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M. C. Stoner papers, 1827-1967 15 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — Approx. 17,071 items

Collection comprises correspondence, legal papers, business records, bills and receipts, photographs, writings, recipes, clippings, and other items relating to the life and career of businessman M.C. (Marshall Clayton) Stoner, of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and three generations of the Brewer and Stoner families from Pennsylvania and Maryland. Includes many speeches by George W. Brewer, a lawyer and senator in the Pennsylvania legislature, 1857-1859, and M.C. Stoner's father-in-law. Much of the correspondence and other items relate to coal mining and specifically to M.C. Stoner's Rocky Ridge Mining Company. There are also letters written to Stoner's daughter, Louise, chiefly from male friends.

Collection comprises correspondence, legal papers, business records, bills and receipts, photographs, writings, recipes, clippings, and other items relating to the life and career of businessman M.C. (Marshall Clayton) Stoner, of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Includes many speeches by George W. Brewer, a lawyer and senator in the Pennsylvania legislature, 1857-1859, and M.C. Stoner's father-in-law. Much of the correspondence and other items relate to coal mining and specifically to M.C. Stoner's Rocky Ridge Mining Company.

Other materials, including early legal papers, pertain to three generations of the Brewer and Stoner families from Pennsylvania and Maryland. There are also letters written to Stoner's daughter, Louise, chiefly from male friends. Her writings may also be present in the collection.

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Theresa El-Amin papers, 1960s-2010 30 Linear Feet — 22,500 Items

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Activist and union organizer who was involved with the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Service Employees International Union, the Black Radical Congress, the Black Workers for Justice, Jobs with Justice, Solidarity, and the Durham NAACP. El-Amin was also a founding member of the Labor Party and the Southern Anti-Racism Network. Organizational and subject files from El-Amin's years of activism and organizing in the Service Employees International Union, the Black Radical Congress, the Southern Anti-Racism Network, and numerous other groups and causes. Also includes publications, photographs, videotapes, and correspondence.

The Theresa El-Amin Papers have been divided into series: Organizations and Movements, Subject Files, Conferences, Personal Files and Correspondence, Printed Materials, Photographs and Audiovisual, Black Liberation Historical Documents, Realia, and Oversize Materials. The largest series, Organizations and Movements, features materials from El-Amin's long career as an activist and union organizer with groups such as Black Workers for Justice, the Service Employees International Union, Jobs with Justice, the Green Party of the United States, the NAACP, the Coalition of Labor Union Women, the Black Radical Congress, Solidarity, and the Southern Anti-Racism Network. Other highlights of the Organizations and Movements series include the Black Liberation movement and the Free Mumia Abu-Jamal movement. There are also numerous other groups and movements represented within this series. Contents typically include handouts and fliers from various events; email correspondence; reports and publications from different groups, including some newsletters; and clippings with coverage of different campaigns and activities.

The Subject Files series was largely created by El-Amin, with additional subjects added in processing to account for loose pages in the collection. Topics heavily represented include Muhammad Ahmad, community organizing and its many components, healthcare, South Africa and apartheid, North Carolina, and workplace safety. There are also subject files for several countries, as well as materials about Hurricane Katrina.

The Printed Materials series includes newsletters, magazines, journals, fliers, handouts, and other miscellaneous materials from a wide variety of sources. The first box contains runs of various periodicals, including Forward Motion, In Defense of Marxism, and Labor Notes. These runs are incomplete and represent only a sampling of the publication. The second box of printed materials relates largely to El-Amin's union involvement, and features miscellaneous union publications from the 1980s-2000s. There is a small amount of earlier material, mainly in the Historical Pamphlets folder, which includes publications on desegregation and its impact on unions. The remainder of the series is also largely miscellaneous, with one or two issues of a wide range of newsletters, magazines, or organizational reports.

The small Conferences series contains conference books, fliers, correspondence, and handouts from various conferences El-Amin attended between 1985 and 2010. There is some overlap between this series and the Organizations and Movements series. Another small series is El-Amin's Personal Files and Correspondence, which consists largely of certificates and other remnants of her professional organizing education and career. This series also includes copies of her resumes and a 1997 oral history transcript.

The Photographs and Audiovisual Materials series includes large amounts of loose photographs, labeled by El-Amin, documenting many of the organizations, activities, and events referenced in earlier portions of the collection. It also includes some personal photographs of El-Amin's family and friends. The VHS tapes in this series document a range of protests and issues important to the BWFJ and El-Amin's union organizing.

Articles and pamphlets acquired by El-Amin relating to the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation movement of the 1960s are included in the Black Liberation Historical Documents series. Highlights include a transcript of Stokely Carmichael, Chairman of SNCC, speaking at the 1966 Berkeley conference on "Black Power and its Challenges." Includes articles on the condition of African Americans by Bayard Rustin, as well as coverage of the Watts riot and recovery of the Watts area. Also includes several issues of Commentary Reports from the 1960s.

The Realia series is largely unsorted, but includes three boxes of t-shirts and one box of buttons and other ephemera collected by El-Amin in her years as an activist.

Finally, the Oversize Materials contains objects withdrawn from their respective series due to their large size. These include Jobs with Justice foam boards and posters.

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Evans family papers, 1920s-1990s 24 Linear Feet — 5609 Items

Collection contains correspondence, scrapbooks, albums, clippings, addresses, writings, and other materials that concern the personal lives and careers of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel J. ("Mutt") and Sara Evans, and their sons, Robert and Eli. Mutt Evans's mayoral correspondence is divided into a general file and a subject file. Some materials depict the private lives of the Evanses, including photographs, albums, and personal correspondence. Sara's family, the Nachamsons, is often represented. The collection also includes extensive documentation about Sara's role in Hadassah, both locally and nationally, as well as the family's participation in other Isareli and Jewish causes. Also included are materials from their work in developing and fundraising for the Judaic Studies Program at Duke University.

Collection contains correspondence, scrapbooks, albums, clippings, addresses, writings, and other materials that concern the personal lives and careers of the Evans family, particularly Emanuel J. and Sara Evans, their sons, Eli and Robert, and Emanuel's brother, Monroe. The family owned and operated United Department Stores, and for twelve years, 1951 to 1963, Emanuel Evans was mayor of Durham, NC. He was also very active in his synagogue, was a president of VISTAS, and participated actively in the University of North Carolina's Alumni Association.

There are two scrapbooks on Emanuel Evans's mayoral terms and a similar volume and other materials devoted to Mrs. Evans's activities as leader of Hadassah including items pertaining to Israel. Mr. Evans's mayoral correspondence is divided into a general file and a subject file. In pictures and personal correspondence, the Nachamson family is often represented. One early clipping from a Fayetteville, N.C. newspaper, tells of Mr. Evans's sister being refused teaching positions because of her Jewish faith. Eli Evans is a correspondent and writer, led the establishment of the National Jewish Archives of Broadcasting, and was on the staff of the Carnegie Foundation that helped launch "Sesame Street." He was president of the UNC student body and a number of items in the collection concern his presidency.

Also included is an address of Eli Evans presented during the conference on Southern-Jewish history in 1976, Eli Evans's vita, his unpublished diary of the Kissinger shuttle, and a large number of his writings, many concerning U.S. politics, minorities, and Jews in the South. There is a reprint of a chapter from his book, The Provincials, and reports from the Charles H. Revson Foundation, of which he is president. Also included are materials concerning Eli's brother Robert, a correspondent with CBS, who continued on as a television executive. Their uncle, Monroe Evans, was mayor of Fayetteville, NC, and his service is documented in several of the collection's scrapbooks.

One entire scrapbook is devoted to the writings of Mildred and Madeline Evans, Monroe's wife and daughter.

The audiovisual series contains a 16mm film copy of a 1957 episode of Edward R. Murrow's "See It Now," with which Robert Evans was involved, and a 16mm film copy of Governor Terry Sanford's November 1964 appearance on WUNC-TV, in which he reflects on his governorship and the current political scene. Several audio recordings capture Sara Evans addressing the Seaboard Regional Conference of Hadassah in 1982. Eli N. Evans's appearance on Richard D. Heffner's The Open Mind is documented.

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Caribbean Sea Migration collection, 1959-2014 3 Linear Feet — 600 Items

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Materials from (or related to) the migration by sea of Cubans, Dominicans, and Haitians, including the refugee camp for Cuban and Haitian rafters that existed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, largely dating from 1991-1996. Collection includes camp newspapers and artwork created by refugees held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba; materials from the U.S. Coast Guard and other military sources, such as newspapers written in Haitian Creole, photocopies of camp rules and refugee intake procedures, and a transcript from an introductory video shown to refugees arriving at the camps; magazines and media coverage of refugee situations, including some material on Elián González; photographs and slides of refugees, Coast Guard personnel, and conditions in the camps in Cuba. Refugees arriving in Miami are included as are photographs of the work of the Guantanámo Refugee Assistance and Services Program in Miami and in the camps in Guantánamo Bay.

Materials include newspapers, artwork, clippings, U.S. military publications aimed at camp residents, camp notes, reports, and photographs from a variety of sources. Newspapers are one of the largest formats within the collection, which includes the complete run of éxodo, a newspaper with color issues printed from November 1994-September 1995 from Camps Kilo and Charlie Village in the Guantánamo Bay camps; issues of El Bravo, El Balsero, and El Futuro from 1994-1995; Sa K'pase, N'ap Boule, and Qué Pasa, newspapers printed by the U.S. military in Creole and Spanish and designed for Haitian and Cuban refugees at the camps; as well as newspaper clippings and some magazine issues covering the refugee crisis of 1994-1995 and the plight of Caribbean refugees in general.

Photographs are another significant component of the collection. U.S. Coast Guard photographs and slides of rafters and rescuers date from 1980 to the 1990s or 2000s, and are accompanied by photocopies from the U.S. Coast Guard's Historian Office detailing refugees assistance as early as 1959. The collection also includes unsorted and largely unlabeled photographs from the camps; those that are labeled date from 1994.

Other materials in the collection include some refugee artwork, publications about Cuba, a folder of Cuba information including some materials on Elián González, and other ephemera mentioning Cuban refugees. In addition, 8 CDs with photographs and other materials have been transferred to Duke's ERM server and are in the custody of the Electronic Records archivist.

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The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Alvin A. Achenbaum papers, 1948-2011 and undated 117 Linear Feet — 80,000 Items

Market researcher and advertising executive who worked at several agencies; partner in a consulting practice under several names; lecturer and author of marketing textbooks. The Alvin A. Achenbaum Papers span the years 1948-2011 and document Achenbaum's career in advertising (with Grey Advertising, J. Walter Thompson and Backer Spielvogel Bates agencies) and marketing consulting (as a partner in Alvin Achenbaum Associates, Canter Achenbaum Heekin, and Achenbaum Bogda Associates). Collection includes writings and speeches, correspondence, photographs, research reports and related materials. Clients represented include 7-Eleven, American Red Cross, AT&T, Block Drug, Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Chrysler, Dairy Queen, Dentsu, Franklin Mint, General Foods, GTE, Hallmark, Honda, Integrity Music, Kayser-Roth, Kia, K-Mart, Miller Brewing, MTA, Nationwide, Nestlé, Nissan/Datsun, PCA, Pfizer, Philip Morris, Quaker Oats, Revlon, Ryerson Tull, Seagram, Toyota, U.S. Dept. of Defense, and Warner-Lambert. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Alvin A. Achenbaum Papers span the years 1948-2011 and document Achenbaum's career in advertising (with Grey Advertising, J. Walter Thompson and Backer Spielvogel Bates agencies) and marketing consulting (as a partner in Alvin Achenbaum Associates, Canter Achenbaum Heekin, and Achenbaum Bogda Associates). Collection includes writings and speeches, correspondence, photographs, research reports and related materials. Clients represented include 7-Eleven, American Red Cross, AT&T, Block Drug, Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Chrysler, Dairy Queen, Dentsu, Franklin Mint, General Foods, GTE, Hallmark, Honda, Integrity Music, Kayser-Roth, Kia, K-Mart, Miller Brewing, MTA, Nationwide, Nestlé, Nissan/Datsun, PCA, Pfizer, Philip Morris, Quaker Oats, Revlon, Ryerson Tull, Seagram, Toyota, U.S. Dept. of Defense, and Warner-Lambert.

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Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. Also includes an original list of titles and a slide projector. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict other types of archaeological sites. The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches. Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection. The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector and by an original list of slide titles. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict archaeological sites of interest to tourists. The original title for one such set, represented by many of the slides in this collection, was "Lantern slides and art photos produced by the American Colony photographers illustrating Bible lands."

The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches and are housed in a typical paper mat and a glass cover, sealed on the borders with black tape. They are stamped with "American Colony Photographers" on the top of the frame and "Jerusalem, Palestine" on the bottom. Titles in the collection inventory are transcribed from handwritten titles on the slide mounts.

Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection.

The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector, and by 10 cardboard squares cut out from the original slide boxes, showing the title of the collection and lists of slide titles.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

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The Duke University chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers is an academic group for Engineering students at Duke University, formed in 1932. Records contain correspondence, annual reports, meeting announcements, planning materials for the Engineers Show, a newsletter, minutes, membership lists, membership certificates, photographs, and clippings. Major subjects include the American Society of Civil Engineers, Duke University, the School of Engineering, civil engineering study and teaching, professional development, student societies, and the history of civil engineering. Materials range in date from 1932 to 1983 (bulk 1944-1970). English.

Contains correspondence, annual reports, notes from field trips, photographs, and other materials pertaining to the activities of the Duke University student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers from 1932 to 1983 (bulk 1944-1970).

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Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated 15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items

Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.