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The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863 - 1961 13.25 Linear Feet — 12500 Items

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Office of Alumni Affairs at Duke University administers the Duke Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization serving over 120,000 alumni and former students of Duke University, in addition to thousands of parents and friends of the university. Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter. English.

Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter.

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Anthony family of Burlington (Guilford Co.), N.C. Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

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Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been segregated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Bedinger and Dandridge Family papers, 1752-2000 30 Linear Feet — 13,000 Items

Bedinger and Dandridge families of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York. Collection consist of journals, correspondence, poems, reviews, and other papers of the Bedinger, Dandridge, Washington, Henry Clay, and Adam Stephen families, of Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio; and of the Cornwall, Lawrence, Mitchell, Walter Bowne, and Rufus King Southgate families, of Connecticut, Maine, and New York primarily created or collected by Caroline Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The papers fall into six classes: journals and fragments of journals of Danske Dandridge (1864-1909), Henry Bedinger (1830s), and Daniel Bedinger (1811); correspondence and material on Kentucky and the northern Shenandoah Valley during the Revolutionary period; family correspondence, genealogies, and memoirs used in writing the Bedinger family history; papers of Henry Bedinger, the American Minister to Denmark in the 1850s; poems, reviews and literary correspondence of Danske Dandridge, and poems and prose of her father, Henry Dandridge, and of her daughter, Serena Catherine Dandridge; and horticultural writings of Danske Dandridge.

Collection includes the correspondence and papers of five generations of families from Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York chiefly created or collected by Carolina Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The primary portion of the collection is made up of the personal and family papers of Danske Dandridge (1858-1914), a writer and horticulturist. From 1866 to her marriage in 1877, Danske Dandridge's correspondence is concerned with social life in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and with family matters. Her literary correspondence begins in the early 1880s and continues until the year of her death. Correspondents include John Esten Cooke, Edmund C. Stedman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Thomas W. Higginson. There are sustained exchanges of letters with William Hayes Ward, editor of The Brooklyn Independent which published much of her work; with the poet Lizette Woodworth Reese of Baltimore; and Margaretta Lippincott. Material on gardening begins to appear in the papers for the 1890s and includes a large number of letters and eleven notebooks.

Danske Dandridge's family correspondence continues with here sister Mrs. J. F. B. (Mary Bedinger) Mitchell, and her brother, Henry Bedinger IV, as well as with her numerous cousins.

Correspondence of Adam Stephen Dandridge (1844-1924) reflects his career in the West Virginia House of Representatives and his business as a seller of farm machinery.

Correspondence and papers of Serena Katherine (Violet) Dandridge, daughter of Danske and Adam Stephen Dandridge, bear on her career as an illustrator for the zoologist Hubert Lyman Clark, and reflect her interest in women's suffrage and the Swedenborgian Church. There are also twelve volumes of her writings in manuscript.

Correspondence and papers of Danske Dandridge's father, Henry Bedinger Dandridge III, include letters on literary subjects from Thomas Willis White, Philip Pendleton Cooke, and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; papers from his years as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849; records of his service, 1853-1858, first as a consul and then as minister of the United States in Sweden and in particular his negotiation of the treaty with Sweden in 1857; and his notebooks containing poems and comments on social life in Virginia.

Letters of Caroline B. (Lawrence) Bedinger, mother of Danske Dandridge, to her husband's family in the South and her relatives in New York concern her experience as a young woman in Washington, D.C., and Virginia; her stay in Copenhagen; the Civil War experiences of her husband's family and her own; family life; and the education of her children.

The collection contains a large number of transcripts made by Danske Dandridge from originals in the possession of various branches of her family, including the Swearingens, Shepherds, Morgans, Rutherfords, Worthingtons, Washingtons, Kings, Brownes, and Lawrences for the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. There are also copies of letters and documents from the Lyman C. Draper manuscripts at the University of Wisconsin. Essentially, they are the papers of three brothers, George Michael Bedinger (1756-1843), Henry Bedinger II (1753-1843), and Daniel Bedinger (1761-1818), and their descendants and connections. Among the many subjects discussed are Indian warfare and conditions on the Virginia frontier; descriptions of the events of the Revolution; trading in salt and fur; experiences of Americans held prisoner by the British during the Revolution; flour milling in the Potomac valley; trade and transport of farm commodities; travel on the Mississippi to New Orleans, 1811-1812; James Rumsey and the development of the steamboat; the settling of Kentucky and Ohio, descriptions of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Baltimore at various times from 1800 to 1860; antebellum social life, South and North; and extensive comments on politics through 1860, particularly on the opposition to Federalism and the early Democratic-Republican Party.

Description taken from Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (1980).

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Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

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The materials comprising the British Correspondence and Miscellany Collection are dated from 1556 to 1972 (bulk 1740-1890). The papers are arranged into the following series: Correspondence, 1556-1972 and undated; Subject Files, 1699-1902 and undated; Pictures, 1795-1921 and undated; and Miscellaneous Material, 1814-1836 and undated An artificial collection, the papers are, for the most part, unrelated by provenance. The collection consists chiefly of correspondence, and topics include numerous political events and activities of the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries in Great Britain and the colonies (particularly India and Africa).

The Correspondence Series includes numerous letters to and from British notables. Among the major correspondents represented are: the 8th Duke of Argyll, the 1st and 2nd Barons Auckland, Charles Bradlaugh, John Bright; Robert Brownrigg; George Canning, John Wilson Croker, the 1st Earl of Durham, John Foster, the 1st Baron Dover, George Joachim Goschen, John Hay, the 3rd Marquess Lansdowne, W.E.H. Lecky, Captain John Lenty, the 1st Earl of Liverpool, the 3rd Earl of Lucan, William Melbourne, Lord Broderick Midleton, Viscount Milner, David Christie Murray, Thomas Nimmo, Baron Northcote, Pierce O'Mahoney, the 3rd Viscount Palmerston, the 1st Baronet Pollock, George Rose, the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, William Sheowring, John Deas Thompson, the 1st Duke of Wellington, William Wilberforce, and Edward Wodehouse.

Among the items in the Correspondence Series are a copy of John Bright's 1851 speech entitled "Papal Aggression" (Bright correspondence); material regarding the Horseguards (Brownrigg correspondence); a testimonial to the character of Sir Francis Burdett written by Lady Hester Stanhope (Burdett correspondence); a letter regarding Wellington's correspondence concerning a transport ship wrecked in the Tagus during his last Iberian campaign (Canning correspondence); letters from David Dundas, including two accompanying circulars (1804 and 1805) from the War Office (Dundas correspondence); and correspondence (and accompanying transcripts) between King George I and M. Braconnier (1709) concerning the King's inability to send a detachment large enough to oppose the French along the borders of the Rhone and Lake Geneva (George I correspondence). Other items include correspondence relating to George Henry's mission in Nyasaland (Henry correspondence); material concerning the cargo ship "The Sea Witch" (Lenty correspondence); correspondence regarding Marsden-Smedley's unsuccessful campaign for Parliament in 1910 (Marsden-Smedley correspondence); and Wellesley's transcript of a testimonial to the character of Charles Wyatt written by the Governor General of India (Wellesley correspondence). The Murray correspondence includes handwritten biographical notes and a printed review (1908) of David Christie Murray's Reflections.

Papers in the Subject Files Series concern a wide range of political, military, and economic matters. They include an anonymous account (1743) of the battle of Dettingen (in French); papers (1856-1860 and undated) relating to the raising of ships at Sebastopol during the Crimean War; a collection of letters from various correspondents concerning decimal currency (1856-1869); papers concerning Newfoundland fisheries (1901-1902); and a document pertaining to the impressment of sailors (1745).