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Josiah C. Trent papers, 1536-1961 and undated, bulk 1938-1951 6.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 1 oversize folder — approx. 1800 items — approximately 1800 items

U.S. thoracic surgeon, rare book and manuscript collector. The papers consist mostly of correspondence, printed material, photographs, and lecture notes taken during medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency, and notes and drafts for published and unpublished research and articles. The bulk of the material documents Dr. Trent's activities and publications as collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. There are folders of photographic reproductions of medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th century to the 20th century, whose content is reflected in the earliest dates for the collection. There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his rare book and manuscripts collection to the Duke Medical Center Library, along with condolences and other items related to his wife, Mary Duke Biddle Trent. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Josiah C. Trent papers consist mostly of correspondence, photographs, research files, and notes and drafts of published and unpublished research and articles. Many of these materials concern Dr. Trent's activities and publications as a collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. The collection also includes printed materials, photographs, a card file - possibly of his personal library, and lecture notes taken during his medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency. The Writings series reveals his wide interests in surgery, medicine in general, the humanities, and medical history.

There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his large rare book, artifact, and manuscript collection to the Duke Medical Center Library. Early dates in the collection refer to the content of reproductions of 16th-19th century medical illustrations rather than their dates of reproduction.

The correspondence, found in the Subject Files folders, dates mostly from the 1940s and 1950s, documenting Dr. Trent's rare book and manuscript collecting, and his involvement with various professional organizations and his association and friendships with prominent figures in various fields: medical history - John Fulton, Henry Sigerist, W. W. Francis; book collecting - Henry Schuman; Duke University - Wilburt Davison, Lenox D. Baker. Some folders contain an index of the contents.

There is also some information concerning Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Dr. Trent's wife, who was instrumental in facilitating the support of the history of medicine collections at Duke.

The collection also contains several hundred photographic prints and negatives reproducing medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th to 20th centuries. The earliest dates in the collection refer to the content of the images, rather than their reproduction by Dr. Trent, Duke Medical Library staff, and others, in the mid-20th century.

The files were kept in Dr. Trent's medical office and contain relatively few items which pertain to his private life. Items of a more personal nature may be found in the James H. and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Family Papers in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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British Correspondence and Miscellany collection, 1556-1972 and undated 4 Linear Feet — 3,500 Items

The materials comprising the British Correspondence and Miscellany Collection are dated from 1556 to 1972 (bulk 1740-1890). The papers are arranged into the following series: Correspondence, 1556-1972 and undated; Subject Files, 1699-1902 and undated; Pictures, 1795-1921 and undated; and Miscellaneous Material, 1814-1836 and undated An artificial collection, the papers are, for the most part, unrelated by provenance. The collection consists chiefly of correspondence, and topics include numerous political events and activities of the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries in Great Britain and the colonies (particularly India and Africa).

The Correspondence Series includes numerous letters to and from British notables. Among the major correspondents represented are: the 8th Duke of Argyll, the 1st and 2nd Barons Auckland, Charles Bradlaugh, John Bright; Robert Brownrigg; George Canning, John Wilson Croker, the 1st Earl of Durham, John Foster, the 1st Baron Dover, George Joachim Goschen, John Hay, the 3rd Marquess Lansdowne, W.E.H. Lecky, Captain John Lenty, the 1st Earl of Liverpool, the 3rd Earl of Lucan, William Melbourne, Lord Broderick Midleton, Viscount Milner, David Christie Murray, Thomas Nimmo, Baron Northcote, Pierce O'Mahoney, the 3rd Viscount Palmerston, the 1st Baronet Pollock, George Rose, the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, William Sheowring, John Deas Thompson, the 1st Duke of Wellington, William Wilberforce, and Edward Wodehouse.

Among the items in the Correspondence Series are a copy of John Bright's 1851 speech entitled "Papal Aggression" (Bright correspondence); material regarding the Horseguards (Brownrigg correspondence); a testimonial to the character of Sir Francis Burdett written by Lady Hester Stanhope (Burdett correspondence); a letter regarding Wellington's correspondence concerning a transport ship wrecked in the Tagus during his last Iberian campaign (Canning correspondence); letters from David Dundas, including two accompanying circulars (1804 and 1805) from the War Office (Dundas correspondence); and correspondence (and accompanying transcripts) between King George I and M. Braconnier (1709) concerning the King's inability to send a detachment large enough to oppose the French along the borders of the Rhone and Lake Geneva (George I correspondence). Other items include correspondence relating to George Henry's mission in Nyasaland (Henry correspondence); material concerning the cargo ship "The Sea Witch" (Lenty correspondence); correspondence regarding Marsden-Smedley's unsuccessful campaign for Parliament in 1910 (Marsden-Smedley correspondence); and Wellesley's transcript of a testimonial to the character of Charles Wyatt written by the Governor General of India (Wellesley correspondence). The Murray correspondence includes handwritten biographical notes and a printed review (1908) of David Christie Murray's Reflections.

Papers in the Subject Files Series concern a wide range of political, military, and economic matters. They include an anonymous account (1743) of the battle of Dettingen (in French); papers (1856-1860 and undated) relating to the raising of ships at Sebastopol during the Crimean War; a collection of letters from various correspondents concerning decimal currency (1856-1869); papers concerning Newfoundland fisheries (1901-1902); and a document pertaining to the impressment of sailors (1745).

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Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995 112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items

Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

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William Johnston Cocke papers, 1682-1977, bulk 1900-1960 6.4 Linear Feet — 2121 Items

Rhodes scholar and lawyer of Asheville, N.C. Collection is divided into the following categories: Correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); Writings (1682-1965); Speeches (1896-1965); Miscellany (ca. 1908); Clippings (1792-1975); Printed materials (1865-1977); Volumes (1886-1954); Pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an Alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. Most of the material spans the years 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests; family correspondence and photographs; clippings; and scrapbooks. Cocke's many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; and travels in Europe. Some letters refer to Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew.

Collection reflects the varied interests of Cocke. It is divided into the following categories: correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); writings (1682-1965); speeches (1896-1965); miscellany (ca. 1908); clippings (1792-1975); printed materials (1865-1977); volumes (1886-1954); pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. The collection covers a wide variety of topics and time periods, but most of the material has dates in the span 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests. His many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; travels in Europe; Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew; publishing efforts; and a meeting with Lady Astor and the future King Edward VII. Other items include family letters; manuscripts by Cocke's mother, Nola, including "My Reminiscences of the Sixties (1861-1865)" about the Reconstruction era in Tenn.; clippings regarding a proposed N.C. constitution amendment requiring a literacy test for voter registrants in the 1860s; speeches by William Cocke, Sr., mayor of Asheville, N.C.; a guardian's account book later turned into a scrapbook; a large campaign scrapbook for Senate candidate Alton Asa Lennon; Cocke-Dilworth family photographs and many albumen prints of Europe. Topics in the alphabetical file include civic clubs; United World Federalists, Inc.; the attempt to establish the state of Franklin in what is now western N.C.; legal cases regarding horse stealing, a slave sale, and other topics; court reform in N.C. and the Bell Committee; and the Commission on International Cooperation under the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development.

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Abbot Family papers, 1733-1999 and undated, bulk 1860-1910 19 Linear Feet — 10 boxes

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Thomas Nelson Page papers, 1739-1927 and undated, bulk 1885-1920 12.4 Linear Feet — 9329 Items

Virginia lawyer and writer; ambassador to Italy from 1913-1919. The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927. Personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items (chiefly 1885-1920) relate to Page's legal and literary career; his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; and his interest in civic affairs, plantation life, social reform and race relations in the United States, particularly during and after Reconstruction; American politics and diplomacy, especially during World War I; and European travel. Many of his papers directly relate to his term as ambassador to Italy during World War I, from 1913 to 1919.

The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1880s to 1920. The papers include personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items, all relating to Page's legal and literary career. Topics include his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; his role in and perspective on American politics and foreign relations, particularly during World War II; travels in Europe; and his interest in civic affairs, social reform and race relationsin the United States, particularly during and following Reconstruction. Collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal and Financial Papers, Writings and Speeches, Diplomacy, Visual Materials, Personal Papers, and Clippings Two oversize newspapers are described in a series at the end of the finding aid.

In the Correspondence Series, the largest in the collection, letters prior to 1880 include personal correspondence from various members of the Page family, especially between Thomas Nelson Page, his mother, Elizabeth Burwell (Nelson) Page, and brother, Rosewell Page, who lived at the ancestral estate, "Oakland," in Hanover County, Virginia. Page describes his political activities in letters concerning the presidential campaigns of 1912 and 1916. Correspondence from this period also includes personal letters to members of the family describing new experiences in diplomatic life, and routine business correspondence. Significant correspondents in the series include C. F. Adams, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, J. C. Harris, William D. Howells, Robert Lansing, Robert T. Lincoln, Henry C. Lodge, Theodore Roosevelt, E. Root, J. M. Stoddart, and William H. Taft. For some of these individuals only one or two pieces of correspondence exist. Another set of correspondence, dated 1883-1912 and interfiled at the end of the correspondence series, comprises photocopies of letters (and a few other items, including a telegram, Christmas greeting, and obituary clipping on Henry Hobson) chiefly from Page to close friend Henry Wise Hobson (1858-1898), originally of Virginia, and to his wife Katherine. Notes: Originals for photocopies are in the donor's possession. The collection also includes two scrapbooks, found in the Personal Papers Series, containing cards and envelopes from distinguished persons. This series also houses documents related to Page's ties with the University of Virginia, personal reminiscences, various fragmentary notes, and a journal from 1863. Four folders of carbon copies of diplomatic dispatches from Page to the U.S. State Department and to President Woodrow Wilson, along with other papers related to his diplomatic activities, can be found in the Diplomacy Series. Another small group, the Legal and Financial Series, houses documents relating to Page's properties and other business affairs. The Writings and Speeches Series contains many manuscripts and drafts of political and literary speeches, memoirs, essays, and articles, but none of Page's major literary works. Several folders of materials in this series contain Page's detailed journalistic notes describing his trips in 1916 to the war fronts in Italy and France. Extensive folders of cuttings in the Clippings Series were taken from both American and Italian newspapers, and comprise a significant portion of the collection. The clippings refer to events in Page's career such as lyceum appearances, political appointments, and political speeches, both in the United States and in Italy. In addition, Page clipped articles referring to race relations in the United States, particularly in the South. The clippings also document national and global events during Page's years as an ambassador to Italy from 1913 to 1919, and provide rich background material for a study of United States foreign relations with Italy and other countries during World War I. There are also a few photographs in the Visual Materials Series, some of which depict scenes from wartime Italy.

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Farrar Family papers, 1740-1984 and undated (bulk 1878-1940) 9 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Chiefly family and professional correspondence, but also printed material, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, diaries, clippings, and photographs. The collection primarily pertains to the Farrar family and to Preston C. Farrar. Much of the Correspondence Series (1801-1976, undated) consists of personal letters among family members, especially written to Preston C. Farrar; his wife Edna P. Farrar; brother Samuel Clark Farrar, Jr.; sister Josephine; father Samuel Clark Farrar; and mother Ettie Farrar. However, the series also documents the careers in education of Samuel Farrar, Sr., and Preston Farrar. Business letters from Samuel Farrar concern real estate investments in Pennsylvania and New York that father and son owned jointly.

The Diaries Series (1887-1927, undated) includes diaries Preston C. Farrar kept while attending Washington and Jefferson College (1887-1891). The Writings and Speeches Series (1890-1925, undated) includes writings by Preston C. Farrar on teaching literature, English, and education. The Printed Material Series (1878-1957) includes drama and opera programs for New York City theaters, collected by Edith P. Farrar (1899-1957). The Photographs Series contains pictures and photograph albums primarily of family and friends (1888-1938, undated). The Scrapbooks and Clippings Series (1879-1945, undated) contains items that pertain to educational law and school operation; family events; local Allegheny elections; and world news, especially World War I. The Genealogy Series (1740-1984, undated) contains primarily correspondence, notes, and transcripts of wills relating to the Cooke/Cook family.

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Bedinger and Dandridge Family papers, 1752-2000 30 Linear Feet — 13,000 Items

Bedinger and Dandridge families of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York. Collection consist of journals, correspondence, poems, reviews, and other papers of the Bedinger, Dandridge, Washington, Henry Clay, and Adam Stephen families, of Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio; and of the Cornwall, Lawrence, Mitchell, Walter Bowne, and Rufus King Southgate families, of Connecticut, Maine, and New York primarily created or collected by Caroline Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The papers fall into six classes: journals and fragments of journals of Danske Dandridge (1864-1909), Henry Bedinger (1830s), and Daniel Bedinger (1811); correspondence and material on Kentucky and the northern Shenandoah Valley during the Revolutionary period; family correspondence, genealogies, and memoirs used in writing the Bedinger family history; papers of Henry Bedinger, the American Minister to Denmark in the 1850s; poems, reviews and literary correspondence of Danske Dandridge, and poems and prose of her father, Henry Dandridge, and of her daughter, Serena Catherine Dandridge; and horticultural writings of Danske Dandridge.

Collection includes the correspondence and papers of five generations of families from Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York chiefly created or collected by Carolina Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The primary portion of the collection is made up of the personal and family papers of Danske Dandridge (1858-1914), a writer and horticulturist. From 1866 to her marriage in 1877, Danske Dandridge's correspondence is concerned with social life in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and with family matters. Her literary correspondence begins in the early 1880s and continues until the year of her death. Correspondents include John Esten Cooke, Edmund C. Stedman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Thomas W. Higginson. There are sustained exchanges of letters with William Hayes Ward, editor of The Brooklyn Independent which published much of her work; with the poet Lizette Woodworth Reese of Baltimore; and Margaretta Lippincott. Material on gardening begins to appear in the papers for the 1890s and includes a large number of letters and eleven notebooks.

Danske Dandridge's family correspondence continues with here sister Mrs. J. F. B. (Mary Bedinger) Mitchell, and her brother, Henry Bedinger IV, as well as with her numerous cousins.

Correspondence of Adam Stephen Dandridge (1844-1924) reflects his career in the West Virginia House of Representatives and his business as a seller of farm machinery.

Correspondence and papers of Serena Katherine (Violet) Dandridge, daughter of Danske and Adam Stephen Dandridge, bear on her career as an illustrator for the zoologist Hubert Lyman Clark, and reflect her interest in women's suffrage and the Swedenborgian Church. There are also twelve volumes of her writings in manuscript.

Correspondence and papers of Danske Dandridge's father, Henry Bedinger Dandridge III, include letters on literary subjects from Thomas Willis White, Philip Pendleton Cooke, and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; papers from his years as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849; records of his service, 1853-1858, first as a consul and then as minister of the United States in Sweden and in particular his negotiation of the treaty with Sweden in 1857; and his notebooks containing poems and comments on social life in Virginia.

Letters of Caroline B. (Lawrence) Bedinger, mother of Danske Dandridge, to her husband's family in the South and her relatives in New York concern her experience as a young woman in Washington, D.C., and Virginia; her stay in Copenhagen; the Civil War experiences of her husband's family and her own; family life; and the education of her children.

The collection contains a large number of transcripts made by Danske Dandridge from originals in the possession of various branches of her family, including the Swearingens, Shepherds, Morgans, Rutherfords, Worthingtons, Washingtons, Kings, Brownes, and Lawrences for the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. There are also copies of letters and documents from the Lyman C. Draper manuscripts at the University of Wisconsin. Essentially, they are the papers of three brothers, George Michael Bedinger (1756-1843), Henry Bedinger II (1753-1843), and Daniel Bedinger (1761-1818), and their descendants and connections. Among the many subjects discussed are Indian warfare and conditions on the Virginia frontier; descriptions of the events of the Revolution; trading in salt and fur; experiences of Americans held prisoner by the British during the Revolution; flour milling in the Potomac valley; trade and transport of farm commodities; travel on the Mississippi to New Orleans, 1811-1812; James Rumsey and the development of the steamboat; the settling of Kentucky and Ohio, descriptions of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Baltimore at various times from 1800 to 1860; antebellum social life, South and North; and extensive comments on politics through 1860, particularly on the opposition to Federalism and the early Democratic-Republican Party.

Description taken from Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (1980).

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George H. Brown papers, 1757-1933 and undated, bulk 1850-1878 3 Linear Feet — Circa 817 items

Lawyer, superior court judge, associate justice of North Carolina Supreme Court, active in Washington (Beaufort Co.), N.C. Professional correspondence, indentures, deeds, wills, receipts, a memorandum book, and other papers, mainly dating from 1850-1878 and largely relating to George Hubbard Brown, an attorney from Washington, N.C., and his legal practice, and to his service as associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. There is a small amount of correspondence, among which are letters from John Humphrey Small, U.S. Representative from North Carolina.

Indentures, deeds, wills, receipts, a memorandum book, and other papers, mainly dating from 1850-1878 and largely relating to George Hubbard Brown, an attorney from Washington, N.C., and his legal practice, and to his service as associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. There is a small amount of correspondence, among which are letters from John Humphrey Small, U.S. Representative from North Carolina.

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Thomas Thweatt Jones papers, 1757-1979 and undated 6.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 8100 Items

Physician and resident of Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families of North Carolina and Virginia (Dinwiddie County and other places). Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.); records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital in England during World War II (affiliated with the Duke School of Medicine); Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook and her journals of 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and a photograph album and other scrapbooks.

The Thomas Thweatt Jones papers consist of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, memoranda, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families history and genealogy.

Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.) students and faculty; personal correspondence; clippings and printed publications dealing with alcoholism and agathanasia, a term Dr. Jones adopted referring to a patient's right to die; records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital during World War II; Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook; a photograph album; journals of her 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and genealogical materials, including a sketch by Dr. Jones of his brother, Dr. Robert R. Jones, Jr., one of the original staff members of Duke Hospital. Robert Jones was killed in 1941 by a patient.

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Thomas Ellison Keitt papers, 1758-1945 and undated 2 Linear Feet — 769 items

Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.

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Vause W. Marshall papers, 1768-1940 1 Linear Foot — 494 Items

Collection consists of correspondence, legal documents, bills, receipts, Civil War muster rolls, clippings and business printed matter, and a diary.

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Eleanor Elliott papers, 1768-2006 and undated (bulk 1951-2006) 55 Linear Feet — 40,500 Items

Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

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McCoy-Love Family papers, 1774-1970 and undated 12.3 Linear Feet — circa 9,210 Items

Asheville, N.C. residents. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Assoc. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There are a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

The papers of this Asheville, North Carolina family span the years 1774-1970. Two prominent members of the families were George William McCoy, Sr. (b. 1901), editor of the Asheville-Citizen Times, and his father-in-law, Harry Weaver Love (b. 1883), YMCA executive. The collection contains personal and business correspondence, genealogical material, financial and legal records, printed material, clippings, addresses and writings, scrapbooks, miscellaneous items, photographs, and a number of volumes. Topics include the development of parks in the Appalachia region, particularly the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and activities relating to the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Association. Harry Love's business papers include a large number of correspondence, reports, pictures and volumes relating to his work with the YMCA, in the U.S. and abroad; there are a great many items relating to the Philippine Islands. There is a sizable number of papers from Wythe Munford Peyton, a civil and highway engineer, who worked for several N.C. railroads; the papers of William C. Coleman, a businessman who sold and serviced Harley-Davidson motorcycles (1914-1915); and papers of the Frelinghuysen-Southwick family of N.J. and N.Y., one relative being a Senator and another, Emeline Sherman Smith, a poet. There are a few items concerning Thomas Dixon who founded the Mt. Mitchell Assoc. of Arts and Sciences.

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Eugene Clyde Brooks papers, 1774-1971 and undated 4.1 Linear Feet — 3,105 Items

Professor of Education at Trinity College, Durham NC. Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

Collection chiefly is composed of letters, educational reports, numerous writings and addresses, and various professional papers, all relating to tobacco relief, education, and agriculture in North Carolina. Specific topics cover the Department of Education of what was then known as Trinity College in Durham, N.C.; the history of North Carolina, from an unpublished draft; and the matter of education for rural populations in N.C. and elsewhere. Materials include a microfilm of Brooks' papers held by the Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C.; telegrams; extensive manuscripts for unpublished works, lecture notes, and an address by Supt. Benjamin Lee Smith of Greensboro Public Schools. Other items in the collection include a scrapbook; cards from Brooks to his wife from abroad; original poems written by Brooks; photographs; memorabilia; an itinerary of his trip with other agricultural experts to Europe; a contract in manuscript drawn up in 1774 between citizens of Mecklenburg Co. and John Patterson, a school teacher, who was engaged to teach there; a printed document concerning Judge Walter Clark; and other miscellaneous items. There is also a printed copy of the diary of Dr. J. F. Shaffner, Sr. and blueprints of the N.C. State Fairgrounds.

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Duncan McLaurin papers, 1779-1932 and undated, bulk 1822-1872 2.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,800 Items

Duncan McLaurin was a farmer, teacher, lawyer, and state legislator of Richmond County, North Carolina. Correspondence, bills, receipts, legal and other papers, and printed matter (1822-1872), of McLaurin and members of his family. McLaurin's papers (mainly 1822-1850) relate to economic conditions in North Carolina, South Carolina, and the U.S. in general; the development of infrastructure and education in North and South Carolina; the Civil War; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections from 1832 to 1848. Civil War topics include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi). A large amount of correspondence from relatives in Mississippi (circa 1830-1867) concerns frontier conditions, slavery, politics, agricultural and labor problems, sectionalism and nationalism in Mississippi, Reconstruction conditions, and family affairs. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. Includes an atlas with a list of slaves circa 1864 written on the flyleaf.

Personal and political correspondence, legal papers, bills and receipts, and printed material comprise the papers of Duncan McLaurin (1787-1872). Correspondence, including many letters from friends and relatives who migrated to Mississippi, discusses the forced removal of the Choctaw Indians; wars with tribes in Georgia and Alabama; economic conditions, especially the panics of 1837 and 1857; the Bank of the United States; banks and currency; cotton production, markets, and prices. There are many references to slavery, particularly in Mississippi: the sale of slaves, runaway slaves, a lynching of an African American in 1839, the fear of slave insurrections in 1856 and 1860; and the abolition movement. There are also references to the annexation of California; land prices and speculation; the growth of religious denominations in Mississippi and Louisiana; the development of schools in Mississippi, Georgia, and North Carolina, and of Wake Forest Institute (Wake Forest, North Carolina), and Union Seminary (Richmond, Virginia); the temperance movement; the early development of railroads, roads, and canals in North Carolina; politics in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; and national politics, including presidential elections, 1832-1848.

Civil War topics in the correspondence include camp life, economic conditions, food supplies, the hope for foreign intervention, morale, conscription and desertion, the blockade of Southern ports, the battles of Murfreesboro (Tennessee), Jackson (Mississippi), Port Royal Harbor (South Carolina), and Hanover Court House (Virginia), and the siege of Vicksburg (Mississippi); economic conditions and Reconstruction government in Mississippi; and difficulties with sharecroppers and debtors.

Legal papers consist of deeds, contracts, wills, court orders, and, after 1850, papers pertaining to the wardship of his sister, Isabel Patterson, and her children after her mental breakdown. Miscellaneous printed items include an atlas, 1835, with a list of slaves dating from the end of the war written on the flyleaf; a memorial to the North Carolina state legislature from the Society of Friends, 1832; a reply to President Jackson's proclamation on nullification; a report of the treasurer of the University of North Carolina to the trustees, 1839; a report of the Merchants Bank of New Bern, the Bank of the State of North Carolina, and the Bank of Cape Fear, 1838; a North Carolina Republican campaign circular, 1873; The Prison News, Raleigh, North Carolina, for March 1, 1932; and other various items.

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Ralph Leslie Rusk papers, 1782-1981 30 Linear Feet — 25,276 Items

Professor of American Literature at Columbia University, 1925-1953. One of the founders of the journal American Literature. Married Clara Gibbs in 1915. The Ralph Leslie Rusk Papers span the years 1782-1981, and chiefly concern Rusk's teaching and research in American Literature, notably the life and letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The collection contains research papers and notebooks, and travel diaries related to Rusk's research and teaching; a large series of correspondence covering the years 1912-1963; teaching materials such as lecture notes; clippings files and articles related to Rusk's publications and related activities; many photographs; Rusk, Gibbs, and Emerson family papers; and papers relating to his wife, Clara Gibbs, including a scrapbook and wedding mementoes. Some of the papers and photographs refer to a period of time spent teaching in the Philippines, around 1912-1914. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Ralph Leslie Rusk Papers span the years 1782-1981, and chiefly concern Rusk's teaching and research in American Literature, notably the life and letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The collection contains research papers and notebooks, and travel diaries related to Rusk's research and teaching; a large series of correspondence covering the years 1912-1963; teaching materials such as lecture notes; clippings files and articles related to Rusk's publications and related activities; many photographs; Rusk, Gibbs, and Emerson family papers; and papers relating to his wife, Clara Gibbs, including a scrapbook and wedding mementoes. Some of the papers and photographs refer to a period of time spent teaching in the Philippines, around 1912-1914. The collection was originally arranged by additions, described below in more detail. Some boxes have been reordered to reflect a chronological or topical sequence, thus, some box numbers appear out of order.

The original collection (6-19-78) (32 items; dated 1939-1956) contains an essay on William Peterfield Trent, and 31 letters regarding Rusk’s academic activities. There are letters from Bliss Perry, Stanley T. Williams, Henry A. Pochmann, George C. D. Odell, Newton Arvin, John Erskine, Randall Stewart, Harry H. Clark, and Ernest E. Leisy.

The addition (9-25-85) (5982 items; dated 1880-1979) relates primarily to Rusk’s research for editing The Letters of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and his teaching. Rusk maintained journals and ledgers during research trips in Europe, where he retraced the travels of Ralph Waldo Emerson. There are photostatic copies of Emerson family letters, articles about Emerson and related topics, and a clippings file featuring reviews of Rusk’s book. In addition, Rusk’s lecture notes are held in three volumes, notebooks, and notecard files. There are also photographs, photograph albums, and letters (1912-1914) from the period Rusk spent as a professor at the University of the Philippines. These items including descriptions of the islands and culture. There are also miscellaneous items and scrapbooks.

The addition (12-18-85) (100 items; dated 1883-1980) contains an inventory and appraisal of Rusk’s private library now housed at Columbia University; as well as Clara Gibbs’ scrapbooks, correspondence, and various commencement invitations. There are also items related to their marriage, including her bride’s book, a wedding announcement, and their marriage certificate.

The addition (6-25-86) (16,920 items; dated 1782-1963) contains correspondence, clippings, travel diaries, and pictures for the Rusk and Gibbs families. The clippings refer to Rusk’s books THE LIFE OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, LETTERS OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, and THE LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE WESTERN FRONTIER. The correspondence pertains to Rusk’s research and teaching.

The addition (87-116) (12 items; dated 1941-1981) comprises official documents concerning the deaths of Rusk family members. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Westall Family papers, 1790-1986 (bulk 1880-1986) and undated 6 Linear Feet — 2,226 Items

Prominent family from Asheville, NC. Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photographs of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photos of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

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Nell Irvin Painter papers, 1793-2019 and undated, bulk 1876-2007 184.25 Linear Feet — Approx. 134,625 Items

Nell Irvin Painter is a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history who has been a faculty member of Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Collection spans the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and contains correspondence, research notes, photocopies of original documents, manuscripts, publication proofs, syllabi, department memoranda, records of her speaking engagements, photographs, personal journals, papers, and photographs, many varying audiovisual formats, and computer diskettes. Also contains extensive file series related to the research and writing of five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present.

The Nell Irvin Painter Papers span the years 1793-2019, with the bulk of the material dating between 1876 and 2007, and are primarily composed of the extensive correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, and other professional papers that Painter has produced in her long career as a scholar, teacher, and writer in 19th- and 20th-century American and African American history. The materials document the breadth and depth of Painter's interests and her intellectual and personal influence on a generation of historians. Her varied roles as student, teacher, colleague, and mentor are recorded in a wide variety of formats: correspondence with colleagues, students, family, and friends; syllabi, department memoranda, and meeting minutes from her graduate and faculty positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the Universities of North Carolina and Pennsylvania; materials from many professional organizations in the fields of African American history, Southern history, American studies, and women's studies; and records of her speaking engagements, conferences, and meetings. Painter the historian and author are revealed in the extensive notes, photocopies, recordings, photographs, manuscripts, and proofs produced in writing many articles and five of her major books: Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas after Reconstruction; The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South; Standing at Armageddon: The United States, 1877-1919; Sojourner Truth, A Life, A Symbol; and Creating Black Americans: African-American History and its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. The portrait is rounded out by the materials in other series: personal files, which include materials from her student years at Harvard and abroad in Ghana and France as well as personal journals; a few papers of Ghanaian writer Ayi Kwei Armah; photographs, including many historical photographs of African Americans as well as many personal snapshots in color and black-and-white; and other non-print media such as audiotapes, audiocassettes, videocassettes, and computer diskettes.

Painter's research files contain a wealth of information about many topics in American history: biography of African Americans; biography as a literary form; slavery; Reconstruction; the 1870s migration from the South to Kansas; a variety of social reform movements--such as abolition, communism, labor, and women's suffrage--and movers, such as Sojourner Truth and Hosea Hudson; and the history of social conditions and political change in the United States from the early-19th to the mid-20th century, particularly as expressed in race relations, in women's history, and in the South. At the same time, Painter's papers also constitute a contemporary record of many trends in American culture such as career and educational choices and opportunities for academic women and African American professionals. Her correspondence with students, colleagues, and longtime friends such as Nellie Y. McKay, her teaching material and academic files, her papers from an array of historians' organizations, and her personal journals each shed their own light on these themes.

The collection is arranged in these series: Correspondence, Writings and Research, Teaching Materials, Professional Service, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, Audiovisual Materials,Electronic Formats, and a collection of private papers collected by Painter, the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers. The first four series comprise almost eighty percent of the physical extent of the collection and are each divided into several subseries. The Correspondence Series follows Painter's personal life, education, and professional career from her graduate years at Harvard in the late 1960s through her retirement from Princeton in 2004.

The Writings and Research Series is arranged in seven subseries, the first five of which are based on five of Painter's major books; the final two subseries are Other Research Topics, which gathers many of Painter's shorter writings, and Writings by Others. With the exception of the last, all the subseries here contain correspondence with colleagues and editors; typescript drafts of works; various stages of proof; extensive photocopies of archival materials and published articles; voluminous notes about her readings and research; and some photographs and recordings, most of which have been removed to their respective series for preservation.

The Teaching Materials Series documents Painter's work with students and academic colleagues at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of North Carolina, Hunter College, and Princeton University. It is arranged into two series: Courses Subseries, with syllabi, reading lists, and Painter's notes on the development of her courses that reflect the evolution of women's studies and African American studies in the curriculum; and the Academic Files Subseries, revealing Painter's many different roles over three decades: graduate student, job applicant, junior and tenured faculty member, dissertation advisor, mentor, and department head.

The Professional Service Series, arranged in two subseries, documents Painter's activities in the broader academic community beyond her university of employment and her personal connections through materials from well over one hundred professional organizations, conferences, foundations, committees and task forces, as well as editorial boards of journals and publishers with which Painter has worked during her career. The Engagements Subseries gathers documents relating to addresses, speeches, and awards ceremonies at some three hundred conferences, meetings, and symposia.

Five smaller series and a gathering of oversize material round out the collection. The Personal Files Series contains an assortment of records such as curriculum vitae; documents about her family; and some records of her student years, especially her travel and study in France and Africa. The series includes some three dozen personal journals covering most of the years from 1959-2005 containing entries about her life and career (NOTE: some journals are CLOSED to use; see details in the series note). The Photographic Materials Series contains several hundred photographs, negatives, and slides, predominantly personal and travel snapshots but also including professional portraits of Painter as well as a number of original photographs and reproductions of archival photographs she used in her research and writing. Much of the material in the early years of the Audiovisual Materials Series is related to her research and writing; by the 1990s, the content shifts focus to documenting Painter herself on the occasion of various interviews and addresses. The Electronic Formats Series consists of diskettes containing correspondence and drafts of writings. The Oversize Materials contains items from several series and subseries are gathered. The final series in the collection consists not of Painter's own work but that of a Ghanaian novelist and poet; see the Ayi Kwei Armah Papers (RESTRICTED) series note for further information on the provenance and usage of these materials.

Unprocessed additions to the collection are listed at the end of the collection guide.

Note about date range of materials: The primary material produced by Painter begins around 1959 with her earliest journals. Earlier dates in various series, occurring mainly in Writings and Research, reflect the intellectual content and original publication of the large volume of reproduced research material present in the collection.

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Hersey Everett Spence papers, 1794; 1904-1973 2.88 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Hersey Everett Spence was a minister, educator, and writer. After graduating from Trinity College in 1908 he spent ten years in the pastorate before returning to his alma mater in 1918 as Professor of Religious Education and Biblical Literature. The collection contains correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

The Hersey Everett Spence papers contain correspondence, writings (poems, plays, eulogies by Smith), clippings, a sound recording, and other printed material reflecting the opinions and career of H.E. Spence. Spence was noted for his outspokenness on the state of the University and on matters such as desegregation (he was not in favor) and athletics (he was in favor). Other subjects present include: biography and family genealogy; the Methodist Retirement Home; and the Duke Memorial Methodist Church (both in Durham, NC). The collection includes over 100 unpublished poems; a copy of Spence's "When Preacher's Meet", a volume concerning the NC Pastor's School; the typescript of "I Remember" (1954) [400 pages, titled "Fifty Years of Alma Mater"]; and a taped interview (12 June 1970; no transcript). The materials in the collection range in date from 1794; 1904-1973; with the bulk of the materials dating from 1938 to 1970.

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Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated 15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items

Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Goodrich-Baker family papers, 1811-1952 and undated 0.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 300 Items

The Goodrich and Baker families hailed from Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois. Collection comprises letters, with a few other items, mostly to and from members and friends of the Baker and Goodrich families of Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois, chiefly in the 19th century. Included are letters to Union soldiers and letters from Turkey and India in the 1870s and 1880s.

Collection comprises letters, with a few other items, mostly to and from members and friends of the Baker and Goodrich families of Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois, chiefly in the 19th century. Included are letters to Union soldiers and letters from Turkey and India in the 1870s and 1880s.

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Laura "Tibbie" Roberts papers, 1811-2011 and undated 4.5 Linear Feet — 2933 items

Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

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Frederic B.M. Hollyday papers, 1818-1982, bulk 1860s-1946 2 Linear Feet — Approx. 298 Items

Frederic Hollyday was a professor of German history in the Department of History at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists chiefly of letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War; letters and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, with enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic; and papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, including family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938. In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke; genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogical information, a diary in typescript, and legal papers, of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

Collection consists chiefly of three main groups of papers. The first comprises letters of the Kennedy, Mumford, Hewlett, and Mann families, mainly from Michigan, containing some references to state political matters and the Civil War. The second contains correspondence and papers of Willoughby O'Donoughue, surgeon of the 1st Michigan Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, contain enlistment and discharge papers, mustering-out lists, and papers concerning the Grand Army of the Republic. The third group comprises the papers of Frederick Blackmar Mumford, dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, and includes family letters, clippings, pictures, legal papers, diplomas and special awards, a diary, 1945, and a scrapbook tracing Mumford's career, 1917-1938.

In addition, the collection includes correspondence pertaining to the controversy over the negotiations about establishing the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library at Duke as well as an agenda for the meetings of the Academic Council on the same issue. Correspondents include: Edwin H. Cady; Jay Luvaas, Professor of History at Allegheny College and Ph.D. graduate at Duke; Roger Marshall, Special Assistant to President Sanford; Terry Sanford, President of Duke University; and Richard L. Watson, Jr., Acting Chairman of the History Department.

Other papers in the collection include genealogy and family history of the Hollyday and Kennedy families; photographs; a scrapbook of correspondence, genealogy, diary in typescript, legal papers and other documents of the Mumford, Kennedy, Camburn, Strong and Hoskins families; Frederick Blackmar Mumford's (Hollyday's grandfather) travel diary describing Europe in 1900; and Prussian legal documents of the Dallmar family, 1850-1885.

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Inez Alexandria Stephens MacKinnon papers, 1821-1953 4.5 Linear Feet — 900 Items

Papers of MacKinnon, including correspondence with her sister, Louise Mae Davis Stephens, her husband, Francis T. MacKinnon, and other family members and friends (ca. 1920s-1930s); her diary during her courtship (1919-1922); and photograph albums, portraits, scrapbook, and mementos. Also includes husband Francis MacKinnon's WWI scrapbook and letters to family written during his military service in Europe; sister Louise Stephens' personal correspondence, photographs, portraits, mementos, and scrapbooks (ca. 1912-1937); courtship letters of Inez MacKinnon's parents, Jefferson Davis Stephens and Mae Inez Yarborough (ca. 1900); Jefferson Stephens' diary (ca. 1899-1926); and 19th-century papers of the Stephens and Yarborough families, including an 1821 court order by the Territory of Florida. (accession #91-081)

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Louis H. Roddis papers, 1823-1990 50 Linear Feet — 159.4 linear feet 95,000 Items

Collection reflects career of Louis H. Roddis in the general field of energy with emphasis on policy and strategic issues. Topics include electric power, gas resources, petroleum, water power, energy conservation, the energy crisis of the 1970s, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. Primarily documented in the collection are developments with nuclear power and within the nuclear industry including materials related to the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island accidents. The collection also reflects Roddis' participation in a variety of public service, charitable, industrial, and trade organizations.

The Louis H. (Louis Harry) Roddis Papers span the years 1823 to 1990 with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s and 1980s. The collection reflects Roddis's distinguished career in the general field of energy with emphasis on policy and strategic issues. Topics include electric power, gas resources, petroleum, water power, energy conservation, the energy crisis of the 1970s, and alternative energy sources. Primarily documented in the collection are developments with nuclear power and within the nuclear industry. The collection also reflects Roddis's participation in a variety of public service, charitable, industrial, and trade organizations. Materials in the collection include reports, speeches, testimonies, rebuttals, annual reports, articles, clippings, studies, photographs, meeting minutes and agendas, memoranda, legal briefs, writings, and printed materials. The collection documents his involvement with the US government on various energy issues, Roddis's interest in the human safety aspect of the energy industry, his professional interests in utility companies of which he was a board member, and his private work as a consulting engineer. Correspondents include US government agencies, US and international utility company executives, and colleagues from professional organizations. US government agencies and committees represented in the collection include the Department of Energy, the Energy Research Advisory Board, the Atomic Industrial Forum, the Federal Energy Administration, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the Energy Research and Development Administration.

The series in the Roddis papers document following broad topics: energy sources and alternatives, nuclear energy, issues of utility companies, US energy policies, professional and government energy organizations, and Roddis's work as a consulting engineer and authority in the energy field.

Energy sources and alternatives are topics included in the following series: Fossil Energy; Solar Energy; Oceans and Policy; Energy Conservation; Energy Sources; and Transportation Energy.

Series which pertain to nuclear energy include Atomic Energy History; Fast Breeder Reactors; Nuclear Power Industry; Environmental Radioactivity; Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Waste Disposal and Proliferation; Floating Nuclear Ship Power / PropulsionPlants; Nuclear Power Plant Siting; Three Mile Island Accident; Human Factors; and Chernobyl.

The US Utility History; Consolidated Edison History; International Utilities; US Utility Rates and Financing; Transmission and Distribution; Detroit Edison; Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority; Puerto Rico Water Resource Authority; Long Island Lighting Company; and Washington Public Power Supply series relate to key issues for utility companies.

The Energy Policy; Energy Statistics; Science and Technology Policy; and Energy and the Environment series cover US energy policies.

Professional and government energy organizations represented in the collection are found in the following series: Institute of Nuclear Power Operations; Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems; Energy Research and Development Administration; Energy Research and Development Planning; Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB); Panel and Committee Reports of ERAB; Other Government Agencies Material; Other; Electric Power Research Institute; Atomic Industrial Forum; North American Electric Reliability Council; Edison Electric Institute; Committees and Panels; Gas Research; and Renewable Energy Institute.

The Pacific Sierra; Anti-Trust Cases; International Nuclear Energy Systems Company; Exxon; J. V. Neely; Gould; Speeches; Donavan Hamester and Rattien; Contracts; John J. McMullen Associates; Berlin Energy Congress; Testimonies and Depositions; and Liquefied Natural Gas Imports seriesdocument Roddis's work as a consulting engineer and authority in the energy field.

The material in the Miscellaneous Series overlaps with other series found throughout the collection. Topics include nuclear energy, the utility industry, professional organizations, marine energy, reports from power plants and utility companies such as the North Carolina Energy Corporation, energy conferences, and the U.S.S. Nautilus which Roddis was involved in designing.

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M. C. Stoner papers, 1827-1967 15 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — Approx. 17,071 items

Collection comprises correspondence, legal papers, business records, bills and receipts, photographs, writings, recipes, clippings, and other items relating to the life and career of businessman M.C. (Marshall Clayton) Stoner, of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and three generations of the Brewer and Stoner families from Pennsylvania and Maryland. Includes many speeches by George W. Brewer, a lawyer and senator in the Pennsylvania legislature, 1857-1859, and M.C. Stoner's father-in-law. Much of the correspondence and other items relate to coal mining and specifically to M.C. Stoner's Rocky Ridge Mining Company. There are also letters written to Stoner's daughter, Louise, chiefly from male friends.

Collection comprises correspondence, legal papers, business records, bills and receipts, photographs, writings, recipes, clippings, and other items relating to the life and career of businessman M.C. (Marshall Clayton) Stoner, of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Includes many speeches by George W. Brewer, a lawyer and senator in the Pennsylvania legislature, 1857-1859, and M.C. Stoner's father-in-law. Much of the correspondence and other items relate to coal mining and specifically to M.C. Stoner's Rocky Ridge Mining Company.

Other materials, including early legal papers, pertain to three generations of the Brewer and Stoner families from Pennsylvania and Maryland. There are also letters written to Stoner's daughter, Louise, chiefly from male friends. Her writings may also be present in the collection.

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Hans Horst Meyer papers, 1831-1943, 2004 and undated 8 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — approx. 201 items — Approximately 201 items

Hans Horst Meyer was a pharmacologist and scientist on the faculty of the University of Vienna in the early 20th century. The papers are mostly in German, and consist of Meyer's professional correspondence; diplomas and awards; a few professional writings; an autograph book with signatures and correspondence of notable scientists and others; genealogical papers relating to his attempts in the late 1930s to document his family's ancestry; several volumes, including a family Bible and a diary of his son Arthur's first six years of life; and professional and personal photographs. There are two photographs of neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (Boston), inscribed to Meyer (1914 and 1929), and a sketch by Cushing. There are a few letters from family members, one of which describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany. An addition to the collection consists of a few letters, photographs, negatives, and other memorabilia relating to Meyer's son, Arthur W. Meyer, personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, and Arthur's son Horst, who became a physicist at Duke University. The Hans Horst Meyer papers form part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers, mostly in German, document pharmacologist and scientist Hans Horst Meyer's career and personal life, and consist of personal and professional correspondence; written pieces; genealogical documents; diplomas, medals, and awards; a Bible and other assorted volumes; professional and personal photographs; and an autograph album.

The certificates and medals were received by Meyer between 1901 and 1937, and come from a variety of international scientific organizations, such as the New York Academy of Medicine, the Royal Society of Physicians in Budapest, and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. Meyer also received the German Order of the Red Eagle and honorary citizenship of the city of Vienna. Also included is a small group of letters and printed materials relating to honors received by Meyer, as well as a reprint of Meyer's chapter in the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie.

Of note are two portrait photographs of pioneer neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1914 and 1929), both inscribed to Hans Horst Meyer, and a warm letter from Cushing to Meyer's son Arthur, a physician. A sketch of a spongioblast, attributed to Cushing, rounds out this group.

The personal papers include a group of official documents, identity and voting cards, and correspondence with parishes and German officials, attesting to Meyer's efforts from about 1938 to 1939 to document his family's religious heritage and obtain a new German identity card, possibly in order to leave the country. Meyer died in Vienna in 1939 while his application was still under review. Also among the personal papers are a few letters from family members, one of which, dated October 6, 1939, describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany.

Meyer's personal papers are accompanied by a German bible, a volume of poetry and quotations, and a journal in which Meyer recorded his son Arthur's first six years of life. There are also photographs of Hans Horst Meyer with various family members: his wife Doris, shortly after marriage, his sons Arthur and Kurt, his daughter-in-law Lotte, and grandchildren.

The autograph album contains 147 autographs and letters of well-known and lesser-known Germans, most of whom lived in the 19th century. Included are a letter each from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller, and Clara Schumann, a postcard from Johannes Brahms, and the autographs of many individuals, including Henrik Ibsen and Charles Dickens.

An addition to the collection consists of personal memorabilia, including photographs, glass slides, and a few letters, relating to Hans Horst Meyer's son Arthur, and his close relationship as personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, until Arthur's suicide in 1933. The letters are addressed to (Johannes) Horst Meyer, Arthur's small son, who eventually became a physicist, emigrated to the U.S., and joined the faculty of Duke University.

With the exception of the autograph album, originally in the holdings of the Rubenstein Library general collections, the Meyer papers were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Benjamin Newton Duke papers, 1834-1941, 1969 and undated, bulk 1890-1929 102 Linear Feet

Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

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William Gustavus Metzerott papers, 1838-1889 3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1,000 items

This collection contains business and personal papers, correspondence, and photographs of Metzerott who operated under the firm name, W.G. Metzerott & Co. Some material is in French, but most is in English or German. Metzerott writes to his wife in English. Also included are his will, passport, and information about the drive to establish the Garfield Memorial Hospital, headed by Gen. Sherman. Metzerott was on the board.

Collection contains business and personal papers, correspondence, and photographs of Metzerott who operated under the firm name, W.G. Metzerott & Co. Some material is in French, but most is in English or German. Metzerott writes to his wife in English. Also included are his will, passport, and information about the drive to establish the Garfield Memorial Hospital, headed by Gen. Sherman. Metzerott was on the board.

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Bailey Daniel Webb papers, 1845-2003 and undated, bulk 1950s-2003 9.5 Linear Feet

Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been segregated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

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Clement C. Clay papers, 1846-1970 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — 2,803 Items

Physician; member of the Clay family of Alabama; headed a photographic unit in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Navy in WWII; also served in the Hospital Division of the Medical Corps in that war. Later served as a hospital administrator and taught at a number of universities including the American University in Beirut, University of Chicago, Columbia University and Yale University. His consulting service included work for N.C. Memorial Hospital. Collection includes Clay family correspondence, Clement Clay's professional and military correspondence, and writings, including a number of presentations and reports. There are also scrapbooks, and two photographs of C.C. Clay, II as a child.

Collection includes Clay family correspondence, Clement Clay's professional and military correspondence, and writings, including a number of presentations and reports. There are also scrapbooks, and two photographs of C.C. Clay as a child.

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Dawn Langley Simmons papers, 1848-2001, 2012-2014 and undated, bulk 1969-2000 19.7 Linear Feet — 18,350 Items

Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Luther L. Gobbel papers, 1849-1979 3.2 Linear Feet — 2,024 Items

College administrator and educator. Served as president of Greensboro College (1936-1952) and Lambuth College (1952-1962), as well as Conference Superintendent of the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference (1920's) and Director of Church Relations at California Western University at San Diego for three years. Correspondence, printed material, financial papers, certificates, writings, and photographs relating mostly to Dr. Gobbel's career. Topics include: biographical information about Gobbel and Mrs. Gobbel (d. 1966); college education; education and the church; Methodist Episcopal Church, including the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference; East-West Expressway controversy in Durham, 1970s; education in China, 1937; Protestant churches in Czechoslovakia, 1961; financial papers of Robert A. Gobbel of Rowan Co., N.C., 1870s-1890s; inauguration of Gobbel as president of Greensboro College; his term as president of Lambuth College; a description of a trip taken by Dr. and Mrs. Gobbel through eight Latin American countries, New Orleans, and Atlanta in 1965; and Gobbel's service in World War I. Includes family and professional photographs (some of Methodist Church personnel); Trinity College scrapbook, 1913-1918; and two personal scrapbooks of Dr. Gobbel relating his career.

Correspondence, printed material, financial papers, certificates, writings, and photographs relating mostly to Dr. Gobbel's career. Topics include: biographical information about Gobbel and Mrs. Gobbel (d. 1966); college education; education and the church; Methodist Episcopal Church, including the Sunday School Board of the N.C. Conference; East-West Expressway controversy in Durham, 1970s; education in China, 1937; Protestant churches in Czechoslovakia, 1961; financial papers of Robert A. Gobbel of Rowan Co., N.C., 1870s-1890s; inauguration of Gobbel as president of Greensboro College; his term as president of Lambuth College; a description of a trip taken by Dr. and Mrs. Gobbel through eight Latin American countries, New Orleans, and Atlanta in 1965; and Gobbel's service in World War I. Includes family and professional photographs (some of Methodist Church personnel); Trinity College scrapbook, 1913-1918; and two personal scrapbooks of Dr. Gobbel relating his career.

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North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives, 1850, 1888-2000s and undated, bulk 1920-2008, bulk 1920-2008 230 Linear Feet

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The North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the founding and development of N.C. Mutual in Durham, N.C., and contribute to the historic record on African American businesses and entrepreneurship in the South and in the United States. Dating from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items created from 1920 to 2008, the material covers nearly every aspect of N.C. Mutual's operations, management, and milestones. There are corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements; reports; surveys; memos; legal and financial papers; original life insurance policies; training material; programming and outreach files; many ephemera and artifacts; and thousands of historical photographs of staff and their families, offices, buildings, and Durham scenes. Significant businessmen represented in the papers include founders John Merrick and Aaron Moore; and presidents Bert Collins, Joseph Goodloe, William Kennedy Jr., William Kennedy, III, Charles C. Spaulding, Asa T. Spaulding, and current president James H. Speed. The collection is especially rich in print material, including many issues of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for its assemblage of material on United States African American history, including much information on other companies, and public relations material dating from the earliest years to present times, including advertising ephemera, advertising campaigns, and other related items. Other materials document NCM's outreach to the African American community throughout its history to counter racism, unemployment, and diseases by means of public health programs, church affiliations, mentoring, and scholarship programs. Over one hundred selected digitized photographs and a few documents are also available online. Acquired and curated jointly by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records and History Center and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The records in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company Archives document the history of the oldest currently active African American insurance company in the United States. The materials date from 1850 to 2008, with the majority of the items dating from 1898 to 2008, and cover nearly all aspects concerning the operation, management, and milestones of NC Mutual (NCM). The archive comprises corporate office files, including the offices of five company presidents; annual statements, reports, surveys, and memos; legal and financial files; original life insurance policies and other documents; advertising, internal and external publications, pamphlets, posters, and other print material; training material; many historic photographs; public relations and outreach material; memorabilia; and audiovisual recordings. The bulk of the collection concerns the company's home office in Durham, N.C. but there is a significant amount of material that relates to NCM district offices located throughout the United States, particularly in the South, as well as records that refer to other related organizations such as insurance companies and financial institutions.

The collection contributes significantly to documentation on the history of African American businesses in the United States, particularly in the South, and on the socioeconomic status of African Americans in the South in the 20th century. There is also valuable information on public health issues affecting 20th-century African Americans and public health programming created by NC Mutual as well as other agencies. In addition, through company records and many ephemeral publications such as obituaries, the collection offers detailed documentation of the work status and personal lives of the company's many employees and their life insurance customers, predominantly African American women and men.

The collection is rich in print materials, and includes nearly complete runs of three company publications: The Mutual (1903-1929), The Whetstone (1924-1998), and The Weekly Review (1925-1998). It is also notable for public relations materials dating from the earliest years to the mid-2000s, including advertising ephemera, materials related to advertising campaigns, and other items. Additionally, there are records of NCM's extensive community outreach such as public health, mentoring, and scholarship programs, and documents relating to the company's ties with Durham's churches such as White Rock Baptist, and with other organizations such as Mechanics and Farmers Bank.

Corporate office files form the bulk of the collection, covering nearly every aspect of the company's operations and activities from its founding in 1898. There are extensive correspondence files as well as meeting notes and minutes, many legal and financial reports, and surveys of the insurance industry. Materials relating to a published history of NCM written by one of its presidents, William Kennedy Jr., are located in the Office of the Presidents Series. Company presidents represented most substantially in the files include: William Kennedy Jr. (1952-1958), Asa T. Spaulding (1959-1967), Joseph Goodloe (1968-1972), William Kennedy III (1972-1990), and Bert Collins (1990-2003). Earlier and later presidents and leaders, including founders Merrick and Moore, and presidents C.C. Spaulding and James Speed are also represented in smaller amounts of material. Personnel records are also present and are closed to use until 2074, 75 years after the date of most recent record.

Among the several thousand photographs in the collection, hundreds date from the first decades following the company's founding, and offer important and vivid historical evidence concerning NCM's history, its employees and their families, and the history of Durham, N.C. Many are oversize, and feature twenty panoramic photographs of conventions and other events from the early to mid-20th century. The collection also contains photographs of founders Merrick and Moore and their families, NC Mutual office buildings throughout its history, and many large photographic portraits of senior administration from the earliest years to the mid-2000s. Other photos capture employees at banquets and conventions throughout the company's history; some large sets of images from the early to mid-20th century document employee's homes as well. From the historic photographs and other images not represented in the collection, NCM created a permanent exhibit in its home office's "Heritage Hall" commemorating the company's history; these exhibit images, panels, and labels are also preserved in this collection.

Acquired and jointly curated by the North Carolina Central University's University Archives, Records, and History Center, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Richard Pollay Acme Advertising collection, 1850s-2006 and undated 75 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

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The Acme Advertising Collection is one of the collections created by Professor Richard Pollay in the History of Advertising Archives (Faculty of Commerce, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia). The collection was motivated by the observation that Acme named enterprises are characteristically small ventures that represent the grass roots of local and regional economies. At the same time, the ubiquity of the Acme brand name has made its way into popular culture, where it has become an icon for independent business in general, featured in print cartoons from artists such as Gary Larson (The Far Side) and G.B. Trudeau (Doonesbury), and in the Warner Bros. animated Road Runner features. Items in the Acme Collection come from a variety of sources. Many items were donated to Dr. Pollay, but the majority were acquired by Dr. Pollay himself over several decades. In earlier years items were found in shops, flea markets, and antique stores across North America. However, in recent years most items were acquired through the internet auction site, eBay (www.eBay.com). The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Bros.

The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Brothers.

A significant part of the collection is organized and grouped to represent rooms in a house. For example, kitchen items have been collected together. Office, wardrobe, and bathroom items are similarly gathered. Most items are represented in the Detailed Description by thumbnail images. In all, the collection consists of 28 Series: Kitchen Collectibles; Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles; Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation; Office and School Supplies; Domestic Hardware; Grocery and Store Collectibles; ACME Beer; Warner Brothers; Clothing Collectibles; Industrial Hardware; Bottles and Jars; Catalogs; Stationery and Certificates; Books and Monographs; Specialty Advertisements; Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements; Sales Oddities; Photographs; eBay Files; Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Truck; Audiovisual Materials; Match Covers; Telephone Directories; Business Cards; Trade Cards; Slides; and Miscellaneous Items.

The collection arrived already organized into 28 series. Every item had been assigned an "accession number," a unique 8-digit identifier, in the format "100-xx-xxx": the middle digits refer to the Series number, and the last three digits represent a running accession sequence within the Series. Items have been arranged by Series and numerically therein; however, there are a few exceptions where items have been transferred to another series after having been previously assigned an accession number. The collection also arrived with a descriptive database that was created and maintained by Professor Pollay's staff. The item descriptions in this finding aid represent a distillation of that database into a form more consistent with EAD-compliant finding aids. The collection has been processed with the original order maintained as much as possible. In addition, some items have been deaccessioned or retained by the donor, and only a digital image of the item exists in the collection. Those have been noted in the inventory.

Series 1: Kitchen Collectibles consists of Acme products for kitchen use: juice extractors; sifters; cast iron pans; and other utensils.

Series 2: Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles consists of Acme products for use in the bedroom or used as part of a wardrobe, including shoe pads, zippers, scissors, etc.

Series 3: Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation includes Acme toys and games, and other items used in sports and recreation, including model cars, toy trains, whistles, and playing cards.

Series 4: Office and School Supplies includes Acme products used as office and school supplies: erasers, staplers, rulers, pencils, etc.

Series 5: Domestic Hardware includes objects related to hardware used in homes, including wall thermometers; padlocks; iron hinges; and binoculars.

Series 6: Grocery and Store Collectibles includes grocery items such as evaporated milk, potato bags, bread bags, store signs, product display signs, and postcards.

Series 7: ACME Beer includes bottles, tins, catalogs, souvenir programs, flat advertisements and advertising objects relating to the Acme brand of beer.

Series 8: Warner Brothers consists of advertising objects and novelty items from Warner Bros. that feature the Acme label: Wile E Coyote lapel pin; Acme Optical glass case; along with clothing items like neckties, waist pouches, sweatshirts, and hats.

Series 9: Clothing Collectibles consists of clothing items featuring the Acme label and includes aprons, caps and T-shirts.

Series 10: Industrial Hardware includes industrial type objects like printing plates, radio control switches, etc.

Series 11: Bottles and Jars consists of bottles, glassware and jars featuring the Acme name or logo Also included are two colored glass slides, a baby's bottle and items in glass picture frames.

Series 12: catalogs includes various-sized catalogs, brochures, ledgers, and flyers. They are: Acme Trading Co., Acme Boot Co., and Acme Brick. Each item is individually described.

Series 13: Stationery and Certificates consists of assorted business stationery and certificates, including examples of late 19th century and early 20th century lithography on bond certificates and company letter heads. The companies Duane H. Nash Inc., Acme Harvester Co., and Acme Shear Co. provide examples of typical workmanship.

Series 14: Books and Monographs includes books, picture books, monographs and magazines that feature the Acme sign or logo or make mention of Acme.

Series 15: Specialty Advertisements consists primarily of promotional items such as blotters; small calendars; stickers; and slide charts that feature an Acme logo or trademark.

Series 16: Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements consists of print advertisements; mounted clippings; and photocopies of stationery and other paper items. Several companies are featured, including: Acme Boot Co., Acme Card System Co., Acme Harvester Co., Acme White Lead and Color Paint Works, Acme Wagon Co., Acme Washing Machine Co., and Acme Visible Card System. Each item is individually described. Each item carries an accession number.

Series 17: Sales Oddities consists of various advertising objects that feature an Acme logo or trademark, including both printed and three-dimensional objects such as tokens, pocket items, patches and decals.

Series 18: Photographs consists of photographs, negatives, and reprints of various shops, billboard, signs, and buildings featuring the Acme sign or logo. There are several pictures from Acme News Pictures, Inc. and Acme Telephoto, both press agencies.

Series 19: eBay Files consists of printouts from eBay.com relating to Acme-branded items. Printouts are housed in binders which are arranged roughly by year.

Series 20: Acme Bail Bonds consists of mostly printed materials related to the Acme Bail Bonds Company.

Series 21: Acme Truck consists of print advertisements for the Acme Truck, predominantly dating 1918-1922.

Series 22: Audiovisual Materials consists of sound and video recordings on various formats: cassette and video tapes; CD-ROM; vinyl records; and CDs. Each item features "Acme" as a trademark or logo or as part of the band name.

Series 23: Match Covers consists of assorted matchbook covers featuring the Acme label. Items are housed in a binder.

Series 24: Telephone Directories consists of the advertising Yellow pages. The provenance of these advertisements is largely unknown. The Series reflects the order in which they were collected.

Series 25: Business Cards consists of 138 business cards from various Acme companies. Items are housed in one binder.

Series 26: Trade Cards consists of various trading cards that were produced between the late 1880s and the 1930s. The bulk of items comes from the Lautz Bros Soap Co.

Series 27: Slides consists of 232 slides of various objects, locations and businesses featuring the name Acme. Slides are housed in one binder.

Series 28: Miscellaneous Items consists of miscellaneous items featuring the Acme label, name or trademark. Includes gas masks, farm implements, etc.

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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

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Alumni Affairs records, 1851 - 2005 30 Linear Feet

The Office of Alumni Affairs at Duke University administers the Duke Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization serving over 120,000 alumni and former students of Duke University, in addition to thousands of parents and friends of the university. Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter. English.

Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Norman H. Strouse papers, 1852-1990 and undated 17.3 Linear Feet — 13000 Items

The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT), founded in 1864, is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. Norman Hulbert Strouse served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of JWT during the 1960s. He was also a noted bibliophile and private publisher. The papers of Norman H. Strouse span the years 1852 to 1990, with the bulk of material dating from the 1950s to the 1960s. Records consist of correspondence, office files and memoranda, reports, writings and speeches, charts, client presentations, notes and notebooks, publications, clippings, photographs, and scrapbooks. The collection primarily documents Strouse's work in the JWT Detroit Office; other files touch on corporate administration for the entire company; company history; and public relations. Major clients include Ford, Kraft foods, and Scott paper products. The collection also partially documents Strouse's interests as a bibliophile: book collecting; the works of Robert Louis Stevenson; and his involvement with Silverado Press.

The papers of Norman H. Strouse span the years 1852 to 1990, with the bulk of material dating from the 1950s to the 1960s. Records consist of correspondence, office files and memoranda, reports, writings and speeches, charts, client presentations, notes and notebooks, publications, clippings, photographs, and scrapbooks. The collection primarily documents Strouse's work in the JWT Detroit Office; other files touch on corporate administration for the entire company; company history; and public relations. Major clients include Ford, Kraft foods, and Scott paper products. The collection also partially documents Strouse's interests as a bibliophile: book collecting; the works of Robert Louis Stevenson; and his involvement with Silverado Press.

Collection is arranged into six series: General JWT Office Files; Professional Associations; Business Writings and Speeches; Book Collecting, Library and Printing Interests; Personal Materials; and Oversize Materials.

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Wright H. Everett papers, 1853-1998 and undated 27 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Wright H. Bill Everett (1925-2010) was a media space salesman for several major magazines, and the founder of his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co., that specialized in a variety of print materials combining humorous captions with still images from silent movies. The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audiotapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, Maclean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office? Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audio tapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, MacLean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office?

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Paul Jackson Kramer papers, 1856 - 1994 (bulk 1927-1974) 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

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James Luther Kibler papers, 1857-1957 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approx. 7200 Items

James Luther Kibler (1867-1950) was a public school teacher, prominent Lutheran layman, and active member of the Socialist Party of Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, and photographs, pertaining to Kibler's interest in the history of Virginia, Lutheran issues, his work with the Socialist Party of Virginia, his newspaper column Kibler's Kolumn, and other topics. Also included are over forty scrapbooks compiled by Kibler dating from 1913 to 1953, in which are mounted clippings (including his column), letters, notations, royalty receipts, postcards, and photographs.

Collection comprises correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, and photographs, all pertaining to Kibler's interest in the history of Virginia, Lutheran issues, his work with the Socialist Party of Virginia, his newspaper column "Kibler's Kolumn," and other topics. Also included are over forty scrapbooks compiled by Kibler dating from 1913 to 1953, in which are mounted clippings (including his column), letters, notations, royalty receipts, postcards, and photographs.

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Robert A. Hamer papers, 1857-1995 and undated bulk 1926-1995 2.4 Linear Feet — 1800 Items

Robert A. Hamer was an executive of the Foster and Kleiser Outdoor Advertising Company in California. He worked as a pictorial artist from 1936 to 1953, and as Paint Manager, California Region, from 1956 until his retirement in 1979. The Robert A. Hamer Papers span the years 1857-1995, the bulk of which document the period 1926-1995, and includes photographs, negatives, correspondence, clippings, administrative records, cartoons, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and newsletters. The collection primarily documents Hamer's career in outdoor advertising with the Foster and Kleiser Company in Southern California, and also touches on events in his personal life. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs of Foster and Kleiser billboards in Southern California, covering two time periods, 1926-1935 and 1950-1970. Other photographs document business activities from 1937-1977, including Foster and Kleiser social events; commercial art production; and sign painting. Clients represented in the collection include Anheuser-Busch, C.H. Baker Shoes, and Slavick's Jewelry. Other clients represented are from the alcoholic beverage, food, travel, and automobile industries, and financial institutions.

The Robert A. Hamer Papers span the years 1857-1995, the bulk of which document the period 1926-1995, and include photographs, negatives, correspondence, clippings, administrative records, cartoons, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and newsletters. The collection primarily documents Hamer's career in outdoor advertising with the Foster and Kleiser Company in Southern California, and touches on events in his personal life. The bulk of this collection consists of photographs of Foster and Kleiser billboards in Southern California, covering two time periods, 1926-1941 and 1951-1962. Other photographs document business activities from 1937-1977, including Foster and Kleiser social events; commercial art production; and sign painting. Clients represented include Anheuser-Busch, C.H. Baker Shoes, and Slavick's Jewelry. Other clients represented are from the alcoholic beverage, food, travel, and automobile industries, and financial institutions.

The collection is organized into two series: Business & Personal Files and Photographs & Negatives. The Business & Personal Files Series documents milestones in Hamer's personal and professional life, and contains photographs, correspondence, scrapbooks, administrative records, writings, school newsletters, clippings, awards, cartoon sketches, and memorabilia. Included is a typewritten transcription of correspondence (1857-1880) by Hamer's ancestor, Samuel A. Jackson. The Photographs & Negatives Series makes up the bulk of the collection, and includes photographs and negatives depicting Foster and Kleiser billboards in Southern California. Other photographs document business and personal activities. Included are photographs of model and performer Charo posing with Hamer, accomplished billboard artist Mario Rueda, and other employees.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original locations and relocated to Oversize Materials.

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Moses family papers, 1859-1951 14 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — Approximately 10,400 items

Papers relate to a Jewish family originally from South Carolina and Georgia, and residents of New York City, whose members included drama critic and journalist Montrose Jonas Moses, his wife Dorothy Herne and other Herne sisters, and his sister, author Belle Moses. The collection primarily consists of manuscripts written by Belle Moses, as well as her research notes and letters. Notes, clippings, diaries, letters, and other papers of Montrose J. Moses and Dorothy Herne also represent a substantial portion. There are also five scrapbooks assembled by the Herne sisters. Also included are family and travel photographs, nitrate negatives, physician Montefiore Moses' visiting books, and memorabilia such as pins, calling cards, programs, and other keepsakes. Print materials include literature, poetry, and textbooks published around the turn of the century.

The Moses family papers primarily consist of manuscripts written by Belle Moses, and include her research notes and letters. Notes, clippings, letters, telegrams, diaries, theater advertisements, book reviews, and other papers of Montrose J. Moses and Dorothy Herne also represent a substantial portion.

Additional materials include five scrapbooks assembled by the Herne sisters; family and travel photographs dating from the 19th to the 20th centuries, along with corresponding nitrate negatives; and 19th century doctor's visiting books belonging to Montrose and Belle's father, who was a physician in Georgia. Also present are memorabilia such as pins, calling cards, programs, and other keepsakes. Print materials found in the collection include literature, poetry, and textbooks published around the turn of the century.

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William Blackburn papers, 1859-1985 20 Linear Feet — 15,000 Items

William Blackburn was a professor of English and creative writing at Duke University. The collection includes correspondence, writings, teaching materials and notes, biographical and family papers, printed materials, scrapbooks, audiovisual material, and photographs from William Blackburn and his family.

The William Blackburn papers are arranged in the following series: Correspondence; Writings; Teaching Material; Duke University Literary and Artistic Projects; Biographical Data and Family Papers; Printed Material; Scrapbooks; Audiovisual Material; and Photographs. Correspondence includes Blackburn family letters, letters relating to Blackburn's teaching and career at Duke University, and typescripts of letters by and about Joseph Conrad. Writings include Blackburn's own writings and speeches as well as those of students and his son Alexander Lambert Blackburn. Clippings mostly concern Blackburn's academic work, literary events at Duke in which Blackburn was pivotal, and reviews of the work of his students (including Anne Tyler, William Styron, and Reynolds Price). The collection also includes numerous photographs of family members and some of literary figures.

Addition (2007-0129) (200 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1937-1972) contains correspondence between Blackburn and his daughter, Mary April Blackburn Hill.

Addition (2008-0071) (30 items; 0.1 lin. ft.; 1925-1973) includes correspondence between William Blackburn and his brother, Clark, as well as additional papers from Elizabeth Blackburn. Elizabeth's papers include correspondence and two literary compositions.

Addition (2010-0013) (200 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1928-1985) includes correspondence between Blackburn and his wife, Elizabeth, especially during the breakup of their marriage; notes about William Blackburn from his son, Alexander Blackburn; articles, speeches, and clippings; and materials from his students and colleagues.

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Anthony and Newlin family papers, 1861-1974 and undated 0.4 Linear Feet

Anthony family of Burlington (Guilford Co.), N.C. Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

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Lane family papers, 1862-1916 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 7 Items

The Lane family were residents of Wallingford, Connecticut. This Civil War collection consists of a diary, correspondence, a scrapbook, and other materials. The diary belonged to Oscar B. Lane, who enlisted in June of 1861 and served as the drummer boy for the 5th Connecticutt Volunteers. The diary (1862, May 3-Sept. 10) contains entries concerning the Battle of Winchester during Jackson's Shenandoah Campaign and the Battle of Cedar Mountain of the second Bull Run Campaign. Correspondence (1863, Sept. 5-Dec. 18) from Theodore, Josiah, and Oscar Lane to their sister Harriet were written from Portsmouth, Va., while the three of them served with Harland's Brigade. Letters describe the shooting of deserters, camp life, and the social life in the city of Norfolk, Va. The scrapbook contains clippings concerning Veteran's Drum Corps, the Grand Army of the Republic, photographs, badges, a survivors roster for the 5th Regiment of Conn. Volunteers, postcards, and clippings concerning Wallingford, Conn. Other papers include programs for a veterans' reunion and a convention of the Conn. Fife and Drum Corps.

This collection of Civil War papers consists of a diary, correspondence, a scrapbook, and other papers. The diary belonged to Oscar B. Lane, who enlisted in June of 1861 and served as the drummer boy for the 5th Connecticutt Volunteers; the entries (1862, May 3-Sept. 10) comment on the Battle of Winchester during Jackson's Shenandoah Campaign and the Battle of Cedar Mountain of the second Bull Run Campaign. Correspondence (1863, Sept. 5-Dec. 18) from Theodore, Josiah, and Oscar Lane to their sister Harriet were written from Portsmouth, Virginia, while the three of them served with Harland's Brigade. Letters describe the shooting of deserters, camp life, and the social life in the city of Norfolk, Virginia. The scrapbook contains clippings concerning the Veteran's Drum Corps, the Grand Army of the Republic, photographs, badges, a survivors roster for the 5th Regiment of Conn. Volunteers, postcards, and clippings concerning Wallingford, Connecticut. Other papers include programs for a veterans' reunion and a convention of the Conn. Fife and Drum Corps.

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Wheeler-Fleming Family papers, 1862-1961 (bulk 1899-1918) 2 Linear Feet — 900 Items

Two related families living in La Monte (Pettis County), Missouri. Collection includes correspondence, photographs, financial and legal papers, poetry, cards, clippings, and genealogical information pertaining to the related Wheeler and Fleming families from La Monte, Mo. Photographs (circa 150) are mainly from the late 19th century; most are family portraits, but also include town businesses and rural scenes. Correspondence concerns crops and weather, church life, illnesses, family life, and primary school life in Bates County, Mo. (1899-1900). Includes a group of 100 letters (1908-1933) from R.A.S. Wade, a Missouri Methodist minister in California, who refers to Los Angeles area politics; church history; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; the Masonic Home of California in De Coto, Ca.; prohibition and the temperance movement; World War I; the 1929 Depression; and the legal affairs of the Rev. J. P. Shuler. Some 100 pieces of poetry were also written by Wade and sent to the Wheelers. Genealogical materials refer to the Wheeler, Fleming, Kemp, Routsong, and McArtor or McArthur families. Collection also includes: a history of Methodist Church in La Monte, Mo.; calling cards and greeting cards; memorial booklets; land plats and deeds; records of the La Monte Woman's Missionary Society; school reports; insurance policies; and tax receipts.

Collection includes correspondence, photographs, financial and legal papers, poetry, cards, clippings, and genealogical information pertaining to the related Wheeler and Fleming families from La Monte, Mo. Photographs (circa 150) are mainly from the late 19th century; most are family portraits, but also include town businesses and rural scenes. Correspondence concerns crops and weather, church life, illnesses, family life, and primary school life in Bates County, Mo. (1899-1900). Includes a group of 100 letters (1908-1933) from R.A.S. Wade, a Missouri Methodist minister in California, who refers to Los Angeles area politics; church history; the Methodist Episcopal Church, South; the Masonic Home of California in De Coto, Ca.; prohibition and the temperance movement; World War I; the 1929 Depression; and the legal affairs of the Rev. J. P. Shuler. Some 100 pieces of poetry were also written by Wade and sent to the Wheelers. Genealogical materials refer to the Wheeler, Fleming, Kemp, Routsong, and McArtor or McArthur families. Collection also includes: a history of Methodist Church in La Monte, Mo.; calling cards and greeting cards; memorial booklets; land plats and deeds; records of the La Monte Woman's Missionary Society; school reports; insurance policies; and tax receipts.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863-1961 13.25 Linear Feet

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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Margaret Fishback papers, 1863-1978 and undated (bulk 1920-1973), bulk 1920-1973 47.6 Linear Feet — About 35,700 items

Margaret Fishback was an advertising copywriter for Macy's, Cecil & Presbrey, Warwick & Legler, Young & Rubicam, Doyle Dane Bernbach, and a number of freelance clients. A poet, columnist, and author of prose work, she contributed frequently to national magazines and published several books. The Margaret Fishback Papers span the years 1863 through 1978 and document Fishback's dual careers in advertising and writing as well as her personal life. The collection includes correspondence, layouts, drafts, galley proofs, radio scripts, working copy of advertising text, poetry, prose, published material, appointment books, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials. Clients represented in the papers include Borden's, Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, Clairol, General Foods, Gourmet Foods, Gimbels, Macy's, Martex, Moore-McCormack Lines, Norcross, Norsk, Pabst, and Simmons Beautyrest.

The Margaret Fishback Papers span the years 1863 through 1978 and document Fishback's dual careers in advertising and writing as well as her personal life. The collection includes correspondence, layouts, drafts, galley proofs, radio scripts, working copy of advertising text, poetry, prose, published material, appointment books, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials. Clients represented in the papers include Arrow, Borden's, Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, Clairol, General Foods, Gimbels, Gourmet Foods, Macy's, West Point Pepperell (Martex), Moore-McCormack Lines, Norcross, Norsk, Pabst, Simmons Beautyrest, and Wrigley. Materials that predate Fishback's birth consist of a small collection of 19th-century prints and illustrations.

The collection is organized into three series: Personal Files, Writings, and Advertising.

The Personal Files Series chiefly documents Fishback's personal life through personal correspondence, datebooks, diaries, and photographs. Also included are a number of items collected by Fishback such as etiquette books, newspaper clippings, church bulletins, and travel memorabilia. Biographical data, chiefly news articles, provide secondary source material about Fishback and her family.

The Writings Series documents Fishback's writing career, containing her published works as well as a large amount of work in unpublished form. Writings include articles and light poetry written for national news and general-interest publications such as Collier's, Liberty, Life, Look, the New York Times, New Yorker, Saturday Evening Post, and Time. Writings also include Fishback's contributions to women's magazines such as Cosmopolitan, Family Circle, Glamour, Good Housekeeping, Judge, Mademoiselle, McCall's, War Brides, Woman's Day, and Woman's Home Companion. A large number of Fishback's poems were reprinted as compilations; Fishback also compiled her own work in several scrapbooks. Materials represent Fishback's writings for children, including a promotional booklet for Martex and an English translation of a German poetry book. In addition to general prose and poetry, this series also includes materials collected and produced for a column entitled "Woman-Talk," which Fishback wrote for Liberty from 1943 to 1947. Also included are short stories, greeting card work, letters to magazine and newspaper editors, speeches for various events such as author talks and advertising conventions, and other miscellaneous writings. General files document the administrative aspects of Fishback's writing career. These files contain correspondence, chiefly between Fishback and various editors and publishers, as well as financial and legal materials.

The Advertising Series documents Fishback's advertising work for R.H. Macy and Co. Department Store, as well as work for advertising agencies and freelance work. Included in this series are advertisements in various stages of production: notes, drafts, proofs, and tear sheets. Administrative materials, such as correspondence, often accompany the advertisements. Also represented in this series is evidence of Fishback's professional affiliations, particularly with the Advertising Women of New York (AWNY). Materials generated or collected in the process of preparing for speaking engagements with professional societies are also included. The series also includes a small collection of trade literature, chiefly books on advertising topics written by other authors.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Relocated items have been replaced in the Detailed Description of the Collection by dummy folders enclosed in brackets.

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Timothy H. O'Sullivan photographs, 1868-1873 1.6 Linear Feet — 35 Items

Timothy H. O'Sullivan was an important early American photographer who participated in two geographical surveys of the American West. Collection includes thirty-five gold-toned albumen prints made from glass plate negatives. O'Sullivan made these photographs as part of the King and Wheeler surveys between 1868 and 1873. Main subjects of the photographs are geological and geographical features of Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. Collection also contains four photographs of mining operations and two photographs of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico.

During his brief career, Timothy H. O'Sullivan made many compelling photographs, and in doing so established himself as one of the most important figures in early American photography. This collection includes thirty-five gold-toned albumen prints, resulting from glass plate negatives O'Sullivan made as he photographed the American west for the King and Wheeler surveys between 1868 and 1873. The geological and geographical features of Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming are the subjects most heavily represented in this collection. The collection also contains four photographs of mining operations and two photographs of the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico. The collection is arranged into two series: the King Expeditions Series and the Wheeler Expeditions Series. Both series are arranged chronologically.

Clarence King's Expedition officially bore the title: "The Geological Exploration of the 40th Parallel." King planned to explore a hundred-mile wide swath from the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada Mountains across the Great Basin to the Rocky Mountains, eastern Colorado to the California line. This collection includes nine photographs from King's expeditions in 1868 (1), 1869 (6), and 1872 (2).

In 1871, George Montague Wheeler, topographical engineer, took charge of "The Survey of the Territory of the United States West of the 100th Meridian." The field work conducted for this survey involved fourteen trips during 1871-1879. The primary object of the survey was to complete topographical mapping of the country, much of it largely unexplored, but the scope of the work eventually extended to include exhaustive investigation of geological, zoological, and ethnological matters. Publication of the definitive Report upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One-Hundredth Meridian took place between 1875 and 1889. O'Sullivan made photographs on several of these expeditions. This series includes 26 photographs, from the expeditions of 1871 (18) 1873 (8).

More so than other western expeditionary photographers, Timothy O'Sullivan explored alternative strategies of photographic composition. O'Sullivan created unique compositions through the conscious ordering and visual presentation of bold forms, which emphasized the abstract qualities of the landscape. Several photographs in this collection reveal the formal qualities of O'Sullivan's photographs. These images contrast with the great volume of more picturesque landscapes made by other western expeditionary photographers, although O'Sullivan did make a number of photographs that emphasized natural beauty over form. O'Sullivan was also interested in recording evidence of human interaction with the environment. For example THO.P17 juxtaposes the passing of geological time with evidence of recent human explorations. A photograph also contained in this collection, and of intrinsic interest, THO.P15, reveals visible brush strokes providing evidence of the technique used to coat glass plate negatives.

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William Henry Jackson photographs, 1869-1878 and undated 3.2 Linear Feet — 130 Items

William Henry Jackson (1843-1942), was one of the earliest and most important American photographers. From 1869 to 1878 he was official photographer for the U.S. Geological Survey of the Territories. Collection includes 130 photographs and albumen prints, almost all of which Jackson made while employed by the Survey. States represented are Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming. Photographs are organized in several series by year from 1869 to 1874. Other important photographs include both a series and an album of the area now know as Yellowstone National Park; some of Jackson's photographs were shown to Congress prior to their vote to establish it as the first national park.

William Henry Jackson (1843-1942), photographer, artist, and explorer had a long and distinguished career as one of America's earliest and most important photographers, and to this day he has remained one of the best known of the western expeditionary photographers. During the years 1869-1878, Jackson was the official photographer for the U.S. Geological Survey of the Territories conducted by Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden. This collection includes 130 photographs, albumen prints, almost all of which Jackson made while employed by the Survey. Of these 130 photographs, 68 are unbound, and 62 are bound into an album. The states represented in the collection are Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming. The photographs form a number of series: 1869 Series (3), 1870 Series (20),1871 Series (5), 1872 Series (1), 1873 Series (3), 1874 Series (18), Yellowstone National Park Series (2), Indians Series (11), Not Identified in the Catalogue Series (5), and Album: Photographic Views Of the Yellow Stone National Park Series (62). The photographs of the area now known as Yellowstone National Park may have in part led to the foundation of the of park. A selection of Jackson's photographs were shown to Congress prior to their vote to establish Yellowstone the first National Park.

The series of 1869-1873 are described in: William Henry Jackson, Descriptive Catalogue of the Photographs of the United States Geological Survey of the Territories, for the Years 1869 to 1873, Inclusive, U.S. Geological Survey of the Territories, Miscellaneous Publications, No. 5 (Washington: G.P.O., 1874). The information folders contain copies of the pertinent pages from the Catalogue. The unbound photographs are listed below with abbreviated descriptions. They are arranged first by series and then numerically within each series. The photographs supplied original numbers but not titles, so the Catalogue provided the titles used below. The images for the Series 1869-1872 vary from 4-7 inches x 7-9 inches mounted on 11 x 14 in boards. The images for Series 1873 are approximately 8 or 9 x 13 inches mounted upon 16 x 20 inch boards. The particulars of the unbound and bound photographs from Yellowstone National Park are given with their listings below.

Each photograph bears an original number and title. These titles are listed below within quotation marks. The descriptive catalogue contains fuller descriptions.

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Harriet R. Holman papers, 1869-1986 16.5 Linear Feet — About 7899 Items

Author and professor of English from Anderson, S.C. Collection is chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell, and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley.

The papers of Harriet Rebecca Holman span the years 1869-1986, and are chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. The Page family materials constitute a large portion of the materials in this collection and are represented by their own series. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers, 1870-1936 and undated 6.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

Jessie Vanderbilt McNamee was born in 1874 to a wealthy family residing in Staten Island, New York (Richmond County). In 1901 she married Charles Dewar Simons(1874-1922) and they had one child, Charles Dewar, Jr. Ms. Simons served as a volunteer ambulance driver with the Dongan Hills Motor Corps; helped found and served as the ranking member of the Richmond County chapter of the Red Cross Motor Corps during World War I; served as Vice President of the National Federated Workers for Disabled Soldiers; and was an active member of the Veteran Association of Women War Workers. Her travels throughout Europe during the 1920s and 1930s are documented in diaries, correspondence, and other materials in this collection. Ms. Simons was a friend and neighbor of Alice Austen, a noted photographer who also served in the Richmond County Motor Corps. The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

The Jessie Vanderbilt Simons papers contain materials dating from 1870 to 1936, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1890 to 1936. Materials in the collection primarily document Simons' travels through Europe during the 1920s and 1930s and her work with the Richmond County chapter of the American Red Cross Motor Corps. Twenty-nine yearly diaries detail daily life, family life, travel, participation in the Motor Corps, and other philanthropic activities. Correspondence with her son, family, and friends is also included; as are receipts, invoices, and other financial materials, primarily from travel to Europe; correspondence, printed materials, a scrapbook, and other items documenting Simons' service with the American Red Cross Motor Corps; material relating to friend, photographer, and fellow Motor Corps member Alice Austen; and photographs.

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Minnie Bruce Pratt papers, 1870s-2005, bulk 1975-2005 94 Linear Feet

Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.

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William Bell photographs, 1872 1.6 Linear Feet — 16 Items

William Bell was a photographer from Philadelphia. He was employed in 1872 by the U.S. Geographical and Geological Explorations and Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, a United States Army survey team. Collection includes sixteen gold-toned albumen prints, printed from negatives made by William Bell on the Wheeler Expedition of 1872. Fourteen photographs are from Arizona, two from Utah. Primary subjects include landscapes of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Some of Bell's photographs from this expedition were used for prints in George M. Wheeler's Report Upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian...(Washington: GPO, 1875-1889). In the field Bell prepared his own dry-plate negatives, a photographic process somewhat uncharacteristic for his time. he This process allowed him to store prepared plates longer than his contemporaries, who used wet plates, but would have also increased the exposure times for his plates.

This collection includes sixteen gold-toned, albumen prints, printed from negatives made by William Bell while on the Wheeler Expedition of 1872. Fourteen photographs are from Arizona, and two are from Utah. The primary subjects of this collection are picturesque landscapes made of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Some of Bell's photographs from this expedition were used for prints in George M. Wheeler's Report Upon United States Geographical Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian...(Washington: GPO, 1875-1889). This collection is composed of one series entitled the Wheeler Expedition of 1872 Series.

The government included photographers on western expeditions to make a visual record of the landscape and its inhabitants. The photographs created during these expeditions served to create maps used to plan for the construction of roads and railways; locate natural resources; facilitate future military operations; as well as to collect ethnographic information on and locate Indian tribes. Perhaps most importantly, the commanders of western expeditions used the resulting photographs as a public relations tool to gain support for future expeditions, and to record geological information, the study of which had become a popular science during the period. By the time of their completion, the surveys had explored much of the region between the Great Plains and the Pacific Coast. This recording made Bell and the other western expeditionary photographers some of the earliest participants in America's tradition of documentary photography.

While in the field, Bell utilized a photographic process somewhat uncharacteristic for his time; he prepared his own dry-plate negatives. This process allowed him to store prepared plates longer than his contemporaries, who used wet plates, but would have also increased the exposure times for his plates.

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John Armstrong Chaloner papers, 1876-1933 12 Linear Feet — Approx. 6,500 Items

John Armstrong Chaloner was a celebrity and writer known for coining the catchphrase “Who’s looney now?” in the aftermath of psychiatric experiments and own legal troubles regarding his sanity. Great-grandson of John Jacob Astor; from Cobham (Albemarle County), Virginia. Collection includes business and personal correspondence, legal papers, writings and drafts by Chaloner, printed materials primarily composed of newspaper clippings, and some personal financial documents and photographs. The letters, almost half of the collection, are concerned with Chaloner’s attempts to have himself declared sane after a four-year involuntary internment in Bloomingdale Asylum at White Plains, New York.

The John Armstrong Chaloner papers have been arranged into five series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Writings/Drafts, Printed Materials, and Personal Materials. Correspondence, almost half the collection, comprises business and personal correspondence. Most the content consists of Chaloner’s communications and consultations with various attorneys in New York, North Carolina, and Virginia that address his multiple legal battles. Legal Papers consists of legal briefs, appeals, court transcripts, depositions, memos, and notes from Chaloner’s various legal petitions and trails. Writings/Drafts comprises manuscript drafts, notes, and some published versions of Chaloner’s assorted publications. Printed Materials includes an assortment of magazine articles, advertisements, invitations, flyers, and newspaper clippings. Personal Materials includes some personal photographs and an assortment of financial documents such as bills, receipts, cancelled checks, and ledger sheets.

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Davis Family papers, 1876-2007 and undated, bulk 1924-2004 4 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

The Davis family, originally of Hampton, Virginia, is a prominent African-American family whose members include authors, journalists, photographers, filmmakers, composers, and educators who have made significant contributions to American history and culture. The collection includes photograph albums, loose photographs, and writings documenting the history of the African American Davis family in Hampton, Virginia from the 1930s to the 1950s as well as family members at later points; it also includes materials related to family history and genealogy that span the period from 1876 to the 1920s. Family members featured within the collection include William Roscoe Davis, Andrew Davis, Arthur P. Davis, Sr., Georgia Campbell Neal, Willie Louise Barbour Davis, Collis H. Davis, Sr., Georgia Louise Davis, Jennie Crosby Davis, Collis H. Davis, Jr., Thulani Davis, Anthony Davis, and Charles Sumner Stone, Jr. (Chuck). Educational institutions attended by family members and documented in the collection include Colby College, Fryeburg Academy, George P. Phenix School, and the Hampton Institute.

The Davis Family Papers span the years 1876 to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1924 to 2004, and are arranged into three series of photograph albums, loose photographs, and family papers that document the personal histories of members of the African American Davis family. Of the albums in the Photograph Albums Series, four were created by Louise Davis and one was assembled by Georgia Campbell Neal, Louise's grandmother. Louise Davis's photograph album dating from 1947-1949 contains snapshots that pertain to her stay at Fryeburg Academy and at the Encampment for Citizenship summer program. Her 1949-1953 photograph album documents student life at Colby College in Maine. Many images in the Photographs Series were taken by Billie Davis and by Louise Davis, who were particularly interested in photography, but some were contributed by others, including Reuben Burrell of Hampton Institute. Subjects include members of the Davis family and their friends, both at special events and in everyday home and school life in Hapmton, Virginia from the 1930s to the 1950s. The family papers found in the Writings Series consist of correspondence, documents, and published articles related to Davis family members. These include magazine features on Louise Davis from 2001 and 2004, as well as photocopies of Louise Davis's many articles written for major East Coast newspapers and other publications. Materials related to Thulani Davis include photocopies of her articles for the Village Voice and the San Francisco Sun Reporter, and reviews of her books. Papers related to Anthony Davis include reviews and feature articles on his performance and composition career including his operas X, The Life and Times of Malcolm X, Under the Double Moon, Tania, Amistad, and Wakonda's Dream. Genealogical materials include a photocopy of a handwritten draft of Georgia Campbell Neal's autobiography, reports on several of the Davis family reunions in the 1990s, as well as detailed family trees of the Davis and Stone families.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 654 boxes — 654 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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John Allen Sharpe papers, 1877-1981 and undated 2.25 Linear Feet — approx. 540 Items

John Allen Sharpe was a Duke alumnus who served as editor of the ROBESONIAN newspaper from 1947-1982. Collection includes correspondence, clippings, and photographs, along with business records for S. A. Edmund & Co.

Collection contains papers related to Sharpe's work as editor. Also includes personal correspondence during the periods Sharpe was a Duke student (1928-1932) and a member of the U.S. Army Air Force (1940s), as well as letters from his wife written while she was on a tour of Europe in 1951, and letters from Sharpe to his parents. There are several copies of the ROBESONIAN, along with postcards, family photographs, and a few published works. In addition, there is a ledger and other records, dated 1887-1892, for S. A. Edmund & Co, a business located in the Lumberton area. A letter and 23 other pages, all undated, containing political speeches hand copied and laid-in to the ledger.

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Eugenia Hargous Macfarlane Balch papers, 1878-1949, and undated 1.8 Linear Feet — 400 Items

Pennsylvania artist who studied at Vassar College and in Europe. Clippings, notebooks, photographs, paper ephemera, and correspondence, chiefly 1885-1895, with family or friends (mostly women) concerning in part the role of women in Victorian society and her early career as an artist. Also includes a history of the Clymer family (1949) and several small, original sketches. nicludes a photo album and a scrapbook.

Clippings, notebooks, photographs, paper ephemera, and correspondence, chiefly 1885-1895, with family or friends (mostly women) concerning in part the role of women in Victorian society and Eugenia Balch's early career as an artist and travels in Europe. Balch lived in Paris for some time, and was fluent in French. Also includes a history of the Clymer family (1949) and several small, original sketches. Includes a photograph album. A letter from Alice Fauchon to her close friend, Eugenia Balch, dated May 30, 1892, recounts in detail her attempts to procure an abortion, which were unsuccessful (she gave birth to a son in October).

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St. Philip's Episcopal Church records, 1878-2002 21021 items

St. Philip's Episcopal Church was founded in 1878 in Durham, N.C. This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

This collections contains vestry minutes, correspondence, minutes from various organizations within the church, rector's notes, church bulletins and programs, slides, photographs, financial records, appointment books, scrapbooks, clippings, canvass reports, auditor's reports, sermons, and printed materials. Also included are the records, notes, and correspondence related to parish historian Harold Parker's history of the church (published in 1997), as well as a complete file of the church's extant sermons (1912-1994) Parker compiled for another book. There are also five reels of microfilm containing copies of vestry minutes, marriage records, a church register, etc., organized by Mr. Parker into roughly chronological order and divided into sections by rectorship.

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Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner Autograph Book and papers, 1879-1885, 1910-1933 and undated 1 Linear Foot — 15 Items

Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (1871-1935) was a German bacteriologist and one of the first women to reach the rank of Professor in Germany. The Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner Autograph Book and Papers date from the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century, and contain letters written to Rabinowitsch-Kempner from leading German scientists, as well as a reprint and three photographs. Correspondents include Robert and Hedwig Koch, Paul Ehrlich, Emil Behring, Richard Pfeiffer, and Alexandre Besredka, as well as calling cards with notations from Lord Joseph Lister, Elie (Ilija) Metchnikoff, and Albert Calmette. Many of the letters and calling cards are arranged in a bound scrapbook, and relate to personal as well as professional matters. The collection also contains a series of six letters from Max von Pettenkofer to Paul Lindau, editor of Nord und Süd,. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner Autograph Book and Papers date from the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century, and contain letters written to Rabinowitsch-Kempner from leading German scientists. Correspondents include Robert and Hedwig Koch, Paul Ehrlich, Emil Behring, Richard Pfeiffer, and Alexandre Besredka, as well as calling cards with notations from Lord Joseph Lister, Elie (Ilija) Metchnikoff, and Albert Calmette. Many of the letters and calling cards are arranged in a scrapbook, and relate to personal as well as professional matters. The collection also contains a series of six letters from Max von Pettenkofer to Paul Lindau, editor of Nord und Süd, and a reprint in English by Pettenkofer dating from the late nineteenth-century, as well as three photographs of Robert Koch, Paul Ehrlich, and Emil Behring.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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John Franklin Crowell records and papers, 1883 - 1932 and undated 9.5 Linear Feet — 9500 Items

John Franklin Crowell was an educator, economist, and journalist. He served as President of Trinity College (Randolph County, and Durham, N.C.) from 1887-1894. The John Franklin Crowell Records and Papers primarily consist of materials concerning Crowell's research interests and publications; his presidency of Trinity College; and his activities after leaving Trinity. The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, memoranda, scrapbooks, photographs, printed matter, account books, cash books, and grade books. Materials range in date from 1883 to 1932. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, memoranda, scrapbooks, photographs, printed matter, account books, cash books, and grade books. The correspondence includes letters about the relocation of Trinity from Randolph County to Durham and Crowell's vision for Trinity College. Research and writings include research notes, reprints, manuscripts, photographs, and memorandum books. The memorandum books include notes on a variety of subjects including NY tenements, economic and financial subjects, and personal notes. Scrapbooks include printed matter concerning Trinity College, newspaper clippings on commodity markets, and shipping reports. The printed matter consists of clippings, flyers, newspapers, announcements, and other material pertaining to Crowell's interests. The account books, cash books, and grade books are part of the Trinity College Records, and give details about college life. Major subjects of the collection include Crowell's presidency of Trinity College (Randolph County, and Durham, N. C.); his research interests and publications; and activities after leaving Trinity.

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George Arthur Roberts Family papers, 1884-1970s and undated, bulk 1907-1950s 4.6 Linear Feet — 2240 Items

The George Arthur Roberts Family Papers span the years from 1884 until the late 1970s (primarily the first half of the twentieth century), and consist largely of visual documents, including photographs, photograph albums, slides, and negatives; a collection of postcards and a small amount of printed material are also included. While the majority of the images are unidentified, they provide a rich and extensive pictorial record of the activities of pioneer Methodist missionaries, the early missions they established, and the personal experience and growth of one missionary family in this setting. George Arthur Roberts' memoir Let Me Tell You a Story..., copies of which are included in the collection, describes life as lived by these early missionaries and contrasts them with conditions in 1964, the time of its writing. In addition to documenting aspects of missionary history, the Roberts papers also depict the landscapes and peoples of Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and surrounding areas, particularly the Umtali region (now Mutare), at a time when they remained relatively untouched by western influence. The Papers are organized into the following series based on format: the Photographic Prints Series, Postcards Series, Printed Material Series, Negatives Series, Slides Series, and the Photograph Albums Series.

The Photographic Prints Series and the Slides Series comprise the bulk of the collection. Both series have been organized into the following subseries: People, Mission Activities, and African Scenes/Landscapes. The People Subseries contains numerous portraits of African men, women, and children; missionaries; and primarily the Roberts family themselves, including photos likely taken on various trips both within Africa and to other locations including the United States, Europe, and Asia. Of particular note in the People Subseries are a group of prints of the visit of the British Queen Mother and Elizabeth II to Melsetter Junction in 1948. The Mission Activities Subseries contains images of such school- and church-related events as conferences and gatherings, construction of mission buildings, agriculture, and animal husbandry. Some of the original prints used to illustrate Roberts' Let Me Tell You A Story... can also be found. There is little overlap, in terms of identical images, between the prints and slides series.

The Negatives Series contains 27 rolls of 35mm film, likely dating from the 1950s, from which contact sheets have been made. While the contact sheets are open for research, the master negative rolls themselves are closed to patron use. The series also includes some cut 35mm negative frames and a few medium-format negatives which are open for research. The subject matter of the negatives is similar to that of the Photographic Prints Series and the Slides Series. The majority of the images in this series do not appear to duplicate images found in previous series.

The Photograph Album Series consists of three bound photograph albums, containing a rich variety of images. The collection also includes an extensive Postcards Series, 1918-1965 and undated, from locations largely within Africa but also in Europe, Asia, and North America. The Printed Materials Series contains two copies of Let Me Tell You A Story..., George Arthur Roberts' memoir, and other mission-related material.

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Mason Crum papers, 1885-1974 11 Linear Feet

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Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Account Files, 1885-2008 and undated bulk 1920-1995 400 Linear Feet — 28,0000 Items

Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The JWT Account Files spans the years 1885-2007, with the bulk of materials covering 1920-1995. It is an artificially-created collection of information about client accounts held by the JWT and provides information about JWT's management of its advertising campaigns. Additionally, the files document deliberations about such topics as media selection; markets and marketing; and target audience for individual advertising campaigns. The bulk of the materials, especially the older records, document clients managed by JWT's New York Office, but the work of other offices is also represented, including: Atlanta Office (Marine Corps); Chicago Office (Oscar Mayer, Kraft); Detroit Office (Ford); and San Francisco Office (Sprint). The collection includes account histories; research reports; memoranda; correspondence; printed material; clippings; brochures and pamphlets; product labels and packaging designs; original artwork and advertising proofs; slides; photographs; audiocassettes and videocassettes. Clients represented include Eastman Kodak; Ford; Ford Dealer Association; R.T. French; General Cigar; Hamm's beer; Handy Andy; International Banana Association; IBM; Kellogg; Kraft; Quaker Oats; U.S. Marine Corps; US Sprint; Warner Lambert; White Castle; and the 1964 World's Fair. More limited materials are available for other significant JWT clients, including: Burger King; Champion Spark Plug; Domino's Pizza; Lever Brothers; Northern Telecom; Oscar Mayer; Rolex; Standard Brands; and Scott Paper. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The JWT Account Files spans the years 1885-2008, with the bulk of materials covering 1920-1995. It is an artificially-created collection of information about client accounts held by the JWT and provides information about JWT's management of its advertising campaigns. Additionally, the files document deliberations about such topics as media selection; markets and marketing; and target audience for individual advertising campaigns. The bulk of the materials, especially the older records, document clients managed by JWT's New York Office, but the work of other offices is also represented, including: Atlanta Office (Marine Corps); Chicago Office (Oscar Mayer, Kraft); Detroit Office (Ford); and San Francisco Office (Sprint). The collection includes account histories; research reports; memoranda; correspondence; printed material; clippings; brochures and pamphlets; product labels and packaging designs; original artwork and advertising proofs; slides; photographs; audiocassettes and videocassettes. Clients represented include Eastman Kodak; Ford; Ford Dealer Association; R.T. French; General Cigar; Hamm's beer; Handy Andy; International Banana Association; IBM; Kellogg; Kraft; Quaker Oats; U.S. Marine Corps; US Sprint; Warner Lambert; White Castle; and the 1964 World's Fair. More limited materials are available for other significant JWT clients, including: Burger King; Champion Spark Plug; Domino's Pizza; Lever Brothers; Northern Telecom; Oscar Mayer; Rolex; Standard Brands; and Scott Paper.

Materials relating to client accounts for which only a limited amount of information is available are arranged into a Small Files Series. Following the Small Files, there are account records for thirty individual clients.

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Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives, 1885-2019 and undated 277 Linear Feet — 3.9 Gigabytes

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The Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives document the operations and activities of the OAAA, the primary professional organization throughout the modern history of the outdoor advertising industry in the U.S. The collection also includes materials pertaining to the OAAA's predecessor organizations such as the Poster Advertising Association, Associated Bill Posters, the Painted Outdoor Advertising Association, and the International Bill Poster's Association of North America. There is some information on the outdoor industry abroad as well; Canada and the England/U.K. are more fully addressed than other countries. Materials include a wide variety of media and formats, and include correspondence, directories, published materials (such as technical and periodic reports, newsletters and bylaws), membership records, texts of speeches, articles and clippings, minutes of association meetings, and industry publications such as the long-running serial The Poster.

The Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives document the operations and activities of the OAAA, the primary professional organization throughout the modern history of the outdoor advertising industry in the U.S., 1885-1990s. The bulk of material falls between 1941 and 1980, that is between the entry of the United States into World War II and the end of the 1970s, a period that witnessed rapid and radical changes in the ways that Americans viewed and used the outdoors. The collection also includes materials pertaining to the OAAA's predecessor organizations such as the Poster Advertising Association, Associated Bill Posters, the Painted Outdoor Advertising Association, and the International Bill Poster's Association of North America. Some of the major outdoor advertising companies and organizations represented in this collection include: General Outdoor; Foster & Kleiser; United Advertising; Institute of Outdoor Advertising (IOA); National Outdoor Advertising Bureau (NOAB); and Outdoor Advertising, Inc. (OAI). There is some information on the outdoor industry abroad as well, especially Canada and the England/U.K. Taken as a whole, the collection reflects the activities and concerns (as well as the record-keeping practices) of the outdoor advertising industry.

Although physically organized into 23 series in alphabetical order, the collection may also be collocated intellectually into five main themes or topical areas: organization, affiliations, operational activities, technical activities, and audio-visual material. These broad categories reflect the scope of activities undertaken by the OAAA, the network of trade associations, professional organizations, governmental regulatory bodies, material manufacturers and engineering societies, and member associates. There is considerable overlap among the subjects covered by the various series, so searches of multiple series (and/or keyword electronic searches) should be undertaken to obtain a comprehensive view of the collection.

Included in the collection are multiple-format materials: paper files, printed materials, photographs, slides, blueprints, placards and metal signage. Other materials are a wide variety of media and formats, such as correspondence, directories, published materials (such as technical and periodic reports, newsletters and bylaws), membership records, texts of speeches, articles and clippings, minutes of association meetings, and industry publications such as the long-running serial The Poster. The numerous photographs scattered in files have been given index numbers and have been replaced in the files by photocopies so the originals may be better preserved and more accessible for browsing. The original images are located in the Photographs and Negatives Series, and are organized by index numbers. A searchable online database, Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions (ROAD), contains descriptions of these images.

Researchers interested in the organization of the OAAA might begin with the following series: Administration--Officers; Budget / Finance; Constitution & Bylaws; History; Meetings; Organization--Committees; and Organization--Departments and Divisions. These series document the overall organizational structure and operations of the OAAA, its board, committees and departments, as well as the record of its activities as reflected in meeting minutes, budgets, and its governing bylaws and policies. The OAAA was organized as a corporation, with a president and key officers elected from the Association membership. A Chairman's Advisory Committee assisted the Association leadership. Prominent officers represented in the collection include Frank Cawl, Karl Ghaster, and Walter Holan. Below that, the OAAA followed a dual "line and staff" organizational structure in which functions and activities determined the range of departmental divisions, and each division was overseen by an administrative committee which carried the same name as the division or department. Key divisions within the Association include the Public Policy, Research and Engineering, Business Development, and Plant Development divisions.

Material pertaining to the industry affiliations of the outdoor advertising industry is contained in the following series: History, International, Membership, Notre Dame, Outdoor Advertising Companies, Publications, State Associations, and Trade Organizations. This theme includes the regional and state outdoor advertising associations, along with the outdoor advertising companies that comprised the membership of the OAAA. Prominent among these are the General Outdoor Advertising Co., Foster & Kleiser Company, the R.C. Maxwell Company, John Donnelly and Sons, the Thomas Cusack Company, Columbus Outdoor, and United Advertising. In addition, the collection documents the activities of a number of professional organizations linked to outdoor advertising, such as the Association of National Advertisers, the Associated Advertising Clubs of America, the Advertising Federation of America, the American Association of Advertising Agencies, the American Advertising Federation, the National Outdoor Advertising Bureau, Outdoor Advertising, Inc., the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, the International Congress of Outdoor Advertising, and Notre Dame University's School of Outdoor Advertising.

The operational activities of the outdoor industry are documented mainly in the following series: Campaign Case Studies, Issues and Activities, Local Markets, and Regulation. These activities included sales, industry promotion and education, the monitoring of legislation and public policy affecting outdoor advertising, and public service campaigns. Operational activities linked the OAAA and outdoor advertising to the larger world, through such programs as patriotic and public service campaigns, as well as advocacy and promotional efforts through trade and general-audience publications. In addition, these files document the OAAA's participation in the public debate over issues directly concerning outdoor advertising, such as zoning ordinances, advertising regulation, and visual aesthetics. There are files on research firms and researchers such as A.C. Nielsen, Bruskin Associates, General Media, John Paver and Wilbur Smith. These series show the interactions between the OAAA and both governmental and non-governmental agencies and interest groups, such as the American Automobile Association, the National Safety Council, the Advertising Council (and its precursor the War Advertising Council), and the General Federation of Women's Clubs, as well as some notable individual activists such as Elizabeth Lawton. The materials in these files show the relationships, sometimes oppositional but frequently collaborative, between these agencies and the OAAA, over topics that included legislation and litigation over the regulation of outdoor advertising (at state and local as well as at the federal level) displays (posters, signs, and billboards), patriotism (especially during World War II), the energy crisis, urban renewal, zoning ordinances, the Highway Beautification Act (pursuant to the Federal Highway Acts), and highway and traffic safety. Also included in the series in this topical area are case studies of a wide range of outdoor advertising campaigns, involving such client companies as the Kellogg Company, Ford Motor Company, the Morton Salt Company, Swift and Co., and the Clark Candy Company (now owned by New England Confectionery Company). In addition, the OAAA and its membership conducted advertising campaigns designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the outdoor medium, using famous figures such as Calvin Coolidge, Woodrow Wilson, Miss America Shirley Cothran, and even with a fictitious automobile, the "Testa" car.

Technologies and research-related activities involved in outdoor advertising are represented in the series: Audience / Readership; Physical Structure; Research; and Traffic Audit Bureau. These series address those activities that comprise the production and display of outdoor advertising, such as billboard structure standards; research on paint, paper and glue; illumination; sign legibility; layout and typography; and posting practices. These files include materials on advertising reception and recall, traffic counts and other market-related research. Research aimed at improving the efficiency of outdoor advertising includes studies of billboard and poster placement, standardized sizes of billboards and posters, legibility studies, the development of market research methodologies, and the audits of individual poster plants to ensure industry-wide standard practices. In addition, the OAAA engaged in ongoing research into the technical aspects of manufacturing and posting outdoor advertising displays, through studies of billboard structure construction and engineering, building and plant maintenance, landscaping, paint and color research, paper, glue, illumination techniques and standards, the formation and modification of building codes and code compliance, and workplace safety. These activities involved ongoing relationships between the OAAA and a number of research and engineering agencies and associations, such as the A.C. Nielsen Company (readership studies), the Simmons Market Research Bureau, Wilbur Smith and Associates, the Barney Link Fellowship (academic research), the Traffic Audit Bureau (a nationwide organization based in N.Y.), Raymond Loewy Associates (developer of the Loewy panels), the Tiffen Art Metal Co. (all-metal billboard structures), Bruskin Associates (foot-traffic research), Daniel Starch and Staff, and Axiom (market research).

The audio-visual files, which include the Publications Series; the Video, Film and Audio Recordings Series; and the Photographs and Negatives Series, contain materials such as photographs, slides, negatives, trade and Association publications, training films, and audio recordings of presentations. A searchable on-line database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions --ROAD) contains descriptions of the majority of these photographs, slides and negatives. Please contact Research Services for information on accessing the ROAD resource. Photographs, negatives, and slides are available for research usage. Films, videotapes and audio recordings are closed for preservation reasons.

Glossary of Key Terms Used in Outdoor Advertising

NOTE: Trade terms in the glossary text in boldface indicate that those terms also have an entry in this glossary.

3-Sheet Poster: A poster measuring 6' high by 3' wide, usually found along the outer walls of retail stores.

6-Sheet Poster: A poster measuring 4'4" x 9'10", usually found near retail stores. This was originally the size meant by the term Junior Poster

8-Sheet Poster: A poster format measuring 6' x 12' overall with a bleed area of 5' x 11'. The 8-sheet posters are prominent features around retail establishments, and are widely used for advertising around neighborhoods. They also gained popularity among farm equipment suppliers for economical and seasonal reminder advertising. They are also currently known as Junior Posters.

24-Sheet Poster: The most widely used poster size in North America, and what most people mean when they refer to "billboards." These posters have a copy area measuring 8'8" high by 19'6" wide.

30-Sheet Poster: The largest standard poster size, measuring 12'3" x 24'6" overall with a bleed area of 10'5" x 22'8".

Allotments: The number of poster panels that make up a showing.

Animation: Devices or techniques used to create the illusion of movement in a poster or bulletin display. Animation may be mechanical, like a moving armature or figure, or it may be achieved with lighting patterns. The famous Coca-Cola spectacular at Times Square, for example, uses programmed lights to create the illusion that the Coke bottle regularly fills and empties.

Approach: In a line of travel, the distance from which an advertising structure first becomes fully visible to the point where the copy is no longer readable (having passed out of sight). Sometimes descriptive terms are used, such as Flash Approach, Short Approach, Medium Approach, or Long Approach, which also indicate the relative duration that an advertising structure remains visible to a potential reader in traffic.

Flash Approach: For pedestrian traffic, it refers to an approach distance of under 40'; for vehicles an approach of under 75' (for vehicles moving under 30 miles per hour) to under 100' (for vehicles moving over 30 mph).

Short Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance between 40'-75'; for vehicles an approach distance from 75'-150' (under 30 miles per hour) to 100'-200' (over 30 mph).

Medium Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance between 75'-125'; for vehicles an approach distance from 150'-250' (under 30 miles per hour) to 200'-350' (over 30 mph).

Long Approach: For pedestrian traffic, an approach distance greater than 125'; for vehicles an approach from over 250' (under 30 miles per hour) to over 350' (over 30 mph).

Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC): An independent auditing organization that conducts advertising and readership research, primarily in newspapers and magazines. It was founded in 1914, and continues its research mission today. The pre-eminent print media research organization in the world, it served as the model for the Traffic Audit Bureau. In fact, TAB was conceived to provide the same kinds of service to the outdoor advertising industry that ABC provided for the print industry.

Audited Circulation: The Traffic Audit Bureau (TAB) investigates and determines the circulation for a given advertising location, based on procedures generally accepted by the business community. The Audit Bureau of Circulations is another independent reporting firm that provides similar research services.

Awareness: The degree to which one remembers having seen a particular ad in a test market.

Billboard: A generic term that refers to any large outdoor advertising sign. These may be any of the many multiple-sheet posters, painted bulletins, wall murals, stadium signs, and so on. However, in popular use, the term billboard refers to the standard 24-sheet poster, along with its physical structure, which became a ubiquitous part of the American roadside architecture. The outdoor industry dropped "billboard" as a technical term in the early 1930s, due to negative connotations, but the word has persisted in the popular vocabulary of the American public to this day.

Blanked ad: In a recall or awareness study, portions of a poster's copy, usually the advertiser's name, brand name, or marketing slogan, are covered and hidden from view. Respondents are asked if they can identify the ad despite the missing or covered copy elements.

Blanking: The white paper border surrounding poster copy.

Bleed Area: Bleed is when printed images run all the way to the edge of the page, as opposed to standard printing which leaves a white border around the image. Bleeds are usually printed larger than the finished image (called trim size). The part of the printed image's margin that is trimmed away to achieve a final size is called the bleed area. It differs from cropping, in which a part of the actual image is removed.

Bleed-Through: A situation where previous advertising copy can be seen though present copy. Also called "show-through."

Blister: Air pockets that sometimes form between the sheets of a poster and the posting surface.

Circulation: The traffic volume at a given location; it is synonymous with traffic. Circulation refers to the circulation of people in an urban landscape. Beginning in 1912, the outdoor advertising industry became increasingly concerned with the growing urban concentration of people, the patterns of circulation of people, and the challenge of locating advertising structures at points of maximum circulation.

Cooperative Account: An outdoor advertising campaign in which both the manufacturer and the distributor of a product share the costs of advertising.

Copy: The pictorial design, background, and message combined in a display on a poster or bulletin. Copy refers to all of the elements that go into a billboard design, not just the textual message.

Counting Station: A specific point along a traffic artery where vehicles are counted in order to determine traffic volume.

Coverage: The placement of an outdoor advertising message on a network of principal thoroughfares so that the advertiser's message reaches as many people, as often as possible, throughout a given display period.

Cut-Outs: Figures or mechanical devices that are attached to a poster structure to create a 3-dimensional effect.

Daily Effective Circulation (DEC): The size of the audience that has the opportunity to see a given advertising message in a 24-hour period. It is the least number of people counted in the Daily Gross Circulation (DGC) who have a reasonable opportunity to see an advertising display. The basic formula is: 50% of pedestrian DGC traffic; 50% of motor vehicle traffic; and 25% of mass transportation traffic.

Daily Gross Circulation (DGC): The total number of persons who pass by a given set of panels (a representative showing) in a given day.

Daily Impressions: Another term for Daily Effective Circulation; an estimate of the number of people who pass by a given outdoor ad.

Display Period: The duration of an advertising display, as stipulated in a posting contract.

District Showing: A showing where posters are displayed in only a portion of a market (hence the term "district"), rather than in the whole market.

Effective Circulation: The potential audience for a given advertising structure.

Electric Spectacular: A flashing or neon lighted display generally seen at points of high congestion or at tourist attractions. New York City's Times Square; the Boardwalk at Atlantic City, New Jersey; and the strip in Las Vegas are examples of sites famous for their large concentrations of dramatic spectaculars.

Extension: Another term for cutout; additional copy beyond the panel face of a bulletin or billboard.

Face: The surface area of an outdoor advertising structure.

Facing: The side of an advertising structure visible to traffic flow.

Flagging: A tear on a poster, which causes it to hang loose, like a flag.

Frequency: The number of times a person has a chance to see a given advertising message during a showing period.

Gross Rating Points (GRP): The total number of impressions delivered by a showing. GRP are figured by dividing the Daily Effective Circulation (DEC) by the market population.

Hoarding: An early word for billboard. Originally, a hoarding, from the Old French word for "fence," referred to the fencing placed around construction sites. Its association with advertising came from the fact that such fences were handy posting surfaces for bill posters. Eventually fences, along with large wall-like structures, were erected specifically for advertising purposes along roadways. Modern billboards represent the culmination of historical efforts to control the placement of outdoor advertising as well as to regulate the size and configuration of posting surfaces, in an effort to address concerns and complaints raised by hoardings and the specter of "billboard blight."

Identification: Identification occurs when a respondent identifies an advertiser in a blanked ad during an awareness/recognition study.

Illuminated Bulletin: Posters or bulletins equipped with electric lighting, generally used in areas with high traffic volume day and night.

Impression: A term used to indicate the number of people who have an opportunity to see an ad in a given period of time.

Intensity: The size of a poster showing, or the extent to which an advertiser's message is displayed in a market. Intensity is usually represented in terms of an index number, such as #100, #50, and so on. See the entry for showing for further explanation.

Junior Panel: The posting structure measuring 6'x8', designed to accommodate Junior Posters.

Junior Poster: Junior posters are smaller versions of standard 24-sheet poster billboards that maintained the billboard's 1:2.25 height-width proportions but included only 1/4 the overall dimensions and surface area. They were commonly referred to as 6-sheet posters, although the standard officially adopted by the OAAA was technically a 6-1/2 sheet size. By the 1970s the term "Junior Poster" was interchangable with the term 8-sheet poster. They were originally conceived to reinforce and supplement standard-sized poster campaigns, but developed a niche in urban areas, around retail establishments, and in sites where zoning laws limited the use of larger posting structures.

Length of Approach: The measured distance from which a painted bulletin or poster is clearly visible.

Line of Travel: The centerline of an approach road.

Lithography: A technique for reproducing images in the mass production of posters. In lithography, the design is transferred onto stone or metal plates which are inked and printed onto paper.

Load Factor: In a traffic study, the average number of occupants in a vehicle.

Location List: A list of the locations of all poster panels sold and delivered.

Mandatory Copy: Ad copy that is required by law to appear on advertising of certain products. It includes warnings, labeling requirements, and disclaimers.

Market: A market is generally considered in terms of a local consumer area, typically a town or municipality. Traffic research has shown that typically 20 percent of a town's roads carry 80 percent of its traffic, within each market. Therefore, roughly equal sections of major traffic arteries are divided into poster zones, which determine the intensity of a poster display campaign, called a poster showing.

Minimum Showing: The smallest number of poster panels that an advertiser can purchase without paying a per-panel rate premium.

Mobile Panel: An advertising panel mounted on a trailer that can be transported to a given site. It is usually used for merchandising purposes or event advertising.

Molding: The frame made of wood, metal or plastic, which surrounds the face of an advertising structure. Also called "trim."

M.O.V.I.: Metro Outdoor Visibility Index. A pre-testing technique that allows an advertiser to evaluate the effectiveness of an outdoor message design by simulating the environment in which the message will appear.

Net Advertising Circulation (NAC): The Daily Effective Circulation (DEC) of a showing, modified by the poster structures' Space Position Value (SPV). To arrive at the NAC of a showing, the average NAC of all illuminated panels in a poster plant is multiplied by the number of illuminated panels in a showing. The same procedure is followed for the un-illuminated panels in a showing, and the NAC is the sum of the two figures.

Off-Premise Sign: A sign that advertises a product or service away from the location where it is made or provided.

On-Premise Sign: A sign that advertises a product or service at the location where it is made, sold or provided.

Outdoor Advertising: Refers to all advertising encountered out-of-doors. The OAAA currently recognizes four broad categories of outdoor advertising: billboards, street furniture, and transit advertising as well as alternative media, which includes advertising sites such as stadiums, airborne advertising, and gas pumps.

Outdoor Travel: The number and percentage of people who go outdoors in a given day.

Out of Home: A catch-all phrase that refers to all forms of advertising that reach consumers primarily outside his or her home.

Painted Bulletin: Bulletins differ from posters in a number of ways. Bulletin structures tend to be larger than poster boards; the standard bulletin structure measures 14' x 48', or twice the width of a standard poster panel. Also, bulletins generally occupy the most desirable locations along major roadways. While poster panels or sheets are typically mechanically reproduced by lithograph or other means, painted bulletins are painted, frequently by hand, and each bulletin tends to be in some way unique. Painted bulletins share a common history with the arts of sign-painting, lettering and calligraphy. The term "painted bulletin" also refers to notices and advertisements painted on walls and roofs, as well as signs and notices painted on barns along rural roadways. Painted bulletins frequently feature special cutouts that alter the appearance of the structure. They tend to be more expensive than posters, due not only to the desirability of their locations but also to the labor required in their execution and maintenance. Painted bulletins are generally leased for showings that last a year.

Porta-Panel: Full-sized poster panels erected for indoor events.

Plant Capacity: The total number of #100 showings (see the explanation under Showing) that are available in a poster plant.

Plant Operator: A company or individual who operates or maintains outdoor advertising structures.

Poster Panel: A structure used to display either 24- or 30-sheet posters. It measures 12' high by 24' wide. Also called a billboard.

Poster Plant: A poster plant consists of all the bulletin structures in a single urban area controlled by a single advertising company. The establishment of poster plant standardized operations, construction, maintenance and quality control has been an integral part of the OAAA's activities since its inception. The ultimate goal is for all poster plants to deliver the same quality of service to advertisers, limiting the difference only to the quality of the location of a plant's advertising structures.

Posting Date: The date on which the posters of a showing are scheduled for display.

Pounce Pattern: A poster pattern is projected onto large sheets of paper and traced in outline form. The outline is then perforated with a needle, and the perforated designs are known as a pounce pattern. Dust is blown through the perforations, which creates a pattern on the posting face, ready for painting. Prior to computerized graphic design techniques, it was a common practice for transferring and enlarging copy art.

Premiere Panel: A standard display, measuring 12'3" x 24'6" overall. Typically, premiere panels are single sheet vinyl panels stretched over a 30-sheet poster panel structure.

Rain Lap: The practice of lapping poster panel sections, so that the upper sections overlap the lower sections, similar to shingles. Rain lap panels reduce flagging and rain seepage.

Rates: Beginning in 1901 Associated Bill Posters inaugurated the practice of publishing the rates of its member agencies in an effort to promote a standard of service across the outdoor advertising profession. The rates were listed in terms of the cost per sheet, a number which had to be multiplied by the number of sheets required for each poster, and by the number of postings in a showing. Thus, a listed rate of 12 cents (.12) meant that for example in Minneapolis, where a properly representative showing required 80 24-sheet or 150 8-sheet posters, the typical cost (in 1900) of a showing would be $144.00 for an 8-sheet display (150 x 8 x .12), or $230.40 for a 24-sheet display (80 x 24 x .12).

Reach: The approximate percentage of a target audience population that will be potentially exposed to an advertising message at least once during a showing period.

Readership-Remembrance: The number and percentage of people who remember having seen a given poster.

Riding a Showing: A physical field inspection of the panels used in a showing.

Roadside Signs: A collective term for all signage found along roadsides. Roadside signage falls into 2 basic categories: commercial (both on-premise and off-premise) and governmental (right-of-way signage, including traffic markers, warning signs, and historic markers).

Rotary Bulletin: A standard 14' x 48' bulletin structure that can be moved ("rotated") to different locations at fixed intervals.

Setback: The distance from the line of travel to the center of an advertising structure.

Showing: A "package" of poster displays. A showing generally lasts for 30 days, and is categorized numerically in terms of intensity, and generally noted as either #50 or #100 showings. A #50 showing includes one poster display for every poster zone (a section of a local market), a #100 showing includes 2 posters, and so on. The numerical index ensures that each poster campaign will receive an adequate distribution, and each advertiser will receive equal treatment by the posting firm. Traditionally, showings were referred to in terms of a full- (#100), half- (#50), or quarter- (#25) showing, but by the 1920s, the terms had changed to: intensive, representative, and minimum.

S.M.S.A.: Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. An economically integrated area consisting of a central city and its contiguous counties.

Snipe: An adhesive strip used to change a portion of the copy of a bulletin. Also called "overlay."

Space Position Value (SPV): The index of visibility of a poster panel. SPV is based on four factors: length of approach, speed of travel, angle of the panel to approach, and the relationship of the panel to adjacent panels.

Spotted Map: A map showing the locations of the panels used in a given poster showing.

Stock Posters: Standardized poster designs that may be purchased by an advertiser and customized by adding the specific business's name.

Street Furniture: Advertising displays that also function as public amenities, such as bus shelters, benches, trash receptacles, newsstands, kiosks, and in-store signage.

Traffic: The volume of vehicles and pedestrians passing by a particular point during a specified time interval. See also Circulation.

Traffic Count: An audit of the number of vehicles passing a given point, called a counting station, in order to determine the daily effective circulation of a location.

Transit Advertising: Advertising messages intended to reach users of non-personal transportation. Transit advertising includes taxi-cab tops, bus sides and interior panels, subway cars, and airport and railway posters.

Transit Shelter: A curbside structure located at bus and trolley stops. Transit shelters provide standardized advertising spaces measuring 69x48" with a bleed area of 67x46".

Tri-Vision™: An advertising structure made of slatted faces that can revolve at regular intervals, displaying three different messages in rotation.

Unit: A single poster panel or painted bulletin.

Glossary of Key Acronyms Used in the Records of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America

OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America

AAA: American Automobile Association (consumer interest and advocacy group)

AAAA: American Association of Advertising Agencies (industry organization)

ABC: Audit Bureau of Circulations (print media research company)

AMMO: Audiences Market by Market for Outdoor (IOA computer program for market research)

AMRB: Axiom Market Research Bureau, Inc. (research company)

ANA: Association of National Advertisers (industry organization)

ANSI: American National Standards Institute (engineering industry organization)

ARF: Advertising Research Foundation (research company)

ASA: American Standards Association (engineering industry organization)

BBDO: Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborne (advertising agency)

BOCA: Building Officials Conference of America (professional organization)

BPAA: British Poster Advertising Association (industry organization)

BPR: Bureau of Public Roads (U.S. government agency)

BTA: British Transport Advertising Ltd. (transit advertising company)

CIE: Coras Iompair Eirann Outdoor Advertising (Irish company)

COMB: Canadian Outdoor Measurement Bureau (research company)

DMB&B: D'Arcy Masius Benton and Bowles (advertising agency)

DOT: Department of Transportation (U.S. government agency)

F & K: Foster and Kleiser (outdoor advertising company)

FHWA: Federal Highway Act (U.S. legislation)

GFWC: General Federation of Women's Clubs (interest group)

GOA: General Outdoor Advertising Company

HBA: Highway Beautification Act (U.S. legislation)

HUD: Department of Housing and Urban Development (U.S. government agency)

IAA: International Advertising Association (industry organization)

ICBO: International Conference of Building Officials (professional organization)

IOA: Institute of Outdoor Advertising (marketing arm of OAAA)

IPA: Institute of Practitioners of Advertising (professional organization)

LTA: London Transport Advertising (British advertising company)

NASA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (U.S. government agency)

ND: Notre Dame University (South Bend, Ind.)

NESA: National Electric Sign Association (engineering industry organization)

NOAB: National Outdoor Advertising Bureau (industry organization cooperatively owned by ad agencies. Its primary function was to service outdoor advertising campaigns through on-the-spot evaluations and site inspections.)

OAI: Outdoor Advertising, Inc. (marketing arm of OAAA)

OARI: Outdoor Advertising Research Institute (research company)

OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (U.S. government agency)

PAA: Poster Advertising Association (industry organization)

PAAC: Poster Advertising Association of Canada (industry organization)

PACE: Poster Advertising Circulation Evaluation (research company)

POAA: Painted Outdoor Advertising Association (industry organization)

SICMEA: Societe Industrielle du Constructions Metalliques En Acier (French billboard construction and posting company)

SMRB: Simmons Market Research Bureau (research company)

TAB: Traffic Audit Bureau (research company; a non-profit organization dedicated to producing authenticated circulation values for outdoor advertising markets)

USO: United Service Organizations (U.S. public service agency)

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Ettie Crystal Riddell papers, 1886-1968 10 Linear Feet — 2733 Items

Active in Disciples of Christ in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and other states. Husband, Louis Riddell, was a minister for the denomination. Collection contains correspondence, diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials relating to Riddell and her husband, Louis Riddell. The materials document not only Riddell's personal life as the wife of a minister and her involvement in the Disciples of Christ ministry, but also the evolving role of women in American religious communities. Notebooks contain sermons that Ettie Riddell delivered to women's groups. Her diaries date chiefly from the 1930s to the 1960s, but there are also two early diaries from 1894 and 1896. Other materials, especially correspondence, clippings, and sermon notes, document the ministry of Louis Riddell and the lives of other Riddell family members.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, photographs, and other materials relating to Riddell and her husband, Louis Riddell. The materials document not only Riddell's personal life as the wife of a minister and her involvement in the Disciples of Christ ministry, but also the evolving role of women in American religious communities. Notebooks contain sermons that Ettie Riddell delivered to women's groups. Her diaries date chiefly from the 1930s to the 1960s, but there are also two early diaries from 1894 and 1896. Other materials, especially correspondence, clippings, and sermon notes, document the ministry of Louis Riddell and the lives of other Riddell family members.

A large number of the materials are annotated by Dorothy S. Bruce (now Welbon), granddaughter of Ettie Crystal Riddell and Louis D. Riddell. The materials are in original order as received; basic processing but no rearrangement was performed. Container list was created by the donor.

The list includes notations for ECR (Ettie Crystal Riddell) and LDR (Louis D. Riddell).

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Jay Rutherfurd papers, 1887-1995 8 Linear Feet — Approx. 2613 Items

Broadcast journalist, businessman, and resident of Palm Beach (Palm Beach Co.), Fla. These papers are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection also contains more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows. In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. These materials also document Jay Rutherfurd's trips to Morocco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as the social life of Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Florida.

The papers of Jay Rutherfurd are comprised primarily of correspondence, clippings, essays, and articles related to the subjects Rutherfurd covered during his career as a broadcast journalist. Topics reflect his interest in diplomacy, journalism, and U.S. foreign relations since 1961. Much of the material documents the career of Angier Biddle Duke, a Rutherfurd family friend who served in the diplomatic corps during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Other material reflects the instrumental role Rutherfurd played in the creation of Duke University's Living History Program. The collection features more than 53 audiocassettes, two videocassettes, scripts, and filmed interviews (late 1960s to 1980s) with prominent individuals, as well as recordings of TV news segments and radio shows.

In addition, the collection contains Rutherfurd family photographs, diaries, scrapbooks, legal papers, and a genealogy, as well as drafts of Jay Rutherfurd's memoir and miscellany. Individuals represented in these materials include John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Haile Selassie, King Hussein of Jordan, Tito, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robin Chandler Lynn Duke, Jacques Fray, Rafael Calvo, Stanton Griffis, Earl E. T. Smith, Ottis Pike, Lucius Clay, Averell Harriman, Henry Kissinger, John Sherman Cooper, Stanton Griffis, Terry Sanford, Willy Brandt, Ellsworth Bunker, and Ryoichi Sasakawa, as well as other celebrities and heads of state. The material also documents Rutherfurd's trips to Morroco, Southeast Asia, Nepal, the Panama Canal Zone, the People's Republic of China, Iran, and the Middle East, as well as social life in Southampton, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Fla.

Original audiovisual recordings are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be produced before contents can be accessed. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this material.

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Edward James Parrish papers, 1888-1926 and undated 9.2 Linear Feet — 31 boxes; 3 oversize folders; and 6 volumes — Approximately 1500 items

Tobacco manufacturer, resident of Durham, North Carolina, and Tokyo, Japan. The papers of Edward James Parrish primarily consist of business and personal papers, correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921), and photographic collections of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. Items include a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), and a scrapbook created by their only daughter Lily Parrish. Turn-of-the-century photograph albums relate to the Parrishes time in Japan (circa 1899-1905) and form a large series of their own. Two were assembled by Kichibei Murai of the Murai Brothers, a Tokyo cigarette manufacturing company of which Parrish was the first vice-president; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are seven fine souvenir albums with large hand-tinted albumen prints from noted Japanese studios, including that of Kusakabe Kimbei. There are also personal photograph and postcard albums of the Parrish's travels in Japan, Korea, and China, and Mrs. Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan. Loose family photographs and portraits dating from about 1890 to 1920 round out the collection.

The Edward James Parrish Papers include business and personal correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921) of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. There are also various bills, a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), photographic collections, several postcard albums, and a scrapbook created by Lily Parrish.

The papers also include Rosa Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan, as well as her writings on the status of women. There are also materials relating to Kichibei Murai's family and to Murai Brothers Company in Japan, close partners and friends of the Parrish family.

Photographic formats include glass plate negatives, loose prints, photo postcards, and over 20 albums. Two of the photograph albums date from the late 19th century and were owned by Kichibei Murai; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are black-and-white late 19th and early 20th century loose albumen and early gelatin silver prints of family members.

The photograph albums document the Parrish family's travels in Japan, China, and Niagara Falls, and include personal snapshots taken at these locations as well as in their home of Durham, N.C.; there are also many commercial souvenir photographs from Japan. The latter take the form of large finely handtinted albumen prints of Japanese scenery, landscapes, cultural sites and temples, clothing, entertainment, and transportation, housed in high-quality souvenir photograph albums; many of these feature highly decorated lacquer inlay covers, elaborate bindings. Most include captions. The studio of Kusakabe Kimbei, a noted photographer, created many of the prints and albums, and the work of other notable studios have also been identified.

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Victor Bassett papers, 1888-1938 and undated 2.0 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

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Physician, health officer, and librarian of the Georgia Medical Society; from Savannah. Collection contains public health information, including correspondence, health and mortality records, biographical information, genealogies, reports, and printed matter relating to the medical history and practice of medicine in Savannah. Also includes manuscript drafts from naturalist Walter J. Hoxie.

Public health information, including correspondence, health and mortality records, biographical information, genealogies, reports, and printed matter. Most of the material relates to Bassett's work in public health and medical professional education efforts for Savannah and Chatham County, Georgia. Some topics addressed are school health examinations, nurses and midwives training, vaccination efforts, and milk pasteurization and licensing. There is also a significant amount of material acquired and assembled by Bassett as part of his role as librarian and medical historian for the Georgia Medical Society, including his research about the history of the medical profession in Savannah and Georgia from the colonial period through the late nineteenth century. Collection includes photoduplicates of original manuscripts and artifacts held in other repositories as well as Bassett's notes and drafts of biographical sketches about prominent Georgia physicians and families. Collection also contains Bassett's extensive lecture notes and laboratory notebooks from his medical training at the University of Wisconsin and University of Pennsylvania. Subjects covered include bacteriology, chemistry, infectious diseases, obstetrics, and gynecology.

Also held in this collection is a series of drafts by author Walter J. Hoxie, a naturalist and Girl Scout pioneer who also wrote columns for the Savannah Morning News and was an apparent family friend of the Bassetts. Most of the drafts appear to be unpublished folk stories or family stories; there are also bird-watching lists.

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Shields Family papers, 1888-1968 and undated 2.7 Linear Feet — circa 1000 Items

Reverend Robert Shields, his wife Louise Shields, and members of their family were Methodist missionaries in Angola between the 1890s and the 1960s. The Shields Family Papers consist of correspondence, legal papers, and photographs created by three generations of a missionary family. The correspondence documents the experiences of a missionary family in Angola (Luanda and Malange) and Zimbabwe (including the Umtali region) in the early twentieth century, and includes letters written from family members in England, among them letters written from Greta Gazeley to her mother, Wilhelmina Shields Gazeley, in the 1950s. The photographs, dating from the early 1900s to the 1960s, portray the lives of missionaries in Africa through portraits and snapshots of the Shields family and other groups both European, American and African, as well as photographs of groups of schoolchildren, mission buildings, and various scenes of African life and landscapes. The collection includes a handwritten memoir by Robert Shields, a biographical account of Louise Raven Shield's life compiled by her daughter, Irene Withey Shields, and various writings by Irene Withey Shields and Wilhelmina Taylor Shields on their experiences in Africa. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The Shields Family Papers consist of correspondence, legal papers, and photographs created by three generations of a missionary family. The correspondence documents the experiences of a missionary family in Angola (Luanda and Malange) and Zimbabwe (including the Umtali region) in the early twentieth century. In 1903, Louise Shields brought her children to live in London and gave birth to Helen there; much of the correspondence is between Louise and Robert during this period of separation. Leaving her children in England to return to Angola, Louise received additional correspondence from the woman who took care of the children in her absence. Also included in the correspondence is a series of letters written by Greta Gazeley to her mother Wilhelmina Taylor Shields Gazeley in the 1950s. The legal papers in the collection consist of marriage certificates, copies of birth certificates, an immigration visa for Robert Shields, and US Army discharge papers for Robert Dodson Shields. In addition, the collection includes a handwritten memoir by Robert Shields, a biographical account of Louise Raven Shield's life compiled by her daughter, Irene Withey Shields, and various writings by Irene Withey Shields and Wilhelmina Taylor Shields on their experiences in Africa. Also included are Irene's and Wilhelmina's diplomas from the University of Cape Town.

The extensive collection of photographs, dating from the early 1900s to the 1960s, provide a portrait of the lives of missionaries in Africa. The majority are portraits and snapshots of the Shields family and other groups both European, American, and African, as well as photographs of groups of schoolchildren, mission buildings, and various scenes of African life and landscapes. Several of the family portraits were taken during the family's time in England. The collection contains one photograph of Bishop William Taylor and a young African boy. Also included are a number of picture postcards. With the exception of three photograph albums, the photographs are unsorted and the majority are undated.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

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William Henry Glasson papers, 1891 - 1946 and undated 5.0 Linear Feet

William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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R.C. Maxwell Company records, 1891-2001 and undated 135 Linear Feet — 118,350 Items

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R.C. Maxwell Company of Trenton, N.J., was one of the earliest enduring outdoor advertising companies, founded in 1894 by Robert Chester Maxwell (1873-1955) and continued to operate primarily in the New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania area until the company was sold in 2000. The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The R.C. Maxwell Company Records span the years 1891-2001 and include photographs and negatives, videocassettes, ledgers and account books, scrapbooks, correspondence and legal papers relating to the company's operations in outdoor advertising. Photographs and negatives in several formats (film, glass negatives, polaroid prints) document billboard designs for a variety of advertisers as well as depicting billboard and electric sign structures and their location relative to the surrounding environment. Urban locations include Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J., Boardwalk, where a number of photographs also document the Miss America beauty pageant parade and other parades in which the R.C. Maxwell Company participated. A few photographs document billboard construction and erection; there are also photographs of the Maxwell family and of Maxwell company staff and employees. Scrapbooks contain images of billboards and wall paintings produced by the Maxwell company as well as by David L. Clark, a High Point, N.C. artist and sign painter who was R.C. Maxwell's guardian. Other scrapbooks document primarily Coca-Cola signs of the early 20th century, as well as World War I support efforts including the U.S. Food Administration (under the direction of Herbert Hoover), the U.S. Fuel Administration, and Liberty Bond campaigns. Companies represented in the collection include the Boardwalk Advertising Signs Co., C&B Electric Signs Co., Trenton Advertising Co., and Trenton Poster Advertising Co.

Approximately 15,000 photographs, dating up to around 1952, have been described in the searchable ROAD Database (Resource of Outdoor Advertising Descriptions). The numbered and indexed black-and-white photographs and negatives (along with a limited number of glass negatives) include images of billboard and electric spectacular executions (illuminated billboards); road shots showing the approach views to billboard structures; images of Maxwell advertising structures; and images of urban and rural billboard displays in various states, primarily Pennsylvania and New Jersey, including a number of images of Times Square in New York and the Atlantic City, N.J. boardwalk. Because the majority of photographs show the billboards in their surroundings, the images provide a snapshot of the people and buildings near the billboard.

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William McDougall papers, 1892 - 1982 9.5 Linear Feet — 10000 Items

William McDougall (1871-1938), an early twentieth century psychologist, taught at Duke University from 1927 to 1938. McDougall espoused a hormic theory of psychology, emphasizing genetics and instinct over nurture. McDougall was also a strong proponent of parapsychology. The William McDougall Papers, 1892-1982, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, notebooks, photographs, diaries, drawings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Major subjects include Lamarckian experiments conducted by McDougall, the McDougall family (and sons Kenneth and Angus in particular), the study of parapsychology, the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, the Psychology Department at Duke University, and anthropological studies in Borneo and the Torres Strait. English.

The William McDougall Papers date from 1892 to 1982, and contain McDougall's own papers as well as those of his family and other researchers. The collection is organized into three series. The first series, Professional, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the late 1920s to the late 1930s, the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Of particular note is his correspondence with other scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences. A card file which indexes these correspondents is available with the collection. McDougall's notes from his Lamarckian experiments on rats can also be found here, as can photograph albums from his anthropological travels in the late 1890s. The Family series contains correspondence, notebooks, photographs, clippings, writings, research and education materials, diaries, drawings, and other materials. Many materials belonging to two of McDougall's sons, Kenneth and Angus, are filed here. The third series, Other Researchers, contains writings and correspondence written by other researchers about McDougall or about McDougall's influence on psychology. These materials were not directly related to or owned by McDougall; most were generated after his death.

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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Falkener Family papers, 1893-2001 9 Linear Feet — 7000 Items

African-American family based in Greensboro (Guildford Co.), North Carolina. Waldo C. Falkener served on the Greensboro City Council from 1959-1963. His wife, Margaret, was also politically active. The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener, and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, including photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Later accessions include clippings, correspondence, and other materials documenting the political careers of the Falkeners. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection primarily documents the political career of Waldo C. Falkener and comprises minutes and reports from Greensboro City Council meetings. The council minutes include committee reports (finance, public works, transportation, and real estate committees), as well as ordinances, laws, memoranda, and letters. Meeting notes are arranged by date, spanning 1959-1966. There are also materials from his campaigns for office and items that document his successes as a council member. Some correspondence relates to the life of Falkener's father, Henry Hall Falkener, also an active politician and public school teacher. Documents span beyond Falkener's death in 1992 up until 2001, including obituaries and memorial material. In addition, there are documents relating to other family members, George H. Falkener, Henry Hall Falkener, Madge Z. Mitchell Falkener, and Margaret E. Falkener. Materials include photographs, news articles, correspondence, and deeds. Printed materials consist largely of those published by the Greensboro City Council, including annual budget reports, personel reviews, and handbooks. The collection includes newspaper articles about Falkener's civic services and letters of appreciation (1972, 1979), as well as materials related to the successful campaign to name a Greensboro elementary school after Falkener and his father (2001).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Charles W. Hoyt Company records, 1894-1973 and undated (bulk 1909-1928), bulk 1909-1928 4.4 Linear Feet — 3,300 Items

The records of the Charles W. Hoyt Company advertising agency span the years 1894-1973 with the bulk dating between 1909-1928. The collection primarily documents the founding and operation of the company, and to a lesser extent the personal activities of the Hoyt family (Charles, Effie, Winthrop, and Everett) and Winthrop's service during World War II in the U. S. Army Air Force. Materials include correspondence, scrapbooks, company publications and manuals, financial records, clippings, diaries, writings, drawings, photographs, house advertisements, Nazi medals, song lyrics, and printed material. Very little information exists in the collection concerning the Hoyt Company's clients. The only client advertisements that survive were produced for Merck and Co. The Hoyt company scrapbooks document some activities for clients including Arnold Bakers, Golden Blossom Honey, Jamaica Tourist Board, KLM, Stanley Home Products, the Charles B. Woolson Co. and the State of New Hampshire. The collection contains correspondence between family members as well as between the company and Merck and Co., the Charles B. Knox Co., and William Benton, one of the founders of the Benton and Bowles advertising agency. Another notable person mentioned in the collection is Hoyt Company employee Samuel Meek, who would go on to become an important executive for the J. Walter Thompson Company advertising agency. The collection is organized into the Company Series; the Family Series; and the Winthrop Hoyt World War II Series. Large-format items are located in the Oversize Materials.

The Company Series contains the bulk of material in the collection and is concerned with the founding, and subsequent operation of the Charles W. Hoyt Company from 1909 to 1965 by Charles W. Hoyt (until his death in 1928), and then by his sons Winthrop and Everett "Red" Hoyt. The Company produced and sold advertising and marketing plans to clients in addition to providing other advertising services. Charles Hoyt's philosophy of "planned" advertising is well-documented.

The Family Series consists of personal diaries, correspondence, photographs and other printed materials relating to Hoyt family members as distinct from the activities of the Charles W. Hoyt Company. Family members for whom materials exist include Charles W. Hoyt, Effie Smith Hoyt, Winthrop Hoyt, and Everett "Red" Hoyt.

The Winthrop Hoyt World War II Records Series documents Hoyt's service during the war as an intelligence officer in the United States Army Air Force. It includes correspondence and writings, photographs, Nazi medals and other materials.

Oversize Materials include items removed from other series due to their size.

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Coleman family papers, 1895-1971 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 364 Items

Residents of Canada, Europe, and Asheville, N.C. Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Fleury Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts and the "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music instruction (violin and piano), women's society life in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century.

Collection consists largely of a two-volume diary, 1895-1919, of Isabel Coleman, a twenty-three volume set of diaries, 1904-1971, belonging to Mary Augusta Coleman, and photographs of Fleury-Coleman family members and some of their residences. There are also two volumes pertaining to Mary Coleman's personal accounts, "French Broad River Garden Club, 1967-1969," a few items of correspondence and genealogy, and a number of clippings and printed materials. Topics covered by the materials include music clubs, instruction and performance (violin and piano) in Europe and the U.S., women's society life and fashions in Asheville, N.C., and women's travel in European countries during the 20th century. There are few comments about current events, even during the World Wars and the Depression, but there are extensive accounts of social life and customs in Europe and Asheville, N.C.

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Norine Shipley Norris papers, 1895-2000 1.8 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Norine Shipley Norris attended Southern Female College (also known as Cox College) in 1897-1899, and taught Sunday school in Atlanta at Kirkwood Baptist Church in the early 1900s. This collection (2009-0129) (200 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1890s-2000) includes a variety of materials from Norine Shipley Norris, in particular her school notebooks, correspondence, and catalogs from the Southern Female College, which she attended for at least two years. Of note is the correspondence from Earnest Sevier Cox, a white supremist who courted Shipley for a time (1905-1906); photographs and records from her years of teaching at Kirkwood Baptist Church (1901-1904); and her handwritten application to the Daughters of the American Revolution (1918). Also included are a number of photographs and tintypes, scrapbooks, several books of poetry and literature, and miscellaneous clippings and ephemera.

This collection (2009-0129) (200 items; 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1890s-2000) includes a variety of materials from Norine Shipley Norris, in particular her school notebooks, correspondence, and catalogs from the Southern Female College, which she attended for at least two years. Of note is the correspondence from Earnest Sevier Cox, a white supremist who courted Shipley for a time (1905-1906); photographs and records from her years of teaching at Kirkwood Baptist Church (1901-1904); and her handwritten application to the Daughters of the American Revolution (1918). Also included are a number of photographs and tintypes, scrapbooks, several books of poetry and literature, and miscellaneous clippings and ephemera.

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Trinity Park School collection, 1898 - 1922 2.5 Linear Feet

Trinity Park School was established in 1898, under headmaster J.F. Bivins, to better prepare students for admission at Trinity College and other institutions. The school operated on the campus of Trinity College until 1922, when it was permanently closed. The Trinity Park School Collection includes bound volumes, print materials, the papers of headmaster F.S. Aldridge, and photographs, and financial information. Annual Trinity Park School catalogs have been removed and cataloged separately.

The Trinity Park School Collection includes bound volumes, print materials, and photographs. The Bound Volumes Series contains accounting ledgers, a grade book, minute books, and a roll book. Trinity Park School's annual catalogs have been removed and cataloged separately. These materials offer insight into the students at the school, their courses of study, and their financial situations.

The second series, Print Materials, contains financial information, correspondence, illustrated booklets, and other documents related to Trinity Park School.

The third series, F.S. Aldridge Papers, contains the correspondence of the headmaster of Trinity Park School. It dates primarily from 1921 and 1922, when the school was closed.

The final series, Photographs, includes photos of students, faculty, buildings, and other images from the school. Oversized photographs can also be found in this series.

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Charles Torrence Nesbitt papers, 1899-1947 and undated 2.5 Linear Feet — approximately 440 items

Physician and public health official, of Wilmington, North Carolina. Collection comprises correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, and other papers, relating to Nesbitt's career, especially his service as superintendent of health (1911-1917) in Wilmington, N.C., and public health and sanitation in Wilmington. Includes an autobiographical account of Nesbitt's medical education at the University of Pennsylvania, Bellevue Medical College and Baltimore Medical College, and his experiences as a young physician, with references to early psychiatric practices, and political and social affairs and homosexuality in New York City during the 1880s. Physicians discussed in the memoir include Austin Flint, Jr., Edward Gamaliel Janeway, Frederick Peterson, George Reuling, and John Allen Wyeth. Correspondents include Rupert Blue, Albert Pike Bourland, Edward Hatch, Jr., Jacob Lott Ludlow, Angus Wilton McLean, Arthur Wilson Page, Walter Hines Page, Watson Smith Rankin, Leo L. Redding, Charles Wardell Stiles, Frank Porter Stockbridge, Henry Walters, and George Chandler Whipple.

Collection comprises correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, and other papers, relating to Charles Torrence Nesbitt's career, especially his service as superintendent of health (1911-1917) in Wilmington, N.C., and public health and sanitation in Wilmington. Includes an autobiographical account of Nesbitt's medical education at the University of Pennsylvania, Bellevue Medical College (now New York University Medical Center) and Baltimore Medical College (now the University of Maryland School of Medicine), and his experiences as a young physician, with references to early psychiatric practices, and political and social affairs and homosexuality in New York City during the 1880s.

Physicians discussed in the memoir include Austin Flint, Jr., Edward Gamaliel Janeway, Frederick Peterson, George Reuling, and John Allen Wyeth. Correspondents include Rupert Blue, Albert Pike Bourland, Edward Hatch, Jr., Jacob Lott Ludlow, Angus Wilton McLean, Arthur Wilson Page, Walter Hines Page, Watson Smith Rankin, Leo L. Redding, Charles Wardell Stiles, Frank Porter Stockbridge, Henry Walters, and George Chandler Whipple.

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Frank and Anne Warner papers, 1899-2000 and undated bulk 1933-1985 12 Linear Feet — 4934 Items

Anne and Frank Warner were folklorists and folk song musicians. The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials from as early as 1899 to as late as 2000, documents the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north.

The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials dating from 1899 to 2000, is a record of the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture and African-American music traditions, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north. The bulk of the materials date from the 1930s through the 1980s, and are organized into six series: Correspondence; Subject Files; Folk Materials; Writings; Audiovisual Materials; and Prints and Negatives. Through handwritten correspondence with a wide variety of folk singers and musicians, subject files, printed materials, film, video, photographs, and the Warners' own studio albums of folk songs, these materials document early methods for recording and collecting songs - the 20th century development of American ethnomusicology. Moreover, as an invaluable resource for studies in traditional American folk life, the collection also includes field audio recordings and photographs of folk singers, songwriters, and musicians in their element, at home with their families, singing and playing their instruments. Notable individuals referred to in the Warner Collection include: William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Bill Doerflinger, Lena Bourne Fish, ("Yankee") John Galusha, David Grimes (of the Philco Corporation), Wayland Hand, Rena and Nathan Hicks, Buna Vista and Roby Monroe Hicks, Ray Hicks, Peter and Beryl Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Bessie and Frank Proffitt, Carolyn Rabson, Carl Sandburg, Pete Seeger, Charles K. ("Tink") Tillett and family, and Charles L. Todd. The Warners were actively involved with a number of organizations, among them: the American Folklore Society, the Country Dance and Song Society of America, Duke University, the Library of Congress, the Newport Folk Foundation, the New York State Historical Association, and the YMCA. The Warners published a number of essays concerning traditional American folk culture and music in Think Weekly, the Appalachian Journal, Country Dance and Song, the Long Island Forum, A Celebration of American Family Folklore, and Come for to Sing. In addition to these, Ann Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs in the Frank and Anne Warner Collection, 1984, remains the authoritative compendium of the Warners' research in and collection of traditional American folk music.

The Warners' personal and professional relationships with various people and organizations can be traced through materials in the Correspondence Series, 1934-1985. Significant exchanges with the American Folklore Society, the Library of Congress, with William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Wayland Hand, Alan Lomax, Carl Sandburg, and Pete Seeger are extensively documented in the files. More correspondence can be found elsewhere in the collection - organized topically in the Subject Series, and according to correspondents' names in the Folk Materials Series.

The Subject Files Series, 1899-1984, houses documentary materials that give a wider context to the Warners' life and work. This series includes information about the Warners' genealogies, Frank Warner's work with youth and his career in the YMCA, material germane to the lawsuit that developed over the song "Tom Dooley," information on and clips about various performances and recordings, and other materials.

The Folk Materials Series, 1938-1982, contains correspondence between the Warners and many of the traditional American folk singers and musicians that they visited; for some of the individuals there is more information than correspondence alone. This series is organized by state, city or region, and then individual or family, for example: North Carolina, Appalachia, Rena and Nathan Hicks. The states represented are: North Carolina, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and West Virginia. The Warners' correspondence with both Rena and Nathan Hicks and Bessie and Frank Proffitt comprise the most extensive files. The series materials provide essential documentation for understanding the communities and the world views of the musicians.

The Writings Series, 1938-1985, contains a variety of materials, including documents that the Warners published in journals dedicated to folk life; grant applications; materials germane to the production and publication of Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs; words to recorded and unrecorded folk songs in the collection, including some songs by Frank Warner; and Anne Warner's hand-written field research journals and notebooks.

An extensive collection of songs, interviews, and other recordings on audio tape reels, cassette tapes, phonograph albums, and compact discs are housed in the Audiovisual Materials Series, 1940-2000. Several motion picture films and video tape recordings also document the Warners' work and performances. Many of the items in the Audiovisual Materials Series are documented in written form in the Writings Series, including the sound recordings of folk songs and interviews collected in the Library of Congress master tapes, and which are not included in Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs.

The Prints and Negatives Series, 1933-1969, extends the Warner collection's scope to include photographic images as well. There are 239 black and white prints, which are arranged alpha-numerically into lots from Lot 1 through Lot 9E. Within the lots, the prints are identified by number. In the pictures, the Warners have captured images of many traditional American folk musicians and singers. The Warners themselves appear frequently throughout the collection. The photographic documentation of the Warners' travels contains pictures of folk singers and their homes and families, including: Nathan, Roby Monroe, Buna Vista, Ray and Linzy Hicks; Lena Bourne Fish; Bessie and Frank Proffitt; the Tillett family; Louis Solomon; and Carl Sandburg.

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National Biscuit Company photograph album, 1900-1935 0.6 Linear Feet

The National Biscuit Company was founded in 1898, the product of a merger among the American Biscuit and Manufacturing Company, the New York Biscuit Company, and the United States Baking Company. The new conglomerate was headquartered in New York City with 114 bakeries across the United States. Over the next several decades the company grew by acquiring companies such as the F.H. Bennett Company, maker of Milk-Bone Pet Products, and the Shredded Wheat Company, maker of Triscuit Wafers and Shredded Wheat Cereal. The name "Nabisco" was first used as the name for a cracker introduced in 1901, but the corporate name did not change to Nabisco until 1971. The Uneeda Biscuit, National Biscuit Company's first packaged cracker, was the subject of the company's first million-dollar advertising campaign. Collection comprises a photograph album containing 129 gelatin silver prints and two cyanotypes by anonymous photographers. The majority of the photographs feature storefront and grocery displays of National Biscuit Company cookies and crackers, including Oreos, Animal Crackers, Fig Newtons, Graham Crackers, Uneeda Biscuits, among others. Several of the photographs indicate that the images were taken in Buffalo, New York, and many document the National Biscuit Company's sales force there, posed formally, attending sales meetings, or engaged together in leisure activities. The album also contains photographs of horse drawn delivery wagons, a display for Milk Bone dog biscuits, children dressed in costumes that promote company products, and a classroom of children "playing store."

Collection comprises a photograph album containing 129 gelatin silver prints and two cyanotypes by anonymous photographers. The majority of the photographs feature storefront and grocery displays of National Biscuit Company cookies and crackers, including Oreos, Animal Crackers, Fig Newtons, Graham Crackers, Uneeda Biscuits, among others. Several of the photographs indicate that the images were taken in Buffalo, New York, and many document the National Biscuit Company's sales force there, posed formally, attending sales meetings, or engaged together in leisure activities. The album also contains photographs of horse drawn delivery wagons, a display for Milk Bone dog biscuits, children dressed in costumes that promote company products, and a classroom of children "playing store."

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"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901 49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.

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Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

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Boatman Family papers, 1901-1981 and undated 72 Linear Feet — 8620 Items

Methodist educators and family members from Kentucky and Alabama. The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

The Boatman Family Papers span the years 1901-1981; the majority of the papers were generated by the Rev. Dr. Conway and Mrs. Caroline Boatman, Methodist educators from Kentucky. The collection is arranged in series by family member and institution, the most substantial series being the Conway and Caroline Boatman Series; the John Paul Boatman Series; and the Union College Series. Other smaller groups pertain to other family members. Family correspondence makes up the majority of the collection, but there are also scrapbooks; educational records (primarily financial); many photographs of Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky; and clippings and other printed items. Topics covered by the correspondence in the Conway and Caroline's papers cover their courtship (1909-1919); the Methodist Episcopal mission in Jubbulpore, India (1919-1923); and India Methodist Theological College (1923-1925). There are also many references to the three institutions where Dr. Boatman served as President - Iowa National Bible Training School (1928-1931), Snead College in Boaz, Ala., and College of Barbourville, Ky. (1939-1959). Fund-raising, especially during the Depression, is a commonly recurring theme. Other letters from sons of the Boatmans refer to their college years from the 1930s-1940s. Institutions referred to here include Drew University, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Southwestern College in Kansas.

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Meinrad Craighead papers, 1901-2007 4 Linear Feet — 2500 Items

Award-winning artist and writer whose works focus on humankind's relationship with God. She has lived and worked around the world, but eventually settled in New Mexico in the 1980s. Accession (2010-0020) includes letters; photographs; exhibition catalogs and publicity; public response to her poems and books; research and notes on mythologies, art, and nature; and other personal materials from her life. The materials largely date from the 1960s through the 1980s, covering her scholarship in Europe, her time in England as a nun in Stanbrook Abbey, and the years following her return to New Mexico. Includes Craighead's prayer books and psalters, some dating from the early 1900s, as well as some copies of her own publications and artwork. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Meinrad Craighead Papers includes a variety of materials, largely dating from Craighead's adult life from the 1960s to the 1980s. The collection is divided into the following series: Personal Papers, Writings, Research, Artwork, Photographs, and Books.

Craighead's Personal Papers Series is a mixture of items, ranging from personal correspondence to official correspondence relating to her U.S. passport. Several folders have information on Craighead's recent activities, including presentation notes, her travel for speaking or workshop engagements, and materials from her retreats and public programming in the 1990s-2000s. This series also includes several versions of Craighead's resume, documenting her activities prior to the mid-1980s.

The Writings Series consists largely of feedback, book reveiws, and correspondence following the publishing of three of Craighead's books: The Sign of the Tree (1979), The Mother's Songs (1986), and the Litany of the Great River (1991). Drafts from the latter reveal that the book was initially referred to as the "Litany of the Rio Grande." The Writings Series also includes loose drafts, poems, and other undated materials.

The Research Series includes Craighead's handwritten notes and drafts from her research into the mythology and mysticism of different world cultures, including ancient Egypt, Rome, and Native Americans. Another interest of Craighead was the role of nature, including different animals, in the symbolism and spirituality of various religions and groups. These files are loosely sorted by subject.

Samples of Craighead's prints and paintings can be found in the Artwork Series, which also includes exhibition catalogs, printings and publications of her work (including several copies of Catholic Worker newspapers, which used her illustrations in the 1970s), as well as a small amount of artwork and poetry by others that Craighead collected. The prints in this series are not original works of art, but instead are photocopies or photographs of her work. They include copies of her inkprints, paintings, and glass etchings.

The Photographs Series includes the majority of the collection's photographs, which are both color and black-and-white prints, as well as negatives. Craighead appears to have taken several rolls of film of altars, outdoor landscapes, foliage, rock formations, and animals that she then used in creating her artwork. Other photographs from this series are portraits of Craighead, by both friends and professional photographers, as well as a small amount of photographs of Stanbrook Abbey in England. A final photograph worth mentioning is one of Craighead and three nuns at Pope Pius VI's coronation in Rome in 1963.

The final series, the Printed Materials Series, includes Craighead's personal books, copies of her published books, and books that include her artwork as illustrations. Craighead's personal books consist of prayer books, early editions of Christian texts, and a book about the Stanbrook Abbey Press. Craighead's illustrations can be found in three editions of Catholic missals from 1975 and 1982. Finally, this series includes autographed copies of Craighead's own publications, The Mother's Birds, The Sign of the Tree, and "Christian Symbols," a compilation of loose prints.

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Marshall T. Meyer papers, 1902-2004 and undated, bulk 1984-1993 63.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 48,900 Items

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Marshall T. Meyer was an activist rabbi who worked in Argentina during the period of the Dirty War/El Proceso (mid 1970s to mid 1980s). The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The collection contains extensive evidence of Meyer's activities and interests, especially those he engaged in during his tenure at Comunidad Bet el in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and then at B'nai Jeshurun in New York City. The files document Meyer's professional activities, including his often over-lapping roles as religious leader, scholar, and human rights activist. Much of the material in the collection reflects Meyer's devotion and commitment to a socially and politically engaged Conservative Judaism and his involvement with Jewish communities around the world. Meyer was particularly involved in calling attention to human rights violations and working with the victims of violent political oppression in South and Central America in the 1970s and 1980s and then in Palestine, Israel, and the Middle East in the 1990s. Meyer's extensive involvement and leadership in national and international religious, peace, and human rights organizations such as the World Council of Churches are also well-represented, as is his life-long association with his alma maters, Dartmouth College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

The Correspondence Series contains letters in English and Spanish written and received by Meyer (additional correspondence is also contained in Meyer's research files and electronic files). Significant correspondents include Louis Finkelstein, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Shalom Spiegel.

The Writings and Speeches Series holds Meyer's original compositions in English, Spanish, and Hebrew. These compositions include various literary genres (op-eds, newspaper articles, essays) as well as speeches, addresses, and sermons.

The Research Files Series is subdivided into four categories: Geographic, Organizations, People, and Subject. These files may contain correspondence, notes, printed material, writings, and ephemera. The most common themes that run through this series include human rights, Jewish life, rabbinic education, Latin American Jewry, the Middle East, and Argentina's "Disappeared." The Research Files Series displays a deeper level of intellectual involvement by Meyer (e.g. annotations on printed material, categorizing and filing, integration of correspondence)

The Printed Material Series includes newspapers, clippings, monographs, and serials that Meyer collected over the years. Subjects cover similar territory as the research files. Unlike the Research Files, this material is generally not annotated and was less organized.

The Teaching Material Series contains material from classes taught by Meyer.

The Personal Files Series includes material largely outside the scope of Meyer's professional work: photos, memorabilia, schoolwork, and appointment books.

Video and audio recordings of Meyer's engagements are found in the Audiovisual Material Series. These include lectures, speeches, interviews, television appearances, and religious services. Originals of video and audio tape are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of the material.

The Condolences Series contains cards and notes expressing sympathy on Meyer's death. Many of these contain testimonials and reminiscences of his role as rabbi and activist.

Finally, the Electronic Files Series contains transcriptions of documents authored by or related to Meyer, many of which overlap with the content of and the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Teaching Material, and Audiovisual Materials Series.

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Keystone View Company educational lantern slides set, 1904-circa 1919 0.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Another features a memorial portrait of Secretary of State John Hay (d. 1905). The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography, probably in secondary schools and colleges. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Titles were transcribed from the originals as assigned by the Keystone Company.

Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, China, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Other images include a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913, a memorial portrait of John Hay, Secretary of State (died in 1905), the ship U.S.S. Maine, the "Rough Riders," and a portrait of the American Consul in Cuba. The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Arthur M. Proctor papers, 1906 - 1967 5.5 Linear Feet — 4000 Items

Arthur Marcus Proctor (1886-1955) was a professor in the Department of Education at Duke University. He also served as Director of the Duke Summer Session for several years. The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education. English.

The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education.

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Alfred E. Edgcomb papers, 1906-1983 and undated 19.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 14,000 Items

Businessman active in the lumber industry. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, photographs, and other materials from lumber businesses beginning before 1910, especially in East Tennessee and in the Philippine Islands with headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. The Insular Lumber Co., Negros Island, P.I., produced mahogany. Also present in the collection are personal and family papers, including numerous photographs.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, photographs, and other materials from lumber businesses beginning before 1910, especially in East Tennessee and in the Philippine Islands with headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. The Insular Lumber Co., Negros Island, P.I., produced mahogany. Also present in the collection are personal and family papers, including numerous photographs and letters to the Edgcombs from friends.

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Percy E. Ryberg papers, 1906-1991 6 Linear Feet — 11 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Collection primarily comprises New York psychiatrist Percy E. Ryberg's personal family correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers, some of which speak to Ryberg's youth in Argentina. Professional correspondence, articles, and other items document his career and interests in sexual and mental health, substance abuse treatments, identity, spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine, and other topics, and the publication of his book, Health, Sex, and Birth Control. Also includes biographical and genealogical information; photographs and photograph albums; and glass plate negatives. Acquired by the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The collection consists primarily of psychiatrist Percy Ryberg's personal correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers (1908-1991), some of which speak to his youth in Argentina. Ryberg's career as a physician and psychiatrist is represented through professional correspondence, writings, and medical research material. The material includes articles on the treatment of alcoholism in the mid-twentieth century, the publication of his book Health, Sex and Birth Control, and research on histamine reactions on the skin. Other topics that may be mentioned in the papers include mental health treatment, gender identity, schizophrenia, and spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine. There are also clippings and correspondence relating to the trial of William Koch (1940s), a U.S. physician who claimed to have developed a cure for cancer.

The collection also includes photographs (1906-1990s), mostly family snapshots and professional portraits of Ryberg, and photograph albums documenting Ryberg's travels and career. Glass plate negatives bear images of diplomas, and a military portrait of Ryberg from 1942.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Sidney D. Gamble photographs, 1906-2007 15 Linear Feet — Approximately 11,250 items

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The Sidney D. Gamble collection consists primarily of contact sheets, hand-colored glass slides, 35mm duplicate slides, contact prints, negatives, and other photographic formats documenting Gamble's four visits to China from 1908 to 1932. In total, there are over 5,000 unique images in the collection depicting urban and rural life, economic conditions, public events, agriculture, religious statuary, architecture, and the countryside. In addition to photographs of China, the collection contains a handful of images captured by Gamble from Japan and Korea and images captured by David Gamble in the western United States, circa 1906. Also included are artifacts, audiovisual materials, including moving images captured by Gamble in China from 1926 to 1933, scrapbooks, a small selection of Gamble's personal papers, and records of the Sidney D. Gamble Foundation for China Studies, which relate to the exhibition of Gamble's photographs in China and the United States, 1980s-2000s. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists primarily of contact sheets and contact prints, hand-colored glass slides, 35mm duplicate slides, negatives, and other photographic formats documenting Sidney Gamble's four visits to China from 1908 to 1932. In total, there are over 5,000 unique images, which depict urban and rural life, economic conditions, public events, architecture, religious statuary, and the countryside.

Other materials in the collection include artifacts; audiovisual materials, including moving images captured by Gamble in China from 1926 to 1933; a small collection of Sidney D. Gamble's personal papers; records of the Sidney D. Gamble Foundation; and printed materials. The Personal Papers series includes biographical information, correspondence, scrapbooks, notebooks, and writings documenting Gamble's travels in China and his study of the country's social life and customs. The Gamble Foundation Records series consists of correspondence, printed materials, and reports documenting the Foundation's curation and exhibition of Gamble's photographs in the United States and China from the 1980s to the 2000s. The Printed Materials series includes Mandarin character drill cards, and Mandarin readers used in Chinese language schools, as well as a thesis describing the origins and evolution of the Princeton in Asia program. In addition to photographs of China, the collection contains a handful of images captured by Sidney Gamble from Japan and Korea, and images captured by his father David Gamble in the western United States around 1906.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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DoubleTake records, 1908-1999, bulk 1994-1999 53.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 58,872 Items

The DoubleTake magazine records contain story manuscripts with editor's markings, correspondence, photographs and slides, and production files for issue numbers 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection holds story manuscripts (with editor's marks), correspondence, and production files for issues 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files.

Later accessions include production files and correspondence between the magazine's editors and its contributors, also covering issues 1-16.

Accession 2010-0081 includes photographer name files, dating from 1993 (pre-production) through 1998, kept by Alex Harris and other DoubleTake staff. Files were created whenever a photographer corresponded with the magazine, and include copies of correspondence between editors and photographers, slides of sample work, contracts for those who were accepted as contributors, and occasional biographies or other information about the photographer. Some files represent a particular museum's exhibit rather than a personal photographer; these are designated with exhibit titles instead of a photographer's name.

Files are organized alphabetically, and include correspondence from well before the magazine began publication, as well as materials post-dating Harris's departure from the magazine.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Bertram Metter papers, 1908-2000 and undated, bulk 1953-1989 8.7 Linear Feet — 3250 Items

Bertram Metter worked for over thirty years as an advertising and marketing executive, most notably as a copywriter, creative director, and Vice Chairman at J. Walter Thompson USA (JWT). In in early years at JWT, Metter worked as a direct response specialist for the Ford Motor Company direct marketing operation. He also served as a primary on the Ford account, during which time he directed print and television promotion for Ford and played a key role in the launching of several new car models. The Bertram Metter Papers span 1908 to 2000, with the bulk of the collection dating 1953 through the late 1980s. Collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, newspaper and magazine clippings, sheet music, printed materials, photographs, and photostats. In addition to materials for the Ford Motor Company, the collection documents Metter's work for other major clients, including the Pepsi-Cola Company (Mexico) and Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. Bulk of the collection consists of advertising and marketing research, client reports and correspondence, promotional materials, and other professional files. Also contains materials related to Metter's later work as a consultant and author, including drafts of an unpublished book manuscript entitled Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson, a chronicle of his career at JWT.

The Bertram Metter Papers span 1908 to 2000, with the bulk of the collection dating 1953 through the late 1980s. The collection includes materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, newspaper and magazine clippings, sheet music, printed materials, photographs, and photostats, that document Metter's thirty years in advertising and marketing, with a focus on his career as a copywriter, creative director, and Vice Chairman at J. Walter Thompson USA (JWT). The collection provides a record of Metter's early work as a "direct response specialist" for the Ford Motor Company direct marketing operation, and other roles on the Ford account (Metter directed print and television promotion for Ford and played a key role in the launching of several new car models). In addition to Ford materials, the collection documents Metter's work for other major clients, including the Pepsi-Cola Company (Mexico) and Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. While the bulk of the collection consists of advertising and marketing research, client reports and correspondence, promotional materials, and other professional files, the collection also contains materials related to Metter's later work as a consultant and author, including drafts of an unpublished book manuscript entitled "Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson," a chronicle of his career at JWT.

The collection is organized into four series: Professional Files, Writings, Ford Motor Company Account Files, and Other Clients.

The Professional Files Series contains JWT office (non-client) files, memoranda, and publications; industry publications and press clippings; overviews of Metter's professional biography; and limited files on Metter's consulting work for Ross Roy Advertising. The Writings Series contains Metter's writings on the advertising industry; bulk of series is composed of an unpublished book manuscript entitled "Breaking the Rules at J. Walter Thompson," comprised primarily of chapter drafts and research. The Ford Series, the largest series in the collection, includes materials relating to the launch and promotion of new models (Escort, Maverick, Mustang, Olympic, Pinto, Thunderbird, and Torino); marketing research and strategic reports; Ford direct mail materials and newsletters; television commercial scripts and storyboards; advertisement clippings and headlines; reproduction prints of early photographs of the Model T from the Ford Archives, Henry Ford Museum; photostats promoting the Ford Erika; and photocopies of sheet music of Ford songs from the early twentieth century. The Other Clients Series includes materials relating to general marketing research; new business acquisition; and promotional campaigns for clients other than Ford, including Firestone, Liggett & Myers, and Pepsi-Cola (Mexico). Large-format materials have been removed from their original series location and relocated to Oversize Materials.

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Milton C. Marney papers, 1908-2003 9.6 Linear Feet — 7,200 Items

Scientist, taxonomist, and brother of Carlyle Marney. Collection contains professional and personal correspondence including family letters. Also included are research papers and book chapters on taxonomy and prescriptive science.

Collection contains professional and personal correspondence including family letters. Also included are research papers and book chapters on taxonomy and prescriptive science.

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W.W. Parleir papers, 1909-1937 1.8 Linear Feet — 9 Items

W.W. Parleir (d. 1937) was an outdoor advertising executive in Alabama during the 1910s through the 1930s. He worked at Theiss, Douglas & Ribble (Birmingham) and at Capital City Advertising (Montgomery), and was Chairman of the Outdoor Advertising Association of Alabama 1934-1937. The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Arranged alphabetically.

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Walter Weir papers, 1909-1996 and undated, bulk 1950-1990 14 Linear Feet — Approximately 7,700 Items

Walter Weir was an advertising executive, marketing and communications consultant, and professor of advertising. He worked for a number of agencies, including N.W. Ayer & Sons, J. M. Mathes, Lord & Thomas, and Kenyon & Eckhardt. He founded Walter Weir, Inc., which merged into larger firms over the years, was co-owner of Switzerland-based La Borie/Weir S.A., and headed Walter Weir Communications, Inc. Weir also taught advertising at the University of Tennessee and Temple University, wrote three books on advertising, annonymously authored the Creative Man's Corner column in Advertising Age magazine for 25 years, and composed numerous speeches, articles, short stories, poems, songs, and musicals. The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

This collection is organized into six series: Musical, Personal, Professional, Teaching, Writings and Speeches, and Audiovisual Materials.

The Musical Series documents Weir's work on scores and scripts for musical theatre. Much of the correspondence in this series narrates Weir's efforts to produce a musical based on the Frederic Wakeman novel The Hucksters. Includes correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Personal Series contains biographical data about Weir and his involvement with family and friends through correspondence, clippings, greeting cards, photographs, and handwritten notes. The bulk of the correspondence documents Weir's personal and professional relationship with his son, Anthony.

The Professional Series documents Weir's career in advertising, marketing, and communications. Advertising copy, clippings, correspondence, proposals, presentations, and legal and financial papers represent Weir's work from the beginning of his career at N.W. Ayer through the evolution of his company, Walter Weir, Inc., as well as through subsequent business ventures, including La Borie/Weir SA, Walter Weir Communications, Inc., and freelance consulting work.

The Teaching Series represents Weir's work, following his official retirement from the advertising industry, as a professor of advertising, marketing and communications at the University of Tennessee and Temple University. Correspondence, course materials, and clippings document this extension of Weir's career from his introduction to and retirement from the academy.

The Writings and Speeches Series includes fiction, poetry, and non-fiction written by Weir on subjects both related and unrelated to advertising. Among these are articles published in Printer's Ink and Advertising Age; unpublished manuscripts of autobiographies, bound copies of Weir's book How to Create Interest-Evoking, Sales-Inducing, Non-Irritating Advertising; transcripts of talks and addresses Weir gave about advertising throught his career, including an address for the James Webb Young Foundation; and correspondence with Rance Crain of Crain Communications, Inc., publisher of Advertising Age.

The Audiovisual Series includes auiotapes and audiocassettes of advertising-related talks and addresses, notably for the Million Dollar Round Table Tape Cassette Program. In addition, there are radio spots for clients including Mountain Dew, E.F. Hutton, and Merril, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane, as well as samples of voiceovers and radio commercial productions.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Relocated items have been indicated in the Detailed Description of the Collection by notes enclosed in brackets.