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Aitken family letter and will, 1775, 1793 1.8 Linear Feet — 2 items

The Aitken family was of Scottish descent. John Aitken, senior, lived in Rashiehill, Scotland. One of his sons, James Aitken, was eventually ordained as a Presbyterian minister in Elizabeth town (Elizabeth City), North Carolina. Collection comprises a letter written by James Aitken to his parents from Wilmingtown (Wilmington), North Carolina, on 1775 June 5, as well as a last will and testament for John Aitken, Senior, as recorded in 1793. In his letter, James describes local people as "genteel" and respected for their "education and good behaviour," and goes on to describe local planters and their various crops, long distances ridden, the situation for Presbyterians and his upcoming ordination and resettlement, his plans to obtain a plantation and purchase or hire slaves, preparations for war with Great Britain, and payment of his debts. In his will, John Aitken, Senior, names his son, John, as his successor, and outlines the distribution of his money, land, and property. The will is witnessed by Charles Lang and William Muirhead.

Collection comprises a letter written by James Aitken to his parents from Wilmingtown (Wilmington), North Carolina, on 1775 June 5, as well as a last will and testament for John Aitken, Senior, as recorded in 1793. In his letter, James describes local people as "genteel" and respected for their "education and good behaviour," and goes on to describe local planters and their various crops, long distances ridden, the situation for Presbyterians and his upcoming ordination and resettlement, his plans to obtain a plantation and purchase or hire slaves, preparations for war with Great Britain, and payment of his debts. In his will, John Aitken, Senior, names his son, John, as his successor, and outlines the distribution of his money, land, and property. The will is witnessed by Charles Lang and William Muirhead.

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Lady Elizabeth Holford was born Elizabeth Lewis around 1650. She first married a merchant called Harbin, whose wealth she inherited. Her second husband was a poor baronet, Sir William Holford, who died before her. Lady Holford died on 3 November 1720, without an heir. Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

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Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.

Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.

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Person Family papers, 1754-1971 6 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Family active in Louisburg, Franklin Co., N.C. and also in Nash Co., N.C. Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person. Addition comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person.

Addition (05-110) (200 items, 1.7 lin. ft.; dated 1754-1971 and undated) comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

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Collection comprises correspondence, documents and print materials belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735 to 1859, and consist of over eighty letters, both incoming and outgoing, many legal and financial papers, other manuscript documents, and ephemeral print items such as broadsides and circulars. One folder contains military muster lists and fines stemming from Anderson's service as clerk of the 68th regiment of the Virginia militia. Topics in the correspondence include slavery and slave trade, particularly in Virginia, colonization efforts, emancipation, the status of mixed-race individuals, Virginia and U.S. politics, Virginia military history, religion and church affairs, and education. Of particular note are several letters and documents relating to Anderson's children, who he fathered with one or more slaves; one of these children, Haidee, was sent to Eaglewood, a boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké Weld and Theodore Dwight Weld. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of correspondence, documents and ephemera belonging to merchant and land owner Robert Anderson of Williamsburg and Yorktown, Virginia. The materials date from 1735-1908, with the bulk dating from 1735-1859. The earliest document is a deed of gift of land from Thomas Vine of York County, Virginia, to his grandson.

There are over 100 pieces of incoming and outgoing correspondence dating from 1804 to 1859, with a few letters dated much later. Many of the retained copies and drafts are written on small slips of paper and docketed, which appears to have been Anderson's idiosyncratic method of dealing with his correspondence. Topics include religion and church matters; U.S. and Virginia politics; Virginia history; mercantile transactions; education; and slavery, including prices for slaves in the Richmond market, and Anderson's correspondence referring to purchases and sales of individual slaves. A printed circular letter from 1850 concerns colonization efforts to send freed slaves to Liberia.

Of note are several letters relating to children Anderson fathered with enslaved women, especially his daughter Haidee, who he sent to Eaglewood, the boarding school run by abolitionists Angelina Grimké and Theodore Dwight Weld; one long letter was written by Grimké to Anderson, exhorting him to emancipate Haidee and her mother. Eaglewood was part of the utopian community in Raritan Union Bay, New Jersey.

Stemming from Anderson's work as clerk for the 68th Regiment of the Virginia militia in James City County (Jamestown), there are 39 items, some written by Anderson, some by the Sheriff of Williamsburg, which consist chiefly of detailed muster lists and fines (1806-1858), and two printed lists of individuals receiving military pensions received due to an Act of Congress in 1828. Other documents in the collection refer to Virginia history during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, and to the history of the Virginia Norfolk Junior Volunteers, founded in 1802, in which Anderson served.

There are also deeds, wills, and other documents; several dozen financial receipts; and a few printed and partially printed ephemeral items. Family names appearing in the deeds, bonds, and other documents are Bryan, Coke, Moody, Dickeson, Nelson, White, and Chapman. Among the later documents is a list of medical expenses from 1852 that seem to relate to Anderson's slaves or servants, and an 1858 bill for boarding school expenses for Haidee, signed by Theodore Weld. A document from 1855 records citizens protesting a request from the ship "Seabird" to land cargo and passengers, due to an outbreak of yellow fever in the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards.

Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.