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The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

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Jean O'Barr papers, 1974-2011 18.6 Linear Feet — 13,950 Items

Professor and founder of Duke University's Women's Studies program. Materials from the founding and operation of Duke's Women's Studies program, including proposals, reviews, and annual reports. Also includes scrapbooks with photographs and conference materials; correspondence about the Women's Studies program; and publications about O'Barr and the Women's Studies program. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists largely of O'Barr's files and materials from the founding and operation of Duke University's Women's Studies Department. It includes proposals, reviews, and annual reports. Also includes scrapbooks with photographs and conference materials; correspondence about the Women's Studies program; and publications about O'Barr and the Women's Studies program. Also includes reviews of other women's studies programs throughout the United States; pamphlets and projects relating to the Women's Studies Department; materials relating to the founding of SIGNS magazine; student papers discussing gender; published and unpublished articles by O'Barr, including surveys of women at Duke, writings by O'Barr related to her African studies, and articles about women in academia and the workplace; graduate studies by O'Barr relating to Africa and anthropology; book reviews; and other miscellaneous material. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Joe H. Hernandez was born in 1924 and worked at the San Antonio General Depot between 1951-1954. Collection comprises a commercially produced scrapbook (12 x 14.5 inches) containing 50 black-and-white and 102 color photographs, ranging in size from 3.5 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches. Hernandez and several of his friends were female impersonators, so the majority of the photographs are of men in various states of drag. Others show Hernandez surrounded by his friends and family or in affectionate embraces with gay male friends. Also present are ticket stubs, matchbook covers, night club flyers, programs, postcards, and clippings, mostly having to do with performance venues and gay clubs in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Antonio, and Kansas City, as well as with famous performers. They also document Hernandez's interest in Broadway shows, jazz, and actors and actresses. Laid-in are several U.S. Army personnel documents from Hernandez's work at the San Antonio General Depot 1951-1954; in addition, there are two photographs of Hernandez in uniform. Also laid-in are several other photographs, clippings, and programs. Photograph album has been disbound for conservation purposes.

Collection comprises a commercially produced scrapbook (12 x 14.5 inches) containing 50 black-and-white and 102 color photographs, ranging in size from 3.5 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches. Hernandez and several of his friends were female impersonators, so the majority of the photographs are of men in various states of drag. Others show Hernandez surrounded by his friends and family or in affectionate embraces with gay male friends. Also present are ticket stubs, matchbook covers, night club flyers, programs, postcards, and clippings, mostly having to do with performance venues and gay clubs in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Antonio, and Kansas City, as well as with famous performers. They also document Hernandez's interest in Broadway shows, jazz, and actors and actresses. Laid-in are several U.S. Army personnel documents from Hernandez's work at the San Antonio General Depot 1951-1954; in addition, there are two photographs of Hernandez in uniform. Also laid-in are several other photographs, clippings, and programs. Photograph album has been disbound for conservation purposes. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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In the late 18th century, Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), also known as the Ladies of Llangollen, left their lives in the upper tiers of Anglo-Irish society and made a home for themselves in Llangollen, Wales, to the disapproval of both their families. Butler and Ponsonby appeared to have understood their relationship as a marriage, and they were known for dressing alike in masculine clothing. They were part of an emerging culture of 'romantic friendship' between same-sex couples. While they lived a life of rural retreat, the Ladies' relative celebrity and social status meant that their home Plas Newydd became a salon. They hosted the many of the intelligensia of the day, including poets such as Wordsworth and Byron, and the reigning Queen Charlotte. The collection is largely made up of letters by the Ladies, as well as materials about Llangollen, the cultural haven of Plas Newydd, and images of the Ladies in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Ladies of Llangollen Collection is made up of materials both by and about Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby's life at their home, Plas Newydd, in Llangollen, Wales.

The largest part of the collection is the letters written by and to the Ladies. Most of the correspondence takes place between Sarah Ponsonby and her cousin Mrs. Sarah Tighe, along with letters from Eleanor Butler, their neighbor Ch. L. West, and the Fownes family, Sarah Ponsonby's cousins and former guardians. The manuscripts include poems by the Ladies, as well as an account written about the Ladies of Llangollen by Ch. L. West and an album by a visitor to Llangollen. The papers contain items and images of the Ladies of Llangollen, Llangollen Vale, and the traditions of Wales in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Guidebooks, maps, and printed materials make up the materials about the history of the Ladies' beloved Llangollen. The images of the Ladies and their home in Llangollen Vale make up the largest part of the image files.

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Lynnsy Logue papers, 1995-2007 0.6 Linear Feet — 2 items

Lynnsy Logue is a sculptor and founder of the Wonderful Women organization. She worked with Rachel Watkins to create The Homecoming Queens project in the mid-1990s. Accession (2009-0099) (2 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2007) includes a scrapbook and a videotape from The Homecoming Queens public arts project. The Homecoming Queens was a traveling exhibit of life-size mannequins and papier-mache dolls that represented women suffering from various social and political issues around the world, including female genital mutilation, rape, abuse, war, aging, and sexism. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0099) (2 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1995-2007) includes a scrapbook and a videotape from The Homecoming Queens public arts project. The Homecoming Queens was a traveling exhibit of life-size mannequins and papier-mache dolls that represented women suffering from various social and political issues around the world, including female genital mutilation, rape, abuse, war, aging, and sexism. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Marilla M. Ricker scrapbook, 1866-1911 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 item

Marilla Ricker was an influential suffragist and pioneering woman lawyer. Her scrapbook consists chiefly of newspaper clippings by and about Ricker, chronicling her long activist career and public life advocating for suffrage and equal rights for women. It also includes correspondence and ephemera.

Collection comprises a scrapbook (66 leaves, 27 x 35 cm.) bound in maroon cloth with oak leaf and acorn decoration on front cover. The first leaf is inscribed "Marilla M. Ricker, March 1, 1896, 30 Codman Place, Roxbury, Mass." It consists chiefly of U.S newspaper clippings by and about Ricker. Some clippings have mss. annotations indicating the titles and dates of the newspapers. Topics include Ricker's political writings, philanthropic activities, and extensive activism on behalf of women's suffrage. Suffrage activities detailed in the newspaper stories include Ricker's legal activities, attempts to vote, run for public office, and apply for a diplomatic post. Also pasted in are six notes addressed to Ricker from correspondents including the Arts and Crafts Movement leader Elbert Hubbard, Illinois Senator John A. Logan, and the African-American author, orator, and abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Clipped autographs from faith leader Sarah J. Farmer, suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Ohio Senator John Sherman are also pasted in. Black and white portraits and illustrations of Ricker are interspersed throughout. The scrapbook also contains an 1881 certification admitting Ricker to the bar of the District of Columbia, an 1899 brief from a case Ricker tried before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire, printed ephemera including the seal of the American Secular Union and Freethought Federation, and 25 U.S. postage stamps.

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Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.

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Resident of South Berwick, Maine. The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information; as well as a catalog for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The centerpiece of this collection is a late 19th century scrapbook belonging to Sarah E. Goodwin of Berwick, Maine, into which manuscript and printed instructions and patterns for the creation of tapestries, collars, edging, capes, mittens, afghans, hoods, curtains, infant shoes, slippers, and other items were pasted and pinned. Patterns for knitting, crocheting, quilting, embroidery, tatting, and other types of handwork are included. Collection also includes a commonplace book of knitting and crocheting patterns, which also contains home remedies for illnesses and diseases, and a variety of household tips, as well as poems, literary quotations, and miscellaneous lists of information. Other items in the collection include a catalogue for a Baptist church in South Berwick, Maine (1898), numerous patterns for embroidered monograms, and many loose patterns.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.