) includes a research paper and notes on Israeli absorption centers as well as newsletters and pamphlets for StoriesWork. Other items in this addition include pamphlets and flyers advertising Ucko's research consulting business, a program for a 1975 production of All in the Family at the University of Maryland Munich campus (Ucko served as faculty advisor), and a 2013 resume.

The Lenora Greenbaum Ucko Papers were acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Leo Bogart papers, 1912-2005 and undated

59.4 Linear Feet — 52,259 Items
Leo Bogart was an applied sociologist and mass media expert who was Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau (NAB) from 1960-1989. In his career with the NAB, Bogart pioneered new methodologies in newspaper marketing research and led two major projects during the mid 1970s-1989 to bolster the ailing newspaper industry, the Newspaper Readership Project and the Future of Advertising Project. He was also a prolific author and public speaker, and published 195 articles and 14 books, and delivered over 150 speeches from 1943-2005. The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

The Leo Bogart Papers span the years 1912-2005 and document Bogart's professional work with the Newspaper Advertising Bureau; as a mass media expert; and as an author and public speaker. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, speeches, books, journals, chapters, drafts, proposals, notes, reports, scrapbooks, resumes, interviews, schedules, programs, pamphlets, administrative records, research materials, publications, promotional materials, ephemera, yearbooks, student papers, military records, photographs, negatives, and slides. Materials represent Bogart's professional work as Vice President and General Manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, as well as his early employment with Standard Oil (New Jersey), McCann-Erickson, and Revlon, Inc.; as a prolific author and public speaker; as a Senior Fellow with the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columbia University; and as a mass media consultant with the Innovation International Media Consulting Group. The bulk of files relate to research on U.S. markets, although some files do cover international research projects. Topics include newspaper marketing research; newspaper readership; newspaper advertising; television and society; critiques of mass media; social science research methodology; and international newspapers in emerging markets. The collection also documents Bogart's early experiences as a student and as a soldier in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II, which formed the basis for several of his writing projects.

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Lester Wunderman papers, 1946-2010 and undated

60 Linear Feet — 42000 Items
Lester Wunderman is an advertising executive primarily in the direct marketing industry, founder of an agency in his name now a subsidiary of Young & Rubicam, and a noted collector of Dogon (Mali) art works. The Lester Wunderman Papers span the years 1946-2010 and include writings, speeches, correspondence, reports, photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, 16mm films, and other materials relating to Wunderman's career in direct marketing and direct-mail advertising, his work on Boards of Directors and Trustees, and as a consultant. Included are drafts, proofs and correspondence relating to Wunderman's 1996 book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay. Advertising agencies represented in the collection include Caspar Pinsker, Maxwell Sackheim, Wunderman Cato Johnson, Wunderman Ricotta & Kline and Young & Rubicam. Also included are correspondence, photographs, negatives and other materials relating to Wunderman's collection of Dogon (Mali) art works, carvings and sculptures, and their use in museum exhibits, catalogs and books on African art. Firms and institutions represented in the collection include American Express, Children's Television Workshop (Sesame Street, Electric Company), Columbia House record club, Ford (including Lincoln-Mercury and Merkur), IBM, Jackson & Perkins mail order nursery, Mitchell Madison Group, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), National Observer Correspondence Schools (Famous Artists School, Famous Writers School) and Time, Inc. magazines. Languages present include Spanish, French, Danish, German and Japanese, and have not been translated into English. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Lester Wunderman Papers span the years 1946-2010 and include writings, speeches, correspondence, reports, photographs, audiocassettes, videocassettes, 16mm films, and other materials relating to Wunderman's career in direct marketing and direct-mail advertising, his work on Boards of Directors and Trustees, and as a consultant. Included are drafts, proofs and correspondence relating to Wunderman's 1996 book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay. Advertising agencies represented in the collection include Caspar Pinsker, Maxwell Sackheim, Wunderman Cato Johnson, Wunderman Ricotta & Kline and Young & Rubicam. Also included are correspondence, photographs, negatives and other materials relating to Wunderman's collection of Dogon (Mali) art works, carvings and sculptures, and their use in museum exhibits, catalogs and books on African art. Firms and institutions represented in the collection include American Express, Children's Television Workshop (Sesame Street, Electric Company), Columbia House record club, Ford (including Lincoln-Mercury and Merkur), IBM, Jackson & Perkins mail order nursery, Mitchell Madison Group, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), National Observer Correspondence Schools (Famous Artists School, Famous Writers School) and Time, Inc. magazines. Languages present include Spanish, French, Danish, German and Japanese, and have not been translated into English.

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Lionel Barrow papers, 1940-2008

48.3 Linear Feet
Dean of Howard University School of Communications, 1975-1985; founder of the Minorities and Communications Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Collection includes materials from Lionel Barrow's advertising career, his teaching and tenure at Howard University, and his involvement in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC). The earliest materials include student work from Barrow's youth and his studies at Morehouse College, as well as materials from his service in the 24th Infantry Regiment during the Korean War. Another significant portion of the collection is Barrow's newspaper clippings and subject files, dating largely from the 1960s-2000s. His research on an unfinished book about the Freedom's Journal is also a large component of the collection. Also included are numerous photographs, some dating as early as the 1950s, but the bulk of which date 1982-2000s. These include family vacations and events, as well as professional events with AEJMC, the National Association of Black Journalists, and other conferences and organizations. Another notable component of the collection is the section of materials from Barrow's mother, Wilhelmina Barrow, who served as an American Red Cross Girl in Europe during World War II and the post-war period. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection includes materials from Barrow's advertising career, his teaching and tenure at Howard University, and his involvement in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC). AEJMC materials include a series of folders from a diversity survey in 2004; files from the founding and the operations of the Minorities and Communications Division; and programs and reports from AEJMC activities, especially in the 1970s and 1980s. Materials also reflect Barrow's involvement in the Council for Opportunities in Education, in particular his promotion of the TRIO program, offering funding and education opportunities for underprivileged youth.

A small part of the collection is Barrow's educational materials, dated 1940s-1970s, including reports and essays from his years at Morehouse College as well as his Ph.D. proposals and notes from the University of Wisconsin.

Also included are materials from his service in the 24th Infantry Regiment during the Korean War. The Korean War material, dated 1950-1951, includes press releases, written by Barrow, regarding various battles and army movements. Also included is correspondence to his mother, Wilhelmina Barrow, discussing his activities, as well as his struggles with payment and segregation in the U.S. Army.

Another significant portion of the collection is Barrow's newspaper clippings, dating largely from the 1960s-2000s, covering racial integration and the Civil Rights movement in Washington D.C., issues in journalism, and diversity and the condition of black Americans. These clippings have been loosely arranged by Barrow according to the date, the person's name, or the subject.

There are also numerous folders with clippings and research from Barrow's unfinished book on the history of the Freedom's Journal, the first African-American owned and operated newspaper in the United States. Subjects include slavery, education, conditions in different states, and other information about American life in the 1820s.

Also included are numerous photographs, some dating as early as the 1950s, but the bulk of which date from 1982 to the 2000s. The majority of the photographs are snapshots, many featuring the Barrow family and its activities. There are also snapshots of professional events with AEJMC, the National Association of Black Journalists, and other conferences and organizations. The photographs have not been arranged, but arrived well-labeled by Barrow, frequently with dates and captions for each image.

The collection also includes materials from Wilhelmina Barrow, Lionel's mother, relating to her service in the American Red Cross during World War II and in the post-war period. Wilhelmina's materials include ARC training and recruitment documents, her transport papers, newspapers and other publications geared toward servicemen and women, reports from Red Cross Clubs, suggested itineraries for traveling Europe while on leave, and souvenirs from her trips to Italy, France, and Belgium. Also included in this section are reports and clippings about the National Council of Negro Women; Barrow was a member for some time during the 1950s and 1960s. Some of these materials relate to segregation and discrimination.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Mahala Ashley Dickerson papers, 1958-2007 and undated

1.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 900 Items
African-American lawyer and businesswoman in the states of Alaska, Indiana, and Alabama. The personal and business papers of African American lawyer and businesswoman Mahala Ashley Dickerson span the years 1958 to 2007, the year of Dickerson's death, and chiefly consist of correspondence; newspaper clippings; real estate records; programs, letters, and additional items documenting honors, awards, and public appearances; papers concerning her homestead plot in Alaska and other personal and business concerns; photographs and videocassettes; and directories, journal publications, and pamphlets and correspondence concerning the American Bar Foundation and the Alabama State Bar Association. Business records chiefly are related to Dickerson's law firm of Dickerson & Gibbons, and the charitable organization Al-Acres, which she founded in memory of her son, Alfred, who drowned in 1960. There is some correspondence in the collection related to her memoir, Delayed Justice for Sale, which she published in 1998.

The personal and business papers of African American lawyer and businesswoman Mahala Ashley Dickerson span the years 1958 to 2007, the year of Dickerson's death, and chiefly consist of correspondence; newspaper clippings; real estate records; programs, letters, and additional items documenting honors, awards, and public appearances; papers concerning her homestead plot in Alaska and other personal and business concerns; photographs and videocassettes; and directories, journal publications, and pamphlets and correspondence concerning the American Bar Foundation and the Alabama State Bar Association. Business records chiefly are related to Dickerson's law firm of Dickerson & Gibbons, and the charitable organization Al-Acres, which she founded in memory of her son, Alfred, who drowned in 1960. There is some correspondence in the collection related to her memoir, Delayed Justice for Sale, which she published in 1998 and is available in Duke's Perkins Library. Audiovisual materials consist of personal photos of Dickerson, friends, and family, and videos of the American Bar Association's Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Awards Ceremony for Dickerson, 1995. A box of oversized memorabilia houses a pasteboard mount of the first page of an original 1984 article reviewing Dickerson's life accomplishments, and a poster advertising Dickerson's bid for Alaska's House of Representatives in 1968. Collection is arranged in topical groupings in alphabetical order. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Margaret Taylor Smith papers, 1918-2010 and undated bulk 1980-2008

19.85 Linear Feet — 24,761 Items
A native of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, Margaret Taylor Smith attended Duke University from 1943-1947. After graduating with a degree in sociology, Smith and her husband relocated to Birmingham, Michigan. Smith raised four children while taking an active part in her community through volunteer work and leadership. Smith's work as a research associate studying family life became the basis for a 1987 book, Mother, I Have Something to Tell You. Smith served as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations. In addition, Smith continues her commitment to Duke University by holding leadership positions on multiple boards, by acting as a founding member and chair of the Council on Women's Studies, and by enabling the creation of the Sarah W. and George N. Taylor Endowment Fund for women's leadership and the Margaret Taylor Smith Endowed Directorship for Women's Studies. The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research on American families, specifically relationships between mothers and children, that resulted in the publication of a book, Mother I Have Something To Tell You; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research that resulted in the publication of a book; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. Smith's original folder titles were retained. Smith, an avid note taker, often recorded information on the exterior of folders and manila envelopes. These folders were retained and appear in the collection. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Duke University Series comprises materials related to Smith's leadership and professional voluntarism at the university, including correspondence, event planning notes, meeting minutes, endowment information, and speeches.

The Mother, I Have Something To Tell You Series documents the publication of the 1987 book, authored by Jo Brans, based on Smith's sociological research that describes how mothers deal with children who display untraditional behavior. Specifically, Smith researched American families whose children challenged social and sexual mores during the 1960s and 1970s. The series contains correspondence, drafts, speeches, and Smith's research related to the book, including the mothers' subject files, which typically contain written transcripts of Smith's interviews with the women, both with and without Smith's notes, questionnaires and sociological data, and audiocassette recordings of the interviews. Original audio recordings are closed to research. Use copies need to be created before contents can be accessed.

Materials related to Smith's social and family life are located in the Personal Papers Series, which primarily comprises correspondence with family, friends, and some professional associates, but also includes photographs, newspaper clippings, ephemera from Smith's days as an undergraduate at Duke University, and her father's World War I diary.

The Professional Voluntarism Series contains materials documenting Smith's professional activities, including awards, correspondence, speaking engagements, subject files, voluntarism, and philanthropy. The series particularly highlights Smith's work as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations; her volunteer work with the Junior League; and her interest in ethics and ethical dilemmas.

Later Additions have not been processed. Accession (2010-0066) contains email correspondence. Accession (2010-0135) includes addition research materials, correspondence, proposals, and other miscellaneous notes. Accession (2010-0164) includes correspondence regarding the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture; the Duke University Women's Studies department; Smith's Class of 1947 and their reunions; and other miscellaneous materials and notes.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Marshall T. Meyer papers, 1902-2004 and undated, bulk 1984-1993

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63.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 48,900 Items
Marshall T. Meyer was an activist rabbi who worked in Argentina during the period of the Dirty War/El Proceso (mid 1970s to mid 1980s). The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The collection contains extensive evidence of Meyer's activities and interests, especially those he engaged in during his tenure at Comunidad Bet el in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and then at B'nai Jeshurun in New York City. The files document Meyer's professional activities, including his often over-lapping roles as religious leader, scholar, and human rights activist. Much of the material in the collection reflects Meyer's devotion and commitment to a socially and politically engaged Conservative Judaism and his involvement with Jewish communities around the world. Meyer was particularly involved in calling attention to human rights violations and working with the victims of violent political oppression in South and Central America in the 1970s and 1980s and then in Palestine, Israel, and the Middle East in the 1990s. Meyer's extensive involvement and leadership in national and international religious, peace, and human rights organizations such as the World Council of Churches are also well-represented, as is his life-long association with his alma maters, Dartmouth College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

The Correspondence Series contains letters in English and Spanish written and received by Meyer (additional correspondence is also contained in Meyer's research files and electronic files). Significant correspondents include Louis Finkelstein, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Shalom Spiegel.

The Writings and Speeches Series holds Meyer's original compositions in English, Spanish, and Hebrew. These compositions include various literary genres (op-eds, newspaper articles, essays) as well as speeches, addresses, and sermons.

The Research Files Series is subdivided into four categories: Geographic, Organizations, People, and Subject. These files may contain correspondence, notes, printed material, writings, and ephemera. The most common themes that run through this series include human rights, Jewish life, rabbinic education, Latin American Jewry, the Middle East, and Argentina's "Disappeared." The Research Files Series displays a deeper level of intellectual involvement by Meyer (e.g. annotations on printed material, categorizing and filing, integration of correspondence)

The Printed Material Series includes newspapers, clippings, monographs, and serials that Meyer collected over the years. Subjects cover similar territory as the research files. Unlike the Research Files, this material is generally not annotated and was less organized.

The Teaching Material Series contains material from classes taught by Meyer.

The Personal Files Series includes material largely outside the scope of Meyer's professional work: photos, memorabilia, schoolwork, and appointment books.

Video and audio recordings of Meyer's engagements are found in the Audiovisual Material Series. These include lectures, speeches, interviews, television appearances, and religious services. Originals of video and audio tape are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of the material.

The Condolences Series contains cards and notes expressing sympathy on Meyer's death. Many of these contain testimonials and reminiscences of his role as rabbi and activist.

Finally, the Electronic Files Series contains transcriptions of documents authored by or related to Meyer, many of which overlap with the content of and the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Teaching Material, and Audiovisual Materials Series.

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Mary Margaret Wade papers, 1966-2007

9.4 Linear Feet — 6555 Items
Artist, writer, and arts educator. Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's that were missionaries in Alaska. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains personal correspondence, photographs, writings and drawings, subject files, ephemera, and clippings. The photographs document Wade's personal life, her art exhibits, and trips to Cuba, Alaska, and Costa Rica. The drawings and writings primarily consist of published versions and drafts of cartoons, as well as some manuscripts of writings and drawings for texts, including the artwork for Have You Ever Seen an Ugly Bride?, an unpublished book by Wade and Elizabeth Lide. The subject files include a file for the Resource Center for Women and Ministry in the South, an abortion rights petition signed by Norma McCorvey, and typescripts documenting the Kilbuck family, who were ancestors of Wade's and Moravian missionaries in Alaska in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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McFadden Family papers, 1921-2002

6.5 Linear Feet — 4875 Items
William Allen McFadden (1904-1991), Methodist minister from Indiana, graduate of DePauw, Boston University School of Theology, and Union Seminary in New York. He was a lifelong pacifist and social justice worker. His wife was Glenora English McFadden (1910-2001) and her mother was Estella Graves English (1885-1960). The McFaddens had three children: Margaret McFadden (whose papers are also housed in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture), Edith Collins, and David McFadden. This collection consists of numerous accessions containing correspondence, audiocassettes, diaries, photographs, yearbooks, printed materials, newspaper clippings, and other miscellaneous materials, largely produced by William and Glenora McFadden during their courtship and marriage, 1921-1991. Also included is correspondence from Glenora McFadden's mother, Estella Graves English, and correspondence from Margaret McFadden, the McFaddens' daughter. Please consult the Collection Overview below for more information about the materials in each accession.

The accession (2005-0028) (300 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1936-1994 and undated) consists of sermons, letters, and diaries of William Allen McFadden, 1930-1991; sermons, journals, and letters of Glenora English McFadden, circa 1936-1994; and letters of Estella Graves English, 1959-1986. Includes a genealogy list compiled by Irene English Shoemaker. Also contains ephemera, photographs, and clippings.

The addition (2005-0092) (404 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated ca. 1936-2000) contains correspondence to Glenora and Bill McFadden. Also includes photographs, 2 audiotapes, and clippings.

The addition (2007-0048) (760 items, 1.7 lin. ft.; dated 1921-2001) contains sermons, correspondence, and a typescript for History of Israel. Also includes Glenora English's school notebooks; a William McFadden notebook; a yearbook from Bedford High School, 1921; two yearbooks from De Pauw University, 1922 and 1925; and a glass slide.

The 2007 addition (2007-0125) (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1921-1998) contains printed materials, manuscripts, correspondence, sermons, and clippings as well as a yearbook, diary, and commonplace book.

The 2007 addition (2007-0215) (1000 items; 2 lin. ft.; dated 1926-2001) includes correspondence, scrapbooks, audio cassette tapes with recorded sermons, a yearbook, diaries, and photographs from the McFadden family, including letters from Bill to Glenora prior to their marriage. Also included is schoolwork from Margaret McFadden's childhood and high school years, and correspondence from her dating from the 1970s.

The 2009 addition (2009-0207) (2 items; 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 1928) includes 2 school notebooks belonging to Glenora English; one consists of her notes from American History and one is a project about United States geography.

The 2013 addition (2013-0188) (375 items; 0.5 lin. ft; dated 1993-2002) consists mainly of family correspondence.

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Meinrad Craighead papers, 1901-2007

4 Linear Feet — 2500 Items
Award-winning artist and writer whose works focus on humankind's relationship with God. She has lived and worked around the world, but eventually settled in New Mexico in the 1980s. Accession (2010-0020) includes letters; photographs; exhibition catalogs and publicity; public response to her poems and books; research and notes on mythologies, art, and nature; and other personal materials from her life. The materials largely date from the 1960s through the 1980s, covering her scholarship in Europe, her time in England as a nun in Stanbrook Abbey, and the years following her return to New Mexico. Includes Craighead's prayer books and psalters, some dating from the early 1900s, as well as some copies of her own publications and artwork. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Meinrad Craighead Papers includes a variety of materials, largely dating from Craighead's adult life from the 1960s to the 1980s. The collection is divided into the following series: Personal Papers, Writings, Research, Artwork, Photographs, and Books.

Craighead's Personal Papers Series is a mixture of items, ranging from personal correspondence to official correspondence relating to her U.S. passport. Several folders have information on Craighead's recent activities, including presentation notes, her travel for speaking or workshop engagements, and materials from her retreats and public programming in the 1990s-2000s. This series also includes several versions of Craighead's resume, documenting her activities prior to the mid-1980s.

The Writings Series consists largely of feedback, book reveiws, and correspondence following the publishing of three of Craighead's books: The Sign of the Tree (1979), The Mother's Songs (1986), and the Litany of the Great River (1991). Drafts from the latter reveal that the book was initially referred to as the "Litany of the Rio Grande." The Writings Series also includes loose drafts, poems, and other undated materials.

The Research Series includes Craighead's handwritten notes and drafts from her research into the mythology and mysticism of different world cultures, including ancient Egypt, Rome, and Native Americans. Another interest of Craighead was the role of nature, including different animals, in the symbolism and spirituality of various religions and groups. These files are loosely sorted by subject.

Samples of Craighead's prints and paintings can be found in the Artwork Series, which also includes exhibition catalogs, printings and publications of her work (including several copies of Catholic Worker newspapers, which used her illustrations in the 1970s), as well as a small amount of artwork and poetry by others that Craighead collected. The prints in this series are not original works of art, but instead are photocopies or photographs of her work. They include copies of her inkprints, paintings, and glass etchings.

The Photographs Series includes the majority of the collection's photographs, which are both color and black-and-white prints, as well as negatives. Craighead appears to have taken several rolls of film of altars, outdoor landscapes, foliage, rock formations, and animals that she then used in creating her artwork. Other photographs from this series are portraits of Craighead, by both friends and professional photographers, as well as a small amount of photographs of Stanbrook Abbey in England. A final photograph worth mentioning is one of Craighead and three nuns at Pope Pius VI's coronation in Rome in 1963.

The final series, the Printed Materials Series, includes Craighead's personal books, copies of her published books, and books that include her artwork as illustrations. Craighead's personal books consist of prayer books, early editions of Christian texts, and a book about the Stanbrook Abbey Press. Craighead's illustrations can be found in three editions of Catholic missals from 1975 and 1982. Finally, this series includes autographed copies of Craighead's own publications, The Mother's Birds, The Sign of the Tree, and "Christian Symbols," a compilation of loose prints.

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Merle Hoffman papers, circa 1944-2012 and undated bulk 1961-2000

100 Linear Feet — 68275 Items
Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

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Milton C. Marney papers, 1908-2003

9.6 Linear Feet — 7,200 Items
Scientist, taxonomist, and brother of Carlyle Marney. Collection contains professional and personal correspondence including family letters. Also included are research papers and book chapters on taxonomy and prescriptive science.

Collection contains professional and personal correspondence including family letters. Also included are research papers and book chapters on taxonomy and prescriptive science.

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Minnie Bruce Pratt papers, 1870s-2005, bulk 1975-2005

94 Linear Feet
Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.

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Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007

184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items
Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

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New York Radical Feminists records, 1969-2011

1.2 Linear Feet
The New York Radical Feminists (NYRF) was a radical feminist group founded by Shulamith Firestone and Anne Koedt in 1969. Collection contains organizing and theory documents as well as photographs from the New York Radical Feminists, as well as groups associated in some way with the NYRF or NYRF members dating from 1969-2011.

The first 14 folders of the collection (acc. 2008-0262; dated 1969-1985) contain organizing and theory documents of the New York Radical Feminists, such as the first introduction to the group completed on December 5, 1969 by Shulamith Firestone and Anne Koedt with other members of its founding Stanton-Anthony Brigade (formed on October 3, 1969). Also included are consciousness raising topics and guidelines, lists of accomplishments and activities from 1971-1976, as well as notes from a 1971 session of the Lucy Stone Brigade; materials documenting speak-outs, conferences, and other activities; public relations and financial documents; and copies of the NYRF newsletter (1970-1977). Documents include originals as well as photocopies.

The collection includes a USB flash drive with images from the collection. These images are page scans of the entire collection except for the newsletters. Contents of the flash drive have been transferred to a library server.

Folder 15 in box 1 (acc. 2010-0203; dated 1972-1984) contains a selection of materials documenting enterprises that NYRF members participated in such as Mother Courage Restaurant, Womanbooks, Women’s CoffeeHouse, the New York Feminist Federal Credit Union, and the Women Like Me Oratory Group. Included are clippings, fliers, handouts, programs, press releases, conference schedules, newsletters, fund-raising letters, and photographs.

Box 2 of the collection (acc. 2011-0114; dated 1970-2011) contains material documenting NYRF member participation in other groups. Included are clippings, fliers, and other documents related to a range of events and spaces such as Women's Equality Day events, 35 West 22nd Street Women’s Center, East 5th Street Abandoned Women's Shelter Takeover, and the 1974-1975 New York City Feminist Community Coalition.

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Norine Shipley Norris papers, 1895-2000

1.8 Linear Feet — 200 Items
Norine Shipley Norris attended Southern Female College (also known as Cox College) in 1897-1899, and taught Sunday school in Atlanta at Kirkwood Baptist Church in the early 1900s. This collection (2009-0129) (200 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1890s-2000) includes a variety of materials from Norine Shipley Norris, in particular her school notebooks, correspondence, and catalogs from the Southern Female College, which she attended for at least two years. Of note is the correspondence from Earnest Sevier Cox, a white supremist who courted Shipley for a time (1905-1906); photographs and records from her years of teaching at Kirkwood Baptist Church (1901-1904); and her handwritten application to the Daughters of the American Revolution (1918). Also included are a number of photographs and tintypes, scrapbooks, several books of poetry and literature, and miscellaneous clippings and ephemera.

This collection (2009-0129) (200 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1890s-2000) includes a variety of materials from Norine Shipley Norris, in particular her school notebooks, correspondence, and catalogs from the Southern Female College, which she attended for at least two years. Of note is the correspondence from Earnest Sevier Cox, a white supremist who courted Shipley for a time (1905-1906); photographs and records from her years of teaching at Kirkwood Baptist Church (1901-1904); and her handwritten application to the Daughters of the American Revolution (1918). Also included are a number of photographs and tintypes, scrapbooks, several books of poetry and literature, and miscellaneous clippings and ephemera.

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North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives, 1850, 1888-2000s and undated, bulk 1920-2008, bulk 1920-2008

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230 Linear Feet
The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the founding and development of N.C. Mutual in Durham, N.C., and contribute to the historic record on African American businesses and entrepreneurship in the South and in the United States. Dating from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items created from 1920 to 2008, the material covers nearly every aspect of N.C. Mutual's operations, management, and milestones. There are corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements; reports; surveys; memos; legal and financial papers; original life insurance policies; training material; programming and outreach files; many ephemera and artifacts; and thousands of historical photographs of staff and their families, offices, buildings, and Durham scenes. Significant businessmen represented in the papers include founders John Merrick and Aaron Moore; and presidents Bert Collins, Joseph Goodloe, William Kennedy Jr., William Kennedy, III, Charles C. Spaulding, Asa T. Spaulding, and current president James H. Speed. The collection is especially rich in print material, including many issues of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for its assemblage of material on United States African American history, including much information on other companies, and public relations material dating from the earliest years to present times, including advertising ephemera, advertising campaigns, and other related items. Other materials document NCM's outreach to the African American community throughout its history to counter racism, unemployment, and diseases by means of public health programs, church affiliations, mentoring, and scholarship programs. Over one hundred selected digitized photographs and a few documents are also available online. Acquired and curated jointly by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records and History Center and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The records in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the history of the oldest currently active African American insurance company in the United States. The materials date from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items dating from 1898 to 2008, and cover nearly all aspects concerning the operation, management, and milestones of NC Mutual (NCM). The archive comprises corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements, reports, surveys, and memos; legal and financial files; original life insurance policies and other documents; advertising, internal and external publications, pamphlets, posters, and other print material; training material; many historic photographs; public relations and outreach material; memorabilia; and audiovisual recordings. The bulk of the collection concerns the company's home office in Durham, N.C. but there is a significant amount of material that relates to NCM district offices located throughout the United States, particularly in the South, as well as records that refer to other related organizations such as insurance companies and financial institutions.

The collection contributes significantly to documentation on the history of African American businesses in the United States, particularly in the South, and on the socioeconomic status of African Americans in the South in the 20th century. There is also valuable information on public health issues affecting 20th-century African Americans and public health programming created by NC Mutual as well as other agencies. In addition, through company records and many ephemeral publications such as obituaries, the collection offers detailed documentation of the work status and personal lives of the company's many employees and their life insurance customers, predominantly African American women and men.

The collection is rich in print materials, and includes nearly complete runs of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for public relations materials dating from the earliest years to the mid-2000s, including advertising ephemera, materials related to advertising campaigns, and other items. Additionally, there are records of NCM's extensive community outreach such as public health, mentoring, and scholarship programs, and documents relating to the company's ties with Durham's churches such as White Rock Baptist, and with other organizations such as Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

Corporate office files form the bulk of the collection, covering nearly every aspect of the company's operations and activities from its founding in 1898. There are extensive correspondence files as well as meeting notes and minutes, many legal and financial reports, and surveys of the insurance industry. Materials relating to a published history of NCM written by one of its presidents, William Kennedy Jr., are located in the Office of the Presidents Series. Company presidents represented most substantially in the files include: William Kennedy Jr. (1952-1958), Asa T. Spaulding (1959-1967), Joseph Goodloe (1968-1972), William Kennedy III (1972-1990), and Bert Collins (1990-2003). Earlier and later presidents and leaders, including founders Merrick and Moore, and presidents C.C. Spaulding and James Speed are also represented in smaller amounts of material. Personnel records are also present and are closed to use until 2074, 75 years after the date of most recent record.

Among the several thousand photographs in the collection, hundreds date from the first decades following the company's founding, and offer important and vivid historical evidence concerning NCM's history, its employees and their families, and the history of Durham, N.C. Many are oversize, and feature twenty panoramic photographs of conventions and other events from the early to mid-20th century. The collection also contains photographs of founders Merrick and Moore and their families, NC Mutual office buildings throughout its history, and many large photographic portraits of senior administration from the earliest years to the mid-2000s. Other photos capture employees at banquets and conventions throughout the company's history; some large sets of images from the early to mid-20th century document employee's homes as well. From the historic photographs and other images not represented in the collection, NCM created a permanent exhibit in its home office's "Heritage Hall" commemorating the company's history; these exhibit images, panels, and labels are also preserved in this collection.

Acquired and jointly curated by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records, and History Center, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Office of Black Church Studies records, 1968-2013

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The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity. There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included. Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity.There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included.Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

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O. Milton Gossett papers, 1951-2004 and undated

14 Linear Feet — 2760 items
O. Milton Gossett was an advertising executive with Compton Advertising and Saatchi & Saatchi agencies. He was also a member of the National Advertising Review Board and conducted career workshops for college students in conjunction with the American Advertising Federation. The O. Milton Gossett Papers span the years 1951-2004 and document Gossett's advertising career with the Compton Advertising (Compton) and Saatchi & Saatchi agencies, along with materials relating to the merger of Compton with Saatchi & Saatchi in 1982, including correspondence with Charles and Maurice Saatchi. The collection includes personal and professional correspondence, writings and speeches, company newsletters, and other printed materials. Also included are advertising proofs and tear sheets, television commercial scripts and storyboards, videocassettes, scrapbooks, clippings, photographs, and cutouts of company employees, as well as artifacts and memorabilia. In addition, there is information on the history of the Procter & Gamble Company and its major advertising campaigns, including a number of advertisements for Ivory Soap.

The O. Milton Gossett Papers span the years 1951-2004 and document Gossett's advertising career with the Compton Advertising (Compton) and Saatchi & Saatchi agencies, along with materials relating to the merger of Compton with Saatchi & Saatchi in 1982, including correspondence with Charles and Maurice Saatchi. The collection includes personal and professional correspondence, writings and speeches, company newsletters, and other printed materials. Also included are advertising proofs and tear sheets, television commercial scripts and storyboards, videocassettes, scrapbooks, clippings, photographs, and cutouts of company employees, as well as artifacts and memorabilia. In addition, there is information on the history of the Procter & Gamble Company and its major advertising campaigns, including a number of advertisements for Ivory Soap.

The collection is organized into four series: Personal Files, Administrative Files, Writings and Speeches, and Audiovisual Materials. The Personal Files Series includes personal correspondence, photographs of Gossett and his colleagues, and items relating to Gossett's international travels. Other materials document Gossett's professional life, including early resumes. Also included is a daily diary from 1960-1961. The Administrative Files Series includes corporate publications, photographs, print advertisements, television commercial scripts, storyboards, speeches, subject files, and correspondence that document Gossett's career at Compton Advertising and Saatchi & Saatchi. The Writings and Speeches Series chiefly includes speeches, written and delivered by Gossett, relating to various advertising topics. Many speeches were created as part of Gossett's American Advertising Federation workshops, and were delivered at a number of colleges and universities. Writings include magazine articles written by Gossett, as well as an introduction to an article in the Encyclopedia of Advertising and Marketing. The Audiovisual Materials Series features twenty-seven videocassettes, primarily of television commercials produced by Saatchi & Saatchi.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Restricted materials have also been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Restricted Materials. Relocated items have been replaced in the Detailed Description of the Collection by dummy folders enclosed in brackets.

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Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives, 1885-2019 and undated

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277 Linear Feet — 3.9 Gigabytes
The Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives document the operations and activities of the OAAA, the primary professional organization throughout the modern history of the outdoor advertising industry in the U.S. The collection also includes materials pertaining to the OAAA's predecessor organizations such as the Poster Advertising Association, Associated Bill Posters, the Painted Outdoor Advertising Association, and the International Bill Poster's Association of North America. There is some information on the outdoor industry abroad as well; Canada and the England/U.K. are more fully addressed than other countries. Materials include a wide variety of media and formats, and include correspondence, directories, published materials (such as technical and periodic reports, newsletters and bylaws), membership records, texts of speeches, articles and clippings, minutes of association meetings, and industry publications such as the long-running serial The Poster.

The Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives document the operations and activities of the OAAA, the primary professional organization throughout the modern history of the outdoor advertising industry in the U.S., 1885-1990s. The bulk of material falls between 1941 and 1980, that is between the entry of the United States into World War II and the end of the 1970s, a period that witnessed rapid and radical changes in the ways that Americans viewed and used the outdoors. The collection also includes materials pertaining to the OAAA's predecessor organizations such as the Poster Advertising Association, Associated Bill Posters, the Painted Outdoor Advertising Association, and the International Bill Poster's Association of North America. Some of the major outdoor advertising companies and organizations represented in this collection include: General Outdoor; Foster & Kleiser; United Advertising; Institute of Outdoor Advertising (IOA); National Outdoor Advertising Bureau (NOAB); and Outdoor Advertising, Inc. (OAI). There is some information on the outdoor industry abroad as well, especially Canada and the England/U.K. Taken as a whole, the collection reflects the activities and concerns (as well as the record-keeping practices) of the outdoor advertising industry.

Although physically organized into 23 series in alphabetical order, the collection may also be collocated intellectually into five main themes or topical areas: organization, affiliations, operational activities, technical activities, and audio-visual material. These broad categories reflect the scope of activities undertaken by the OAAA, the network of trade associations, professional organizations, governmental regulatory bodies, material manufacturers and engineering societies, and member associates. There is considerable overlap among the subjects covered by the various series, so searches of multiple series (and/or keyword electronic searches) should be undertaken to obtain a comprehensive view of the collection.

Included in the collection are multiple-format materials: paper files, printed materials, photographs, slides, blueprints, placards and metal signage. Other materials are a wide variety of media and formats, such as correspondence, directories, published materials (such as technical and periodic reports, newsletters and bylaws), membership records, texts of speeches, articles and clippings, minutes of association meetings, and industry publications such as the long-running serial The Poster. The numerous photographs scattered in files have been given index numbers and have been replaced in the files by photocopies so the originals may be better preserved and more accessible for browsing. The original images are located in the Photographs and Negatives Series, and are organized by index numbers. A searchable online database, Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions (ROAD), contains descriptions of these images.

Researchers interested in the organization of the OAAA might begin with the following series: Administration--Officers; Budget / Finance; Constitution & Bylaws; History; Meetings; Organization--Committees; and Organization--Departments and Divisions. These series document the overall organizational structure and operations of the OAAA, its board, committees and departments, as well as the record of its activities as reflected in meeting minutes, budgets, and its governing bylaws and policies. The OAAA was organized as a corporation, with a president and key officers elected from the Association membership. A Chairman's Advisory Committee assisted the Association leadership. Prominent officers represented in the collection include Frank Cawl, Karl Ghaster, and Walter Holan. Below that, the OAAA followed a dual "line and staff" organizational structure in which functions and activities determined the range of departmental divisions, and each division was overseen by an administrative committee which carried the same name as the division or department. Key divisions within the Association include the Public Policy, Research and Engineering, Business Development, and Plant Development divisions.

Material pertaining to the industry affiliations of the outdoor advertising industry is contained in the following series: History, International, Membership, Notre Dame, Outdoor Advertising Companies, Publications, State Associations, and Trade Organizations. This theme includes the regional and state outdoor advertising associations, along with the outdoor advertising companies that comprised the membership of the OAAA. Prominent among these are the General Outdoor Advertising Co., Foster & Kleiser Company, the R.C. Maxwell Company, John Donnelly and Sons, the Thomas Cusack Company, Columbus Outdoor, and United Advertising. In addition, the collection documents the activities of a number of professional organizations linked to outdoor advertising, such as the Association of National Advertisers, the Associated Advertising Clubs of America, the Advertising Federation of America, the American Association of Advertising Agencies, the American Advertising Federation, the National Outdoor Advertising Bureau, Outdoor Advertising, Inc., the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, the International Congress of Outdoor Advertising, and Notre Dame University's School of Outdoor Advertising.

The operational activities of the outdoor industry are documented mainly in the following series: Campaign Case Studies, Issues and Activities, Local Markets, and Regulation. These activities included sales, industry promotion and education, the monitoring of legislation and public policy affecting outdoor advertising, and public service campaigns. Operational activities linked the OAAA and outdoor advertising to the larger world, through such programs as patriotic and public service campaigns, as well as advocacy and promotional efforts through trade and general-audience publications. In addition, these files document the OAAA's participation in the public debate over issues directly concerning outdoor advertising, such as zoning ordinances, advertising regulation, and visual aesthetics. There are files on research firms and researchers such as A.C. Nielsen, Bruskin Associates, General Media, John Paver and Wilbur Smith. These series show the interactions between the OAAA and both governmental and non-governmental agencies and interest groups, such as the American Automobile Association, the National Safety Council, the Advertising Council (and its precursor the War Advertising Council), and the General Federation of Women's Clubs, as well as some notable individual activists such as Elizabeth Lawton. The materials in these files show the relationships, sometimes oppositional but frequently collaborative, between these agencies and the OAAA, over topics that included legislation and litigation over the regulation of outdoor advertising (at state and local as well as at the federal level) displays (posters, signs, and billboards), patriotism (especially during World War II), the energy crisis, urban renewal, zoning ordinances, the Highway Beautification Act (pursuant to the Federal Highway Acts), and highway and traffic safety. Also included in the series in this topical area are case studies of a wide range of outdoor advertising campaigns, involving such client companies as the Kellogg Company, Ford Motor Company, the Morton Salt Company, Swift and Co., and the Clark Candy Company (now owned by New England Confectionery Company). In addition, the OAAA and its membership conducted advertising campaigns designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the outdoor medium, using famous figures such as Calvin Coolidge, Woodrow Wilson, Miss America Shirley Cothran, and even with a fictitious automobile, the "Testa" car.

Technologies and research-related activities involved in outdoor advertising are represented in the series: Audience / Readership; Physical Structure; Research; and Traffic Audit Bureau. These series address those activities that comprise the production and display of outdoor advertising, such as billboard structure standards; research on paint, paper and glue; illumination; sign legibility; layout and typography; and posting practices. These files include materials on advertising reception and recall, traffic counts and other market-related research. Research aimed at improving the efficiency of outdoor advertising includes studies of billboard and poster placement, standardized sizes of billboards and posters, legibility studies, the development of market research methodologies, and the audits of individual poster plants to ensure industry-wide standard practices. In addition, the OAAA engaged in ongoing research into the technical aspects of manufacturing and posting outdoor advertising displays, through studies of billboard structure construction and engineering, building and plant maintenance, landscaping, paint and color research, paper, glue, illumination techniques and standards, the formation and modification of building codes and code compliance, and workplace safety. These activities involved ongoing relationships between the OAAA and a number of research and engineering agencies and associations, such as the A.C. Nielsen Company (readership studies), the Simmons Market Research Bureau, Wilbur Smith and Associates, the Barney Link Fellowship (academic research), the Traffic Audit Bureau (a nationwide organization based in N.Y.), Raymond Loewy Associates (developer of the Loewy panels), the Tiffen Art Metal Co. (all-metal billboard structures), Bruskin Associates (foot-traffic research), Daniel Starch and Staff, and Axiom (market research).

The audio-visual files, which include the Publications Series; the Video, Film and Audio Recordings Series; and the Photographs and Negatives Series, contain materials such as photographs, slides, negatives, trade and Association publications, training films, and audio recordings of presentations. A searchable on-line database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions --ROAD) contains descriptions of the majority of these photographs, slides and negatives. Please contact Research Services for information on accessing the ROAD resource. Photographs, negatives, and slides are available for research usage. Films, videotapes and audio recordings are closed for preservation reasons.

Glossary of Key Terms Used in Outdoor Advertising

NOTE: Trade terms in the glossary text in boldface indicate that those terms also have an entry in this glossary.

3-Sheet Poster: A poster measuring 6' high by 3' wide, usually found along the outer walls of retail stores.

6-Sheet Poster: A poster measuring 4'4" x 9'10", usually found near retail stores. This was originally the size meant by the term Junior Poster

8-Sheet Poster: A poster format measuring 6' x 12' overall with a bleed area of 5' x 11'. The 8-sheet posters are prominent features around retail establishments, and are widely used for advertising around neighborhoods. They also gained popularity among farm equipment suppliers for economical and seasonal reminder advertising. They are also currently known as Junior Posters.

24-Sheet Poster: The most widely used poster size in North America, and what most people mean when they refer to "billboards." These posters have a copy area measuring 8'8" high by 19'6" wide.

30-Sheet Poster: The largest standard poster size, measuring 12'3" x 24'6" overall with a bleed area of 10'5" x 22'8".

Allotments: The number of poster panels that make up a showing.

Animation: Devices or techniques used to create the illusion of movement in a poster or bulletin display. Animation may be mechanical, like a moving armature or figure, or it may be achieved with lighting patterns. The famous Coca-Cola spectacular at Times Square, for example, uses programmed lights to create the illusion that the Coke bottle regularly fills and empties.

Approach: In a line of travel, the distance from which an advertising structure first becomes fully visible to the point where the copy is no longer readable (having passed out of sight). Sometimes descriptive terms are used, such as Flash Approach, Short Approach, Medium Approach, or Long Approach, which also indicate the relative duration that an advertising structure remains visible to a potential reader in traffic.

Flash Approach: For pedestrian traffic, it refers to an approach distance of under 40'; for vehicles an approach of under 75' (for vehicles moving under 30 miles per hour) to under 100' (for vehicles moving over 30 mph).

Short Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance between 40'-75'; for vehicles an approach distance from 75'-150' (under 30 miles per hour) to 100'-200' (over 30 mph).

Medium Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance between 75'-125'; for vehicles an approach distance from 150'-250' (under 30 miles per hour) to 200'-350' (over 30 mph).

Long Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance greater than 125'; for vehicles an approach from over 250' (under 30 miles per hour) to over 350' (over 30 mph).

Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC): An independent auditing organization that conducts advertising and readership research, primarily in newspapers and magazines. It was founded in 1914, and continues its research mission today. The pre-eminent print media research organization in the world, it served as the model for the Traffic Audit Bureau. In fact, TAB was conceived to provide the same kinds of service to the outdoor advertising industry that ABC provided for the print industry.

Audited Circulation: The Traffic Audit Bureau (TAB) investigates and determines the circulation for a given advertising location, based on procedures generally accepted by the business community. The Audit Bureau of Circulations is another independent reporting firm that provides similar research services.

Awareness: The degree to which one remembers having seen a particular ad in a test market.

Billboard: A generic term that refers to any large outdoor advertising sign. These may be any of the many multiple-sheet posters, painted bulletins, wall murals, stadium signs, and so on. However, in popular use, the term billboard refers to the standard 24-sheet poster, along with its physical structure, which became a ubiquitous part of the American roadside architecture. The outdoor industry dropped "billboard" as a technical term in the early 1930s, due to negative connotations, but the word has persisted in the popular vocabulary of the American public to this day.

Blanked ad: In a recall or awareness study, portions of a poster's copy, usually the advertiser's name, brand name, or marketing slogan, are covered and hidden from view. Respondents are asked if they can identify the ad despite the missing or covered copy elements.

Blanking: The white paper border surrounding poster copy.

Bleed Area: Bleed is when printed images run all the way to the edge of the page, as opposed to standard printing which leaves a white border around the image. Bleeds are usually printed larger than the finished image (called trim size). The part of the printed image's margin that is trimmed away to achieve a final size is called the bleed area. It differs from cropping, in which a part of the actual image is removed.

Bleed-Through: A situation where previous advertising copy can be seen though present copy. Also called "show-through."

Blister: Air pockets that sometimes form between the sheets of a poster and the posting surface.

Circulation: The traffic volume at a given location; it is synonymous with traffic. Circulation refers to the circulation of people in an urban landscape. Beginning in 1912, the outdoor advertising industry became increasingly concerned with the growing urban concentration of people, the patterns of circulation of people, and the challenge of locating advertising structures at points of maximum circulation.

Cooperative Account: An outdoor advertising campaign in which both the manufacturer and the distributor of a product share the costs of advertising.

Copy: The pictorial design, background, and message combined in a display on a poster or bulletin. Copy refers to all of the elements that go into a billboard design, not just the textual message.

Counting Station: A specific point along a traffic artery where vehicles are counted in order to determine traffic volume.

Coverage: The placement of an outdoor advertising message on a network of principal thoroughfares so that the advertiser's message reaches as many people, as often as possible, throughout a given display period.

Cut-Outs: Figures or mechanical devices that are attached to a poster structure to create a 3-dimensional effect.

Daily Effective Circulation (DEC): The size of the audience that has the opportunity to see a given advertising message in a 24-hour period. It is the least number of people counted in the Daily Gross Circulation (DGC) who have a reasonable opportunity to see an advertising display. The basic formula is: 50% of pedestrian DGC traffic; 50% of motor vehicle traffic; and 25% of mass transportation traffic.

Daily Gross Circulation (DGC): The total number of persons who pass by a given set of panels (a representative showing) in a given day.

Daily Impressions: Another term for Daily Effective Circulation; an estimate of the number of people who pass by a given outdoor ad.

Display Period: The duration of an advertising display, as stipulated in a posting contract.

District Showing: A showing where posters are displayed in only a portion of a market (hence the term "district"), rather than in the whole market.

Effective Circulation: The potential audience for a given advertising structure.

Electric Spectacular: A flashing or neon lighted display generally seen at points of high congestion or at tourist attractions. New York City's Times Square; the Boardwalk at Atlantic City, New Jersey; and the strip in Las Vegas are examples of sites famous for their large concentrations of dramatic spectaculars.

Extension: Another term for cutout; additional copy beyond the panel face of a bulletin or billboard.

Face: The surface area of an outdoor advertising structure.

Facing: The side of an advertising structure visible to traffic flow.

Flagging: A tear on a poster, which causes it to hang loose, like a flag.

Frequency: The number of times a person has a chance to see a given advertising message during a showing period.

Gross Rating Points (GRP): The total number of impressions delivered by a showing. GRP are figured by dividing the Daily Effective Circulation (DEC) by the market population.

Hoarding: An early word for billboard. Originally, a hoarding, from the Old French word for "fence," referred to the fencing placed around construction sites. Its association with advertising came from the fact that such fences were handy posting surfaces for bill posters. Eventually fences, along with large wall-like structures, were erected specifically for advertising purposes along roadways. Modern billboards represent the culmination of historical efforts to control the placement of outdoor advertising as well as to regulate the size and configuration of posting surfaces, in an effort to address concerns and complaints raised by hoardings and the specter of "billboard blight."

Identification: Identification occurs when a respondent identifies an advertiser in a blanked ad during an awareness/recognition study.

Illuminated Bulletin: Posters or bulletins equipped with electric lighting, generally used in areas with high traffic volume day and night.

Impression: A term used to indicate the number of people who have an opportunity to see an ad in a given period of time.

Intensity: The size of a poster showing, or the extent to which an advertiser's message is displayed in a market. Intensity is usually represented in terms of an index number, such as #100, #50, and so on. See the entry for showing for further explanation.

Junior Panel: The posting structure measuring 6'x8', designed to accommodate Junior Posters.

Junior Poster: Junior posters are smaller versions of standard 24-sheet poster billboards that maintained the billboard's 1:2.25 height-width proportions but included only 1/4 the overall dimensions and surface area. They were commonly referred to as 6-sheet posters, although the standard officially adopted by the OAAA was technically a 6-1/2 sheet size. By the 1970s the term "Junior Poster" was interchangable with the term 8-sheet poster. They were originally conceived to reinforce and supplement standard-sized poster campaigns, but developed a niche in urban areas, around retail establishments, and in sites where zoning laws limited the use of larger posting structures.

Length of Approach: The measured distance from which a painted bulletin or poster is clearly visible.

Line of Travel: The centerline of an approach road.

Lithography: A technique for reproducing images in the mass production of posters. In lithography, the design is transferred onto stone or metal plates which are inked and printed onto paper.

Load Factor: In a traffic study, the average number of occupants in a vehicle.

Location List: A list of the locations of all poster panels sold and delivered.

Mandatory Copy: Ad copy that is required by law to appear on advertising of certain products. It includes warnings, labeling requirements, and disclaimers.

Market: A market is generally considered in terms of a local consumer area, typically a town or municipality. Traffic research has shown that typically 20 percent of a town's roads carry 80 percent of its traffic, within each market. Therefore, roughly equal sections of major traffic arteries are divided into poster zones, which determine the intensity of a poster display campaign, called a poster showing.

Minimum Showing: The smallest number of poster panels that an advertiser can purchase without paying a per-panel rate premium.

Mobile Panel: An advertising panel mounted on a trailer that can be transported to a given site. It is usually used for merchandising purposes or event advertising.

Molding: The frame made of wood, metal or plastic, which surrounds the face of an advertising structure. Also called "trim."

M.O.V.I.: Metro Outdoor Visibility Index. A pre-testing technique that allows an advertiser to evaluate the effectiveness of an outdoor message design by simulating the environment in which the message will appear.

Net Advertising Circulation (NAC): The Daily Effective Circulation (DEC) of a showing, modified by the poster structures' Space Position Value (SPV). To arrive at the NAC of a showing, the average NAC of all illuminated panels in a poster plant is multiplied by the number of illuminated panels in a showing. The same procedure is followed for the un-illuminated panels in a showing, and the NAC is the sum of the two figures.

Off-Premise Sign: A sign that advertises a product or service away from the location where it is made or provided.

On-Premise Sign: A sign that advertises a product or service at the location where it is made, sold or provided.

Outdoor Advertising: Refers to all advertising encountered out-of-doors. The OAAA currently recognizes four broad categories of outdoor advertising: billboards, street furniture, and transit advertising as well as alternative media, which includes advertising sites such as stadiums, airborne advertising, and gas pumps.

Outdoor Travel: The number and percentage of people who go outdoors in a given day.

Out of Home: A catch-all phrase that refers to all forms of advertising that reach consumers primarily outside his or her home.

Painted Bulletin: Bulletins differ from posters in a number of ways. Bulletin structures tend to be larger than poster boards; the standard bulletin structure measures 14' x 48', or twice the width of a standard poster panel. Also, bulletins generally occupy the most desirable locations along major roadways. While poster panels or sheets are typically mechanically reproduced by lithograph or other means, painted bulletins are painted, frequently by hand, and each bulletin tends to be in some way unique. Painted bulletins share a common history with the arts of sign-painting, lettering and calligraphy. The term "painted bulletin" also refers to notices and advertisements painted on walls and roofs, as well as signs and notices painted on barns along rural roadways. Painted bulletins frequently feature special cutouts that alter the appearance of the structure. They tend to be more expensive than posters, due not only to the desirability of their locations but also to the labor required in their execution and maintenance. Painted bulletins are generally leased for showings that last a year.

Porta-Panel: Full-sized poster panels erected for indoor events.

Plant Capacity: The total number of #100 showings (see the explanation under Showing) that are available in a poster plant.

Plant Operator: A company or individual who operates or maintains outdoor advertising structures.

Poster Panel: A structure used to display either 24- or 30-sheet posters. It measures 12' high by 24' wide. Also called a billboard.

Poster Plant: A poster plant consists of all the bulletin structures in a single urban area controlled by a single advertising company. The establishment of poster plant standardized operations, construction, maintenance and quality control has been an integral part of the OAAA's activities since its inception. The ultimate goal is for all poster plants to deliver the same quality of service to advertisers, limiting the difference only to the quality of the location of a plant's advertising structures.

Posting Date: The date on which the posters of a showing are scheduled for display.

Pounce Pattern: A poster pattern is projected onto large sheets of paper and traced in outline form. The outline is then perforated with a needle, and the perforated designs are known as a pounce pattern. Dust is blown through the perforations, which creates a pattern on the posting face, ready for painting. Prior to computerized graphic design techniques, it was a common practice for transferring and enlarging copy art.

Premiere Panel: A standard display, measuring 12'3" x 24'6" overall. Typically, premiere panels are single sheet vinyl panels stretched over a 30-sheet poster panel structure.

Rain Lap: The practice of lapping poster panel sections, so that the upper sections overlap the lower sections, similar to shingles. Rain lap panels reduce flagging and rain seepage.

Rates: Beginning in 1901 Associated Bill Posters inaugurated the practice of publishing the rates of its member agencies in an effort to promote a standard of service across the outdoor advertising profession. The rates were listed in terms of the cost per sheet, a number which had to be multiplied by the number of sheets required for each poster, and by the number of postings in a showing. Thus, a listed rate of 12 cents (.12) meant that for example in Minneapolis, where a properly representative showing required 80 24-sheet or 150 8-sheet posters, the typical cost (in 1900) of a showing would be $144.00 for an 8-sheet display (150 x 8 x .12), or $230.40 for a 24-sheet display (80 x 24 x .12).

Reach: The approximate percentage of a target audience population that will be potentially exposed to an advertising message at least once during a showing period.

Readership-Remembrance: The number and percentage of people who remember having seen a given poster.

Riding a Showing: A physical field inspection of the panels used in a showing.

Roadside Signs: A collective term for all signage found along roadsides. Roadside signage falls into 2 basic categories: commercial (both on-premise and off-premise) and governmental (right-of-way signage, including traffic markers, warning signs, and historic markers).

Rotary Bulletin: A standard 14' x 48' bulletin structure that can be moved ("rotated") to different locations at fixed intervals.

Setback: The distance from the line of travel to the center of an advertising structure.

Showing: A "package" of poster displays. A showing generally lasts for 30 days, and is categorized numerically in terms of intensity, and generally noted as either #50 or #100 showings. A #50 showing includes one poster display for every poster zone (a section of a local market), a #100 showing includes 2 posters, and so on. The numerical index ensures that each poster campaign will receive an adequate distribution, and each advertiser will receive equal treatment by the posting firm. Traditionally, showings were referred to in terms of a full- (#100), half- (#50), or quarter- (#25) showing, but by the 1920s, the terms had changed to: intensive, representative, and minimum.

S.M.S.A.: Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. An economically integrated area consisting of a central city and its contiguous counties.

Snipe: An adhesive strip used to change a portion of the copy of a bulletin. Also called "overlay."

Space Position Value (SPV): The index of visibility of a poster panel. SPV is based on four factors: length of approach, speed of travel, angle of the panel to approach, and the relationship of the panel to adjacent panels.

Spotted Map: A map showing the locations of the panels used in a given poster showing.

Stock Posters: Standardized poster designs that may be purchased by an advertiser and customized by adding the specific business's name.

Street Furniture: Advertising displays that also function as public amenities, such as bus shelters, benches, trash receptacles, newsstands, kiosks, and in-store signage.

Traffic: The volume of vehicles and pedestrians passing by a particular point during a specified time interval. See also Circulation.

Traffic Count: An audit of the number of vehicles passing a given point, called a counting station, in order to determine the daily effective circulation of a location.

Transit Advertising: Advertising messages intended to reach users of non-personal transportation. Transit advertising includes taxi-cab tops, bus sides and interior panels, subway cars, and airport and railway posters.

Transit Shelter: A curbside structure located at bus and trolley stops. Transit shelters provide standardized advertising spaces measuring 69x48" with a bleed area of 67x46".

Tri-Vision™: An advertising structure made of slatted faces that can revolve at regular intervals, displaying three different messages in rotation.

Unit: A single poster panel or painted bulletin.

Glossary of Key Acronyms Used in the Records of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America

OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America

AAA: American Automobile Association (consumer interest and advocacy group)

AAAA: American Association of Advertising Agencies (industry organization)

ABC: Audit Bureau of Circulations (print media research company)

AMMO: Audiences Market by Market for Outdoor (IOA computer program for market research)

AMRB: Axiom Market Research Bureau, Inc. (research company)

ANA: Association of National Advertisers (industry organization)

ANSI: American National Standards Institute (engineering industry organization)

ARF: Advertising Research Foundation (research company)

ASA: American Standards Association (engineering industry organization)

BBDO: Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborne (advertising agency)

BOCA: Building Officials Conference of America (professional organization)

BPAA: British Poster Advertising Association (industry organization)

BPR: Bureau of Public Roads (U.S. government agency)

BTA: British Transport Advertising Ltd. (transit advertising company)

CIE: Coras Iompair Eirann Outdoor Advertising (Irish company)

COMB: Canadian Outdoor Measurement Bureau (research company)

DMB&B: D'Arcy Masius Benton and Bowles (advertising agency)

DOT: Department of Transportation (U.S. government agency)

F & K: Foster and Kleiser (outdoor advertising company)

FHWA: Federal Highway Act (U.S. legislation)

GFWC: General Federation of Women's Clubs (interest group)

GOA: General Outdoor Advertising Company

HBA: Highway Beautification Act (U.S. legislation)

HUD: Department of Housing and Urban Development (U.S. government agency)

IAA: International Advertising Association (industry organization)

ICBO: International Conference of Building Officials (professional organization)

IOA: Institute of Outdoor Advertising (marketing arm of OAAA)

IPA: Institute of Practitioners of Advertising (professional organization)

LTA: London Transport Advertising (British advertising company)

NASA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (U.S. government agency)

ND: Notre Dame University (South Bend, Ind.)

NESA: National Electric Sign Association (engineering industry organization)

NOAB: National Outdoor Advertising Bureau (industry organization cooperatively owned by ad agencies. Its primary function was to service outdoor advertising campaigns through on-the-spot evaluations and site inspections.)

OAI: Outdoor Advertising, Inc. (marketing arm of OAAA)

OARI: Outdoor Advertising Research Institute (research company)

OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (U.S. government agency)

PAA: Poster Advertising Association (industry organization)

PAAC: Poster Advertising Association of Canada (industry organization)

PACE: Poster Advertising Circulation Evaluation (research company)

POAA: Painted Outdoor Advertising Association (industry organization)

SICMEA: Societe Industrielle du Constructions Metalliques En Acier (French billboard construction and posting company)

SMRB: Simmons Market Research Bureau (research company)

TAB: Traffic Audit Bureau (research company; a non-profit organization dedicated to producing authenticated circulation values for outdoor advertising markets)

USO: United Service Organizations (U.S. public service agency)

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Paul Jeffrey papers, 1969-2006

145 Linear Feet — Approximately 3500 Items
Paul H. Jeffrey was a saxophonist, composer, arranger, and educator. The Paul Jeffrey Papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. Also present are audio and moving image materials, photographs and posters, as well as correspondence, promotional materials, and written records relating to various aspects of Jeffrey's career.

The Paul Jeffrey Papers span the dates 1969 to 2006. The papers have as their focal point nearly 1,400 manuscript scores and parts that Jeffrey composed or arranged for big band jazz ensemble, primarily for the Duke Jazz Ensemble. The papers also include photographs, posters, and other written records of Jeffrey's musical career since the 1960s. There are additionally over 500 hours of concert and studio recordings in a number of audio and moving image formats that date since the 1960s. These formats include audiocassettes, open reel audio tapes, compact discs, digital audio tapes, long-playing records, VHS, and Hi-8 video cassettes. The collection is arranged into the following five series: Correspondence, Promotional Material, and Festival Records; Photographs and Posters; Audio and Moving Image Materials; Music Manuscripts; and Oversize Music Manuscripts. Audio and Moving Image Materials are arranged by format, and Music Manuscripts are arranged alphabetically. Acquired as a part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

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Pee Wee Moore papers, 1945-2009

3 Linear Feet — 500 Items
"Pee Wee" (Numa Smith) Moore (born Raleigh, N.C., 5 March 1928; died Raleigh, N.C., 13 April 2009) was a professional jazz saxophonist, who performed and recorded with musicians including Louis Jordan, Illinois Jacquet, James Moody, Dizzy Gillespie, and Mary Lou Williams. The Pee Wee Moore Papers contain materials created and collected by Moore from throughout his career as a jazz saxophonist, including photographs, newspapaer clippings and other paper materials, as well as audio and moving image recordings of concerts, rehearsals, and oral history interviews.

The Pee Wee Moore Papers contain materials created and collected by Moore from throughout his career as a jazz saxophonist. Materials are arranged into three categories: photographs, clippings and miscellaneous materials, and audio and moving image materials. Photographs include professional and candid pictures of Moore from throughout his life with images of jazz musicians including Dizzy Gillespie and James Moody. There are a large amount of clippings concerning Moore's life as a saxophonist, with a particular emphasis on his time performing with Louis Jordan, as well as manuscript drafts of jazz lead sheets. The collection also contains A/V materials including concert and rehearsal recordings from the 1980s along with oral history recordings related to Moore's life.

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Phillip Rhodes papers, 1957-2008 and undated

60 Linear Feet — 60 linear feet
North Carolina born and raised composer, Duke alumnus, and composer-in-residence and professor at Carleton College. Collection comprises primarily scores, music sketches, recordings, professional files, and correspondence that follow the development of Rhodes' compositional career. Includes published compositions and unpublished student works for both vocal and instrumental ensembles, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, and other publicity related items from performances of his music.

Collection comprises primarily scores, professional files, and correspondence that follow the development of Rhodes' compositional career. Name and Correspondence files consists mainly of correspondence between Rhodes and a variety of professional organizations, but also includes Rhodes' handwritten notes, some publicity materials, and other administrative documents. Personal Files includes unpublished works and music sketches from Rhodes' time as a student at both Duke and Yale, as well as some correspondence and biographical publicity materials more generally related to his career. Events and Programs consists of assorted concert programs from performances of Rhodes' music. Rhodes' music has been divided into four series based on genre: Chamber and Solo Instrumental Works, Choral and Solo Vocal Works, Operas and Oratorios, Orchestral and Wind Ensemble Works. The series include music sketches, drafts, revisions, original manuscripts, master sheets, piano reductions, published scores, conductor's scores, and when noted, instrumental parts.

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Pitchforks of Duke University records, 1980 - 2008

6.5 Linear Feet
Contains the records of the Pitchforks of Duke University, a men's a cappella singing group. Types of materials include articles of incorporation, a constitution, certificates, correspondence, applications, press, flyers, clippings, photographs, rosters, and sound recordings. Major subjects include student life at Duke University, male college students, vocal performance groups, and student groups. English.

Contains articles of incorporation, a constitution, certificates, correspondence, applications, press, flyers, clippings, photographs, rosters, and sound recordings of the Pitchforks, a Duke University men's singing group. Records date from 1980-2008 (bulk 1980-1985).

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R.C. Maxwell Company records, 1891-2001 and undated

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135 Linear Feet — 118,350 Items
R.C. Maxwell Company of Trenton, N.J., was one of the earliest enduring outdoor advertising companies, founded in 1894 by Robert Chester Maxwell (1873-1955) and continued to operate primarily in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area until the company was sold in 2000. The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co.

Approximately 15,000 photographs, dating up to around 1952, have been described in the searchable ROAD Database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions). The numbered and indexed black-and-white photographs and negatives (along with a limited number of glass negatives) include images of billboard and electric spectacular executions (illuminated billboards); road shots showing the approach views to billboard structures; images of Maxwell advertising structures; and images of urban and rural billboard displays in various states, primarily Pennsylvania and New Jersey, including a number of images of Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J. boardwalk. Because the majority of photographs show the billboards in their surroundings, the images provide a snapshot of the people and buildings near the billboard.

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Richard Pollay Acme Advertising collection, 1850s-2006 and undated

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75 Linear Feet — 3000 Items
The Acme Advertising Collection is one of the collections created by Professor Richard Pollay in the History of Advertising Archives (Faculty of Commerce, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia). The collection was motivated by the observation that Acme named enterprises are characteristically small ventures that represent the grass roots of local and regional economies. At the same time, the ubiquity of the Acme brand name has made its way into popular culture, where it has become an icon for independent business in general, featured in print cartoons from artists such as Gary Larson (The Far Side) and G.B. Trudeau (Doonesbury), and in the Warner Bros. animated Road Runner features. Items in the Acme Collection come from a variety of sources. Many items were donated to Dr. Pollay, but the majority were acquired by Dr. Pollay himself over several decades. In earlier years items were found in shops, flea markets, and antique stores across North America. However, in recent years most items were acquired through the internet auction site, eBay (www.eBay.com). The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Bros.

The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Brothers.

A significant part of the collection is organized and grouped to represent rooms in a house. For example, kitchen items have been collected together. Office, wardrobe, and bathroom items are similarly gathered. Most items are represented in the Detailed Description by thumbnail images. In all, the collection consists of 28 Series: Kitchen Collectibles; Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles; Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation; Office and School Supplies; Domestic Hardware; Grocery and Store Collectibles; ACME Beer; Warner Brothers; Clothing Collectibles; Industrial Hardware; Bottles and Jars; Catalogs; Stationery and Certificates; Books and Monographs; Specialty Advertisements; Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements; Sales Oddities; Photographs; eBay Files; Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Truck; Audiovisual Materials; Match Covers; Telephone Directories; Business Cards; Trade Cards; Slides; and Miscellaneous Items.

The collection arrived already organized into 28 series. Every item had been assigned an "accession number," a unique 8-digit identifier, in the format "100-xx-xxx": the middle digits refer to the Series number, and the last three digits represent a running accession sequence within the Series. Items have been arranged by Series and numerically therein; however, there are a few exceptions where items have been transferred to another series after having been previously assigned an accession number. The collection also arrived with a descriptive database that was created and maintained by Professor Pollay's staff. The item descriptions in this finding aid represent a distillation of that database into a form more consistent with EAD-compliant finding aids. The collection has been processed with the original order maintained as much as possible. In addition, some items have been deaccessioned or retained by the donor, and only a digital image of the item exists in the collection. Those have been noted in the inventory.

Series 1: Kitchen Collectibles consists of Acme products for kitchen use: juice extractors; sifters; cast iron pans; and other utensils.

Series 2: Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles consists of Acme products for use in the bedroom or used as part of a wardrobe, including shoe pads, zippers, scissors, etc.

Series 3: Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation includes Acme toys and games, and other items used in sports and recreation, including model cars, toy trains, whistles, and playing cards.

Series 4: Office and School Supplies includes Acme products used as office and school supplies: erasers, staplers, rulers, pencils, etc.

Series 5: Domestic Hardware includes objects related to hardware used in homes, including wall thermometers; padlocks; iron hinges; and binoculars.

Series 6: Grocery and Store Collectibles includes grocery items such as evaporated milk, potato bags, bread bags, store signs, product display signs, and postcards.

Series 7: ACME Beer includes bottles, tins, catalogs, souvenir programs, flat advertisements and advertising objects relating to the Acme brand of beer.

Series 8: Warner Brothers consists of advertising objects and novelty items from Warner Bros. that feature the Acme label: Wile E Coyote lapel pin; Acme Optical glass case; along with clothing items like neckties, waist pouches, sweatshirts, and hats.

Series 9: Clothing Collectibles consists of clothing items featuring the Acme label and includes aprons, caps and T-shirts.

Series 10: Industrial Hardware includes industrial type objects like printing plates, radio control switches, etc.

Series 11: Bottles and Jars consists of bottles, glassware and jars featuring the Acme name or logo Also included are two colored glass slides, a baby's bottle and items in glass picture frames.

Series 12: catalogs includes various-sized catalogs, brochures, ledgers, and flyers. They are: Acme Trading Co., Acme Boot Co., and Acme Brick. Each item is individually described.

Series 13: Stationery and Certificates consists of assorted business stationery and certificates, including examples of late 19th century and early 20th century lithography on bond certificates and company letter heads. The companies Duane H. Nash Inc., Acme Harvester Co., and Acme Shear Co. provide examples of typical workmanship.

Series 14: Books and Monographs includes books, picture books, monographs and magazines that feature the Acme sign or logo or make mention of Acme.

Series 15: Specialty Advertisements consists primarily of promotional items such as blotters; small calendars; stickers; and slide charts that feature an Acme logo or trademark.

Series 16: Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements consists of print advertisements; mounted clippings; and photocopies of stationery and other paper items. Several companies are featured, including: Acme Boot Co., Acme Card System Co., Acme Harvester Co., Acme White Lead and Color Paint Works, Acme Wagon Co., Acme Washing Machine Co., and Acme Visible Card System. Each item is individually described. Each item carries an accession number.

Series 17: Sales Oddities consists of various advertising objects that feature an Acme logo or trademark, including both printed and three-dimensional objects such as tokens, pocket items, patches and decals.

Series 18: Photographs consists of photographs, negatives, and reprints of various shops, billboard, signs, and buildings featuring the Acme sign or logo. There are several pictures from Acme News Pictures, Inc. and Acme Telephoto, both press agencies.

Series 19: eBay Files consists of printouts from eBay.com relating to Acme-branded items. Printouts are housed in binders which are arranged roughly by year.

Series 20: Acme Bail Bonds consists of mostly printed materials related to the Acme Bail Bonds Company.

Series 21: Acme Truck consists of print advertisements for the Acme Truck, predominantly dating 1918-1922.

Series 22: Audiovisual Materials consists of sound and video recordings on various formats: cassette and video tapes; CD-ROM; vinyl records; and CDs. Each item features "Acme" as a trademark or logo or as part of the band name.

Series 23: Match Covers consists of assorted matchbook covers featuring the Acme label. Items are housed in a binder.

Series 24: Telephone Directories consists of the advertising Yellow pages. The provenance of these advertisements is largely unknown. The Series reflects the order in which they were collected.

Series 25: Business Cards consists of 138 business cards from various Acme companies. Items are housed in one binder.

Series 26: Trade Cards consists of various trading cards that were produced between the late 1880s and the 1930s. The bulk of items comes from the Lautz Bros Soap Co.

Series 27: Slides consists of 232 slides of various objects, locations and businesses featuring the name Acme. Slides are housed in one binder.

Series 28: Miscellaneous Items consists of miscellaneous items featuring the Acme label, name or trademark. Includes gas masks, farm implements, etc.

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Robert Ward papers, 1910-2012 and undated

137 Linear Feet
Robert Ward was a composer primarily of operas, instrumental works, and symphonic choral works. He won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his opera, The Crucible, which remains his best-known work. Ward served as Chancellor of the North Carolina School of the Arts and as a faculty member at Columbia and Duke Universities. His papers span from his time as a student at the Eastman School of Music in the 1930s to his final years composing in 2012. They include scores, music sketches, recordings, libretto drafts, correspondence, scrapbooks, research and information files, writings and speeches by and about Ward, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, and other materials that document his professional life and work as a composer.

The Robert Ward Papers have been divided into eight series: Biographical Materials, Correspondence, Operas, Instrumental Works, Vocal Works, Music Sketchbooks and Student Works, Music by Others, and Untitled Recordings. Biographical Materials consists of documents pertaining to Ward's work as a composer, including newspaper clippings, profiles, the composer's published writings and interviews, documents from the organizations with which he affiliated, events held in his honor, and certificates and awards he received. The Correspondence series primarily consists of professional communications between Robert Ward and several organizations. Ward's music has been divided into three series based on genre and arranged alphabetically by title of piece within each series: Operas, Instrumental Works, and Vocal Works. Materials for each composition may include scores, recordings, and publicity materials such as newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews. Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Ward, as well as manuscripts for some of his student works. Music by Others includes a variety of scores and recordings by other composers included in Ward's papers, the majority of which are recordings. Untitled Recordings comprises assorted media that contain no composition titles, although some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances.

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Rosetta Reitz papers, 1929-2008

41 Linear Feet — 30,750 Items
Rosetta Reitz (1924-2008) was a business owner, stock broker, university lecturer, and writer on issues including food, feminism, women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians. She was also the founder and owner of Rosetta Records, a company most prominent in the 1980s that was dedicated to re-releasing historic recordings by female jazz and blues musicians. The Rosetta Reitz Papers address aspects of the entirety of Reitz's career, with the majority related to Rosetta Records and to Reitz's associated music research since the 1970s. The collection contains company documents, research notes, manuscripts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, photocopies, photographs, a variety of audio and moving image formats, as well as magazines and books.

The Rosetta Reitz Papers span the dates 1929-2008, with the bulk of the material covering the period of the late 1970s through the 2000s. While the collection addresses aspects of the entirety of her career, the vast majority is related to Rosetta Records and Reitz's related music research. The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical Information, Rosetta Records Business Files, Presentations, Writings, Photographs, Posters, Audio and Moving Images, and Reference Materials.

The Biographical Information Series contains published and unpublished writings, correspondence, resume materials, and scrapbooks by and about Rosetta Reitz.

The Rosetta Records Business Files Series contains materials related to the founding of Rosetta Records in 1979 and its daily operations in the decades that followed, which primarily focus on the design and production of the company's catalog releases. Also of note are the files related to Reitz's involvement with Greta Schiller and Andrea Weiss in creating a documentary film on the International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

Print materials related to the many concerts, lectures, presentations, and courses that Reitz produced and/or taught on jazz, the blues, and other topics are found in the Presentations Series. Of note are the files related to Reitz's numerous presentations of "Shouters and Wailers", which was an evolving film-based lecture that Reitz delivered throughout the U.S. as well as overseas, that focused on female jazz and blues musicians.

The Writings Series contains manuscript drafts, research notes, and other materials related to Reitz's written works on food, feminism and women's health, and female jazz and blues musicians, including writing related to her grassroots advocacy for the creation of a US postage stamp honoring Bessie Smith.

The Photographs Series primarily contains 8x10 publicity photographs of various jazz and blues musicians, along with other candid photographs from Reitz's life and career.

Oversize promotional materials, primarily related to Reitz's film-based "Shouters and Wailers" presentations, but also related to individual female jazz and blues musicians, are located in the Posters Series.

The Audio and Moving Image Series contains all of the commercial releases by Rosetta Records in cassette, LP, and/or CD formats, including recordings featuring Ida Cox, Dorothy Donegan, Lil Green, the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, Valaida Snow, Rosetta Tharpe, Dinah Washington, Ethel Waters, Mae West, Georgia White, and others. It also contains audio recordings of the "Blues is a Woman" concerts, hosted by Carmen McRae, that Reitz produced for the Kool Jazz Festival and the Newport Jazz Festival in the early 1980s. Also a part of the series are VHS and 16mm film of musical performances by female jazz and blues musicians that originally aired on television and that Reitz compiled as a part of her ongoing research. Original audio and moving image materials are closed to listening and viewing. However, researchers can access the original artifacts for the purpose of reading liner notes and carrying out other text-based studies. Scanned images of all LP covers and liner notes are available in JPEG format on DVD 1 in Box 58. CD or DVD use copies, which are open to patron use, are available for some items and are noted below. Unless otherwise noted, use copies must be made for access to audio and moving image content.

The Reference Materials Series contains newspaper clippings, magazines, and books, primarily related to jazz and the blues, that Reitz drew upon in the course of her ongoing research and writing.

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R. Philip Hanes papers, 1928-2010

119 Linear Feet — 131,729 Items

The papers of R. Philip Hanes span the years 1928 to 1987 with the bulk occurring during the 1960s through the 1980s. Included are correspondence; printed material, such as brochures, leaflets, pamphlets, and programs; mimeographed material; clippings; press releases; newsletters; reports; financial records; minutes and agenda of meetings; agreements and contracts; pictures and slides; questionnaires; telephone logs; and plans.

The Hanes collection is useful as a study of a southern businessman and arts supporter, not only in North Carolina but also nationally, from the late 1950s to the mid-1980s. A principal focus of the collection is the arts involvement of Hanes on a local (Winston-Salem), state (North Carolina), regional, as well as national level. As a result of Hanes's encouragement for the arts, in part through board memberships on numerous arts organizations, the manuscripts contain much information about these organizations as well. Another related focal point is Ampersand, Inc., a Winston- Salem consulting firm Hanes established. It provided fund raising, management, and public relations services for non- profit organizations, especially arts groups.

To a lesser extent there is information in the collection about Hanes's concern for conservation of natural resources. There is only a small amount of material in the papers pertaining to his career as a textile company executive at Hanes Dye and Finishing Company. Chiefly these company records relate to some area of the arts, such as financial contributions to arts work; a small portion concern labor union activity. Also, there is not much in the collection relating to Hanes's family life.

The involvement of Hanes in arts organizations is evident throughout the collection. The Geographic Series, Subject Files Series, Audiovisual Series, and to a lesser extent the Personal and Boards Series all reflect this strong interest.

Hanes's interest in the arts probably was influenced by his early home life in a household filled with books, paintings, and music. Members of the Hanes family were individuals of culture and avid supporters of the arts. For example, his father, Ralph P. Hanes, Sr., was instrumental in saving and restoring Old Salem, an eighteenth-century Moravian community. Dr. Fred Hanes, Philip Hanes's uncle, was a friend of writer H. L. Mencken. Hanes's work for the arts began in the early 1950s, when Katharine Bahnson asked him to help raise funds for the Winston-Salem Arts Council. He then served on a task force for the organization. Hanes was also closely involved in the work of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the International Council of the Museum of Modern Art, the Winterthur Museum, and the Young President's Organization (YPO). Files for these organizations and institutions appear in the Personal and Boards Series. YPO material is also included in the Subject Files Series. One of Hanes's goals has been to bring outside interest and money to the arts in North Carolina.

One measure of the extent of Hanes's commitment to the arts is that he not only served on the boards and committees of numerous arts organizations but also was a founder of at least eight arts groups. These include the Associated Councils of the Arts, the Jargon Society, Tri-States Arts Council, Southeastern Center for Contemporary Arts, the North Carolina School of the Arts, North Carolina State Arts Council, the Winston-Salem Arts Council, and Piedmont Opera. He also was a founder of the Awards in the Visual Arts program and Ampersand, Inc. Most of these organizations are well-represented in the collection.

The Associated Councils of the Arts, a national private body, was first named Community Arts Councils, Inc. when Hanes was a founder in 1960. By 1964, the name was changed to Arts Councils of America to reflect more accurately the organization and work of the corporation. By 1966, the name became the Associated Councils of the Arts (ACA). Hanes served as vice-president and president of the organization, on the board, and on committees. ACA files, pulled together under the latest name, comprise about twenty percent of the Subject Files Series, with most of the correspondence falling in the 1960s. In addition to Hanes, the primary correspondents in the files are George M. Irwin and Ralph Burgard, with some scattered correspondence with Nancy Hanks. Irwin served as president and chairman of the board of the organization, and Burgard was executive director. Hanks also served as president. The ACA file includes information about the board of directors, conferences, and projects. ACA material also appears in the Personal and Boards Series and the Ampersand Central Files Series.

Another national organization of which Hanes was a founding board member is the Jargon Society, which published the works of nationally famous poets. The society was housed at the Penland School in Penland, N. C. Jargon Society files appear in the Personal and Boards Series, the Ampersand Casebooks Series, and to a lesser extent in the Ampersand Chronological Files Series. There is extensive correspondence of Hanes with Jonathan Williams, the Jargon Society founder. Williams, a poet and publisher, became curator of the Jargon Society Archive at the State University of New York, Buffalo Library in 1980. Williams correspondence appears particularly in the Geographic Series in the Penland, N.C. folders.

Two regional arts groups that Hanes helped establish are the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in 1956 and the Tri-States Arts Council in 1959. SECCA, located in Winston-Salem, N. C., was a major client of Ampersand, Inc. from 1976 to 1982. There are ten boxes in the Ampersand Casebooks Series on this organization, which represent about twelve percent of that series. The Personal and Boards Series also contains some files. The Tri-States Arts Council was a multi-states arts organization, encompassing North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. It was formed before any state arts council. There is material about this council in the Geographic Series, under the heading "North Carolina."

On the state level, Hanes was the primary founder of the North Carolina State Arts Council in 1964. He had persuaded then Governor Terry Sanford to address the American Symphony Orchestra League. Hanes talked to Sanford about creating the Arts Council, which became a part of the North Carolina Department of Administration. The agency later became part of the Department of Cultural Resources. Hanes also served as president and chairman of the council's executive committee. The Geographic Series contains almost two boxes of letters and memoranda, agendas, minutes, and reports on this organization, and there is some information in the Ampersand Central Files Series. There is extensive correspondence between Hanes and Robert V. Brickell, Executive Director of the Council, 1966-1968. Also, in the Geographic Series there are files for various local arts councils under the names of the state and city, such as "North Carolina. Greensboro."

Another state-level institution for which Hanes was a founder is the North Carolina School of the Arts (NCSA), created in 1966 in Winston-Salem. He was also an early major fund raiser for the school as well as being on the board and various committees. Hanes was prominent among local leaders who raised one million dollars by telephone to provide a physical plant for the institution. There is NCSA material in the Personal and Boards Series, the Geographic Series, the Subject Files Series, as well as the Ampersand Casebooks Series. In the latter series, NCSA files account for 25 boxes, or almost one-third of the series. NCSA was a major Ampersand client from 1974 to 1985. These files pertain to donors for the school and fund-raising campaigns in various North Carolina cities such as Charlotte, Hickory, High Point, Gastonia, and the Research Triangle area.

There are also several folders in the Ampersand Casebooks Series (Arts Council, Downtown Revitalization, and NCSA files) for the Roger L. Stevens Center for the Performing Arts in Winston-Salem. The center, which had its grand opening in 1983, belongs to the NCSA. Ampersand promoted NCSA'S "Vision in Motion" campaign to fund the Stevens Center. It represents a partnership between the business community and the arts, in which Hanes and Ampersand played a major role. There were corporate and private contributions as well as an NEA challenge grant. The eleven-story Greek revival building also is a part of downtown Winston-Salem's revitalization, in which Hanes and Ampersand again were instrumental. Roger L. Stevens, a broadway producer for whom the center was named, is a former businessman who switched to a theatrical career in the 1950s. He was chairman of the board of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D. C. From 1965- 1969, he headed the National Council on the Arts, which became the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). He also was a board member of NCSA. His correspondence is scattered throughout the collection, and there is a file under his name in the Personal and Boards Series.

Hanes was very active as a founder of local arts organizations in his hometown of Winston-Salem, including the Winston-Salem Arts Council. In the late 1940s, a group of citizens and community groups worked to form a united organization for the arts, which became the Winston-Salem Arts Council on August 9, 1949. Hanes began his association with the arts in 1950 as one of the founding members of this council, the first arts council in the United States. Its purpose was to unite arts associations in fund raising, scheduling of events, advertising, and budgeting. From this beginning grew the North Carolina Arts Council, regional arts councils, and the American Council for the Arts. Hanes was vice-president of the Winston-Salem Arts Council and served on several committees, including personnel, nominating, development, executive, endowment, and long- range planning. There are several folders on the Council in the Geographic Series, under the heading of "North Carolina, Winston-Salem," and some in the Personal and Boards Series. However, the bulk of the material is in the Ampersand Casebooks Series, where eleven Council boxes comprise almost fifteen percent of that series. It was a major Ampersand client from 1977 to 1985.

Another Winston-Salem organization Hanes helped to establish was the Piedmont Opera. He was a founding board member and served as vice-president, but there does not appear to be any material on this group in the collection.

In addition to founding the eight arts organizations, Hanes was also a founder in 1979 of the Awards in the Visual Arts program (AVA). It was a competition for regional artists from throughout the United States which granted fellowship money to artists. AVA was co-sponsored by the NEA, the Rockefeller Fund, and the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and coordinated by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA). SECCA hired Ampersand to direct the program, bring people together, organize the competition, obtain judges, and establish the divisions in the United States. The AVA material in the collection is contained in the Ampersand Casebooks Series, and forms a part of the SECCA files.

Another major arts institution that Hanes served was the National Endowment for the Arts. He was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and served on the board and on the Music Committee. Hanes also was a National Council on the Arts member and served under two chairmen, Roger Stevens and Nancy Hanks. Hanes worked to support the arts council movement from within NEA along with NEA chairman Nancy Hanks and Chuck Mark, head of the State and Local Arts Agencies Division of NEA. Both Hanks and Mark letters appear throughout the collection. NEA files are scattered throughout the collection in the Personal and Boards, Subject Files, Ampersand Central Files, and Slides Series. The Slides Series contains slides of early NEA meetings in 1965 and 1966. Included in particular are pictures of Harper Lee, Roger Stevens, John Steinbeck, Agnes de Mille, Gregory Peck, and Lady Bird Johnson. Also, photographs of various arts centers are included in the Miscellaneous Series.

In 1976, by which time Hanes's reputation in the arts was well-established, he and S. Kathryn Page founded Ampersand Inc. The company was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hanes Dye and Finishing Company, Hanes's employer for 28 years. In forming Ampersand, Inc., Hanes combined his business acumen with his experience as an active participant in the arts as consultant, board member, patron, fund raiser, and advisor to arts organizations. The company, a management service organization, specifically targeted the managers and boards of cultural organizations as its clients. These clients often were from North Carolina, many from Winston-Salem. The name of the company was derived from the symbol "and," a connecting symbol used to join things together. The firm provided fund raising, management, and public relations services for non-profit organizations, especially arts groups. Other services which Ampersand supplied included long and short-range planning, project feasibility studies, marketing, staff and executive recruitment, trustee development, special event management, custom research, and volunteer program and board development. The company provided a uniform approach to promoting the arts with these services.

Ampersand employed a relatively small number of staff members. President and chief administrative officer was co- founder Kathryn Page. To complete the staff Ampersand filled the following positions at various times: research associate, consultant, client consultant, senior consultant, executive assistant, public relations specialist, administrative associate, and intern. Hanes was chairman of the board and chief executive officer.

Although Hanes had anticipated working with Ampersand for the rest of his life, the experiment in Hanes's own words "was unsuccessful" (See letter of Dec. 1, 1988 in Information Folder). Ampersand lasted for a decade until 1986. There were several problems, one of which appeared to be financial, because often clients did not pay the fees. Consequently the business lost a considerable amount of money. Ampersand also wanted to show its client organizations "how to strengthen the board, build up public relations, develop good administrative practices, and essentially do their own fund raising." (Dec. 1, 1988 letter) This attempt to show arts and other non-profit organizations how they could apply business practices to their own operations often was only marginally successful.

The Ampersand Series is the largest one, comprising a little over one-half of the Hanes collection. The series provides four different approaches to access because it is divided into sections. One point of access is by client name as evidenced in the Casebooks. They functioned as an organizational tool for Ampersand to evaluate the client and its needs, to develop a system of obtaining economic support, and to assist in finding appropriate personnel. Correspondence varies in content from mass-produced letters to personal ones from Hanes or his staff. The alphabetical run of clients in the Casebooks section provides an overall view of the process involved in working with individual organizations. Between 1977 and 1984 Ampersand averaged 15 clients a year and contracted with 40 different clients during its existence.

The North Carolina School of the Arts, the Arts Council (Winston-Salem), and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art were the three major Ampersand clients, as evidenced by the amount of material in the casebooks. These three organizations remained as clients for the majority of the company's lifespan. The SECCA files also contain material about the Awards in the Visual Arts program, 1979- 1982.

Other clients, with at least two or three boxes each of material in the Casebooks, include the James B. Hunt political campaigns, the North Carolina Dance Theatre (Winston-Salem), the North Carolina Museum of Art (Raleigh, N.C.), Old Salem, St. John's Art Gallery (Wilmington, N.C.), Salem College and Academy (Winston-Salem), the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild (Asheville, N.C.), and the Walnut Street Theater (Philadelphia). The Hunt campaign files chiefly pertain to outgoing two-term North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt's unsuccessful Democratic bid in the 1984 U. S. Senate race. He attempted to unseat the incumbent, Senator Jesse Helms (Republican). Ampersand headed a Friends of the Arts division of Governor Hunt's campaign, and Hanes evidently was a consultant to the Hunt campaign. In the files there is also material about "A Celebration of the Arts," a Hunt North Carolina fund raiser. Although the Hunt material centers around the 1984 campaign, there is a little material about his 1979-1980 race for a second term as governor.

The Arts and Crafts Association files and the Sawtooth Center for Visual Design folders also fill over two boxes total. The Association began as the Arts and Crafts Workshop, a project of the Junior League of Winston-Salem, in 1945. It officially became the Arts and Crafts Association in 1948, organized as a private, non-profit venture in arts education. In 1982 the name was changed to Sawtooth Center for Visual Design, when the organization moved into its new quarters in Winston Square in downtown Winston-Salem. By changing the name, the organization also hoped to end the confusion between its name and the Arts Council. The two Sawtooth Center folders from 1984 relate to the Tom Davis Design in Flight Competition, sponsored by the Sawtooth Center for students of all ages in the Winston- Salem schools.

There is additional information relating to Winston- Salem in the Winston-Salem Symphony Association files and the Winston-Salem Downtown Revitalization files. Also, there is downtown revitalization information in the Arts Council file. Hanes was very involved in this downtown renewal. He and other interested citizens began examining the possibility of building a new downtown area around the performing arts in the mid-1970s. The Winston-Salem Arts Council was also a promoter of the idea. The new downtown Winston-Salem arts center included Winston Square, the Stevens Center, and supporting businesses. A vacant theater, formerly known as the Carolina Theater, was renovated to become the Stevens Center. The dedication ceremony occurred in 1983. The Winston-Salem Journal and the Winston-Salem Sentinel faithfully reported on local arts developments and thus are good secondary sources on that topic.

There are several clients in the Casebooks, for which there are one or one-and-one-half boxes. These include the Alabama School of Fine Arts (Birmingham), Dance St. Louis, the (N.C.) Governor's Business Council on the Arts and Humanities, the Jargon Society, the Moravian Music Foundation (Winston-Salem), the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (Winston-Salem), the North Carolina Symphony (Raleigh), and the Spoleto Festival (Charleston). Spoleto Festival material as well as Governor's Business Council information also appear in the Personal Series. Other clients with smaller files include the Alabama Shakespeare Festival (Anniston), the Chicago City Ballet, the Frank Holder Dance Company (Greensboro, N.C.), the International Wilderness Leadership Foundation (Ft. Collins, CO.), the Raleigh Cultural Arts Action Plan, Roanoak Project (Roanoak, N.C.), Upstairs Gallery (Tryon, N.C.), and the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce.

The second approach to access in the Ampersand Series is the Chronological Files. They are chiefly correspondence of Hanes and other Ampersand staff, arranged by date, and therefore provide a clearer view of the sequence of events. Representative topics are clients, such as NCSA and its "Vision in Motion" campaign, grants, funding, potential donors, executive searches, gifts, contracts, meetings, and general business. There is reference in 1977 to the Creative Problem Solving Course that Ampersand established, and plans for another in 1978. In addition there is a file on the course in the Personal Series and the Ampersand Central Files Series. Hanes also wrote some letters as chairman of the board of Hanes Dye and Finishing and discussed environmental and conservation concerns, and the arts. Scattered letters pertain to topics which supplement files in other parts of the collection, such as NCSA, the Winston-Salem Arts Council, the Nature Conservancy, the Jargon Society, Winston-Salem Downtown Revitalization, the Sawtooth Building and Center City Development. There are references to Joan Mondale's visit to Winston-Salem in 1978.

The third approach to access in the Ampersand Series is the Central Files. Like the Chronological Files, this is also primarily a correspondence file, but arranged by topic, providing an overall picture of the business by subject. The letters are mainly those of Hanes and other Ampersand staff. Included are files for various clients, institutions and organizations, reference material on these organizations, and financial information about Ampersand.

The fourth access point is company records. This section contains not only financial records of Ampersand but also information about clients and proposals. It reveals information about clients which are not included in the casebooks and the initial steps of the consulting process, even if unsuccessful subsequently.

Other aspects of Hanes's life as revealed in the collection are the interconnected interests of conservation of natural resources and outdoor recreation. His commitment to preserving the environment, especially in North Carolina, extended to both the seacoast and the mountains. He purchased most of Stone Mountain, five miles west of Roaring Gap, N.C., which became a state park. Also, Hanes was concerned as well about the preservation of the Appalachian Trail and Roan Mountain, which was threatened by commercial development. He expressed his love of the outdoors also as a hiker; hunter, especially of wild duck, pheasant, and dove; and trout fisherman.

Hanes's interest in the environment led him to serve several conservation societies as governor, director, national advisor, and committee member. These include the Nature Conservancy, the National Audubon Society, the American Land Trust, the Izaak Walton League of America, Appalachian Trail Conference, and the Appalachian Highlands Association. In addition, Hanes was a founder of the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and the North Carolina Land Heritage Trust. The Personal and Boards Series in particular reflect these interests in ecology and outdoor recreation. There are large files for the National Audubon Society and the Nature Conservancy, and to a lesser extent the Appalachian Greenway. Other related files in this series include the Izaak Walton League, the Appalachian Trail, Currituck, Shooting Clubs, Ecology, Conservation, Hunting, New River, Roan Mountain, Cane River, and Stone Mountain. There also is some information on The Nature Conservancy in the Ampersand Chronological Files Series. The North Carolina Recreation Commission has some information in the Geographic and Subject Files Series, and the National Recreation Association is represented in the Subject Files Series.

In the Subject Files Series many different topics are represented. Four major ones which have not been noted above include the National Council on the Arts, the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities, the American Symphony Orchestra League, and Arts Management.

There are many letters of prominent persons who were involved in the arts world as artists, as patrons of the arts, or as members of advisory boards of organizations. These correspondents include Edward B. Benjamin, Ralph Burgard, Lammot duPont Copeland, Agnes De Mille, John Ehle, Nancy Hanks, Paul Hudgins, George M. Irwin, Jarold A. Kieffer, Margot Logan, W. McNeil Lowry, Charles Christopher Mark, Sam Ragan, Alvin H. Reiss, Samuel R. Rosenbaum, Michael Whitney Straight, Robert Suderburg, Alvin Toffler, Richard P. Trenbeth, Eric Walter White, and Jonathan Williams. Other correspondents, who were not chiefly artists, shared Hanes's interest in promoting the arts. There are occasional letters from North Carolina governors and other political figures including Jesse Helms, James E. Holshouser, James B. Hunt, Benjamin Everett Jordan, Joan Mondale, Daniel Killian Moore, Terry Sanford, and Robert Walter Scott. Celebrities, such as Helen Hayes and Charlton Heston, also appear in the letters. Other correspondents include John Mason Brewer, Milton Esterow, William Coffield Fields, Siebolt Henry Frieswyk, Norman Lloyd, Sir Peter Ramsbotham, John D. Rockefeller, Laurance S. Rockefeller, James H. Semans, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Edward Weeks.

Names have been indexed only where both quantity and quality (research content) were present. Often the correspondence of one person in this collection is scattered throughout, rather than grouped in one series.

The collection includes 28 boxes from unprocessed additions, which have no boxlist or other descriptions available. These boxes are numbered by Accession number. Unprocessed additions (5479 items; dated [1950s]-2004) include correspondence, greeting cards, subject files, financial records, reports, memorabilia, photographs, videotapes, and a large poster of Hanes' family tree. Materials reflect especially Hanes' interest in the arts, conservation (particularly in western North Carolina and Virginia), and the city of Winston-Salem.

Addition includes correspondence, both incoming and outgoing, as well as appointment books, clippings, and miscellaneous materials relating to Hanes' philanthropy and community involvement in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Prominent topics include the Hanes farm and other conservation and agricultural enterprises; his role in various arts councils and arts movements throughout the city and country, including the National Endowment for the Arts; his interactions with Wake Forest University and other academic institutions; his communications with Wachovia Bank; and other issues or movements that he supported. The majority of the materials are loosely arranged in a chronological file, dating from 1940-2010 (bulk dating from 1991-2009).

1 result in this collection

Ruth W. Morgan collection of Oxford N.C. Women's Conference records, 1999-2004

0.6 Linear Feet — 126 Items
Ruth "Peach Pie" Webb Morgan is an African American native of Granville County, North Carolina. The collection contains material collected by Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection contains material collected by Ruth Webb Morgan from the church-related "Women's Conference" held at the Oxford Public Works Complex in Oxford, North Carolina in 1999, 2001, 2002, and 2004. Items include handouts, photographs, meeting agendas, and notebooks. The materials offer insights into the status and relationships of African American women in North Carolina, and their church-related affiliations and activities.

The cookbooks originally in this collection have been cataloged separately for the Rubenstein Library collections. They may be located by performing a title search for the following items: FAVORITE RECIPES, FAVORITE RECIPES FROM THE FARMERS' ALMANAC, COUNTRY COOKIN' RECIPES, THE SENSATIONAL NIGHTINGALES COOKBOOK, ROYAL QUEEN COOKWARE TREASURY OF COOKING.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

School of Law records, 1914-Ongoing

119.5 Linear Feet — 73,600 Items
The School of Law dates its origins as far back as 1850. The school experienced many organizational changes and several temporary closures in its early years before re-establishing itself as the School of Law in 1904. This collection includes papers of deans of the law school in 1930 and continuing forward. Also included are materials related to the law school's publications, the Duke Bar Association, legal research centers, the law library, Richard Nixon's time as a student at the law school and general administrative files dating back to 1914.

This collection includes papers of the deans of the School of Law starting in 1930. This material covers a wide range of information relating to the daily operations of the law school and includes: general correspondence, financial documents, annual reports, recruitment files, clerkship files, clippings, subject files, meeting minutes, development materials, and general office files. The collection also includes information about the various law school journals and publications edited and created by both students and faculty. Administrative files date back to 1914 and include: blank exams, financial documents, correspondence, placement bulletins, and other general files. Topics include legal education, Richard Nixon, administration, faculty, students, alumni, university presidents and administrators, the American Bar Association, the American Association of Law Schools, the school's Legal Aid Clinic, and law library.

1 result in this collection