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Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.

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Caribbean Sea Migration collection, 1959-2014 3 Linear Feet — 600 Items

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Materials from (or related to) the migration by sea of Cubans, Dominicans, and Haitians, including the refugee camp for Cuban and Haitian rafters that existed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, largely dating from 1991-1996. Collection includes camp newspapers and artwork created by refugees held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba; materials from the U.S. Coast Guard and other military sources, such as newspapers written in Haitian Creole, photocopies of camp rules and refugee intake procedures, and a transcript from an introductory video shown to refugees arriving at the camps; magazines and media coverage of refugee situations, including some material on Elián González; photographs and slides of refugees, Coast Guard personnel, and conditions in the camps in Cuba. Refugees arriving in Miami are included as are photographs of the work of the Guantanámo Refugee Assistance and Services Program in Miami and in the camps in Guantánamo Bay.

Materials include newspapers, artwork, clippings, U.S. military publications aimed at camp residents, camp notes, reports, and photographs from a variety of sources. Newspapers are one of the largest formats within the collection, which includes the complete run of éxodo, a newspaper with color issues printed from November 1994-September 1995 from Camps Kilo and Charlie Village in the Guantánamo Bay camps; issues of El Bravo, El Balsero, and El Futuro from 1994-1995; Sa K'pase, N'ap Boule, and Qué Pasa, newspapers printed by the U.S. military in Creole and Spanish and designed for Haitian and Cuban refugees at the camps; as well as newspaper clippings and some magazine issues covering the refugee crisis of 1994-1995 and the plight of Caribbean refugees in general.

Photographs are another significant component of the collection. U.S. Coast Guard photographs and slides of rafters and rescuers date from 1980 to the 1990s or 2000s, and are accompanied by photocopies from the U.S. Coast Guard's Historian Office detailing refugees assistance as early as 1959. The collection also includes unsorted and largely unlabeled photographs from the camps; those that are labeled date from 1994.

Other materials in the collection include some refugee artwork, publications about Cuba, a folder of Cuba information including some materials on Elián González, and other ephemera mentioning Cuban refugees. In addition, 8 CDs with photographs and other materials have been transferred to Duke's ERM server and are in the custody of the Electronic Records archivist.

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Advertising executive at several U.S. agencies, including McCann-Erickson, Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic Group, and Saatchi & Saatchi. Served as U.S. Ambassador to Slovakia during the Clinton Administration.

Collection spans 1946-2014 and contains correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, printed materials, memorabilia, audiovisual materials and other items pertaining to Spielvogel's career in advertising as well as his public service and community activities. Advertising agencies represented include Backer Spielvogel Bates, Interpublic and Saatchi & Saatchi. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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Carl V. Corley papers, 1930s-1999 20 Linear Feet — 30 boxes

The Carl V. Corley Papers contain the writings, drawings, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, and published materials that document the career and artistic output of Corley, a novelist and illustrator. The collection also includes typescripts and manuscripts of published and unpublished works of gay fiction, southern history, and heterosexual erotica, some of which is in the form of comic books or graphic novels.

The Carl V. Corley papers contain the writings, drawings, scrapbooks, notebooks, and published materials that document the career and artistic output of the novelist and illustrator. The collection also includes typescripts and manuscripts of published and unpublished works of gay fiction, southern history, and heterosexual erotica, some of which is in the form of comic books or graphic novels.

Corley's pulp novels were set primarily in early twentieth century Mississippi and Louisiana, though several were set in the South Pacific, where Corley served during World War II, and reflect varying degrees of autobiographical content. Corley's later works also show his interest in historical subject matter as well as utopian science fiction. Many of Corley's published and unpublished works include cover and textual illustrations produced by Corley.

The collection further includes photographs of the artist and friends, works by related authors and artists, correspondence with publishers, and some work-related notes and materials.

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The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

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Charles DeWitt Watts papers, 1917-2004 and undated 13.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 7249 Items

Pioneering African American surgeon who was chief of surgery at Lincoln Hospital, clinical professor of surgery at Duke University, founder of Licoln Community Health Center, director of student health at North Carolina Central University, and vice president and medical director for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, all in Durham, N.C. Spanning the period of 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. There is material on the formation in 1901 of Lincoln Hospital, a medical care facility for African Americans in Durham, N.C.. and other items on the early 20th century history of Durham, but the bulk of the papers relate to the later half of the 20th century. Formats primarily consist of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials. It is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material in the Medical Records Series have been separated and are currently closed to use. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Spanning the dates 1917 to 2004, the Charles DeWitt Watts Papers contain files related to Watts's education, family, community activities, centered in Durham, N.C., and his career as a surgeon, administrator, and trustee on several boards. The bulk of the material dates from 1970 to 2000. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, reports, notes, speeches, photographs, and print materials, and is organized into the following series: Community Relations, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Professional Files. Material containing personally-identifiable medical information in the Medical Records Series has been separated from the other professional files and is currently closed to use.

Largest in the collection is the Professional Files Series, which primarily contains administrative documents related to Watts's career as a doctor, surgeon, and medical administrator for various private practices, hospitals, boards, and professional societies. Of particular note are files related to Watt's mentor, Dr. Charles Drew, the history of Lincoln Hospital, and the establishment of the Lincoln Community Health Center in 1970. The folders in the Medical Records Series have been segregated and are currently closed to use. The Community Relations Series concerns Watts's professional life outside of medicine, containing files related to his membership in churches and fraternal organizations, non-medically-related boards on which he served, his work with Durham, N.C. organizations, his interest in race relations, and honors awarded him. Also included are the papers of Constance Watts (wife), Lyda Merrick (mother-in-law), and Margaret Smith (a nurse in his office). Of special interest is a scrapbook about the Negro Braille Magazine (now the Merrick-Washington Magazine for the Blind), founded by Mrs. Merrick.

Some professional correspondence is also intermixed in the Personal Files Series, which contains papers related to Watts's family, friends, finances, education, and alumni activities. Of particular note is a transcript of Watts's oral history. Containing both professional and personal content, the Photographic Materials Series contains photographs, slides, and negatives. The bulk consists of portraits and snapshots of the Watts family. Of particular note are early photographs of Lincoln Hospital nursing students and staff members.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Charles McKinney papers, 1952-1993 and undated 42 Linear Feet — 31500 Items

Charles C. Chick McKinney founded and headed the McKinney & Silver (M&S) advertising agency for 22 years, where he held positions of President and Chief Executive Officer. The agency, originally based in Raleigh, N.C., and presently headquartered in Durham, N.C., is one of the largest advertising agencies in the Southeastern U.S. The Charles McKinney Papers cover the years 1952-1993, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968-1990, the period during which McKinney served as President and CEO of the McKinney & Silver (M&S) advertising agency. The collection primarily consists of correspondence, memoranda, clippings, M&S presentations to clients, proofs, speeches, reports, McKinney's handwritten drafts of advertising campaigns, and numerous brochures from graphic artists and design companies. The collection also includes films of advertising spots, slides for new business presentations, and many periodicals related to advertising and graphic design. Companies represented in the collection include American Drew; Bacardi Corporation; Bahamas; Barnett Banks; Benihana; Beatrice Foods Company; Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Company; Black & Decker Corporation; Braniff Airways; Brown & Forman Inc.; Brown & Williamson; Colours; Del Monte Corporation; Drackett; Dunlop Sport, GoodMark Foods, Inc.; Gravely; Homelite; Kingsdown; Mars, Inc.; North Carolina National Bank; North Carolina Travel and Tourism; Norweigan Cruise Line; PET Dairy; Piedmont Airlines, Inc.; Pillsbury Company; Pine State; Quincy's; Royal Caribbean Cruise Line; Tile Council of America; Travelmation; and USAir Group, Inc.

The Charles McKinney Papers cover the years 1952-1993, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968-1990, the period during which McKinney served as President and CEO of the McKinney & Silver (M&S) advertising agency. The collection primarily consists of correspondence; memoranda; clippings; presentations to clients; proofs; speeches; reports; McKinney's handwritten drafts of advertising campaigns; and brochures from graphic artists and design companies. The collection also includes films and videocassettes of advertising spots, slides for new business presentations, and periodicals related to advertising and graphic design. Companies represented in the collection include American Drew; Bacardi Corporation; Bahamas Tourism; Barnett Banks; Benihana; Beatrice Foods Company; Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Company; Black & Decker Corporation; Braniff Airways; Brown & Forman Inc.; Brown & Williamson; Colours; Del Monte Corporation; Drackett; Dunlop Sport; GoodMark Foods, Inc.; Gravely; Homelite; Kingsdown; Mars, Inc.; North Carolina National Bank; North Carolina Travel and Tourism; Norweigan Cruise Line; PET Dairy; Piedmont Airlines, Inc.; Pillsbury Company; Pine State Dairy; Quincy's; Royal Caribbean Cruise Line; Tile Council of America; Travelmation; and USAir Group, Inc.; among others.

Many of the clippings and presentation drafts and fragments arrived unfoldered and interspersed throughout the collection. Complete presentation drafts were foldered by presentation title; presentation fragments and clippings were foldered as miscellaneous. Many of McKinney's drafts of advertising campaigns appeared in ruled notepads, often with clippings and additional sketched interleaved. Items attached to a particular notepad were foldered together and titled by subject and detached from cardboard backing. Legal sized notes were photocopied and reduced to letter size.

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Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated 15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items

Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Charles Torrence Nesbitt papers, 1899-1947 and undated 2.5 Linear Feet — approximately 440 items

Physician and public health official, of Wilmington, North Carolina. Collection comprises correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, and other papers, relating to Nesbitt's career, especially his service as superintendent of health (1911-1917) in Wilmington, N.C., and public health and sanitation in Wilmington. Includes an autobiographical account of Nesbitt's medical education at the University of Pennsylvania, Bellevue Medical College and Baltimore Medical College, and his experiences as a young physician, with references to early psychiatric practices, and political and social affairs and homosexuality in New York City during the 1880s. Physicians discussed in the memoir include Austin Flint, Jr., Edward Gamaliel Janeway, Frederick Peterson, George Reuling, and John Allen Wyeth. Correspondents include Rupert Blue, Albert Pike Bourland, Edward Hatch, Jr., Jacob Lott Ludlow, Angus Wilton McLean, Arthur Wilson Page, Walter Hines Page, Watson Smith Rankin, Leo L. Redding, Charles Wardell Stiles, Frank Porter Stockbridge, Henry Walters, and George Chandler Whipple.

Collection comprises correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, and other papers, relating to Charles Torrence Nesbitt's career, especially his service as superintendent of health (1911-1917) in Wilmington, N.C., and public health and sanitation in Wilmington. Includes an autobiographical account of Nesbitt's medical education at the University of Pennsylvania, Bellevue Medical College (now New York University Medical Center) and Baltimore Medical College (now the University of Maryland School of Medicine), and his experiences as a young physician, with references to early psychiatric practices, and political and social affairs and homosexuality in New York City during the 1880s.

Physicians discussed in the memoir include Austin Flint, Jr., Edward Gamaliel Janeway, Frederick Peterson, George Reuling, and John Allen Wyeth. Correspondents include Rupert Blue, Albert Pike Bourland, Edward Hatch, Jr., Jacob Lott Ludlow, Angus Wilton McLean, Arthur Wilson Page, Walter Hines Page, Watson Smith Rankin, Leo L. Redding, Charles Wardell Stiles, Frank Porter Stockbridge, Henry Walters, and George Chandler Whipple.