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The Office of Alumni Affairs at Duke University administers the Duke Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization serving over 120,000 alumni and former students of Duke University, in addition to thousands of parents and friends of the university. Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter. English.

Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter.

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African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

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Center for Documentary Studies, SNCC Legacy Project Critical Oral Histories Conference Interviews, 2016-2018, 2016-2018 260 Files — MP4 video files, JPEG image files, MP3 audio files, PDF text files, and plain text files. — 75 Gigabytes

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The 2016 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on "The Emergence of Black Power, 1964-1967," while the 2018 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The Critical Oral Histories Conference in 2016 and 2018 were an extension of the SNCC Legacy Project that placed SNCC veterans in conversation with scholars using primary source materials. The events were produced by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the SNCC Legacy Project. Series One contains the 2016 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the years 1964-1967, to discuss the emergence of "Black Power" as an ideological concept as well as political and economic framework. Participants included Charlie Cobb, Courtland Cox, Gloria House, Phil Hutchings, Jen Lawson, Charles McLaurin, Cleve Sellers, Shirley Sherrod, Karen Spellman, Judy Richardson, Maria Varela, Geri Augusto, Emilye Crosby, Worth Long, Hasan Jeffries, Betty Mae Fikes, Bertha O'Neal, John O'Neal, Michael Simmons, and Zoharah Simmons. Series Two contains the 2018 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with participants including Phillip Agnew, Geri Augusto, Rebecah Barber, Kenneth A. Campbell, Charles Cobb, Courtland Cox, Emilye Crosby, Amber Delgado, David (Dave) Dennis, Sr., Ajamu Dillahunt, Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Timothy (Tim) L. Jenkins, Edwin King, Dorie Ann Ladner, Jennifer Lawson, Danita Mason-Hogans, Miles McKeller-Smith, Charles McLaurin, Ambria McNeill, Aja Monet Bacquie, Janet Moses, Robert Moses, Edna Watkins Muhammad, Quinn Osment, Timothy B. Tyson, Hollis Watkins, and Curtis Wilkie.

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The Archives document the history of Benton & Bowles advertisements; the merger of the D'Arcy MacManus Masius and Benton & Bowles companies; the early careers of William Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles; employee training, recruitment, and management; corporate publications; and marketing research. Includes material from three companies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles, Benton & Bowles, and D'Arcy MacManus Masius. Specific formats include memoranda; correspondence; reports; corporate publications, such as house organs, research reports, manuals, credentials, and employee reference material; press releases and a press book; speeches; clippings; photographs in color and black-and-white, and negatives; films and DVDs of advertisements; book manuscripts; audio tapes; financial papers; and a scrapbook. Clients represented in the Advertisements Series include the Procter & Gamble Company, General Foods Corporation, Allied Chemical Corporation, Avco Corporation, Colgate Palmolive Co., Florida Citrus Commission, International Business Machines Corporation, and West Point Pepperell. The unprocessed addition (554 items, dated ca. 1950s-1980s) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History. (01-103).

The D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B) Archives consists of advertising agency records spanning the years 1929 to 1995. The bulk of the material dates from the 1950s to the mid-1980s. The Archives includes material that documents aspects of three advertising agencies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B), Benton & Bowles (B&B), and D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius (D-MM).

The Archives as a whole provides a comprehensive overview of Benton & Bowles advertisements (1932-1995) and commercials (1950s-1980s), primarily those created by the agency's New York office. Other major topics include the advertising careers of William B. Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles by Gordon Webber and Frank Smith; television programs created by B&B in the 1950s; aspects of employee training, recruitment, and management; and marketing research. The Archives also documents the merger of the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency with Benton & Bowles to form DMB&B in 1985. There is very little information in the Archives about the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency prior to the merger. Also, material about Benton & Bowles offices other than New York is limited, and found mostly in B&B house organs.

The D'Arcy-MacManus Masius Files comprise a very small amount of materials in the Archives. Although the D'Arcy agency had its roots in 1906, the Items gathered here date only from 1972-1985, mainly 1981 to 1985. They consist of corporate publications, notes, and clippings. The 75th Anniversary edition of "Between Us" contains an overview of the history of D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius, especially of the D'Arcy Advertising Company, and its clients. Profiles, a resource book, provides information on all of the divisions of the D'Arcy -MacManus Masius Worldwide group of advertising agencies.

The Benton and Bowles Files are by far the largest part of the Archives. They include primarily print advertisements (the largest series in the Archives), but also over 500 films, significant documents relating to the work of the agency, photographs, and corporate publications. The Benton & Bowles Files span the years 1929 to 1985, although most of the material dates from 1950s and after. Item types in the collection include internal memoranda; reports; speeches; printed material (manuals, leaflets, pamphlets, and house organs); photographs; research notes; credentials; employee training material; press releases and clippings; book manuscripts; audio tapes of oral history interviews; and financial papers. The Benton & Bowles Files provide documentation of the history of print and television advertising; television programming; the history of the B&B agency and its corporate culture; corporate communications; marketing research; and advertising executives.

The earliest Items in the B&B Files are two small bank books recording account activity of the fledgling agency from 1929 to 1935 and copies of William ("Billie") Benton's long letters to his mother, 1929-1938, in which he confides details of his new advertising agency as well as family matters. A small number of other Items date from the 1930s and 1940s and illustrate isolated aspects of the agency's business in that period.

Long series of various agency house organs begin in 1947 and provide the most complete and continuous views of Benton & Bowles, its clients, advertising campaigns, personnel, and various offices in the U.S. and abroad.

The Advertisements Series is the largest section of the Archives and contains comprehensive files of print advertising campaigns developed mainly by Benton & Bowles from 1932-1980. The series includes primarily proofs, along with some tearsheets, of consumer and trade advertisements, most from U.S. magazines and newspapers. Files for a few clients include unusual material, such as packaging or client newsletters. Most of the advertisements were removed from large scrapbooks into which B&B employees had pasted them; many have suffered glue damage, but they remain an invaluable source for studying the development of a number of advertising campaigns over long periods of time. Longtime clients of B&B included Procter & Gamble and General Foods, among many others. Neither the Advertisements Series nor any other part of the Archives contains substantial documentation of the creative processes behind the advertisements and advertising campaigns.

For additional information about the Advertisements Series, see the data collection sheets in the Information Folders about the DMB&B Archives. The data collection sheets provide notes about: languages, other than English, used in the advertisements; countries, other than the United States, for which advertisements were produced; the use of celebrities in the advertisements; themes or social and political issues that can be studied in the advertisements; and the use of comic illustrations. The data collection sheets also note the existence of collateral literature for certain advertising campaigns. The Information Folders also contain a list of Benton & Bowles clients and the dates of agency-client relationships.

The Audiovisual Series (RESTRICTED) contains over 500 reels of 16mm film varying in lengths from 200' to 1600'. The majority of the films are compilations of commercials created mainly by Benton & Bowles for many different clients. Also included are several dozen reels of vintage television programs (shows created or sponsored by B&B), several stockholders' meetings, speeches, new business presentations, and outtakes. At the time of this writing, most of the films have not been viewed in their entirety, indexed, or reformatted. However, a selection of films has been reformatted for research use.

Addition (accession #2001-0103) (554 items, 7.5 linear ft.; dated [ca. 1950s]-[1980s]) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Viewing of commercials is restricted until videocassette use copies are made. For a container list, contact Research Services.

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David Price is a political science professor at Duke University, and Democratic congressman from North Carolina's Fourth District since 1987 (re-elected in 2006). The David Price Papers (1960-2006) document the scholarly and political career of David Eugene Price, including his days as a graduate student in the 1960s, his tenure as a political science professor and Democratic Party staff member, and, finally, his years as a Democratic congressman from North Carolina's Fourth District. Records from Price's political headquarters contain thousands of original documents, handwritten and computer-generated; printed materials such as legislative bills and campaign publicity; and a variety of audiovisual materials, including photographs, some slides, many videos, and audio recordings. The collection is especially rich for researchers interested in the American political party system, the work and life of legislators, North Carolina history and government, the North Carolina Democratic and Republican parties, the U.S. Congress, its committee structure, the Hunt Commission, and the broader legislative process. Other materials document political campaigns, notably David Price's own congressional campaigns and Albert Gore's senatorial campaign of 1970-1971.

The David Price Papers document the scholarly and political career of David Eugene Price, including his days as a graduate student in the 1960s, his tenure as a political science professor and Democratic Party staff member, and, finally, his years as a Democratic congressman from North Carolina's Fourth District from 1987 through 1998. Records from Price's political headquarters record the routine activities of Price and his office staff, and the larger system of government in which he participated. The files contain documents, handwritten and computer-generated; printed materials such as legislative bills and campaign publicity; and a variety of audiovisual materials, including photographs, some slides, many videos, and audio recordings. The collection is especially rich for researchers interested in the American political party system, the work and life of legislators, North Carolina history and government, the North Carolina Democratic and Republican Parties, the U.S. Congress, its committee structure, the Hunt Commission, and especially the larger legislative process. Other topics include political campaigns, notably Price's own campaigns and Albert Gore's senatorial campaign of 1970-1971.

Three primary groups comprise the collection. Full descriptions of series and subseries within these groups are found below in the detailed collection description. The Pre-Congressional Papers primarily document Price's years as a student, then as a professor at Yale and Duke Universities; they also trace Price's early involvement with the Democratic Party. These papers are a foundation and prelude to Price's later work as a member of Congress. The Congressional Papers were compiled during his years in public office, and reveal Price's activities as a member of Congress, and his relationships with colleagues, constituents, and other political stakeholders. Finally, the Campaign Office Files were created from the activity of his campaign office in Raleigh, North Carolina, largely separate - as required by law - from the work of his congressional office.

Most original folders and folder titles have been retained. Labels included many abbreviations, acronyms, and initials; the full versions were added in brackets whenever possible. "DP" in folder titles and elsewhere usually refers to "David Price" but can also mean "Democratic Party." Keyword searching is possible within the container list, with some important limitations. First, the expanded forms of acronyms and abbreviations were not added in every instance but rather at the first occurrence with a new series or subseries. Second, labels are not standardized. For example, the search "breast cancer" might retrieve some folders, but not the one labeled "Cancer--breast." A search for the EPA's "Southern Appalachian Mountains Air Quality Initiative" within this collection may not retrieve folders labeled only as "Southern Appalachian Air Quality." To be comprehensive, therefore, searches need to be formulated in several ways. Please consult with a Research Services staff when using this collection.

Dates were obtained by sampling within folders and so may not be strictly accurate. Sampling was also used to identify the content of audiovisual materials, therefore descriptions for recordings may not be complete.

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Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women was founded in 1982 as a collaborative endeavor between Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to promote Women's Studies scholarship, research, and curriculum development in the South. The project was originally named the Duke-UNC Women's Studies Research Center, but changed its name to the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women in 1987. The Center operated with support from the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation, smaller grants from local foundations, and institutional backing from Duke and UNC. The records contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992. English.

The records of the Duke University/University of North Carolina Center for Research on Women contain correspondence, reports, grant documents, audiotapes, a videotape, and other materials relating to the Center for Research on Women. Major subjects include women's studies curriculum development and research, pay equity, and the relationships between race, class, and gender. Materials range in date from 1982 to 1992.

Some of the materials in this collection are not immediately accessible because they require further processing before use. Please contact the University Archives before visiting to use this collection.

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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives as well as supporting papers and recordings, chiefly dating from the mid-1960s through 2000. The materials relate to Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora series includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration drives and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as discriminatory housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. The professional papers provide supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher, and include files related to research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document Espada's Puerto Rican diaspora around the world; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Espada was not only an observant photographer, but was also deeply involved in all of his projects as an activist, social worker, and humanitarian.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which also contains research files on documentary and research topics; preparation for his many photography projects and related exhibits; a few videocassettes; teaching syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews, derives from Espada's work with Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Hoof 'n' Horn Student Musical Theater Company was first formed in 1936 at Duke University. The organization's purpose is to provide the highest possible standard of amateur theater to the Duke University and Triangle Area communities, to serve as an educational vehicle to provide practical experience in all aspects of musical theater, and to be responsible for all necessary assets for the production of shows which it sponsors. The collection features musical scores, orchestrations, sheet music, scripts, programs, posters, a scrapbook, video and audio recordings, and administrative materials. Major subjects include Duke University students and musical productions. English.

The collection features musical scores, orchestrations, sheet music, scripts, programs, posters, a scrapbook, video and audio recordings, and administrative materials. Materials range in date from 1941 to 2006.

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Horse & Buggy Press print and graphic design projects, 1996-2017 4.0 Linear Feet — 7 boxes — 185 items

Collection of fine art print and graphic design projects by Horse & Buggy Press in Durham, North Carolina, commissioned chiefly by non-profit organizations, small firms, individual authors and artists, and community events organizers. Formats include catalogs, broadsides, posters, newsletters, pamphlets and brochures, programs, and jacket and packaging designs for six audio and film recordings. Smaller projects include exhibit and book announcements, business cards, invitations, and menus for local restaurants. Chiefly consists of letterpress work, but there are also examples of offset and digitally printed items. Many projects involved the work of other artists and designers, and many were printed in limited editions. Content often includes poetry, prose excerpts, and quotes. Books and zines printed by Horse & Buggy Press have been separated from this collection and individually described for the Duke University Libraries catalog.

Collection of fine art print and graphic design projects by Horse & Buggy Press in Durham, North Carolina, commissioned chiefly by non-profit organizations, small firms, individual authors and artists, and community events organizers. Formats include catalogs, broadsides, posters, newsletters, pamphlets and brochures, programs, and jacket and packaging designs for six audio and film recordings. Smaller projects include exhibit and book announcements, business cards, invitations, and menus for local restaurants.

Chiefly consists of letterpress work, but there are also examples of offset and digitally printed items. Many projects involved the work of other artists and designers, and many were printed in limited editions. Content often includes poetry, prose excerpts, and quotes. Books and zines printed by Horse & Buggy Press have been separated from this collection and individually described for the Duke University Libraries catalog.