Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Sketches Remove constraint Format: Sketches

Search Results

collection icon
Ben Rosen is an American graphic designer and visual communications consultant. Rosen worked as a designer for J. Gordon Carr and Associates and the Blaine Thompson Company before founding his own firm, Ben Rosen Associates, in 1952, which specialized in corporate identity programs. Rosen is the author of three books on on graphic design and typography: Type and Typography (1963); The Corporate Search for Visual Identity (1970); and Digital Type Specimens (1991). The Ben Rosen Papers span the years 1936 to 2006, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945 through 1991, and document Rosen's sixty-year career in graphic design and visual communications consulting. The collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, graphic design and printed materials, sketches, presentation boards, photographs, and slides, that document design concepts and programs (corporate logos, letterhead, packaging, industrial design, promotion) Rosen developed, through his firm, Ben Rosen Associates, for clients including American Loose Leaf, CCMI McGraw-Hill, Equitable Life Assurance, Exxon/Esso, Food Fair Stores, IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, North American Reinsurance, Philip Morris, Richardson-Vicks, Russ Berrie, and Tishman Realty and Construction. The collection also includes manuscripts and published editions of Rosen's books on graphic design and typography, and touches on several of Rosen's commmemorative projects, including a President Kennedy memorial, a United Nations 20th Anniversary book, and Rosen's submission to the World Trade Center Memorial design competition.

The Ben Rosen Papers span the years 1936 to 2006, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945 through 1991, and document Rosen's sixty-year career in graphic design and visual communications consulting. The collection contains materials in a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, graphic design and printed materials, sketches, presentation boards, photographs, and slides, that document design concepts and programs (corporate logos, letterhead, packaging, industrial design, promotion). Rosen developed corporate visual identity programs and packaging designs, first as an employee of J. Gordon Carr and Associates and the Blaine Thompson Company, and later through his own firm, Ben Rosen Associates, for clients including American Loose Leaf, CCMI McGraw-Hill, Equitable Life Assurance, Exxon/Esso, Food Fair Stores, IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, North American Reinsurance, Philip Morris, Richardson-Vicks, Russ Berrie, and Tishman Realty and Construction. The collection also includes manuscripts and published editions of Rosen's books on graphic design and typography: Type and Typography (1963); The Corporate Search for Visual Identity (1970); and Digital Type Specimens (1991); and touches on several of Rosen's commmemorative projects, including a memorial for President John F. Kennedy, a United Nations 20th Anniversary book, and Rosen's submission to the World Trade Center Memorial design competition.

The collection is organized into five series: Personal Files, Writings, Business Files, Client Files, and Photographic Materials. The Personal Files Series includes original student drawings and sketches from Rosen's years at Cranbrook and Pratt, and later artwork; World War II materials, primarily relating to Rosen's proposed plan to the British government for the conversion of U.S. military bases into postwar British housing; and limited biographical material. The Writings Series contains articles on package design and visual communications by Rosen and others; manuscripts, published volumes, and promotional materials for Rosen's books; and unpublished book concepts and manuscripts. The Business Files Series includes administrative records, new business presentations, reference files and scrapbooks of creative output from several advertising and graphic design firms where Rosen was an employee or partner. The Client Files Series consists primarily of visual communications design work for a number of clients, and materials relating to several commemorative projects. The Photographic Materials Series contains negatives, photographs, and slides documenting some of Rosen's designs.

collection icon
Pennsylvania artist who studied at Vassar College and in Europe. Clippings, notebooks, photographs, paper ephemera, and correspondence, chiefly 1885-1895, with family or friends (mostly women) concerning in part the role of women in Victorian society and her early career as an artist. Also includes a history of the Clymer family (1949) and several small, original sketches. nicludes a photo album and a scrapbook.

Clippings, notebooks, photographs, paper ephemera, and correspondence, chiefly 1885-1895, with family or friends (mostly women) concerning in part the role of women in Victorian society and Eugenia Balch's early career as an artist and travels in Europe. Balch lived in Paris for some time, and was fluent in French. Also includes a history of the Clymer family (1949) and several small, original sketches. Includes a photograph album. A letter from Alice Fauchon to her close friend, Eugenia Balch, dated May 30, 1892, recounts in detail her attempts to procure an abortion, which were unsuccessful (she gave birth to a son in October).

collection icon

The Gene Federico Papers span the years 1918-2003, with the bulk of the collection dating 1951-1991. The collection documents Federico's sixty years as a pioneering leader in advertising and graphic design, and contains materials from a variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, advertisements proofs and clippings, graphic design and printed materials, posters, sketches/sketchbooks, photographs, negatives, and videotapes. In addition to limited personal and biographical material, the collection primarily documents Federico's creative output as a graphic designer, art director, and advertising executive at agencies including Grey Advertising, Doyle Dane Bernbach, Douglas D. Simon, Benton & Bowles, Warwick & Legler, and as a principal at Lord Geller Federico Einstein; the collection has limited material relating to the specific agencies for which he worked. The collection also documents Federico's extensive freelance and exhibition work throughout his career (most notably the "Love of Apples" and "24-Page Book" designs), in addition to his later consulting work for Brouillard Communications. Client advertisements and graphic design materials compose the majority of the collection. Significant clients represented include: Christian Dior; Elektra Records; Elizabeth Arden; Goldman Sachs; IBM; L'Aiglon Apparel; Lady Pepperell; Napier; The New Yorker; and Woman's Day. Though an art director throughout most of his career, Federico contributed significantly to the graphic design and typographical components of advertising. Through clear and innovative integration of design and typographical components, Federico pioneered the use of visual puns in advertisements, and emphasized clarity of message over design complexity. The collection will be of particular value to researchers interested in developments in print advertising and typographical design since World War II. The collection is organized into six series which focus on Federico's contributions to advertising and graphic design: Professional Files, Personal Files, Graphic Design, Advertising Campaigns, Photographs and Negatives, and Videocassettes.

The Professional Files Series includes business correspondence, professional writings, award/exhibit materials, press clippings and industry publications, in addition to limited files on the Art Directors Club of New York City and Lord Geller Federico Einstein. The Personal Files Series includes biographical and family materials; memorabilia documenting Federico's years as a student at Abraham Lincoln High School and Pratt Institute; World War II materials, including U.S. Army publications/posters produced by Federico and four sketchbooks; and original artwork (drawings, sketches, prints) not related to Federico's professional design and advertising work. The Graphic Design Series documents Federico's extensive graphic design work, including announcements and cards, book and record cover designs, calendars, design concepts, illustrations, letterhead, posters, transparencies, and typographic materials, as well as materials by other artists and designers. The Advertising Campaigns Series includes advertisement clippings and proofs, concepts and sketches, and client reports, representing over one hundred clients in a variety of industries. (Series contains a renowned example of Federico's use of visual puns: a 1953 Woman's Day advertisement - "She's got to Go Out to get Woman's Day " - which features a woman on a bicycle, the wheels of which form the "O"s in "Go Out.") The Photographs and Negatives Series includes both black & white and color images of Federico's advertising and graphic design work, Federico and his associates in a business setting, and a limited selection of personal and family photographs. The Videocassettes Series includes seven videotapes of commercials, short films, and memorial tributes documenting Federico's career in graphic design and advertising. Large-format materials (clippings, proofs, sketches, posters) have been removed from their original series location and relocated to Oversize Materials.

Other materials related to this collection may be found in the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives: Competitive Advertisements Collection and Corporation Vertical Files. For materials relating specifically to the advertising agency Benton & Bowles, consult the D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles Advertisements and Archives. Materials relevant to Lord Geller Federico Einstein and advertising strategy may be found in the Arthur Einstein Papers. For materials relating to Brouillard Communications and Doyle Dane Bernbach Advertising, see the Thomas F. Garbett Papers. Materials relevant to IBM advertising may be found in the Edgar Hatcher Papers.

collection icon
From 1924 through 1958 the architectural firm of Horace Trumbauer of Philadelphia, Pa. was hired to design much of Duke University's East and West campuses. Horace Trumbauer, William O. Frank, and Julian Abele were the firm's main designers. Frank Clyde Brown, S.W. Myatt and A.C. Lee were administrators of construction at Duke University during this time. Some of the buildings designed by the firm are the Duke University Chapel, the Allen Administration Building, Cameron Indoor Stadium, Baldwin Auditorium, the East Campus Union Building, the East Campus Central Heating Plant Complex, the Carr Building (formerly known as the Class Room Building), the Medical School and Hospital, the Nurses' Home, the Law School, the School of Religion, the Chemistry Building, and the Botany and Biology Building. The firm also designed the Giles, Alspaugh, Pegram, Bassett, and Brown residence halls (formerly known as Dormitories 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). Included in the collection are blueprints and printed material relating to the planning and construction of buildings at Duke University from 1924 to 1958.

This collection is comprised of architectural drawings and reproduced architectural drawings of buildings on the Duke University campus and nearby. The dates of this collection range from 1924 to 1952, with the bulk of material from 1926-1938.

A number of Related Collections also contain building specifications, daily work logs, financial ledgers, contracts, and general correspondence for most buildings. Correspondence (often including specifications) exchanged primarily between Horace Trumbauer, William O. Frank, Julian Abele, and Frank Clyde Brown (Duke University Comptroller), S.W. Myatt (Assistant to the President) and A.C. Lee (Chief Engineer for Duke University Building) about general construction at Duke University. Additionally, published building specifications can be found in the library catalog. Other blueprints, sketches, and drawings are folded and interfiled among established collections and within the Operations and Maintenance Department Records. General building specifications, plans for proposed buildings, daily work logs, financial ledgers, contracts, and general correspondence are located in the Operations and Maintenance Department Records, as well as the Frank C. Brown Papers. Bound volumes of published building specifications are stored in the University Archives book collection. Photographs of buildings and architectural sketches and drawings are located in the Photograph Collection. Biographical information about Horace Trumbauer and Julian Abele can be found in the Biographical Reference Collection. The Building Reference Collection contains related information about campus buildings.

collection icon

The Howard Scott Papers span the years 1921-1984, although the bulk of materials covers the period from the 1930s to the 1950s, documenting Scott's career in outdoor advertising as a billboard designer and graphic artist. The papers include correspondence (including two letters from Norman Rockwell), newspaper and magazine clippings, awards, and school yearbooks relating to Scott's personal and professional life, in addition to photographs, sketches, lithographs and reprints of outdoor advertising images for clients such as Amoco, Chesterfield (Liggett and Myers), Esso and Mobil oil products, DeSoto, Ford, and Nash automobiles, H.J. Heinz Co., Lever Brothers, Pabst and Schlitz beers, World War II-era programs such as the USO and Navy recruitment, and the 1939-1940 World's Fair. The collection is arranged into four series--the General Papers Series, the Photographs Series, the Graphic Design, Artwork and Sketches Series, and the Memorabilia Series.

The General Papers Series includes correspondence, biographical information, clippings, sketches, school yearbooks, publications and certificates of recognition. Included are articles about "Elmer," the character created by Scott to help promote the 1940 World's Fair.

The Photographs Series includes approximately 100 prints and transparencies depicting billboard images for a variety of products, such as Esso oil and gasoline, Heinz ketchup, Knickerbocker beer, Swan (Lever Brothers) soap and Twenty Grand cigarettes. Several of the photographs show models in poses which served as the basis for billboard images. Some of the images are signed by artists other than Scott. In addition, approximately 20 photographs depict Scott at various ages, and at work in his studio.

The Graphic Design, Artwork, and Sketches Series includes sketches and proof sheets for billboards and outdoor advertising campaigns created by Scott, as well as a sampling of outdoor poster work by other artists. Major clients include Chesterfield cigarettes; Knickerbocker, Pabst and Schlitz beers; DeSoto, Ford and Nash automobiles; Amoco and Mobil gas and oil; along with a sampling of World War II poster designs including Navy recruiting and the USO. Media include pencil and ink sketches, watercolors, lithographs, and oil paintings. A large mixed media painting depicts an award-winning outdoor design for Ford, with the slogan "He's Doing Fine...He Bought a Ford V-8."

The Memorabilia Series includes awards and trophies that Scott won for his advertising artwork and reflects the esteem with which Scott's work was held by his peers in the outdoor advertising industry.

Closely related collections include: the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives; the Garrett Orr Papers; the John Paver Papers; the Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Slide Library; the War Effort Mobilization Campaign Poster Collection; and the R.C. Maxwell Records.

collection icon

John Simpson papers, 1825-1875 and undated 5.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items

Irish-born surgeon in the British Navy who participated in several Arctic voyages. The papers of John Simpson date from 1825 to 1875 and span his entire career as a naval surgeon aboard the English vessels Blonde, Plover and Superior. The collection is arranged into the following series: Accounts of Voyages, Correspondence, Legal Papers, Medical Files, Native Cultures, Meterology Files, Additional Papers, Other Printed Material, and Poetry, Plays, and Amusements. Simpson's journals from the Arctic voyages on the HMS Plover and Superior on which he served as surgeon or assistant surgeon provide detailed accounts of the voyages, including life on board and the medical problems afflicting the crew and passengers. The collection includes detailed meteorological observations aboard the Plover. There are also unique and valuable materials on native cultures in present-day Alaska, Canada, and the Arctic which include extensive Simpson's notes on the local languages, a number of sketches of Inuit people and culture, hand-drawn maps, and drawings of geographical features. Also included in the collection are a variety of legal papers; correspondence; papers and items related to poetry, plays, and amusements aboard the Plover; and miscellaneous other papers and printed materials. A number of the volumes, flyers, and broadsides were printed on board ship. There are additional materials that briefly describe voyages to Guyana, and documents relating to Simpson's service aboard other ships.

The papers of John Simpson date from 1825 to 1875 and span his entire career as a naval surgeon aboard the English vessels Blonde, Plover and Superior. The collection is arranged into the following series: Accounts of Voyages, Correspondence, Legal Papers, Medical Files, Native Cultures, Meterology Files, Additional Papers, Other Printed Material, and Poetry, Plays, and Amusements. Simpson's journals from the Arctic voyages on the HMS Plover and off the coast of West Africa on the Superior provide detailed, vivid accounts of the voyages, including life on board and the medical problems afflicting the crew and passengers, including scurvy, fevers, gonorrhea, and depression. Journals from the HMS Plover also chronicle the provisions that were stockpiled on board and the daily rations provided to the officers and crew. The collection includes detailed meteorological observations aboard the Plover such as temperature and barometrical readings and descriptions of wind and weather conditions.

Simpson was also a keen observer of native cultures in present-day Alaska, Canada, and the Arctic; his unique and valuable materials on Inuit lands and society include extensive notes on the local languages, a number of sketches of Inuit people and culture, hand-drawn maps, and drawings of geographical features.

He also described in detail his experiences off the coast of West Africa, where he served as surgeon on board the Superior, one of the many British Royal Navy ships that transported African "emigrants," often freed from illegal slave ships, to British colonies; during Simpson's service the Superior operated between Sierra Leone and Guyana. There are briefer references in correspondence and possibly in his journals to stays in Malta, Panama, and other locales such as San Francisco (1842).

Also included in the collection are a variety of legal papers; correspondence; papers and items related to poetry, plays, and amusements aboard the Plover; and miscellaneous other papers and printed materials, some of which relate to Simpson's education and career. A number of the volumes, flyers, and broadsides were hand-printed on board ship. There may be references in the papers to Simpson's service on the Blonde, which traveled to the coast of China in 1842, but the journals seem to start with his service on the emigration ship Superior, following the Blonde.

collection icon
online icon
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. It is headquartered in New York. The Domestic Advertisements were collected from JWT offices in the United States, primarily from New York, Chicago and Detroit.

The Domestic Advertisements Collection consists of print advertisements created by U.S. offices of the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT). The bulk of the collection dates from the 1920s and after, but a few examples are available from as early as 1875. Print advertisements appear in a variety of formats--magazine, newspaper, color, black-and-white, proofs, tearsheets, negative transfers, clippings, along with a limited number of sketches for outdoor advertising installations. Some of the advertisements feature work from notable artists, such as Norman Rockwell, and photographers like Edward Steichen, Irving Penn, and Baron De Meyer. In addition to the actual advertisements, the files dating from the 1910s to 1950s often contain "insertion schedules" that provide the dates and names of the magazines or newspapers in which a given advertisement appeared. In general, proofs for JWT's long-time clients have been saved more systematically than those for accounts that JWT did not hold for a long time. The collection does not include advertisements which have been transferred to microfilm (see the JWT Microfilm Collection). Also, advertisements created for clients that JWT lost prior to the 1940s are less likely to have been saved, although some were microfilmed and are still available in that form. For some JWT clients there are no print advertisements at all in this collection. Among the most extensive files of print advertisements are those for the following JWT clients: Champion Spark Plug, Chesebrough-Ponds, Eastman Kodak (Instamatic, Pocket Instamatic, and Disc cameras, Kodak film), Ford Motor Company (consumer and dealer advertisements), R.T. French, Irving Trust Bank, J. Walter Thompson Company ("house advertisements"), Kraft Foods (including Kraft cheeses, Miracle Whip, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, and Velveeta), Lever Brothers (Lifebuoy, Lux, Close Up, Mrs. Butterworth), Pan American World Airways (passenger jet travel, cargo transportation), Radio Corporation of America (RCA) (RCA Victor recordings, consumer goods, National Broadcasting Company), Reader's Digest, Scott Paper, Seven-Up, Standard Brands (Chase and Sandborn, Fleischmann, Royal, Tenderleaf tea), and Warner-Lambert (primarily Listerine, including advertisements produced by the Lambert and Feasley agency).

The Collection is organized into three series--Main Files, Small Files, and Oversize Materials--that reflect both the size of the holdings for each client as well as the physical location of the advertisements. Within each series, clients are arranged alphabetically and then the advertisements are arranged chronologically. The Main File Series includes clients for which at least one box have been preserved. A separate Small Files Series is maintained for clients for which less than one box of advertisements, and often much less, has survived. The Oversize Materials Series includes many of the clients found in both the Main and Small Files Series.

Chesebrough Ponds, 1875-1968. Proofs from the 1920s to 1950s feature testimonial advertising for Pond's Cold Cream. Noted socialites endorsing the product were photographed by well known photographers, including Edward J. Steichen and Baron DeMeyer.

Eastman Kodak Company, 1930-present. Organized into two categories--Consumer and Trade advertisements--that correspond to Kodak's two major marketing areas. Consumer advertisements feature photographs by well known photographers, famous slogans and trademarks, and depict the American family over several decades in settings where the cameras are used. Introductions of new camera models are well represented, including the Instamatic in 1963, the Pocket Instamatic in 1972, the Instant camera in 1975, and the Disc camera in 1982. At different times JWT handled both film and cameras (still and/or movie) or just Kodak films. Trade advertisements include campaigns for medical and industrial films, Kodel fibers, and Eastman Chemical, as well as advertisements aimed at Kodak dealers. Additional Kodak advertising may be found in the Wayne P. Ellis Collection of Kodakiana.

Ford Motor Company, 1945-present. Key campaigns include "There's a Ford in Your Future" (1945-1948), the "Peanuts" campaign (1960-1962) and the launch of the Mustang (1964). In addition to print advertisements showing the introduction of new models, photostats of outdoor billboards in the 1940s and early 1950s are included. Truck and dealer advertising can also be found. A separate collection, the JWT Detroit Office's Ford "Collateral Literature," houses showroom brochures, and diverse sales materials in many formats.

Irving Trust, 1918-1986. Fine line drawings, often of New York City locales, appear in 1920s newspaper advertisements.

J. Walter Thompson Co., 1917-present. These "house" advertisements are an important source of information about the Company's operations and philosophy.

Kraft Foods Corporation, 1922-present. Advertisements for products including Miracle Whip, Velveeta, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, other cheeses, salad dressings, etc. and a number of lesser-known early products are present. Includes many advertisements with recipes and many trade advertisements directed at grocers.

Lever Brothers, 1900-present. The earliest advertisements are for Lifebuoy Soap. J. Walter Thompson Co. introduced Lux Flakes in 1915 and Lux Toilet Soap in 1925. The early Lux Flakes advertisements employed the talents of fine illustrators. Comic style advertising appeared in the 1930s ("Peggy Lux" and others). The Lux Toilet Soap campaigns began featuring movie and stage star testimonials in 1927. One noteworthy campaign dates from 1953-1954 when Irving Penn photographed some of Hollywood's most famous stars. The Lever Brothers advertisements for both Lux products also include photographs of car cards (subway and bus posters) from the 1920s. Other Lever products represented in the collection include Stripe and Close Up toothpastes, Mrs. Butterworth syrup, and Lever 2000 bath soap.

Massachusetts Mutual Insurance Company, 1951-1967. Although few in number, many of the advertisements contain Norman Rockwell illustrations. The original art work has been retained by the client.

Pan American World Airways, 1942-1974. Contains advertisements prepared for both U.S. and international consumers and includes the introduction of jet passenger travel. Cargo advertising also can be found.

RCA (Radio Corporation of America), 1943-1976. In addition to consumer products, advertisements for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) programs can be found in this group.

Reader's Digest, 1945-present. Many of the advertisements since the 1960s highlight articles appearing in the current month's issue. Examples of corporate advertising for international editions of Reader's Digest are also present.

Scott Paper Co., 1927-1983. Numerous product introductions are represented.

Seven-Up, 1944-1978. Shows the changes in positioning this beverage from a family drink to "Wet 'n' Wild" to the "Un-Cola."

Standard Brands, 1925-1984. Advertisements cover a range of products, including Fleischmann's Yeast, Chase and Sanborn, Tenderleaf Tea, and Royal Pudding and Gelatin.

Warner-Lambert, 1915-1997. Advertisements consist primarily of proofs and tearsheets. There are no advertisements present for the years 1945-1947 or 1949. The vast majority of the advertisements are for Listerine Antiseptic, with other products represented beginning in the late 1960s. Listerine was manufactured by the Lambert Pharmacal Company beginning around 1915. William Warner acquired the company in 1955, merged it into his own pharmaceutical business and changed the name to the Warner-Lambert Co.

Warner-Lambert is the only client file in this collection that includes the work of an agency other than JWT. Until 1962, Listerine advertising was handled by the Lambert and Feasley agency in New York, the house agency for the Lambert Pharmacal Co. (St. Louis) up to 1955, and for its successor the Warner-Lambert Co. (Morris Plains, N.J.), from 1955-1962. When JWT obtained the Listerine account in October 1962, the back files of Listerine advertisements were transferred to JWT.

collection icon

Robert S. Smith papers, 1947-1982 and undated 16.5 Linear Feet — 1200 Items

Robert S. Smith is a retired executive who worked as an art director for a number of advertising agencies including William H. Weintraub and Co.; Norman Craig and Kummel; and Ogilvy & Mather (O&M). The Robert S. Smith Papers span the years 1947 through 1982 and document Smith's work as an art director for several advertising agencies, including Norman Craig and Kummel; and Ogilvy & Mather (O&M). The materials consist primarily of sketches; paintings; photographs and contact sheets; advertising layouts and proofs; storyboards for television commercials; and house advertisements for O&M. Clients include Consolidated Cigar (El Producto and La Palina brands); Diageo (Gilbey's liquors), DuBonnet; General Foods (Maxim coffee, Gaines dog food); IBM; Maidenform; Mars; Nabisco; Rand McNally; Ronson; Schenley Distillers (Melrose liquors); and Toro. Also included are a set of sketches and drawings, some signed, by the artist Paul Rand. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Robert S. Smith Papers span the years 1947 through 1982 and document Smith's work as a commercial artist and art director for several advertising agencies, including Norman Craig and Kummel; and Ogilvy & Mather (O&M). The materials consist primarily of sketches; paintings; photographs and contact sheets; advertising layouts and proofs; storyboards for television commercials; and house advertisements for O&M. Clients include Consolidated Cigar (El Producto and La Palina brands); Diageo (Gilbey's liquors), DuBonnet; General Foods (Maxim coffee, Gaines dog food); IBM; Maidenform; Mars; Nabisco; Rand McNally; Ronson; Schenley Distillers (Melrose liquors); and Toro. Also included are a set of sketches, paintings and drawings, some signed, by the artist Paul Rand.

collection icon
Retired advertising executive. Collection documents Sosna's long career as an advertising executive and consultant, and contains materials from a wide variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, printed material, advertisement proofs and clippings, sketches, scrapbooks, slides, negatives, and film. The collection primarily provides a record of advertising campaigns Sosna developed as a copy supervisor, creative director, and advertising executive at Gershuny Associates, Leo Burnett, Grant Advertising, Doherty Clifford Steers & Shenfield, Sullivan Stauffer Colwell & Bayles, Norman Craig & Kummel, and J.M. Mathes, from 1948 to 1973; the collection has limited material relating to the specific agencies for which he worked. In addition, the collection documents Sosna's later writings, lectures, and seminars as an independent consultant in retail and supermarket advertising from the 1970s through 2001, including a complete run of the Supermarket Advertising Newsletter (1981-2000) and a copy of his book Dodge #9: How to Never Make a Mistake: Achieving Success in a World That Is Always Looking for Someone to Blame (2001). Major advertising campaigns represented in the collection include: American Tobacco Company (Bull Durham and Silva Thins cigarettes); Bristol-Myers Company; Bulova Corporation; Dr Pepper Co.; Food Fair/Pantry Pride; Hoover Company; Ladies' Home Journal; Martex; Pabst Brewing Company; Procter & Gamble; Pure Oil Company; and Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co. The collection also documents Sosna's role as supervisor of the Peace Corps advertising campaign in its first two years, from 1961 to 1963. Peace Corps materials include print advertisements; "Volunteer Radio Kits" distributed to broadcasters; one promotional film originally aired on American television; and a letter from Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr., first director of the Peace Corps.

The Sheldon B. Sosna Papers span the years 1922 to 2001, with the bulk of the material dating from 1948 to 1991. The collection documents Sosna's long career as an advertising executive and consultant, and contains materials from a wide variety of formats, including correspondence, writings, printed material, advertisement proofs and clippings, sketches, scrapbooks, slides, negatives, and film. The collection primarily provides a record of advertising campaigns Sosna developed as a copy supervisor, creative director, and advertising executive at Gershuny Associates, Leo Burnett, Grant Advertising, Doherty Clifford Steers & Shenfield, Sullivan Stauffer Colwell & Bayles, Norman Craig & Kummel, and J.M. Mathes, from 1948 to 1973; the collection has limited material relating to the specific agencies for which he worked. In addition, the collection documents Sosna's later writings, lectures, and seminars as an independent consultant in retail and supermarket advertising from the 1970s through 2001, including a complete run of the Supermarket Advertising Newsletter (1981-2000) and a copy of his book Dodge #9: How to Never Make a Mistake: Achieving Success in a World That Is Always Looking for Someone to Blame (2001). Major advertising campaigns represented in the collection include: American Tobacco Company (Bull Durham and Silva Thins cigarettes); Bristol-Myers Company; Bulova Corporation; Dr Pepper Co.; Food Fair/Pantry Pride; Hoover Company; Ladies' Home Journal; Martex; Pabst Brewing Company; Procter & Gamble; Pure Oil Company; and Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co. The collection also documents Sosna's role as supervisor of the Peace Corps advertising campaign in its first two years, from 1961 to 1963. Peace Corps materials include print advertisements; "Volunteer Radio Kits" distributed to broadcasters; one promotional film originally aired on American television; and a letter from Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr., first director of the Peace Corps. The collection is organized into six series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Printed Materials, Advertisements, Scrapbooks, and Visual Materials.

The Correspondence Series includes limited business correspondence, advertising strategy memoranda, and mailings and solicitations specifically related to Sosna's supermarket consulting. The Writings and Speeches Series includes scripts of lectures and seminars Sosna delivered on retail and supermarket advertising throughout the United States from 1983 to 1994, limited market and client reports, and an account of his work with President Kennedy and Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. on an early promotional film for the Peace Corps. The Printed Materials Series includes Sosna's professional writings on advertising (including an installment of "Sosna on Advertising," a long-standing column featured in Grocery Marketing Magazine); a copy of his 2001 book Dodge #9: How to Never Make a Mistake; client materials (letterhead, brochures, mailings, including Peace Corps promotional materials); conference programs; and magazines. Most notably, the series includes a complete set of the Supermarket Advertising Newsletter, a monthly serial which Sosna wrote, edited, and published from January 1981 through December 2000. The Advertisements Series includes original page proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and concept sketches for client advertisements, with an emphasis on consumer/home products, cigarette, beer, and apparel industries. The Scrapbooks Series includes six scrapbooks of advertisement clippings, original page proofs, client brochures, and catalog mailings, primarily documenting clients in women's apparel and consumer/home products. The Visual Materials Series includes over 700 seminar slides originally used in Sosna's presentations on supermarket advertising, a set of color negatives documenting the "Pabst Red Beer" advertising campaign, and the only existing copy of a promotional film for the Peace Corps which Sosna wrote, produced, and edited. Large-format materials (clippings, proofs, sketches) have been removed from their original series location and relocated to Oversize Materials locations.

Other materials related to this collection may be found in the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives: Competitive Advertisements Collection and the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives: Corporation Vertical Files. For materials specifically relating to the agencies Norman, Craig & Kummel and the Leo Burnett Company, consult the Robert S. Smith Papers and the Kensinger Jones Papers, respectively. For materials relevant to American Tobacco Company advertising, see the James Buchanan Duke Papers, the Benjamin Newton Duke Papers, and the John M. W. Hicks Papers. For materials on beer advertising for the Pabst Brewing Company and Schlitz Brewing Company, see the Howard Scott Papers. Materials relevant to Procter & Gamble Company advertising may be found in the D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles Advertisements, the D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles Archives, and the Wells Rich Greene, Inc. Records. Additionally, materials relating to Peace Corps advertising may be found in the David B. McCall Papers.

collection icon

William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

online icon
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.