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Doris Bryn papers, 1939-1998 and undated 6 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Doris Bryn (née Krehnbrink) was a prominent fashion and cover model during the 1940s-1960s and co-designer of several lines of fashion accessories with her husband Roger Vsn Schoyck under the brand names Roger Van S. and Mr. R. The Doris Bryn Papers span the years 1939-1998 and includes correspondence, clippings, print advertisements, photographs, design sketches and garment labels that document Bryn's career as a professional cover and fashion model (for Conover, John Powers and Eileen Ford agencies) and as a designer of dresses, shoes, leather goods, jewelry and other fashion accessories under the lines Roger Van S. and Mr. R among others. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Doris Bryn Papers span the years 1939-1998 and includes correspondence, clippings, print advertisements, photographs, design sketches and garment labels that document Bryn's career as a professional cover and fashion model (for Conover, John Powers and Eileen Ford agencies) and as a designer of dresses, shoes, leather goods, jewelry and other fashion accessories under the lines Roger Van S. and Mr. R among others.

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Dorothy Whitlock papers, 1948-1989 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 300 Items

Occupational therapist and medical illustrator active in Utah and North Carolina. The Dorothy Whitlock Papers span the dates 1948-1989 and derive from Whitlock's work as an occupational therapist and medical illustrator. The collection contains visual materials which include image files and loose images of medical illustrations in a variety of media, including but not limited to watercolor, graphite pencil, brushed graphite paint, pen and ink drawings, photographs of etchings, and photographs. The images include but are not limited to portrayals of various medical procedures, conditions, techniques, and tools. The collection also contains papers related to Whitlock's time as an occupational therapist at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Oteen, North Carolina, and papers related to her interest in and work on tuberculosis. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Dorothy Whitlock Papers span the dates 1948-1989 and derive from Whitlock's work as an occupational therapist and medical illustrator. The collection contains visual materials which include image files and loose images of medical illustrations in a variety of media, including but not limited to watercolor, graphite pencil, brushed graphite paint, pen and ink drawings, photographs of etchings, and photographs. The images include but are not limited to portrayals of various medical procedures, conditions, techniques, and tools. The collection also contains notebooks created during Whitlock's time at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Oteen, North Carolina, where she practiced as an occupational therapist.

Additional items include professional materials, including professional files and loose professional materials containing undated in-service notes on tuberculosis, notes and papers from the National Tuberculosis Association's conferences in 1948, 1950, 1951, and 1952 in Salt Lake City, Utah, planning materials for an occupational therapy convention in Glenwood Spring, Colorado in 1950, including correspondence and papers, and additional loose notes relating to Whitlock's work.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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DoubleTake records, 1908-1999, bulk 1994-1999 53.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 58,872 Items

The DoubleTake magazine records contain story manuscripts with editor's markings, correspondence, photographs and slides, and production files for issue numbers 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection holds story manuscripts (with editor's marks), correspondence, and production files for issues 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files.

Later accessions include production files and correspondence between the magazine's editors and its contributors, also covering issues 1-16.

Accession 2010-0081 includes photographer name files, dating from 1993 (pre-production) through 1998, kept by Alex Harris and other DoubleTake staff. Files were created whenever a photographer corresponded with the magazine, and include copies of correspondence between editors and photographers, slides of sample work, contracts for those who were accepted as contributors, and occasional biographies or other information about the photographer. Some files represent a particular museum's exhibit rather than a personal photographer; these are designated with exhibit titles instead of a photographer's name.

Files are organized alphabetically, and include correspondence from well before the magazine began publication, as well as materials post-dating Harris's departure from the magazine.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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Duke University has celebrated anniversaries of two major founding events: the establishment of continuous education at Brown's Schoolhouse in Randolph County, N.C., in 1838, and the creation of the Duke Endowment, which transformed Trinity College into Duke University in 1924. As a result, the institution commemorated the 100th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1938/1939, the 50th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1974/1975, the 150th Anniversary of its beginnings in Randolph County in 1988/1989, and the 75th Anniversary of the Duke Endowment and founding of Duke University in 1999/2000. The Duke University Anniversaries Collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed matter, programs, speeches, a sound recording, a diary, acknowledgements from other institutions, a time capsule, and other materials relating to events commemorating the beginnings and founding of Duke University. Major subjects include events planning, fund raising, Duke University, Trinity College (Randolph Co., N.C. and Durham, N.C.), Normal College (Randolph Co., N.C.), Union Institute (Randolph Co., N.C.), and Brown's Schoolhouse (Randolph Co., N.C.). English.

The Duke University Anniversaries Collection is divided into four series, arranged by anniversary. 50th Anniversary (1924-1974) of the founding of Duke University series includes correspondence, planning materials, programs, meeting minutes, financial statements, printed matter, and clippings created by the 50th Anniversary Steering and Advisory Committees. Materials range in date from 1973 to 1975. The 75th Anniversary (1924-1999) of the founding of Duke University series includes logos, a commemorative mailing cancellation stamp, a press release, and a sound recording of a speech given by John Koskinen on the Y2K conversion. Materials range in date from 1999 to 2000.

The 100th Anniversary (1838-1938) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes printed materials, correspondence, Centennial Fund records, a diary, publications, invitation lists, congratulations from other institutions, and several complete packets of centennial celebration materials. Also included is a time capsule, labeled: "1939-2039. A collection of items presented to the President of Duke University at the Centennial Celebration, April 22, 1939; not to be opened until the occasion of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the institution." Materials range in date from 1937 to 1939. Finally, the 150th Anniversary (1838-1988) of the beginnings of Duke University series includes articles, printed matter, correspondence, clippings, subject files, photographs, programs, and financial materials. Major subjects include Sesquicentennial Celebration planning and events, the historical marker for Brown's Schoolhouse, and the plaque and maintenance of the Trinity College Memorial Gazebo in Randolph County. Materials range in date from 1988 to 2000 (bulk 1988-1989). The collection also includes a program from the Centennial Celebration of the relocation of Trinity College to Durham, 1992.

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Duke University Museum of Art records, 1962 - 2002 17.5 Linear Feet — approx. 14,000 Items

The Duke University Museum of Art opened to the public in 1969, in a renovated science building on the University's East Campus. In 1998, Duke alumnus Raymond D. Nasher donated funds to support construction of a new art museum at Duke University, the Nasher Museum of Art, set to open in 2005. Collection includes correspondence, administrative files, financial records, exhibit catalogs and publicity material, fund-raising files, clippings, photographs, and related records. Major subjects include the opening of the Museum of Art, the Brummer Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Art, and exhibits. Materials range in date from 1962 to 2002. English.

Collection includes correspondence, administrative files, financial records, exhibit catalogs and publicity material, fund-raising files, clippings, photographs, and related records. Major subjects include the opening of the Museum of Art, the Brummer Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Art, and exhibits. Materials range in date from 1962 to 2002.

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Duke Vigil collection, 1968 - 1988 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

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The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5-11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The collection features announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, ephemera, press releases, clippings, a diary, sound recordings and WDBS broadcasts, and photographs. Individuals prominent within the collection include John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, David Henderson, Duke President Douglas Knight, Samuel DuBois Cook, and Wright Tisdale. Major subjects include student demonstrations, race relations, Duke University employee wages and labor union, and the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1988. English.

The collection features a variety of materials documenting the Vigil at Duke University from April 5-11, 1968. These materials originate from numerous sources and were compiled by University Archives staff for teaching and research. The first series, Subject files, contains primary documents, including announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, and ephemera; media coverage including press releases and clippings; personal papers and a diary about the Vigil from John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, and David Henderson; and analyses and materials relating to the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988.

The Sound recordings series features five audiotapes made by a Duke student during the Vigil. Additional sound recordings can be found in the Related collections series. These collections include the WDBS broadcast recordings and the University Archives Photograph Collection, and they provide further audio and visual documentation of the Vigil. The WDBS records feature eleven audiotapes of radio broadcasts on events during the Vigil. The Photograph Collection includes over twenty black and white photographs of the Vigil, one color photograph, and numerous negatives, contact prints, and slides.

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Duncan McLaurin papers, 1779-1932 and undated, bulk 1822-1872 2.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,800 Items

Duncan McLaurin was a farmer, teacher, lawyer, and state legislator of Richmond County, North Carolina. Correspondence, bills, receipts, legal and other papers, and printed matter (1822-1872), of McLaurin and members of his family. McLaurin's papers (mainly 1822-1850) relate to economic conditions in North Carolina, South Carolina, and the U.S. in general; the development of infrastructure and education in North and South Carolina; the Civil War; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections from 1832 to 1848. Civil War topics include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi). A large amount of correspondence from relatives in Mississippi (circa 1830-1867) concerns frontier conditions, slavery, politics, agricultural and labor problems, sectionalism and nationalism in Mississippi, Reconstruction conditions, and family affairs. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. Includes an atlas with a list of slaves circa 1864 written on the flyleaf.

Personal and political correspondence, legal papers, bills and receipts, and printed material comprise the papers of Duncan McLaurin (1787-1872). Correspondence, including many letters from friends and relatives who migrated to Mississippi, discusses the forced removal of the Choctaw Indians; wars with tribes in Georgia and Alabama; economic conditions, especially the panics of 1837 and 1857; the Bank of the United States; banks and currency; cotton production, markets, and prices. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. There are also references to the annexation of California; land prices and speculation; the growth of religious denominations in Mississippi and Louisiana; the development of schools in Mississippi, Georgia, and North Carolina, and of Wake Forest Institute (Wake Forest, North Carolina), and Union Seminary (Richmond, Virginia); the temperance movement; the early development of railroads, roads, and canals in North Carolina; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections, 1832-1848.

Civil War topics in the correspondence include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), and Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi); economic conditions and Reconstruction government in Mississippi; and difficulties with sharecroppers and debtors.

Legal papers consist of deeds, contracts, wills, court orders, and, after 1850, papers pertaining to the wardship of his sister, Isabel Patterson, and her children after her mental breakdown. Miscellaneous printed items include an atlas, 1835, with a list of slaves dating from the end of the war written on the flyleaf; a memorial to the North Carolina state legislature from the Society of Friends, 1832; a reply to President Jackson's proclamation on nullification; a report of the treasurer of the University of North Carolina to the trustees, 1839; a report of the Merchants Bank of New Bern, the Bank of the State of North Carolina, and the Bank of Cape Fear, 1838; a North Carolina Republican campaign circular, 1873; The Prison News, Raleigh, North Carolina, for March 1, 1932; and other various items.

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The Duplex Advertising Company. Billboard Images and Records spans the period 1964-1993 and documents the outdoor advertising work of this company in the central Texas area, primarily through photographs, negatives and slides of billboards. Many of the images are in color. A large number of the images are of national campaigns advertised in central Texas, as well as billboards, signs and posters of local Texas business services. In addition, a handful of articles written by R. V. Miller, Jr. for a number of publications, as well as other printed material and miscellaneous items from the Duplex Advertising Company, are present. Some of these articles, along with the images themselves, provide examples of commercial art and design in the outdoor advertising arena. The collection includes outdoor advertising images from national clients such as Kentucky Fried Chicken, Chevrolet, Coca Cola, Coors, Wendy's, Hardee's, and Taco Bell, and Texas clients such as Lone Star and Pearl beers.

Related materials may be found in other outdoor advertising collections, including the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Archives, the Garrett Orr Papers, the Howard Scott Papers, the John Paver Papers, the John E. Browning Papers, the R.C. Maxwell Co. Records, and the Strobridge Collection.

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Edward James Parrish papers, 1888-1926 and undated 9.2 Linear Feet — 31 boxes; 3 oversize folders; and 6 volumes — Approximately 1500 items

Tobacco manufacturer, resident of Durham, North Carolina, and Tokyo, Japan. The papers of Edward James Parrish primarily consist of business and personal papers, correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921), and photographic collections of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. Items include a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), and a scrapbook created by their only daughter Lily Parrish. Turn-of-the-century photograph albums relate to the Parrishes time in Japan (circa 1899-1905) and form a large series of their own. Two were assembled by Kichibei Murai of the Murai Brothers, a Tokyo cigarette manufacturing company of which Parrish was the first vice-president; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are seven fine souvenir albums with large hand-tinted albumen prints from noted Japanese studios, including that of Kusakabe Kimbei. There are also personal photograph and postcard albums of the Parrish's travels in Japan, Korea, and China, and Mrs. Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan. Loose family photographs and portraits dating from about 1890 to 1920 round out the collection.

The Edward James Parrish Papers include business and personal correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921) of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. There are also various bills, a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), photographic collections, several postcard albums, and a scrapbook created by Lily Parrish.

The papers also include Rosa Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan, as well as her writings on the status of women. There are also materials relating to Kichibei Murai's family and to Murai Brothers Company in Japan, close partners and friends of the Parrish family.

Photographic formats include glass plate negatives, loose prints, photo postcards, and over 20 albums. Two of the photograph albums date from the late 19th century and were owned by Kichibei Murai; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are black-and-white late 19th and early 20th century loose albumen and early gelatin silver prints of family members.

The photograph albums document the Parrish family's travels in Japan, China, and Niagara Falls, and include personal snapshots taken at these locations as well as in their home of Durham, N.C.; there are also many commercial souvenir photographs from Japan. The latter take the form of large finely handtinted albumen prints of Japanese scenery, landscapes, cultural sites and temples, clothing, entertainment, and transportation, housed in high-quality souvenir photograph albums; many of these feature highly decorated lacquer inlay covers, elaborate bindings. Most include captions. The studio of Kusakabe Kimbei, a noted photographer, created many of the prints and albums, and the work of other notable studios have also been identified.