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Russian Posters collection, 1919-1989 and undated

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4 Linear Feet — 81 Items
The Russian Posters Collection is divided into three series spanning the years 1919 to 1989: 30 posters emphasizing the benefits of communism and the first "Five Year Plan" for workers, the achievements of the USSR under communism, religion as an enemy of the people, and the struggle against and decline of capitalism; 14 placards from the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the USSR describing and depicting the strength of the country in industrial development, consumer goods, agricultural production, electrification, and the national welfare; and the collapse of the colonial system of imperialism and the problems facing capitalism; and last, ten posters from the "perestroika" period of the 1980s, most of which were exhibited in Moscow in 1988. In addition, the collection houses nine facsimiles of Russian posters from the 1920s-1930s. The posters have been digitized and are available online.

The Russian Posters Collection spans a good part of 20th century Russian political history, and is divided into three main groupings: 30 posters emphasizing the benefits of communism and the first "Five Year Plan" for workers, the achievements of the former USSR under communism, religion as an enemy of the people, and the struggle against and decline of capitalism; 14 placards from the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the former USSR describing and depicting the strength of the country in industrial development, consumer goods, agricultural production, electrification, and the national welfare, and the collapse of the colonial system of imperialism and the problems facing capitalism; and last, 26 posters from the "perestroika" period of the 1980s, most of which were exhibited in Moscow in 1988. In addition, the collection houses nine facsimiles of Russian posters from the 1920s-1930s. Some posters feature anti-religious slogans. The posters have also been digitized and are available online.

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Richard Pollay Acme Advertising collection, 1850s-2006 and undated

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75 Linear Feet — 3000 Items
The Acme Advertising Collection is one of the collections created by Professor Richard Pollay in the History of Advertising Archives (Faculty of Commerce, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia). The collection was motivated by the observation that Acme named enterprises are characteristically small ventures that represent the grass roots of local and regional economies. At the same time, the ubiquity of the Acme brand name has made its way into popular culture, where it has become an icon for independent business in general, featured in print cartoons from artists such as Gary Larson (The Far Side) and G.B. Trudeau (Doonesbury), and in the Warner Bros. animated Road Runner features. Items in the Acme Collection come from a variety of sources. Many items were donated to Dr. Pollay, but the majority were acquired by Dr. Pollay himself over several decades. In earlier years items were found in shops, flea markets, and antique stores across North America. However, in recent years most items were acquired through the internet auction site, eBay (www.eBay.com). The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Bros.

The Acme Advertising Collection dates from the 1850s through 2006 and consists of approximately 3000 items from over 900 distinct companies and producers, primarily of U.S. or Canadian origin, all bearing the brand name Acme. The collection contains a diverse array of items, both three-dimensional and printed materials, including: promotional items and memorabilia; trade cards; business cards; magazine tear sheets; catalogs; newspaper clippings; signs; displays; writing instruments; rulers; clothing; toys and games; school and office stationery supplies; photographs and slides. A number of corporations are represented in the collection, including: Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Boots; Acme Brick Company; Acme Harvester; Acme Markets; Acme Motor Truck Company; Acme White Lead and Color Works; Duane H. Nash, Inc.; Lautz Bros. and Company; and Warner Brothers.

A significant part of the collection is organized and grouped to represent rooms in a house. For example, kitchen items have been collected together. Office, wardrobe, and bathroom items are similarly gathered. Most items are represented in the Detailed Description by thumbnail images. In all, the collection consists of 28 Series: Kitchen Collectibles; Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles; Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation; Office and School Supplies; Domestic Hardware; Grocery and Store Collectibles; ACME Beer; Warner Brothers; Clothing Collectibles; Industrial Hardware; Bottles and Jars; Catalogs; Stationery and Certificates; Books and Monographs; Specialty Advertisements; Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements; Sales Oddities; Photographs; eBay Files; Acme Bail Bonds; Acme Truck; Audiovisual Materials; Match Covers; Telephone Directories; Business Cards; Trade Cards; Slides; and Miscellaneous Items.

The collection arrived already organized into 28 series. Every item had been assigned an "accession number," a unique 8-digit identifier, in the format "100-xx-xxx": the middle digits refer to the Series number, and the last three digits represent a running accession sequence within the Series. Items have been arranged by Series and numerically therein; however, there are a few exceptions where items have been transferred to another series after having been previously assigned an accession number. The collection also arrived with a descriptive database that was created and maintained by Professor Pollay's staff. The item descriptions in this finding aid represent a distillation of that database into a form more consistent with EAD-compliant finding aids. The collection has been processed with the original order maintained as much as possible. In addition, some items have been deaccessioned or retained by the donor, and only a digital image of the item exists in the collection. Those have been noted in the inventory.

Series 1: Kitchen Collectibles consists of Acme products for kitchen use: juice extractors; sifters; cast iron pans; and other utensils.

Series 2: Wardrobe and Bedroom Collectibles consists of Acme products for use in the bedroom or used as part of a wardrobe, including shoe pads, zippers, scissors, etc.

Series 3: Toys, Games, Sports and Recreation includes Acme toys and games, and other items used in sports and recreation, including model cars, toy trains, whistles, and playing cards.

Series 4: Office and School Supplies includes Acme products used as office and school supplies: erasers, staplers, rulers, pencils, etc.

Series 5: Domestic Hardware includes objects related to hardware used in homes, including wall thermometers; padlocks; iron hinges; and binoculars.

Series 6: Grocery and Store Collectibles includes grocery items such as evaporated milk, potato bags, bread bags, store signs, product display signs, and postcards.

Series 7: ACME Beer includes bottles, tins, catalogs, souvenir programs, flat advertisements and advertising objects relating to the Acme brand of beer.

Series 8: Warner Brothers consists of advertising objects and novelty items from Warner Bros. that feature the Acme label: Wile E Coyote lapel pin; Acme Optical glass case; along with clothing items like neckties, waist pouches, sweatshirts, and hats.

Series 9: Clothing Collectibles consists of clothing items featuring the Acme label and includes aprons, caps and T-shirts.

Series 10: Industrial Hardware includes industrial type objects like printing plates, radio control switches, etc.

Series 11: Bottles and Jars consists of bottles, glassware and jars featuring the Acme name or logo Also included are two colored glass slides, a baby's bottle and items in glass picture frames.

Series 12: catalogs includes various-sized catalogs, brochures, ledgers, and flyers. They are: Acme Trading Co., Acme Boot Co., and Acme Brick. Each item is individually described.

Series 13: Stationery and Certificates consists of assorted business stationery and certificates, including examples of late 19th century and early 20th century lithography on bond certificates and company letter heads. The companies Duane H. Nash Inc., Acme Harvester Co., and Acme Shear Co. provide examples of typical workmanship.

Series 14: Books and Monographs includes books, picture books, monographs and magazines that feature the Acme sign or logo or make mention of Acme.

Series 15: Specialty Advertisements consists primarily of promotional items such as blotters; small calendars; stickers; and slide charts that feature an Acme logo or trademark.

Series 16: Posters, Magazine, and Newspaper Advertisements consists of print advertisements; mounted clippings; and photocopies of stationery and other paper items. Several companies are featured, including: Acme Boot Co., Acme Card System Co., Acme Harvester Co., Acme White Lead and Color Paint Works, Acme Wagon Co., Acme Washing Machine Co., and Acme Visible Card System. Each item is individually described. Each item carries an accession number.

Series 17: Sales Oddities consists of various advertising objects that feature an Acme logo or trademark, including both printed and three-dimensional objects such as tokens, pocket items, patches and decals.

Series 18: Photographs consists of photographs, negatives, and reprints of various shops, billboard, signs, and buildings featuring the Acme sign or logo. There are several pictures from Acme News Pictures, Inc. and Acme Telephoto, both press agencies.

Series 19: eBay Files consists of printouts from eBay.com relating to Acme-branded items. Printouts are housed in binders which are arranged roughly by year.

Series 20: Acme Bail Bonds consists of mostly printed materials related to the Acme Bail Bonds Company.

Series 21: Acme Truck consists of print advertisements for the Acme Truck, predominantly dating 1918-1922.

Series 22: Audiovisual Materials consists of sound and video recordings on various formats: cassette and video tapes; CD-ROM; vinyl records; and CDs. Each item features "Acme" as a trademark or logo or as part of the band name.

Series 23: Match Covers consists of assorted matchbook covers featuring the Acme label. Items are housed in a binder.

Series 24: Telephone Directories consists of the advertising Yellow pages. The provenance of these advertisements is largely unknown. The Series reflects the order in which they were collected.

Series 25: Business Cards consists of 138 business cards from various Acme companies. Items are housed in one binder.

Series 26: Trade Cards consists of various trading cards that were produced between the late 1880s and the 1930s. The bulk of items comes from the Lautz Bros Soap Co.

Series 27: Slides consists of 232 slides of various objects, locations and businesses featuring the name Acme. Slides are housed in one binder.

Series 28: Miscellaneous Items consists of miscellaneous items featuring the Acme label, name or trademark. Includes gas masks, farm implements, etc.

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History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s

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50 Linear Feet — about 850 items
Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects related to the history of medicine, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, urology, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models and figurines; and other objects such as apothecary jars, cupping glasses, infant feeders, a bas-relief memento mori, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes and stethoscopes, dating from the 17th to the 20th century. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include physician's medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); clinical equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models; and art objects such as apothecary jars, a bas-relief memento mori, a marble skull, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes, from a small monocular "flea glass" to mid-20th century models. Other early medical instruments and supplies include amputation saws, bleeding bowls, cupping glasses, hypodermic needles, infant and invalid feeders, lancets, opthalmoscopes, pill rollers, stethoscopes, syringes, and other items. A more unusual item - and one of the larger pieces - is an adult walker made of wood, dating perhaps to the 19th century or earlier.

There is also a large collection of early anatomical and diagnostic human models from China and continental Europe, in the shape of small, intricately detailed manikins. Most are made from ivory. Some feature removable anatomical parts, and female figures often include a removable fetus. There is also a model illustrating acupuncture points. Other instructional artifacts include glass slides used in medical school lectures.

Most of these objects were photographed by library staff; at a later time, digital images of almost all of the objects in the collection were added to the online Duke University Historical Images in Medicine database, linked in this collection guide. Many of the original black-and-white photographic prints are filed in the History of Medicine Picture File collection. See the Related Materials section in this collection guide for links to these resources.

Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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11 pairs of spectacles and eyeglasses

Artifact-box 202, Item hander0004
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11 pairs of eyeglasses and spectacles: 1. "Harlequin" style with rhinestone frames. 1950s. 2. Spectacles, wire-rimmed 3. Spectacles, wire-rimmed 4. Pince-nez spectacles; round glass, silver frame. With case. 5. Bifocals; oval glass, gold frames. With case. 6. Pince-nez spectacles; oval glass, no frame, chain missing. With case. 7. Reverse half glasses (distance only); silver frame. With case. 8. Spectacles; round glass, silver frame with incised design. With case. 9. Bifocals; round glass, no frame, silver chain with hook. With case. 10. Pince-nez spectacles; oval glass, no frame, chain missing. With case. 11. Pince-nez spectacles; round glass, gold frame. With case.

Paul Kwilecki photographs and papers, circa 1910-2008, bulk 1960-2008

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42 Linear Feet — 54 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 2 oversize boxes — Approximately 9480 Items
Collection comprises over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, along with negatives, contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and printed material, totaling over 9000 items. Kwilecki's photographic work documents rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Subjects include local landscapes, tobacco workers, county fairs, hog slaughtering, cemeteries, churches, courthouses, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, shoppers, downtowns, and house porches and interiors. The themes of race relations and religious life predominate. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Significant correspondents in the manuscripts series include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection includes a small set of Vestal photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Paul Kwilecki Photographs and Papers span the whole of his career and include over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, negatives (chiefly safety but also some nitrate and glass plate), contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and other printed material, totaling over approximately 9000 items.

The bulk of the collection consists of Paul Kwilecki's prints and other photographic material documenting rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Although Kwilecki developed an interest in photography in the 1940s, only a very small portion of the images in the collection pre-date 1970.

The collection is organized into two major series: Photographic Materials, containing prints, contact sheets, and negatives, and a Manuscripts Series housing many files of correspondence, writings, and other personal papers.

While initially interested in photographing tobacco workers, Kwilecki turned his focus to other subjects, including county fairs, hog slaughtering times, cemeteries, churches, courtrooms, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, bus stations, shoppers, downtowns, house porches and interiors, and landscapes. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Throughout the collection, the themes of race relations and religious life tend to predominate.

The Manuscripts Series (1967-2008) also provides an interpretation of life in Decatur County but also documents Kwilecki's photographic philosophy and practices. The correspondence and the journals, related to Kwilecki's work and career as a photographer, comprise the largest groupings. The series also contains Kwilecki's personal journals, dating from 1967-1969; Kwilecki's printing notes; news clippings; exhibition brochures; and a brief internet biography of Kwilecki. Many of Kwilecki's writings attempt to express in words the same topics he tried to illuminate through photography.

Additional manuscripts (14 boxes) and photographic materials were received in 2010 following Kwilecki's passing away. They include many folders of correspondence dating from 1971-2008, arranged in original order either chronologically or alphabetically by folder title. Significant correspondents include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection also includes a small set of Vestal's photographic prints. Other files contain writings, clippings, and other items. The writings include journals from the 1970s; typed excerpts from early 20th century Georgia newspapers, some on racial incidents; drafts of Kwilecki's talks; and notes for the Decatur County photography publication (one folder). A few publications round out the last box in the collection.

The negatives are closed to use; contact sheets and prints offer alternate access to Kwilecki's images. Eleven nitrate large-format sheet negatives, dating from approximately the 1940s-1960s, are slated for digitization. Also included in the collection are several glass plate negatives by an unknown photographer dating perhaps from the 1910s.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jesse Pyrant Andrews photographs and oral histories, 1973-2020

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10.2 Linear Feet — 16 boxes — 257 prints; 79 CD-ROMs — 38.8 Gigabytes — 158 audio files — 79 .wav format files (35.6 gigabytes); 79 .mp3 format use copy files (3.2 gigabytes) — Original negative identifiers and titles assigned by the photographer have been retained. The original identifier on the back of each print typically comprises codes for the body of work, negative file, and negative number. There are a few unnumbered prints. In the case of untitled works, descriptions in brackets have been supplied by library staff. Each print also has been given a Rubenstein Library identifier. Most of the photographs were printed by Andrews in his darkroom from the early 2000s to 2020.
Jesse Pyrant Andrews (b. 1949) is an American photographer based in rural southern Virginia. Collection comprises 257 black-and-white photographs and 39 oral interviews by Jesse Pyrant Andrews documenting rural and small-town life in the Piedmont plateau of central southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Major themes center on the landscapes and people of the region; tobacco cultivation; the lives of farmers, war veterans and laid-off workers; local architecture and historic sites; traditional crafts and music; and new patterns of economics and society in rural Virginia. The materials also include a Vietnam War veterans manuscript memoir and numerous oral histories of veterans. Additional projects include documentary narrative about the southern Virginia Carter-Wooding families; views from an Amtrak train; and street scenes and portraits taken in New York City, California, and Massachusetts. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 257 black-and-white photographs and 39 oral interview recordings by Jesse Pyrant Andrews documenting rural and small-town life in the Piedmont plateau of central southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Most of the images are portraits of farming families, immigrant workers, former textile workers, war veterans, musicians, and other local people, with scenes from homesteads, small towns, farms, and grave sites. Major themes include tobacco cultivation; the lives of war veterans and laid-off workers; regional architecture and historic sites; and traditional activities such as music-making, making handmade firearms, and working with leather. Together, the images and interviews speak to enormous changes in this rural Piedmont region as it transitions into the 21st century.

Three bodies of work whose images are found in the Portraits and Virginia series are referred to by Andrews as the Veterans, Vietnam, and Carter-Wooding Projects. The first two document the lives and struggles of U.S. veterans of World War II and the Vietnam and Gulf wars, and includes many audio interviews. The second project, also accompanied by several oral histories, documents two Halifax County, Virginia families, the Carters and Woodings, and their rural property which dates back to an 18th-century Huguenot land grant. The materials also include a Vietnam War manuscript memoir.

Additional photo projects in the collection document the lives of former textile workers (also accompanied by oral histories); a trip on an Amtrak train; and street life and people in New York City, California, and Massachusetts.

Most of the photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer, commenting on the individuals, their life experiences, and aspects of local culture and society.

Photographs from the series documenting tobacco farming, "13-Month Crop," were selected for a 2002 exhibit of Andrews' work hosted by the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

A large selection of photographs in this collection has been digitized and is available online as part of the Duke Digital Collections.

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13-Month Crop: One Year in the Life of a Piedmont Virginia Tobacco Farm, 2000-2001 1.5 Linear Feet — 38 prints

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Series contains 38 11x14 inch black-and-white (gelatin silver) prints exhibited at Duke University's Perkins Library, August 7-December 14, 2002. Andrews spent one tobacco farming season, April 2000 to April 2001, using a traditional film camera to document the lives of the people who were involved in cultivating tobacco on the Moore family farm in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Images portray the white farm family members as well as migrant Latino farmworkers. Tobacco farming is such labor-intensive work that it is often called a "13-month crop."

American Song Sheets collection, circa 1830s-1920s bulk 1850s-1880s, bulk 1850-1889

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3 Linear Feet — 1982 Items
In the mid nineteenth century, publishers printed the lyrics to popular songs, without their tunes, on small sheets called song sheets, handbills, or broadsides. These sheets were often illustrated with a woodcut scene or portrait and sold at gathering places where people sang together. Duke's collection of American song sheets includes 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from "The Star Spangled Banner" to "Pop Goes the Weasel," forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Duke's collection of American song sheets includes around 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from The Star Spangled Banner to Pop Goes the Weasel, forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Note that some song sheets are housed in the Confederate Pamphlet collection and the Broadsides collection.

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Friedrich Carl Peetz photographs, 1900.

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1 Linear Foot
The collection comprises a photograph album with 127 black-and-white photographs (several are hand tinted; most are 4.5 x 6 in.) mounted on 22 boards. The album probably belonged to Friedrich Carl Peetz, most likely an officer in the German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) and crew member of the S.M.S. Hertha during the Boxer Rebellion. The images were mostly taken in Tsingtao (Qingdao), Chefoo (Yantai), Hong Kong, Peking (Beijing), and Shanhaiguan during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. The photographs document the German involvement in the Rebellion and primarily depict damage to the Taku Forts, German ships (all are identified) and crew, and temples and other historic buildings visited by the Germans in Beijing and other locales in China. Photographs have German captions written in pencil.

Collection comprises a photograph album with 127 black-and-white photographs (several are hand tinted; most are 4.5 x 6 in.) mounted on 22 boards. The album probably belonged to Friedrich Carl Peetz, most likely an officer in the German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) and crew member of the S.M.S. Hertha during the Boxer Rebellion. The images were mostly taken in Tsingtao (Qingdao), Chefoo (Yantai), Hong Kong, Peking (Beijing), and Shanhaiguan during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. The photographs document the German involvement in the Rebellion and primarily depict damage to the Taku Forts, German ships (all are identified) and crew, and temples and other historic buildings visited by the Germans in Beijing and other locales in China. Photographs have German captions written in pencil.

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David X. Young films, 1955-2007

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12.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes of film reels, one box of video- and audio-cassettes, and one box of CDs and DVDs.
Collection consists of 8mm and 16mm films, videocassettes, compact discs, and audiocassettes, deriving from artist David X. Young's work in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. His New York work includes films of W. Eugene Smith working in his loft studio in 1971, as well as experimental films dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. Homemade audiocassette mix tapes document Young's interest in jazz as well as his piano playing. Videocassettes consist of reference copies of several films and television programs on W. Eugene Smith. This collection is part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. Original recordings are closed to research access pending reformatting.

The David X. Young Films, 1955-2007, includes film reels, videocassettes, and audiocassettes produced primarily by artist David X. Young between 1955 and 1996, in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. Although transferred to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library in 2012, the collection was originally acquired from Young’s estate by the Center for Documentary Studies, for use by Sam Stephenson in his research on W. Eugene Smith for the book The Jazz Loft Project (2010). As a consequence, nearly half the collection is comprised of materials relating to Young’s involvement in the production of "Let Truth Be The Prejudice," a half-hour documentary on Smith produced by CBS in 1971, as part of its Lamp Unto My Feet series. These materials include a composite print of the final 28-minute program, un-synced picture and soundtrack reels not used in the final program, and videocassette and disc copies of the reels created by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2007.

The balance of the collection consists primarily of elements related to film projects created by Young between 1955 and 1986, including Klaximo, Seven Haitian Moods, Duck Season. Many of the elements in the collection, representing these and other projects, were spooled--put together on one reel--to facilitate video transfer previous to the films being acquired by the Center for Documentary Studies.

In addition to these films, the collection contains nine audiocassette tapes, including radio broadcasts of music and spoken-word material, as well as one recording of David X. Young playing piano, and four VHS videocassette tapes, from television broadcasts of programs on W. Eugene Smith.

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Audiovisual, 1955-2007 97 items

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The Audiovisual Series is arranged in seven subseries. Four of these reflect film projects Young worked on for which there is existing descriptive information, either provided by Young or by the content of the films themselves, and for which there are discrete reels that do not contain clips from other projects. These include Seven Haitian Moods, Klaximo, Let Truth Be the Prejudice, and The Duck Season. The remaining three subseries contain film reels and video and audio media that do not fit clearly into any particular project -- for the subseries "Other film reels" this is due, in part, to the "spooling" of reels together to facilitate video transfer. In some, but not all, cases the titles in this subseries reflect the different clips on each spooled reel.

Frank Baker collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated

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50 Linear Feet — approximately 18,000 items
Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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Italian Cultural Posters collection, 1930s-1980s and undated bulk 1970-1989

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4 Linear Feet — 115 Items
Collection consists of 115 Italian cultural and political posters, the bulk of which date from the 1970s and 1980s. Nearly half of the posters were printed by the Italian Communist Party (Pci) offices in Milan and Rome, chiefly in the 1970s, and address themes such as control of the media (particularly television and newspapers), the environment, elections, educational reform, political radicalism, labor issues, voting rights, patronage and other forms of corruption, and taxation. Many posters display the images and words of political activists from around the world. Some posters refer to Francoism, to American leaders such as President Nixon, and to the Vietnam War. Many of the latter express an anti-American position. Other posters in the collection advertise art and design exhibits, and announce celebrations and civic events. Also includes a set of 38 color slides of elections broadsides (1986-1987) posted in public spaces in Italy.

Collection consists of 115 Italian cultural and political posters, the bulk of which date from the 1970s and 1980s. Nearly half of the posters were printed by the Italian Communist Party (Pci) offices in Milan and Rome, chiefly in the 1970s, and address themes such as control of the media (particularly television and newspapers), the environment, elections, educational reform, labor issues, voting rights, patronage and other forms of corruption, and taxation. Some posters express opposition to Francoism, to American leaders such as President Nixon, and to American participation in the Vietnam War. Other individuals highlighted in the posters include political figures such as Lenin, and activists such as Angela Davis, Antonio Gramsci, George Jackson (Black Panther), Rosa Luxemburg, and Palmiro Togliatti. Among the many organizations referred are: NATO, the Pci (Communist Party), Pdc (Christian Democrats), and the Comitato Permanente Unitario Antifascista. One poster is a modern reproduction of a painting of an Italian political rally, circa 1901.

Although the majority of the posters carry a political message, others in the collection advertise art and design exhibits, referring to Italian artists ranging from Leonardo da Vinci to video artist Fabrizio Plessi; there are also a smaller number of posters advertising tourist locations and announcing celebrations and civic events held chiefly in Milan and Urbino but also other cities in Italy. Some posters are duplicates of others. Also includes a set of 38 color slides of elections broadsides (1986-1987) posted in public spaces in Italy.

The posters have been digitized and are available online on the Duke Libraries Digital Collections website. Online English translations provided by Paula Jeannet Mangiafico.

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Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017

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3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 29.3 Gigabytes — 5031 files — 40 color photographic prints; 5033 digital files (4681 jpeg, 257 tiff, 68 png, 11 mp4, 10 pdf, 2 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 2 txt)
Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises color photographs and supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises 20 color photographs and over 4000 supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Electronic resources related to these two projects include almost 5000 born-digital image files in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include digital contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing. Note: Tiff images from the "On Board the Aquarius" project are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the library reading room.

The 2017 Aquarius migrant rescue project include many additional related digital files: these include nine videos in mp4 format, taken by Darrin Zammit Lupi. Five document the MV Aquarius rescue and a transfer of refugees from another ship; three are interviews with an Italian rescuer and two migrants; and one is a news report video narrated by Lupi. The interviews describe conditions in detention centers in Libya and on board the escape boats.

Other supporting documents and digital content for the 2017 Aquarius migrant project comprise press releases in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, and other languages; shot lists; demographic data summarizing the makeup of the migrants on board the rescue ship; screen shots of Reuters social media posts relating to this story, featuring Zammit Lupi's images; and scans of a 17-page journal kept by Zammit Lupi while aboard the rescue ship.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

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"18 months is too much", 2006 March 23 Original file id: _C4W2819

Digital-materials RL11613-SET-0005, Image-file RL.11613-TIFF-0118
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Illegal immigrants hold a banner protesting against their detention at a detention centre in the Armed Forces of Malta Lyster barracks, outside Valletta, March 23, 2006. Around 1,000 illegal immigrants are currently in detention in Malta. The Malta government insists the immigrants must be held in detention because their large numbers may cause problems to the economy, while the immigrants say they never intended to come to Malta in the first place and want to be allowed to go to Italy. A delegation of European Members of Parliament is visiting Malta in the coming days to draw up a report on illegal immigration. Photo: Darrin Zammit Lupi

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Aerial view of Safi detention centre (1), 2009 March 13 Original file id: _JM96554

Digital-materials RL11613-SET-0005, Image-file RL.11613-TIFF-0142
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The Safi detention centre is seen in Safi outside Valletta March 13, 2009. International aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres said on Friday it has suspended operations at Malta's migrant detention centres, citing appalling living conditions. European Justice Commissioner Jacques Barrot is expected to visit a detention centre on Saturday. Photo: Darrin Zammit Lupi

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Aerial view of Safi detention centre (2), 2009 March 13 Original file id: _JM96586

Digital-materials RL11613-SET-0005, Image-file RL.11613-TIFF-0143
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Would-be immigrants walk in the yard of the Safi detention centre outside Valletta March 13, 2009. International aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres said on Friday it has suspended operations at Malta's migrant detention centres, citing appalling living conditions. European Justice Commissioner Jacques Barrot is expected to visit a detention centre on Saturday. Photo: Darrin Zammit Lupi

J. Walter Thompson Company. Newsletter collection, 1910-2005

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17 Linear Feet — 0.14 Gigabytes
The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT), founded in 1864, is one of the largest enduring advertising agencies in the U.S. The Newsletter Collection comprises the agency's internally produced newsletters, which date from 1916 through 2005. Newsletters survive from the main office, certain domestic and international offices (particularly from Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, London, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco), and divisions and affiliates (especially Brouillard Communications; Lord, Geller, Federico, Einstein; Dialog; and Thompson Recruitment Advertising) of JWT. Topics contained in the newsletters include staff biographical information; office events; account and client news; featured campaigns; marketing; merchandising; consumer behavior; research and planning; developments and issues in television, radio, and print media; and personal activities of the staff. Most of the newsletters are in English, but German, Spanish, French, Italian and Portuguese language publications are also present. As the Company continues to publish house organs, the collection will continue to grow.

The J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) Newsletter Collection comprises the advertising agency's internally produced newsletters, which date from 1916 through 2005. Included are newsletters from the main office, certain domestic and international offices (particularly from Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, London, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco), and divisions and affiliates of JWT (especially Brouillard Communications; Lord, Geller, Federico, Einstein; and Thompson Recruitment Advertising). The newsletters document JWT's business over the years by providing a forum for JWT staff worldwide to report on their activities and on developments in the advertising industry. Topics include staff biographical information; office events; account and client news; featured campaigns; marketing; merchandising; consumer behavior; research and planning; developments and issues in television, radio, and print media; and personal activities of the staff. In addition, the newsletters reflect many aspects of the corporate culture that set the tone of life in JWT offices. They report events such as blood drives, baseball games, office parties, staff retreats, and more. The sense of civic duty that JWT tried to instill in its personnel by encouraging its staff members to volunteer in their communities runs through many of the newsletters, particularly in the 1950s and 1960s, often concurrent with the agency's Ad Council and public service work.

The physical form of the newsletters evolved from several stapled, typewritten pages in the 1910s and early 1920s, to a (usually) four-page typeset newsletter in the 1950s, to a short newsprint magazine in the 1970s, to a longer glossy magazine in the 1980s. In the 1990s, some newsletters switched to a fully electronic format. The entries for each newsletter in this inventory detail the frequency of publication of the newsletters, the availability of indexes, irregularities in volume numbering and dating, and other pertinent information. Most of the newsletters are in English, but German, Spanish, French, Italian and Portuguese language publications are also present. Publications will be added to the collection as the archives receives and processes newsletter additions.

The collection is arranged into three series and four indexes: Main Newsletters, Domestic Newsletters, and International Newsletters; and an Alphabetical List of Newsletter Titles, an Alphabetical List By Client of "Campaign of the Week" Articles, News Bulletin Contents by Author, and News Bulletin Contents by Title.

The Main Newsletters Series holds the primary house organ for the company and includes some market research results as well as the opening of many international offices in 1929 and 1930. Newsletter articles includes account news, client lists--or account gains and losses--and biographies and short notes on JWT staff, including professional accomplishments, promotions and transfers, visits to other JWT offices, and personal events (i.e. marriages, births, and deaths).

The Domestic Newsletters Series is divided into three subseries--Offices, Divisions, and Other Newsletters. The Offices Subseries documents activities in the major JWT offices in the U.S.--Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. The office newsletters reported account gains and losses, campaign updates, and other business news, with substantial coverage of local events such as staff promotions and transfers, wedding and birth announcements, office parties, anniversaries, company-related sports events, personal and social news. They also updated local staff on news from elsewhere in the agency. Many of these publications were issued regularly as supplements to the main company newsletter published in New York; for instance, the "New York News," at some points during the 1960s, was printed on the back page of the J. Walter Thompson Company News. The Divisions Subseries includes newsletters from subsidiaries and corporate divisions such as Brouillard Communications (JWT division for corporate advertising and public relations), Dialog (JWT division for public relations), Lord, Geller, Federico, Einstein (JWT affiliate for premium advertising), and Thompson Recruitment Advertising (previously named World Wide Agency, the JWT division for employee recruitment advertising). The newsletters report client gains and losses of the division and its individual offices, staff transfers and promotions, marriage and birth announcements, and other personal and social news. Some newsletters primarily address issues and developments pertaining to the specific aspect of advertising with which the division/affiliate concerns itself. The Other Newsletters Subseries includes publications that deal with advertising issues beyond a specific office's activities, along with newsletters issued by the Information Centers of the New York and Chicago offices that described their holdings or abstracted articles from newspapers and magazines relating to advertising. The newsletters address a broad range of issues relating to the advertising industry--marketing; merchandising; research; planning; consumer behavior; client news; major staff changes for agency executives from JWT offices worldwide; reports on single accounts or industries; and reports from the television, radio, print, and other media.

Newsletters from JWT offices in Canada, Latin America, Europe, Asia/Pacific, and Africa are found in the International Series. Most of these newsletters report the business of the offices and of the agency as a whole, noting account gains and losses, campaign results, market surveys, and other developments. News of office parties and anniversaries, employee transfers and promotions, staff birthdays and marriages, visits from JWT executives from other offices, and other social and cultural news are often included in the newsletters; for some newsletters, such lighter news comprises the bulk of the information published. A few newsletters cover much more specific marketing topics, such as Food and Drink News from London and JWT Media Information from Australia.

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1916-1922, News Bulletin

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Issued weekly 1916-1921, and approximately biweekly from 1922 on. No issues were published between numbers 55 (1917 July 9) and 56 (1918 July 8); numbers 69/70 (1918 Oct. 7/14) and 71 (1921 Mar. 15); and numbers 81 (1921 June 17) and 82 (1922 Jan. 9). Some issues include original JWT advertising and/or confidential letters attendant to these bulletins.

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1922-1930, News Bulletin

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These booklet-size serial publications share a title with the earlier News Bulletin, but otherwise are different organs. They were published from 1922 to 1930 for external distribution, and contain articles by JWT personnel and outside contributors, primarily on topics of general interest to members of the advertising industry. Included are articles about consumer motivation, excerpts from market surveys, currentl client lists, and occasional JWT staff news. Originally issued monthly, beginning in February 1922, but publication became irregular, with no issue for September 1923, and varying numbers of issues for subsequent years. Issues are numbered sequentially (numbers 83-141) up to December 1929. In 1930, the publications's name changed to J. Walter Thompson Bulletin, with new numbering.

Reginald Sellman negatives, 1911-1935

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1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes
Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two prints, all taken by amateur photographer Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935, chiefly in Baltimore, Maryland and environs. There is also a detailed handwritten index to over 100 images. Subjects include Susie Ford, possibly Sellman's fiancée; his wife Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman, and their son Bruce Darden Sellman. Places featured include Baltimore residences, streets, bridges, railway stations, monuments, parks, and hospitals and medical institutions such as Johns Hopkins Medical School and the Biedler and Sellman Sanatorium, founded by Reginald Sellman's father, William A. B. Sellman. There are many snapshots of family members, and photos taken during hikes, camping trips, and visits to parks. Maryland locations include Baltimore County historic sites and parks: the Owing's Mills area, Gwynn's Falls, Chatalonee, Loch Raven, Druid Lake, the Chesapeake's Eastern Shore, Elk River, and the Patapsco River. The Sellmans often visited relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are also many images taken in early 20th century Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, Kinston, and Raleigh, including the Raleigh Methodist Orphanage. Some photographs feature commercial fishing scenes and cotton transport.

Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two small prints, all taken by amateur photographer and Baltimore resident Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935. They were originally stored in four black cases, one of which has been retained for the collection. The collection also includes Sellman's meticulous hndwritten index cards. The images are arranged in original chronological order and listed by the photographer's original identification number has been retained; the titles were also taken from the original index cards.

The snapshots were chiefly taken in Baltimore, Maryland and Baltimore County, and depict buildings, streets, bridges, railway stations, parks, rivers, and monuments, and many family members, especially Reginald's friend (possibly fianceé) Susie Ford, and later, his wife Obedience, and their son Bruce. There are quite a few photographs taken on day trips to historic sites and parks in Baltimore County such as St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Chattalonee, Gwynn Falls, Owings Mills, Massey, and Lake Roland. Sellman clearly enjoyed being outside; there are many images of activities such as camping, hiking, and visiting parks and Eastern Shore recreation areas.

Reginald's father, William A. B. Sellman, was the founder of a Baltimore sanatorium, thus there are views of hospitals, including many marked "B.S.S.," almost certainly the Biedler Sellman Sanatorium on Charles Street, where Reginald Sellman was listed as a physician; a few interior shots of the "B.S.S." include an operating room. There are also exterior views of medical teaching institutions such as Johns Hopkins Hospital. In one of the two positive prints in the collection, Susie Ford is shown wearing a nurse's uniform.

There are images of apartment buildings and houses where Reginald and other family members lived, and some interior shots of rooms. There are many casual snapshots of family members. Later images depict Sellman's young son, Bruce, as a baby and young boy, along with his mother, Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman (O.D.S.). She first appears in the images as Obedience Cox Darden, at her own commencement at a nursing school in May 1914.

Reginald and Obedience Sellman often visited her Darden family relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are many vacation photographs from the 1920s taken in Raleigh, Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, and Kinston, N.C. Depicted are train stations, relatives' houses, railroads, street scenes, and businesses, some owned by relatives. A long series features scenes from the Methodist Orphanage in Raleigh, possibly where relatives worked. Zylpha or Zylphia Darden, Obedience's cousin, often appears with baby Bruce. There are many scenes from Beaufort, N.C., with commercial fishing, streets, and the waterfront.

Other earlier vacation spots depicted that Reginald visited with Susie Ford include the Eastern Shore, with Tollchester Beach and its amusement part and piers; Harper's Ferry, West Virginia; and the Blue Ridge in Virginia. The last images from 1935 feature Susie Ford's grave and monument in Mount View Cemetery (undentified state); she probably died in spring 1914.

Also in the collection are four sets of handwritten index cards listing each negative's identification number, roll of film and frame, caption, and technical details such as camera settings, exposure, film number, and date when image was developed. The cards are filed at the beginning of each group of negatives represented by the set. One original black storage case has also been retained, as well as advertisement and leaflets featuring photographic supplies, and an envelope of paper corner mounts.

Apparently, Sellman also photographed with glass plates, but these are not present in the collection. There were also several places in the storage case where the film negatives were missing; in these cases, only the titles remain, taken from the index cards.

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Football records, 1922-[ongoing]

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83 Linear Feet — about 83,300 Items
The Sports Information Office provides information about Duke athletics to the media. They also facilitate press interviews with Duke athletes and coaches. The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the football team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1922-ongoing.

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the football team at Duke University. There are files regarding the freshman football team, specifically the yearly fundraising game played between Duke and the University of North Carolina freshman football teams to raise money for cerebral palsy research. The material ranges in date from 1922-ongoing.

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H. Lee Waters Film collection, 1936-2005

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50 Linear Feet
Born in Caroleen, North Carolina in 1902, studio photographer Herbert Lee Waters supplemented his income from 1936 to 1942 by traveling across North Carolina and parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and South Carolina to film the people of small communities. He collaborated with local movie theaters to screen his films, which he called Movies of Local People. It is estimated that Waters produced films across 118 communities, visiting some of them multiple times. The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and is comprised primarily of 16mm black-and-white and color reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation and access elements created over the years from the original footage: 16mm internegatives, 16mm screening prints, 3/4-inch Umatic videotape, Betacam SP videotape, Digital Betacam videotape, VHS videotape, DVD discs, and high resolution digital files including 2K preservation video copies. The collection contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters' film making, including: a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters to record financial and business information during the filming of Movies of Local People; photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; copy of a 2005 master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters; home movies made by Waters from the 1930s to the 1950s; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and comprises primarily 16mm black-and-white and color reversal original motion picture films created by Waters between 1936 and 1942 as he traveled across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia filming the residents of small towns. Waters aimed to film as many residents in each community as possible, often setting up his camera at the main intersection in town to capture community members walking downtown. Waters also typically filmed school children entering or leaving school and workers arriving to or departing from mills, plants, and factories. Waters often included trick shots to engage his audience, such as trains moving backwards or children jumping in reverse. Although the films are dominated by shots of crowds and individual faces, Waters also captured a wide variety of activities, like school recitals, sports, mechanics at work, and manufacturing processes in factories. Waters also regularly filmed in Black communities within the towns he visited, and in the case of Chapel Hill, filmed exclusively in the Black community.

The H. Lee Waters Film Collection dates from 1936 to 2005 and is comprised primarily of 16mm black-and-white and color reversal original motion picture films created by Waters during the filming of the Movies of Local People series. The collection, arranged alphabetically by town name, also includes various preservation and access elements created over the years from the original footage: 16mm internegatives, 16mm screening prints, 3/4-inch Umatic videotape, Betacam SP videotape, Digital Betacam videotape, VHS videotape, DVD discs, and high resolution digital files including 2K preservation video copies. The majority of films represented in the collection are silent, black and white, and were filmed in North Carolina. The collection includes a small number of color films and one film with sound. Where reels containing mixed black-and-white and color footage were preserved to 16mm film, they were separated into two reels based on picture characteristic during the preservation process.

The collection also contains a small number of papers and physical objects related to Waters, including: photocopied and original advertisements for screenings of Waters' films; photocopies of Waters' notes, receipts, and correspondence concerning film sales; related ephemera; VHS copies of a news report and a film on Waters; a copy of the master's thesis written on the films of H. Lee Waters by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Martin Johnson in 2005; home movies created by Waters from the 1930s to the 1950s; and oral histories with Mary Waters Spaulding and Tom Waters, the children of H. Lee Waters. In addition, the collection contains a photocopy of two log books (encompassed in one volume) maintained by Waters between the years of 1936 and 1942 to document his earnings from the Movies of Local People films. The logs provide information about film screenings in the towns that he visited, including the dates of the screenings, the theaters where the films played, admission prices, the number of tickets sold, and advertising revenues. See the digital collection to view the logbooks.

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Mary McMillan papers, 1936-1997 and undated, bulk 1952-1991, bulk 1952-1991

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8.1 Linear Feet — 13 manuscript boxes; 2 oversize boxes; 2 oversize folders — 2277 Items

The Mary McMillan Papers, 1936-1997 and undated (bulk 1952-1991), consist chiefly of journals and printed material, but also include correspondence, writings and speeches, photographic material, scrapbooks, clippings, videocassettes, audio cassettes, and memorabilia. Arranged in nine series based primarily on the format of the material, the papers illuminate the personal life and professional work of McMillan, a United Methodist missionary and teacher at the Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College in Hiroshima, Japan. In addition to her work as a teacher, the collection documents McMillan's service to the Kyodan, a unifying organization for Christian missionaries in Japan, and to the hibakusha, the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as her peace activism. Also included are materials related to the Topaz Relocation Center, a Japanese-American internment camp in Utah where McMillan worked in 1943. The papers are mostly in English, but include some Japanese language materials.

The bulk of the collection consists of the Journals Series, whose 43 journals contain almost daily accounts of McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, her involvement with the Ushita Christian Church, and her encounters with friends and other people. Also included are her personal thoughts about world events, particularly those related to peace and nuclear disarmament. Beginning on Aug. 11, 1939 with the final preparations for her initial departure, McMillan records her activities through her first year and a half in Japan. The 1939 and 1940 journals document in depth McMillan's adaptation to life in Japan, including her training in the Japanese language and customs, her first visits to various cities throughout the country, and the difficulties she faced as an American woman in pre-World War II Japan. After she and other American workers in Hiroshima were forcibly evacuated on Feb. 29, 1941, journal entries are scarce; however, the almost-daily entries resume in 1952 and continue until the day of McMillan's death on July 19, 1991.

In addition to the journals, McMillan's professional work as a United Methodist missionary and teacher at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College is well documented through the Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Printed Material Series. The Biographical Material Series includes McMillan's handwritten autobiographical notes, as well as newspaper and magazine clippings and booklets documenting McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, and with the Ushita Christian Church, which McMillan helped found in 1948. McMillan's correspondence also sheds light on her work through "mission letters," mass mailings which she wrote periodically as a way of updating her supporters in the United States on her work in Hiroshima.

McMillan also was a staunch advocate of world peace and nuclear disarmament, and after her retirement from the United Methodist Church in 1980, she spent much of her time writing letters and speaking in churches throughout the United States promoting her cause. McMillan's role as a pacifist is well well documented throughout the entire collection by her correspondence, photographs of demonstrations and marches, printed materials, and items in the Clippings Series. Much of the material in the Writings and Speeches Series and the Printed Material Series is related to peace activism, and covers topics such as the lingering effects of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima and that city's fight for peace, the first-hand accounts of bomb survivors, and the United Methodist Church's pacifist stance.

Also contributing to an understanding of McMillan's life, the Photographic Material Series and the Memorabilia Series offer visual and three-dimensional documentation of her activities as a missionary, teacher, and friend to the Japanese.

Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated

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35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items
Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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Institute of Social and Religious Research Series, 1929-1930

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This series contains correspondence, notes, reports, schedules, and printed material pertaining to Warburton's field study of coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in 1929 and a rural-industrial county in Georgia in 1930. Warburton was one of several investigators sent out to small industrial villages to study the churches and their roles in the villages. Though researchers were supposed to concentrate on churches, Warburton devoted much attention to social and economic conditions in the villages. Consequently, there is some revealing descriptive and statistical information on the villages Warburton visited. There is also printed material from the United Mine Workers.

Judy Richardson papers, 1963-2014

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30 Linear Feet
Judy Richardson is a veteran of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who worked in Mississippi during the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project in 1964. She later worked with Blackside, Inc., on the Eyes on the Prize civil rights documentary series, and co-edited Hands on the Freedom Plow, about women's experiences in SNCC. Her papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

The Judy Richardson Papers include materials from her years working on staff at SNCC in Atlanta and Mississippi; her involvement with the Drum and Spear Bookstore in Washington D.C.; extensive print and audiovisual materials from her work in documentary film, including projects like Malcolm X: Make It Plain, Eyes on the Prize, and Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre; her correspondence and drafts from the editing of Hands on the Freedom Plow; project and event files from numerous committees, speaking engagements, and panels; personal files, including her FOIA about her SNCC service in the 1960s; and subject files collected from various projects.

Materials are arranged into series based on format and topic. The Hands on the Freedom Plow Series is closed until 2020. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use.

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Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc., Durham Chapter records, 1968-1998 and undated

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20.7 Linear Feet — 9000 Items
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

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Jazz Loft Project records, 1950-2012 and undated, bulk 2002-2009

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20 Linear Feet
The Jazz Loft Project Records consist of the research and administrative records of author Sam Stephenson's Jazz Loft Project, which documented the events and inhabitants -- including W. Eugene Smith, Hall Overton, and David X. Young -- of 821 6th Avenue, New York City, in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The records include the tapes of an extensive oral history project conducted by Stephenson from 1998 to 2010, general research and administrative notes, logs describing the content of the audio recordings W. Eugene Smith made at the loft, and original audio recordings of Hall Overton's compositions.

The Jazz Loft Project Records include administrative documents, audio and video recordings, and collected research associated with key participants and events in the history of the Jazz Loft building, located at 821 Sixth Avenue in New York City. The collection includes significant documentation of the jazz music scene in New York from 1955-1971, and the life and work of photographer W. Eugene Smith, composer Hall F. Overton, and jazz musician Thelonious Monk. Also of note are materials that document the collection of oral histories, the design and implementation of exhibitions, and conservation reports on audio recordings all related to the Jazz Loft Project. Items in the collection range from 1950 to 2012, with the bulk being created between 2002 and 2009.

A majority of materials in this collection consist of the project's financial and logistical documentation, oral history interviews in print, audio, and video formats, audio reel analysis notes, and biographical/historical articles. Examples of these types of documentation include correspondence, book drafts, promotional materials for exhibitions and events, research notes, and interview transcripts.

The collection contains 824 audiovisual items, including microcassettes, audiocassettes, VHS videocassettes, ¼-inch audio reels, DVDs, CDs, mini-DV videocassettes, and digital audio tapes (DAT). The bulk of this media is associated with oral history interviews, events and exhibitions, and research related to the Jazz Loft Project, but there are also items tangentially related to the Project, such as commercial music recordings, recordings of concerts and performances, original recordings of Hall Overton's opera Huck Finn, and published documentary footage related to W. Eugene Smith and other artists.

Caribbean Sea Migration collection, 1959-2014

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3 Linear Feet — 600 Items
Materials from (or related to) the migration by sea of Cubans, Dominicans, and Haitians, including the refugee camp for Cuban and Haitian rafters that existed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, largely dating from 1991-1996. Collection includes camp newspapers and artwork created by refugees held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba; materials from the U.S. Coast Guard and other military sources, such as newspapers written in Haitian Creole, photocopies of camp rules and refugee intake procedures, and a transcript from an introductory video shown to refugees arriving at the camps; magazines and media coverage of refugee situations, including some material on Elián González; photographs and slides of refugees, Coast Guard personnel, and conditions in the camps in Cuba. Refugees arriving in Miami are included as are photographs of the work of the Guantanámo Refugee Assistance and Services Program in Miami and in the camps in Guantánamo Bay.

Materials include newspapers, artwork, clippings, U.S. military publications aimed at camp residents, camp notes, reports, and photographs from a variety of sources. Newspapers are one of the largest formats within the collection, which includes the complete run of éxodo, a newspaper with color issues printed from November 1994-September 1995 from Camps Kilo and Charlie Village in the Guantánamo Bay camps; issues of El Bravo, El Balsero, and El Futuro from 1994-1995; Sa K'pase, N'ap Boule, and Qué Pasa, newspapers printed by the U.S. military in Creole and Spanish and designed for Haitian and Cuban refugees at the camps; as well as newspaper clippings and some magazine issues covering the refugee crisis of 1994-1995 and the plight of Caribbean refugees in general.

Photographs are another significant component of the collection. U.S. Coast Guard photographs and slides of rafters and rescuers date from 1980 to the 1990s or 2000s, and are accompanied by photocopies from the U.S. Coast Guard's Historian Office detailing refugees assistance as early as 1959. The collection also includes unsorted and largely unlabeled photographs from the camps; those that are labeled date from 1994.

Other materials in the collection include some refugee artwork, publications about Cuba, a folder of Cuba information including some materials on Elián González, and other ephemera mentioning Cuban refugees. In addition, 8 CDs with photographs and other materials have been transferred to Duke's ERM server and are in the custody of the Electronic Records archivist.

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Isaac Leroy Shaver papers, 1893-1982

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13 Linear Feet — 4000 Items
Isaac Leroy Shaver (1893-1984) was a Methodist clergyman and missionary to Japan from the 1920s to the 1960s. The collection includes sermons, correspondence, photographs, printed material and published works related to Shaver's missionary work in Japan and Idaho. The material ranges in date from 1893-1982.

The collection consists of sermons, personal files, photographs, diaries, and appointment books. The sermons are largely from the 1940s-1960s. The sermon notes are in English, though some were transliterated into Japanese. The personal files include correspondence, church bulletins, baptism and marriage records from Idaho, family papers, passports, and clippings. Some correspondence, largely from 1942, concerns Shaver's work on behalf of Japanese held in U.S. detention centers. The photographs include eight albums and numerous loose pictures which have been placed in archival sleeves. The majority of the images are in black and white and were taken in Japan. Some were take at various locations in the United States. Photographic subjects include children, families, congregations, conference attendees, landscape/exterior views and the Shaver family. The printed matter/published works include books written about Japan and Christianity, the mission field, and sermons. There are also several Bibles, hymnals (some in Japanese), prayer calendars, and appointment books. The material that has been sent to the Preservation Dept. within Perkins Library includes photographs and certificates of achievement. The collection ranges in date from 1893-1982.

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Doris Duke Photograph collection, 1880-2006

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56.6 Linear Feet — approximately 12,000 Items
Doris Duke was the only child of James Buchanan (J.B.) Duke, a founder of the American Tobacco Company and Duke Energy Company and a benefactor of Duke University, and Nanaline Holt Duke. Inheriting a bulk of her father's estate in 1925, which included Duke Farms in New Jersey, Rough Point in Newport, R.I., and a mansion in New York City, Doris was soon dubbed by the press as "the richest girl in the world." Although Doris did her best to live a private life, she carried on the Duke family's pattern of philanthropy by contributing to a number of public causes such as the arts, historic preservation, and the environment. Doris Duke died in October 1993 at the age of 80. In her will she left the majority of her estate to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Doris Duke Photograph Collection was created by combining color and black and white photographs, slides, negatives, and other photographic formats contained in albums, boxes, picture frames, and envelopes.

The Doris Duke Photograph Collection was created by combining color and black and white photographs, slides, negatives, and other photographic formats contained in albums, boxes, picture frames, and envelopes into groupings closely mirroring the collections that constitute the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Historical Archives. The collection covers the years 1870 to 2006 and is organized into twelve series: Doris Duke, Duke Endowment, Duke Farms, Duke Gardens, Duke Family, Falcon Lair, General, New York Apartments/New York Mansion, Newport Restoration Foundation, Rough Point, Southeast Asian Art and Culture (SEAAC), and Shangri La.

In cases where the copyright of the image does not belong to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, these are noted in the finding aid and use restrictions/citation information is included when possible.

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Department of African and African American Studies records, 1966-1981

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3 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items
The Dept. of African and African American Studies collection contains the office files of department directors Walter Burford and William Turner. Materials and topics in the collection include course materials for courses taught under the aegis of Black Studies' instructors; the large efforts channeled into recruitment of full-time faculty for the program; committee work related to Black Studies proposals and to the program's departmental status; budgets; and printed matter relating to similar programs and problems at other schools. The materials date from 1966-1981.

Collection contains the office files of the Director of African and African American Studies. Materials and topics in the collection include course materials for courses taught under the aegis of Black Studies' instructors; the large efforts channeled into recruitment of full-time faculty for the program; committee work related to Black Studies proposals and to the program's departmental status; budgets; information concerning similar programs and problems at other schools; and printed material received by the office which gives something of the flavor of minority affairs and resources around the country. Two 7-inch magnetic tape reels are also present documenting the 1972 Black Religion Symposium. The materials date from 1966-1981.

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Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee 40th anniversary conference videocassette tapes, 2000

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0.4 Linear Feet
Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ("Miss Baker") and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC.

Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ('Miss Baker') and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC. The conference celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick") was one of the primary institutions of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 from student meetings led by Baker and held at Shaw. Some of the original student members were organizers of sit-ins at segregated lunch counters in the southern United States. Its purpose then was to coordinate the use of nonviolent direct action to attack segregation and other forms of racism.

SNCC played a leading role in the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party over the next few years. In the later part of the 1960s, SNCC focused on Black Power, and then fighting against the Vietnam War. In 1969, SNCC officially changed its name to the Student National Coordinating Committee to reflect the broadening of its strategies.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.

Sports Information Office: Photographic Negatives collection, circa 1924-1992, 1995, undated

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23 Linear Feet — 20,122 items — The collection includes nitrate, acetate, and likely polyester film bases. The nitrate is housed in an off-site nitrate storage facility. There is evidence to suggest that some of the nitrate is undergoing degradation. Some of the acetate is also undergoing acetate film base degradation. Most of the negatives tend to be approximately 4x5 inches, but sizes can vary. There are also color negatives within the collection.
Collection includes photographic negatives related to sports at Duke. Sports include the following: baseball, basketball, boxing, cheerleading, cross country, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, wrestling, and volleyball. There are also negatives that pertain to general athletics. The subjects of the negatives include athletes, coaches, team pictures, and game action. The collection ranges in date from 1924-1992, 1995, undated.

This collection contains 20,122 negatives related to sports at Duke, and they range in date from about 1924 to 1992, 1995 and undated. The sports represented are as follows: baseball, basketball, boxing, cheerleading, cross country, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, wrestling, and volleyball. There is a series for general athletics, which tends to include images of physical education instructors or coaches from all sports. There is also a series called "Undetermined," which lists individuals for whom no sport or tie to athletes could be determined.

The subjects within each series include athletes, coaches, athletic staff (such as secretaries and trainers), team pictures, game shots, trophies, and athletic fields and facilities. The athletes may have been photographed in uniform, in suits, or in letterman sweaters. They may have been photographed with family and/or friends. Oftentimes, the athletes were posed in faux action shots.

There are not very many images of women athletes, but there are some available, including a small number of images of Women's Athletic Association members playing baseball (not softball), basketball, and tennis.

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Palestinian Student films, 2012-2020

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61 items — 37 Gigabytes
Forty-three films by 44 Palestinian student filmmakers, created between 2012 and 2020, documenting or portraying the political context and lived experience in the West Bank and Gaza.

43 films by 44 Palestinian student filmmakers, created between 2012 and 2020, documenting or portraying the political context and lived experience in the West Bank and Gaza. The films were made in journalism, media, and film classes at nine Palestinian universities, and range from experimental and poetic, to documentary essay and ethnography, to scripted narrative fiction. The films are characterized by their high technical quality, their local feel and community-centered focus, and their varied expression of Palestinian identity. The filmmakers include Amjad Abu Baker, Noor AbuGhaniah, Mohammed Abd El Aziz Abu Hamam, Salah AbuNe'ma, Rayhan Abu Omar, Baha' Abu Shanab, Sarah AbuShusheh, Raja Ahmad, Alaa Alaloul, Mai Alami, Mohammad Alazza, Thaer Al Azzah, Lillian Al Azzeh, Ahmad Al-Bazz, Amjad M. A. Al Fayoumi, Sanabel Al-Hoot, Mohamed Nayef Ahmed Ali, Wisam Al-Jafari, Fatma Adel Qasem Alqadi, Maysa Al-Shaer, Anas Ashreef, Mahmoud Awad, Shayma' Awadeh, Alaa Dayeh, Omar Elemawi, Mohammed S. Ewais, Mohammad Houshieh, Yaser Jodallah, Abeer Kaabnah, Lara Khammash, Mohammed Khatib, Shatha Khatib, Aya Ahmed Matrabie, Renad Nasser, Ali Hamdan Okeh, Randa Owdeh, Lana Sadaqa, Yousef Salhi, Mohammed Shalodi, Naser Shatat, Khaled Tuaima, Salam Yahya, and Tala Zeitawi. Formats include MOV, MP4, and MPEG2 video files. Formats include MOV, MP4, and MPEG2 video files, and PNG, JPG, and PDF image files.

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4th Floor (طابق رقم ٤), 2018 00:06:00, 1920x1080

Digital-materials RL11839-SET-0014, Video-file 4th Floor by Shayma Awadeh.mp4
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Fiction. A young woman meets the neighbors on move-in day (امرأة شابة تلتقي بالجيران في يوم الانتقال); Keywords: women's roles, social commentary (تعليق اجتماعي، أدوار النساء); Associated university/location: Dar Al-Kalima University College of Arts & Culture (دار الكلمة الجامعية), Bethlehem.

W. Duke, Sons & Co. records and advertising materials, 1876-1953

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6.5 Linear Feet — 4000 Items
W. Duke, Sons & Co. was a tobacco manufacturer founded by Washington Duke in 1881. His son, James B. Duke, later became president of the American Tobacco Company. Collection comprises a volume containing meeting minutes for shareholders and the Board of Directors, 1885-1891, along with a volume of company costs and expenses, 1909-1953. There are also advertising materials dated 1876-1904, including trading cards, albums, and other advertising collectibles from the W. Duke Sons & Co., Liggett & Myers, American Tobacco, and other tobacco companies.

The W. Duke, Sons & Co. records and advertising materials includes a volume containing meeting minutes for shareholders and the Board of Directors, 1885-1891, along with a volume of company costs and expenses, 1909-1953. There are also advertising materials dated 1876-1904, including a wide assortment of tobacco trading cards and other collectibles from the W. Duke, Sons & Co, Allen & Ginter, Kinney Bros. Co., Liggett & Myers, and many other tobacco brands. The collection has been arranged into Trading Cards, Booklets, Albums, and Assorted, depending on the format of the materials. The Trading Cards Series is by far the largest, and includes card collections of notable actresses, baseball players, public figures, and politicians, alongs with collections of country costumes, flags, wildlife, ships, musical instruments, and flowers. The Booklets series is a sort of subset of the trading cards, featuring small card-size booklets with stories and illustrations of famous people. The Albums Series includes bound scrapbooks, with individual collected cards, as well as albums published by the different tobacco companies that printed an entire series of cards. Finally, the Assorted Series includes stationary, oddly-shaped cards, background material, and cigarette boxes and tobacco pouches, some still full of cigarettes and tobacco.

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Duke University Chapel recordings, 1954-2005

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90 Linear Feet
Collection contains audio of sermons delivered at religious and ceremonial services in the Duke University Chapel by various ministers, professors, and guests of the University. Notable speakers include Howard Wilkinson, James Cleland, Waldo Beach, Thor Hall, Charlene Kammerer, Jon Laidlaw, Will Willimon, Robert Young and others. The collection consists of 7" reel-to-reel audio tapes, audiocassette tapes, VHS tapes, and digital audio tapes of sermons, programs and Lenten meditations delivered in Duke Chapel from 1954 to ongoing.

Collection contains audio of sermons delivered at religious and ceremonial services in the Duke University Chapel by various ministers, professors, and guests of the University. Notable speakers include Howard Wilkinson, James Cleland, Waldo Beach, Thor Hall, Charlene Kammerer, Jon Laidlaw, William Willimon, Robert Young and others. The collection consists of 7" reel-to-reel audio tapes, audiocassette tapes, VHS tapes, and digital audio tapes of sermons, programs and Lenten meditations delivered in Duke Chapel from 1954 to ongoing.

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Marshall T. Meyer papers, 1902-2004 and undated, bulk 1984-1993

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63.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 48,900 Items
Marshall T. Meyer was an activist rabbi who worked in Argentina during the period of the Dirty War/El Proceso (mid 1970s to mid 1980s). The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The papers of Marshall T. Meyer span the years 1919-2004. The collection contains personal and professional correspondence from throughout Meyer's career as a religious leader and human rights activist; his published and unpublished writings and speeches; printed material collected by Meyer; Meyer's working and research files organized by geography, organizations, people, and subject; personal files, including appointment books, biographical material, papers from Meyer's school days, photographs, memorabilia, and material documenting his numerous engagements; audio tapes and cassettes of Meyer's services, interviews, lectures, and other events; and Betacam and VHS videocassette recordings of interviews and other public appearances by Meyer.

The collection contains extensive evidence of Meyer's activities and interests, especially those he engaged in during his tenure at Comunidad Bet el in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and then at B'nai Jeshurun in New York City. The files document Meyer's professional activities, including his often over-lapping roles as religious leader, scholar, and human rights activist. Much of the material in the collection reflects Meyer's devotion and commitment to a socially and politically engaged Conservative Judaism and his involvement with Jewish communities around the world. Meyer was particularly involved in calling attention to human rights violations and working with the victims of violent political oppression in South and Central America in the 1970s and 1980s and then in Palestine, Israel, and the Middle East in the 1990s. Meyer's extensive involvement and leadership in national and international religious, peace, and human rights organizations such as the World Council of Churches are also well-represented, as is his life-long association with his alma maters, Dartmouth College and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

The Correspondence Series contains letters in English and Spanish written and received by Meyer (additional correspondence is also contained in Meyer's research files and electronic files). Significant correspondents include Louis Finkelstein, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Shalom Spiegel.

The Writings and Speeches Series holds Meyer's original compositions in English, Spanish, and Hebrew. These compositions include various literary genres (op-eds, newspaper articles, essays) as well as speeches, addresses, and sermons.

The Research Files Series is subdivided into four categories: Geographic, Organizations, People, and Subject. These files may contain correspondence, notes, printed material, writings, and ephemera. The most common themes that run through this series include human rights, Jewish life, rabbinic education, Latin American Jewry, the Middle East, and Argentina's "Disappeared." The Research Files Series displays a deeper level of intellectual involvement by Meyer (e.g. annotations on printed material, categorizing and filing, integration of correspondence)

The Printed Material Series includes newspapers, clippings, monographs, and serials that Meyer collected over the years. Subjects cover similar territory as the research files. Unlike the Research Files, this material is generally not annotated and was less organized.

The Teaching Material Series contains material from classes taught by Meyer.

The Personal Files Series includes material largely outside the scope of Meyer's professional work: photos, memorabilia, schoolwork, and appointment books.

Video and audio recordings of Meyer's engagements are found in the Audiovisual Material Series. These include lectures, speeches, interviews, television appearances, and religious services. Originals of video and audio tape are closed to use. Patrons must request use copies to access the content of the material.

The Condolences Series contains cards and notes expressing sympathy on Meyer's death. Many of these contain testimonials and reminiscences of his role as rabbi and activist.

Finally, the Electronic Files Series contains transcriptions of documents authored by or related to Meyer, many of which overlap with the content of and the Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Teaching Material, and Audiovisual Materials Series.

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Asa and Elna Spaulding papers, 1909-1997 and undated, bulk 1935-1983

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144 Linear Feet — 108,000 Items
Asa T. Spaulding was an insurance executive in Durham, N.C. and an activist in civil rights, education, employment, and other work related to minorities' rights. He held various positions in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company for almost thirty-five years, beginning as its actuary in 1933 and serving as its fifth president from 1958 through 1967. Elna Bridgeforth Spaulding was an activist in civil rights for minorities and women and involved in local politics in Durham, N.C, serving as a Durham County Commissioner for five terms, from 1974 through 1984. The Asa and Elna Spaulding Papers, 1909-1997 and undated, bulk 1935-1983, document an African American family's lifelong involvement in the business, political, educational, religious, and social life of Durham, N.C. The collection consists of correspondence, writings and speeches, printed materials, clippings, photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia that reflect the Spauldings' work with the following organizations and groups: North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company; Mechanics and Farmers Bank; Durham County Board of Commissioners; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; National Urban League; Women-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc.; North Carolina Central and Shaw universities; White Rock Baptist Church (Durham, N.C.); and the Lincoln Community Health Center. The collection is divided into two subgroups. The Asa Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in nine series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, North Carolina Mutual Files, Insurance Files, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The Elna Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in six series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials.

The Asa and Elna Spaulding Papers, 1909-1997 and undated, bulk 1935-1983, document an African American family's lifelong involvement in the business, political, educational, religious, and social life of Durham, N.C. The Spauldings were active in a broad range of political bodies, businesses, civic groups, and activist organizations, including among many others theDurham County Board of Commissioners and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and were among the co-founders of Women-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. Their long record of accomplishment in the areas of employment, political representation, civil rights, race relations, and women's rights is documented by the collection's rich variety ofcorrespondence, writings and speeches, printed materials, clippings,photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia. The collection is divided into two subgroups. The Asa Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in nine series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, North Carolina Mutual Files, Insurance Files, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The Elna Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in six series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. Some of these materials have been digitized and are available online.

The Asa Spaulding Subgroup, 1909-1984 and undated, documents Mr. Spaulding's career as an insurance executive and his lifelong activism in civil rights, education, employment, and other work related to minorities' rights. While serving in various capacities in Durham's North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, Spaulding was also instrumental in the development of other local businesses such as the Mechanics and Farmers Bank as well as being active in a number of life insurance organizations at the national level, including the National Insurance Association and the Life Insurance Association of America. As his business career developed, culminating in his becoming the Mutual's fifth president in 1958, his national and international reputation also grew, especially in the areas of civil rights and race relations. This led to his serving on a number of government commissions and task forces and in various organizations concerned with urban affairs. Among the most important of these were the American delegation to a UNESCO conference in India and the National Urban League. Spaulding also maintained lifelong ties to the academic and religious communities. At various times he served on the boards of a number of universities, including North Carolina Central andShaw; in addition he had a long involvement with the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He was active all his adult life not only in his local church, White Rock Baptist Church, but also in national groups such as the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

The Correspondence Series is characterized not by its depth of material for any one correspondent but rather its reflection of the breadth of Spaulding's contacts in business, government, politics, and education. Among the many contacts represented here are North Carolina governors, United States senators and congressmen, and all American presidents from the 1940s through the 1970s. The Writings and Speeches Series contains Spaulding's articles, opinion columns, press releases, speeches, and other works on a wide variety of topics, including civil rights, economics, education, insurance, principles of business management,race relations, and his travels abroad as a representative of the United States and UNESCO. There are also many of his introductions of speakers at public events and tributes to friends and political figures. A highlight of this series is the wealth of material about Spaulding's own life and career. Most of this was gathered by him for a planned though unpublishedautobiography; it consists of correspondence, drafts, interviews, printed material, and a variety of anecdotes and personal stories,

The Organizations Series is by far the largest series in the subgroup. It documents how far and wide Spaulding's interests and activities ranged beyond his career in the insurance industry, particularly his support of and agitation for civil rights and related issues and organizations. Series highlights include material about the following topics and organizations: his tenure on the board of trustees for theLegal Defense Committee of the NAACP; his work as a member of the North Carolina Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; his work with the Women and Minority Directors Seminar (an attempt in the early 1970s to encourage organizations and businesses to hire more minorities at the management level); his activities as an American representative to a UNESCO delegation in the 1950s; and his 1971 mayoral election campaign in Durham. Also to be found here is a collection of materials about White Rock Baptist Church, of which Spaulding was a long time member and director. White Rock Baptist Church was prominent in civil rights activities in North Carolina and hosted many guest speakers.

Spaulding's career in the insurance industry is documented by two series, the North Carolina Mutual Files and the Insurance Files. Spaulding was the actuary for the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company (Durham, N.C.), in the 1930s, its actuary and vice-president in the 1940s, and its fifth president from 1956-1967. Thus the series documents not only Spaulding's career, but the development of the company over several decades into the largest African American-owned business in the world. A particular focus of this series is the dedication of the company's new building in downtown Durham in 1966, probably the major event of Spaulding's tenure as president. TheInsurance Files series reflects his activities in the industry beyond his positions at North Carolina Mutual. A particularly rich group of the papers documents his work with theNational Insurance Association (NIA), of which Spaulding was president in the 1940s. Formerly known as the National Negro Insurance Association, the NIA was an organization of officers of black-owned American insurance companies.

Several smaller series broaden the picture of Spaulding's life and career. The Subject Files contain general biographical data as well as more information about his travels and his campaigns for Durham County Commissioner and Mayor of Durham in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ThePhotographic Materials Seriesalso documents his travels as well as some of the history of North Carolina Mutual, especially the dedication of the new home office building in 1966. The subject matter of theAudiovisual Materials Series is largely biographical or autobiographical. In addition to recordings of some of Spaulding's speeches and public interviews, this series also contains several recordings he made that are apparently materials he was gathering for his planned autobiography.

The Elna Spaulding Subgroup, 1909-1997 and undated, documents Mrs. Spaulding's activism for civil rights for minorities and women and her career in local politics. Although the material spans almost sixty years, the bulk of it is from the late 1960s through the early 1980s. The Correspondence Series contains both personal and professional letters that give an indication of her involvement in local and state politics, advocacy for various groups including women, African Americans, children, and the elderly. Some of the organizations that appear in this series also appear in the Organizations Series.Although some correspondence may appear in the latter series, in general this material is not addressed to or from Mrs. Spaulding individually, but rather is documentation of each organization's work, including meeting agendas and minutes, financial reports, annual reports, and a wide range of planned activities. The papers of the Durham County Board of Commissioners provide the most detailed picture of Mrs. Spaulding's political activity. Her other work has focused on attempts to break down barriers between various groups and their rights. Involvement in these issues, including women's employment, women's rights, and public health, is highlighted by the material fromWomen-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and its Causes, of which she was the founder--in 1968--and first president, as well as such organizations as the Lincoln Community Health Center. The Subject Filesround out the picture of her career, particularly in documenting her campaigns for public office in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Emma Goldman papers, 1909-1941 and undated

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0.8 Linear Feet
Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

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A. [Alexander M.] Shapiro (Stockholm, Sweden) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 January 24 2 Leaves — 3 pages; 28 cm

Box 1, Folder 12
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Shapiro writes about ten anarchists shot in Russia and the various press coverage he will send to Keell. He also writes how he came to be in Sweden.

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A. [Alexander M.] Shapiro (Stockholm, Sweden) to [Thomas H.] Keell (n.p.), 1922 January 9 2 Leaves — 3 pages; 28 cm

Box 1, Folder 12
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Shapiro writes that his address in Moscow is blockaded, regarding misinformation about Russia in the press, including the fate of Russian political prisoners, especially those on hunger strikes. He plans to return to Russia if permitted to do so. In the meantime he wishes to catch up on the anarchist international movement and orders copies of Freedom from Keell.

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Alexander Berkman (Anvers, Belgium.) to H.K. [Thomas H. Keell] (n.p.), 1930 May 9 2 Leaves — 2 pages; 21 cm

Box 1, Folder 1
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Berkman announces that he has been suddenly expelled from France, but that friends are attempting to get him back into the country. The news is confidential. He comments on attacks made on Keell in the new Freedom journal.

William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989

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115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

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World War II ration coupon collection, 1942-1946

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0.2 Linear Feet
Collection consists of ration coupons, stickers, permits, and certificates for tires, bicycles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel oil, gasoline, and food which were issued by the Office of Price Administration between 1942-1946. There are duplicates for a few items.
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Witness to Guantanamo Video Collection, 2009-2017

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10 Terabytes — High (ProRes) and low (MP4) resolution Apple MOV files.
One hundred fifty-three video files of interviews with 149 former detainees and others -- attornies, chaplains, guards, government officials, human rights advocates, journalists -- who witnessed the impact of the Guantanamo Bay detention center in the post-911 years. An additional 346 files, short clips extracted from the interviews featured on the Witness to Guantanamo site, are also included.

One hundred fifty-three video files of interviews with 149 former detainees and others -- attornies, chaplains, guards, government officials, human rights advocates, journalists -- who witnessed the impact of the Guantanamo Bay detention center in the post-911 years. A wide range of topics includes physical and psychological torture, religious faith, medical care, interrogation, trials, and women at Guantanamo. An additional 346 files, short clips extracted from the interviews featured on the Witness to Guantanamo site, are also included.

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Cosmetics Trade Samples and Sachet collection, 1890s-1930s

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1.0 Linear Foot
Consists of 75 trade samples and sachets of cosmetics, powders, makeup, soaps and scented paraphernalia. Companies are primarily based in the United States, but Canadian and French perfumers are also represented, including Andrew Jergens, California Perfume (later Avon), Colgate, Frederick Ingram, Furst-McNess, Johnson & Johnson, Larkin, Lehn & Fink and Richard Hudnut. Poems and testimonials on packaging from Ethel Barrymore, Kate Greenaway, Mrs. Leslie Carter and Modjeska. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.
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Agnesian Face Powder, undated

Box 1, Item RL11349-0050
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"Put up by Miss A.C. Graves, Goldsmith Building, Milwaukee, Wis." (The Goldsmith Building, built in 1893 and demolished 1982, was located at 425 E. Wisconsin Ave.) Text: "Agnesian Trade Mark (sith symbol of St. Agnes) Use Agnesian Softenwhite before powdering. It holds the powder and prevents burning or chapping. 25 cents."

Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers, bulk 1766-1845 and undated

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0.8 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 2 volumes
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

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Anthony Wayne (Charlestown) letter to Benjamin Rush (n. p.), 1783 January 20 1 Leaf — 3 pages; 23 cm

Box 2, Folder 6
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Wayne describes his fever and consumption and their treatment, following his loss of blood "in defence of the rights & liberties of America, 'from her coldest, to her hottest sun.'"

Charles N. Hunter papers, 1850s-1932 and undated

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7.3 Linear Feet
Black educator, journalist, and reformer from Raleigh, North Carolina. Correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, print material such as articles and reports, and other papers, all dating from the Civil War into the first few decades of the 20th century. Includes a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative. The material discusses and illuminates the problems experienced by emancipated blacks during Reconstruction and into the early 20th century, encompassing agriculture, business, race relations, reconstruction, education, politics, voting rights, and economic improvement for African Americans. Other topics include Durham and Raleigh, N.C. history; the temperance movement, Hunter's personal matters and family finances, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the N.C. Negro State Fair. Significant correspondents include Charles B. Aycock, Thomas W. Bickett, William E. Borah, Craig Locke, Josephus Daniels, W.E.B. Du Bois, Charles G. Dawes, John A. Logan, Lee S. Overman, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, Charles Sumner, Zebulon B. Vance, and Booker T. Washington. There is also correpondence from two early African American Congressmen, Henry P. Cheatham and George H. White. Also included is a draft of a speech given by Frederick Douglass in 1880 at the 2nd Negro State Fair.

The Charles N. Hunter Papers date from the 1850s to 1932 and consist of Hunter's personal and professional correspondence, scrapbooks of clippings, articles, reports, and memorabilia. Correspondence relates to personal and financial matters, as well as to Hunter's various activities to improve African American education and economic well-being, particularly in the South. Specific topics touched on throughout his papers include race relations, voting rights, creating an educational system for African Americans, the temperance movement, reconstruction, African American business and agriculture, the North Carolina Industrial Association, and the North Carolina Negro State Fair. The three correspondence subseries form almost half of the Personal and Professional Papers Series . The correspondence subseries are: Business/Community Incoming Correspondence, Personal Incoming Correspondence, and Outgoing Correspondence. Among the correspondents are several African American Congressional representatives such as George H. White and Henry P. Cheatham; major political figures like Franklin D. Roosevelt and John Alexander Logan; important African American scholars including W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington; and many North Carolina governors, in particular Zebulon B. Vance, Charles B. Aycock, Locke Craig, and Thomas Walter Bickett. Although these letters address professional and political issues, Hunter established friendships with many of the noteable correspondents. The incoming correspondence has been arranged into letters pertaining to Hunter's business or community activities and letters relating to Hunter's personal life. There are also numerous drafts and copies of outgoing correspondence that Hunter wrote.

In the Other Professional Papers Subseries, there is a variety of miscellaneous printed materials and papers that cover Hunter's career as a teacher and principal, involvement in the N.C. Industrial Association, and role in the N.C. Negro State Fair. Included in this subseries is an array of print materials that provide a view of African American life in the South. This includes commencement invitations from historically black colleges and universities, a fourth edition of Lunsford Lane's slave narrative, and newspaper clippings. The bulk of this subseries deals with the larger Raleigh area, though some items address national issues.

The Writings and Speeches Subseries includes addresses given by Hunter and others. Most noteable is a transcription of Frederick Douglass' speech given at the 2nd Annual N.C. Negro State Fair. Amongst Hunter's writings are several pieces intended for a local encyclopedia which detail historic locales and important North Carolina men. Writings cover topics such as African American voting rights and post-Reconstruction analysis. Overall, Hunter's writings provide historical sketches of important figures, events, and reprecussions with an emphasis on local history.

The Scrapbooks Series is made up of seventeen scrapbooks assembled by Hunter which contain clippings and other items concerning race relations and other social, political, and economic affairs pertaining to African Americans. They are composed principally of newspaper clippings published in North Carolina, but their scope is national as well as local. The clippings have been copied and arranged chronologically; the originals are closed to use.

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"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901

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49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.
Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

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Kenneth J. Arrow papers, 1921-2017

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142 Linear Feet — 94 boxes — 13.2 Gigabytes
Kenneth Arrow (1921-2017) was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and a professor of economics at Stanford University and Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and other materials documenting his political and personal interests, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, public policy, and international relations.

The Kenneth Arrow Papers document his career as an economist, professor, and Nobel Laureate. The collection provides an overview of his many professional activities, along with his research, writings, and collected notes regarding topics such as microeconomics, contingent valuation, social choice theory, general equilibrium analysis, the economics of information, climate change, and endogenous-growth theories. The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists such as Robert Aumann, Gerard Debreu, Frank Hahn, John Harsanyi, Leonid Hurwicz, Harold Hotelling, Tjalling Koopmans, Alain Lewis, Lionel McKenzie, Roy Radner, Martin Shubik, Herbert Simon, Robert Solow, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Arrow's role as an expert witness during various legal cases involving anti-trust lawsuits, international trade, and public utilities; his professional consulting work for different groups and organizations; his political activism supporting different human rights organizations, including his involvement in agencies promoting peace in the Middle East, environmental regulation, arms reduction, and nuclear testing bans; his itineraries, lectures, and public engagements; administrative activities for various professional associations and conferences, including his leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Beijer Institute, the Econometric Society, the International Economic Association, the Office of Naval Research, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and many more; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the Economics Departments of Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Santa Fe Institute. The collection also contains personal artifacts and documents from Arrow's childhood and early education; awards and honorary degrees, including the Clark Medal, the National Medal of Science, and materials from the Nobel Prize ceremony; assorted books from his personal library; various foreign editions of his published works, in multiple languages; and born-digital records with his email and other working documents.

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University Archives Web Archive collection, 2010-ongoing

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3174.4 Gigabytes
The University Archives Web Archives Collection was compiled by University Archives staff beginning in 2010. The University Archives Web Archive Collection consists of approx. 450 website snapshots comprising 1.8 terabytes. The majority of the collection are Duke University-affiliated sites, either built on domains owned by the University or on external platforms by affiliated offices, departments, or organizations. Website snapshots include those of administrative offices, academic departments, athletic teams, public relations offices, publications, and student organizations. Also included are some websites related to individual faculty, controversies involving Duke community members, and web content related to student activism.

The University Archives Web Archive Collection consists of approximately 450 website snapshots comprising 3.1 terabytes captured between 2010 and the present. The majority of the collection are Duke University-affiliated sites, either built on domains owned by the University or on external platforms by affiliated offices, departments, or organizations.

The collection is arranged into eight series: Administration, Academics, Athletics, Public Relations, Student Organizations, Campus Controversies, Miscellaneous, Publications, and Student Activism. The Administration Series includes websites of Duke administrative offices and units. The Academics Series includes websites of academic colleges, departments, and programs, as well as research institutes, interdisciplinary programs, and materials related to faculty. The Athletics Series includes websites of the Duke Athletics program as well as student-run club athletics. The Public Relations Series includes websites related to Duke's communication with employees, the government, students, and the general public. The Student Organizations Series is the largest grouping in the collection, and includes websites of general interest groups, the Greek system, honors societies, selective living groups, arts organizations, political and social cause organizations, religious and cultural organizations, service organizations, and student government. The Campus Controversies Series includes websites collected about controversial events involving Duke and its student body. The Miscellaneous Series consists of several websites that do not fit into the above series.The Publications Series consists of the websites of various publications produced by Duke and Duke-affiliated organizations. The Student Activism series consists of websites, social media content, and individual blog posts and online articles related to various movements on campus led by students.

Due to the size of the collection, the techniques and tools of web harvesting, and the evolving nature of the Internet, some websites have been crawled more comprehensively than others and are represented more faithfully than others.

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Istanbul postcards and photographs collection, 1890-1930

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0.2 Linear Feet
Collection is a set of postcards and photographs from late 19th and early 20th century Turkey, depicting scenes and people in the Üsküdar neighborhood of Istanbul, Turkey. Materials have been individually numbered and described in English and Turkish.

Collection consists of individual postcards and photographs of Istanbul, specifically the Üsküdar area of the city, dating from the late 1800s through the 1930s. Some postcards are blank; others have been mailed and contain correspondence. Images depicted vary but include markets, mosques, streets and houses, schools, palaces, harbor scenes, piers, and other geographic landmarks. There are images of both people and methods of transportation. Most people are anonymous, but there are some depictions (illustrations) of Florence Nightingale. Photographs are silver gelatin or photomechanical prints. Some postcards are illustrations, at times hand-colored. Items are described individually.

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Photographs taken by Lt. Col. Sir Percy Sykes to illustrate Chinese Turkestan, the Russian Pamirs and Osh, 1915 April-November

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1 album — 1 vol., 48 photograph — 11 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches
Bound photograph album containing 48 photographs taken by Sir Percy Moleworth Sykes during his travels in a mountainous region of Central Asia, now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, with his sister, Ella Sykes. The gelatin silver prints measure approximately 4 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches and are window-mounted two to a page with calligraphic captions in white ink. Subjects include landscapes, strategic buildings such as forts and trading posts, and local Uighur, Beg, Kyrgyz, and Kazak people and their dwellings and animals, as well as British, Russian, Turkish, and Chinese people and officials. Specific locations in captions include Kashgar, the Tuman River, Yarkand, Khotan, Merkit, Bulunkul, the Pamirs, Tashkurgan, Muztagh Ata, Karakul lake, Tian Shan mountains, and Osh. The images are large, crisp, and rich with detail, offering views of a remote area and its culture during tensions in the decades following the Russo-Turkish War.

Sir Percy and Ella Sykes co-authored a book based on this journey, titled Through deserts and oases of Central Asia (1920, available online), and many images in the photograph album were used as illustrations, and are noted in this collection guide. It is clear from the narrative written by Ella Sykes (Part I in the book) that she was also taking photographs during their travels, but according to the album's title statement, the images in this album all were taken by Percy Sykes.

The folio photograph album (11 3/4 by 9 1/2 inches) is bound in half green morocco leather over green cloth boards, and comprises 25 pages with a calligraphic title page in white ink; the volume label inside front cover reads "Kodak Ltd series H album."

All titles were transcribed by library staff from the original album captions. Staff also assigned individual identification numbers to the photographs in sequence as they appear in the album.

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