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Collection
Collection comprises an autograph letter from Marianne North to Dr. Jessop, dated May 22, requesting that Jessop provide details about the possible sale of manuscripts of her ancestor, Roger North.

Collection comprises an autograph letter from Marianne North to Dr. Jessop, dated May 22, requesting that Jessop provide details about the possible sale of manuscripts of her ancestor, Roger North.

Collection

Lydia Howard Sigourney letter, undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a handwritten letter Lydia Howard Sigourney drafted as Secretary for the Hartford Ladies' Association for supplicating justice and mercy towards [sic?] the Indians, to request assistance with the circulation of a petition among the women of Hartford. The letter also discusses the political process behind the petition and its circulation. Includes a faint handwritten addendum, written in another person's hand, noting a decision not to send the letter. The item is undated, but possibly dates to the 1830s.
Collection

Henry Noel Brailsford letters, probably 1911. 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Henry Noel Brailsford was the most prolific British left-wing journalist of the first half of the 20th century. A founding member of the Men's League for Women's Suffrage in 1907, he resigned from his job at The Daily News in 1909 when it supported the force-feeding of suffragettes on hunger strike. Collection comprises two letters from Henry Noel Brailsford to (John Howard?) Whitehouse, probably written in 1911.

Collection comprises two letters from Henry Noel Brailsford to (John Howard?) Whitehouse, probably written in 1911. In the first letter, dated 31 January, Brailsford urges Whitehouse to get his Committee to cooperate with the Conciliation Committee in getting a Conciliation Bill passed ("... the P.M. is more likely to listen to your Committee"). Brailsford also tries to enlist Whitehouse to help him find new members for the Conciliation Committee: "If you see any Liberals who are good suffragists & are not averse in principle from working with Tories, I hope you will invite them to join us." In the second letter, dated 3 March, Brailsford discusses Whitehouse's decision to resign and urges him to reconsider. The resignation was (presumably) over the Conciliation Committee's handling of an inquiry into the violent clash between suffragettes from the Women's Social and Political Union and the police on 1910 November 18 at the House of Commons. On stationery of the Conciliation Committee for Woman Suffrage. Includes transcripts for both letters.

Collection

Edith Sitwell poems, circa 1940-1950 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet and critic whose work helped usher in the modernist era of British poetry. This autograph manuscript contains the text of two of her poems: "Lullaby" and "Serenade: From Any Man to Any Woman." Both poems were inspired by the early years of World War II and were published in her 1942 collection "Street Songs."

The five leaf holograph manuscript with text on the front side of each numbered page consists of two poems both titled at the top and signed "Edith" at the bottom. Both poems, "Lullaby," and "Serenade: Any Man to Any Woman" appeared in her 1942 collection "Street Songs." In this manuscript, "Serenade" is titled "Any Man to Any Woman." Both were inspired by the early years of World War II and are ironically titled. "Lullaby," sung by a baboon, describes a chaotic, primeval world destroyed by wartime chaos and despair in which, "All is equal - blindness, sight/There is no depth, there is no height." "Serenade" spoken by a dying soldier, regards his love through the lens of death and destruction. He identifies his love with a cannon and invites her to "die with me and be my love" in a reversal of the famous Marlowe line.

Both poems are referenced in the Edith Sitwell papers at the Ransom Humanities Center. Viewed March 9, 2017

Source: Misko, Ellen, "A Study of Dame Edith Sitwell's Later Poems: 1940-1945" (1972). Dissertations. Paper 1211. Viewed March 9, 2017

Collection

Mathilde Blind letter, circa 1889-1896 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Mathilde Blind was a writer and feminist active in late 19th century England. This letter was written by Blind thanking a correspondent for sending her a newspaper clipping containing a review of her work. She expresses gratitude for his thoughtfulness and for his "sympathetic spirit" towards her work.

The collection comprises a single autograph manuscript letter on a single folded sheet of paper with text on three sides dated June 19, but lacking a year. The manuscript address given at the top of the first page reads: Holly Cottage, The Mount, Hampstead, London, N.W. In the letter, Mathilde Blind writes to thank an unknown male correspondent for sending her a clipping from the Liverpool Mercury containing a review of one of her works. Blind writes, "Sitting here this evening, somewhat tired, somewhat despondent, there comes to me your letter. I cannot tell you how it cheered and strengthened me. There is something profoundly stirring in the thought that far away, among the great unknown multitude of one's fellow beings, there are people who have entered into one's work with a kindly sympathetic spirit."

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin Collection of Photographs, circa 1860-1960s, bulk 1860-1910 3.5 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — 486 items — Dimensions of the photographic items range from standard carte-de-visite and cabinet card sizes, which are in the great majority, and larger prints from later decades that range from 4x6 to 8x10 inches.

Lisa Unger Baskin, who assembled this collection of photographs centered on women's history and culture, is a bibliophile, collector, and activist. Collection consists of 486 photographs in a variety of formats typical for the time, chiefly albumen. Image data includes titles, dates, biography of the photographer, studio addresses, and other notes. Roughly three-quarters were produced by commercial women photographers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The great majority of the images are studio portraits of white men, women, children, and families; there are also many photographs of well-known women artists, intellectuals, and activists of the time, as well as women and men in work settings, at play, and posed in group portraits. Roughly 35 images are portraits of African Americans and other people of color. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of 486 photographic items, almost all single prints, in a variety of formats typical for the 19th and early 20th centuries, largely albumen, with some gelatin silver prints, a few tintypes, daguerreotypes, glass plates, and one cyanotype. There are also some mechanical prints such as Woodburytypes and half-tone prints. Roughly three-quarters of the images were taken by women photographers operating or managing studios in all regions of the United States, with a smaller number in England, Sweden, Canada, and a few other countries; some were well-known but the majority were small business operators in smaller cities and towns. Whenever possible, a brief photographer's biography is included with the image entry.

The majority of the images are studio portraits of North American men, women, children, and families. Roughly 25 images are portraits of African American or mixed-race individuals young and old, with a few groups of people of color. There are several ethnographic images of northern African women and a few scenes from Southeast Asia. In addition to portraiture, the collection offers images of women artists, authors, nurses, teachers, and students, particularly graduating classes and early sports teams; and women and girls in boarding house and hotel rooms, at work (factories, offices, mines), and at play. Also present are many portraits of female actors, celebrities, entertainers, and wealthy individuals. Of interest are several photographic images distributed by abolitionist movements of light-skinned slave children. There are also groups of commercially produced postcards, collectible cards (including a set of Newsboy cards), and stereographs.

Original titles have been transcribed when present; in the absence of a title, which was frequently the case, library staff devised descriptive titles. When present, dates have been transcribed; the great majority are approximate and are based on the format, biographies and geneaological information, and clothing styles.

Collection

Maria Mitchell letters, circa 1846-1868 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Maria Mitchell was a pioneering United States astronomer. This collection comprises three social correspondence notes written by Mitchell between approximately 1846-1868.

Collection comprises three manuscript notes by Mitchell. The first, written while Mitchell was the librarian at the Nantucket Atheneum, is addressed to a Mrs. Greene regarding a John Quincy Adams letter Mitchell has forwarded to her "at Phebe's request" for her autograph business. The second, written while Mitchell was teaching at Vassar College, is addressed to a Mrs. Burner asking for letters of recommendation to a number of people in London. The third, dated 1877, to a Miss Ladd, sends her regrets for not being able to speak at the Harvard School commencement.

Collection
Madame de Rhinfeld, née St. Clair, grew up in a convent in France, where she was instructed in the construction of artificial flowers. She later used this skill to make a living in England. Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

Collection comprises an handwritten, unpublished manuscript volume (256 written pages, plus 45 watercolor and 5 pen and ink plates of illustrations) by Madame de Rhinfeld, written around 1830. In the manuscript, Rhinfeld provides detailed instruction on how to create 24 different artificial flowers, and describes the tools used to make them. Flowers include pomegranate, hyacinth, roses, pansies, narcissus, geraniums, and orange flowers, among others. Includes watercolor diagrams regarding the construction of each flower, with additional paintings of the finished piece. The instructions are accompanied by a chapter of poetry, stories, quotations, and commentary related to each flower. Scattered throughout the manuscript are other pen and ink drawings. Includes an index to flowers and to poets.

Collection
Lady Elizabeth Holford was born Elizabeth Lewis around 1650. She first married a merchant called Harbin, whose wealth she inherited. Her second husband was a poor baronet, Sir William Holford, who died before her. Lady Holford died on 3 November 1720, without an heir. Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection comprises a handwritten manuscript copy (70 pages; incomplete, the text ends mid-sentence) of Lady Holford's will and codicils, created around 1720, following her death. In the will, large sums of money are bequeathed to several Oxford colleges, including Christ Church, Pembroke and Worcester Colleges, and Hart Hall, along with Charterhouse School. There are also lesser legacies made to various London charity schools, along with other amounts left to individuals.

Collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Collection
Dame Ellen Terry, considered the leading Shakespearean actor of her time, was a member of the company at London's Lyceum Theatre from 1878-1902. Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection comprises an autograph note on Lyceum Theatre letterhead (5"x8"). The actor Ellen Terry writes to "Olga" to schedule a social engagement. She writes, "I'm much grieved to hear of you mother ..." and sends "best remembrances" to Olga's husband. There is also an undated cabinet photograph, by Window & Grove photographers, London.

Collection
Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

Collection
Lydia Bailey was a prominent 19th century Philadelphia printer. The Lydia Bailey account statement itemizes a printing job commissioned by John Steele of the Port of Philadelphia. The job consisted of labels for imported liquor, wine and tea for use on the cargo of commercial ships.

Manuscript document signed by Lydia Bailey, listing 65 itemized expenditures dated March 8-29, 1823, totaling $141.50 for "Printing certificates of spirits, wines & teas imported in the first quarter of 1823." It begins "Genl. John Steele, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia/To Lydia R. Bailey," and concludes with a certifying statement, and a receipt for payment in full signed by Bailey. Each entry specifies the quantity of certificates printed and the name of the ship for which each lot is destined. There is also a single entry for "1000 copies blanks for inspectors."

Collection
Eleanor Vere Boyle (1825-1916) was an British artist of the Victorian era whose work consisted mainly of watercolor illustrations in children's books. Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine.

Collection comprises an autograph letter, signed E. V. B., written by Boyle to Mr. [L?]awley on May 11, regarding payment for wine glasses and his portrait in the Pall Mall Magazine. On her Huntercombe Manor, Maidenhead, letterhead.

Collection
Single-page written, signed testimony by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

Single-page written testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman. Devised title; estimated location based on provenance.

"Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed."

Collection
Collection comprises a single autograph manuscript note dated 1963 with a Paris return address from the conductor and composer Nadia Boulanger to her friend "R.I." Boulanger inquires after his recent illness and encourages him to carry on his work in the future. The note's recipient is likely the composer Robert Irving.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note (dated 1963 October 6) from the French composer and conductor Nadia Boulanger to a sick friend identified as "R.I." It's likely that the recipient was the conductor Robert Irving. Boulanger inquires as to what advice he's received from his doctors, and mentions her own recent illness. She says that her faith has "brought moral relief to the physical suffering." She asks after his plans and hopes for the future, "in spite of all that makes regular work so difficult." Boulanger writes her address at the bottom of the note: 35 Rue Ballu, Paris IX.

Collection
Letter from the writer Anaïs Nin to the American book collector, Thomas DiGenti, who is trying to find a copy of her literary magazine Two Cities. Nin does not have one, but directs him to the NYC bookshop The Phoenix, on Cornelia St. She has turned over distribution of Two Cities to The Phoenix at a financial loss due to constraints on her time. Nin writes of her desire to publish the work of new writers. She goes on to describe a recent trip to Europe where she visited London, Brussels, and Paris, where she was well-received because of the popularity of her work there. Nin asks the collector, Thomas C. Di Genti, if he has an extra copy of her book D,H. Lawrence: An unprofessional study. She wants to send it to her London publisher, who is interested in putting out a new edition. Nin states that she's currently busy writing Seduction of the Minotaur, the last part of her Cities of the Interior sequence which she describes as a "finale to the novels."
Collection
Collection comprises 5 black-and-white gelatin silver developing-out paper photographs taken by SNCC representatives from the Atlanta, Georgia, regional office. One photograph is uncredited, the others were photographed by Joffré T. Clarke, Bob Fletcher, and Tom Wakayama. They are undated, but probably were taken during the 1960s. Subjects in the images are all African-American, and include an elderly woman picking cotton, a young boy drawing with crayons, a little girl in a group watching others, a man slaughtering hogs, and a group building a house.
Collection
Harrogate College Union is the alumnae association for Harrogate Ladies' College in Harrogate, England. The Union was established in 1895. Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones, or M. E. Jones, was headmistress of the school 1898-1935. Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year.

Collection comprises materials related to a celebration, hosted by the college union in 1959, of Elizabeth Wilhelmina Jones' 90th birthday, along with items related to her memorial the following year. Includes two newspaper clippings regarding the birthday; a related luncheon invitation, menu, and college union pin; two items associated with her memorial service; and a notice regarding a memorial fund to be established in her name. In addition, there are three black-and-white photographs of the birthday luncheon and one color photograph of Jones. The rest of the collection items are mainly forms related to photographic orders.

Collection
The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Aphara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

The collection consists of five typescript letters, one photocopied Encyclopedia Britannica article regarding Sackville-West's book "Afara Behn" in the "Representative Women" series, along with a poem. The first letter, one page addressed to Sackville-West, dated 1953 May 22, signed "A. Purvis," discusses the birthplace and date of Aphra Behn. A photocopy of the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Behn is included. A typescript note dated 18 July, 1961, signed V. Sackville-West on Sissinghurst letterhead, was written in response to a letter from Sylvia Haymon about Aphra Behn, and Sackville-West's article on Behn in the Encyclopedia Britannica. Included are copies of three letters, all dated 1961, sent to Sylvia Haymon, two to Sackville-West, and one to Miss J. Parfitt, Acting Editor of the Women's Page of The Times in London. The topics of the undated, one-page "Diary-Poem" have to do with Sackville-West's loss of her given name upon her marriage to Harold Nicolson in 1913, and the loss of Knole, her family's estate in Kent, in 1928 because of patriarchal inheritance laws.

Collection
Mary Ritter Beard was an American historian and archivist. Collection comprises 8 letters Mary R. Beard wrote to Margaret Zogbaum, a resident of Mizzen Top in Tryon, North Carolina, between 1947 and 1950.

Collection comprises 8 letters, 3 autograph and 5 typescript, Mary R. Beard wrote to Margaret Zogbaum, a resident of Mizzen Top in Tryon, North Carolina, between 1947 and 1950. Topics include the state of the publishing industry for literature; plans for visitors; musicologists Henry S. Drinker and his wife, Sophie; and the demands of Beard's writing, including its serving as a "salvation" following her husband's death in 1948, as well as her rule for not writing introductions for works by others.

Collection
Vera Brittain was an English writer and pacifist activist best known for her World War I memoir Testament of Youth. The Vera Brittain letter to critia and editor John Middleton Murry concerns matters relating to the publishing and financing of Murry's literary, socialist, and pacifist magazine The Adelphi. Brittain also writes of her pacifism as it relates to concerns about nuclear warfare in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Consists of a single typescript letter from Brittain to the critic and editor John Middleton Murry dated September 13, 1946. Single-page, with text on front and back written on letterhead reading "2 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea S.W.3." Brittain comments on the revival of Murry's The Adelphi, and on strategies to finance such literary magazines. The second part of the letter discusses her opinions on methods of pacifist activism, particuarly as related to nuclear war. The postscript discusses the forthcoming publication of John Hersey's 1946 book Hiroshima. She comments, "If only the world could read it, the 'next war' would move much further off." It is signed "Vera."

Collection
Photographer Margaret Bourke-White writes to comic book editor Mort Weisinger commenting that she likes a story and that "it ought to be swell with the cartoons." The note likely refers to a comic book about Bourke-White published in 1947.

Collection comprises a single autograph manuscript note (dated 1946 December 14) on letterhead stationery from the Ambassador Hotel, Chicago. Photographer Margaret Bourke-White writes to the comic book editor Mort Weisinger, "It's a good story and I like it very much. Ought to be swell with the cartoons." Bourke-White likely refers to a comic book about her life published in 1947.

Collection
Collection comprises materials created or collected in preparation for a 1990 exhibit held at the University of San Francisco Gleeson Library on Isak Dinesen/Karen Blixen that featured photographs taken of her by Rie Nissen. Includes a few letters, photocopies of biographical information for Nissen, a 1943 catalog of Nissen's photography, caption notes for the photographs, exhibit caption cards, as well as publicity drafts and material. There are two items written in Danish.
Collection
Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."
Collection
Pearl S. Buck was an American writer best known for her depictions of rural Chinese life. Her bestselling novel The Good Earth was awarded the Pulizer Prize, and she was the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature (1938). This letter is written by Buck to Frances Perkins, then Franklin D. Roosevelt's Secretary of Labor, the first woman to hold a cabinet post. Buck thanks Perkins for congratulating her on winning the Nobel Prize. She writes that the award, "was given as much to America and China as it was to me."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from the author Pearl S. Buck to the U.S. Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins. Perkins had written to Buck to congratulate her for winning the Nobel Prize in Literature for 1938. Buck responds, "It is very kind of you indeed to write me as you have about the Nobel Prize. It adds a great deal to the pleasure of this award, which I cannot but feel was given as much to America and China as it was to me." Buck's return address is given as "209 The Manor, 333 E. 43rd Street, New York City."

Collection

Laura Knight letters, 1939 May 11 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Dame Laura Knight was an English artist who worked in oils, watercolours, etching, engraving and drypoint. Two letters written by Laura Knight on 1939 May 11 that provide letters of introduction for contacts in the United States on behalf of fellow artist Clara Klinghoffer. One is written to Klinghoffer, the other to Marion Fenhagen.

Two letters written by Laura Knight on 1939 May 11 that provide letters of introduction for contacts in the United States on behalf of fellow artist Clara Klinghoffer. One is written to Klinghoffer, the other to Marion Fenhagen.

Collection
Children's book author and socialite Julia Ellsworth Ford writes to fellow children's book writer Helen Hoke offering an introduction to the Yeats family while Hoke is in Dublin. Ford particularly wishes Hoke to meet Elizabeth Yeats because of her printing work with the Cuala Press. She writes that she considers William Butler Yeats the greatest poetic genius to emerge from England and Ireland in the 20th century, but that it will be difficult to meet him because he "is more or less a recluse because of writing all the time."

Collection consists of a single two-page autograph typescript letter on letterhead stationery dated 1935 October 16 with manuscript postscript. Julia Ellsworth Ford writes to Helen Hoke offering an introduction to members of the Yeats family while Hoke is in Dublin that winter. Ford particularly wants Helen to meet Elizabeth Yeats because of her work printing with the Cuala Press; Ford owns a complete set of their books. Ford writes that she had hosted the father, John Butler Yeats, in New York, where he stayed until his death in 1922. If Hoke wishes to meet William Butler in Ireland, she should ask Elizabeth, but that he "is more or less of a recluse because of writing all the time."

Collection
May Byron was a prolific British author best known for her children's books including a series of biographies and abridgements of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan. In this letter, she responds to Rev. Edwin J. Matthews' request for the most important life lesson she's learned and for a list of her publications. Byron responds that she couldn't possibly sum up her life's experiences into one lesson, and that she can't provide a list of her publications because she's lost track of them. She does note that most of her children's books are still in print and have "been going on selling for some 20 years."

Collection consists of a single autograph manuscript letter written by May Byron to Reverend Edwin J. Matthews. Byron's return address is "c/o British Weekly" and Matthews' address is "The Rectory, Calstone, Calne, Wiltshire." Matthews had written to ask Byron, "the one lesson which has been most impressed upon me by my life's experiences." Byron replies, "These experiences have been so wide, so varied, and in several respects so unique that I could not possibly sum up their results in one lesson." Matthews had also asked Byron for a list of her writings, and she replies that she's unable to do so because she's lost track of them. She states that both the British Museum and the Library of Congress had asked her for a similar list, and she was unable to help them, in part because of her use of pseudonyms, and also because of her many years' work as a journalist. She concludes by stating that most all her writings are currently out of print, except for her children's books, "which have been going on selling for some 20 years."

Collection

Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

Collection
Helen Adams Keller was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. Collection includes letters from Helen Keller to Agatha and Harry Hunter, dated 1930 and undated, thanking them for their food gifts at Christmas. There is another letter from Keller to Frank L. Boyden, dated 1949, regarding the possibility of a bequest by him to the American Foundation for the Blind. Includes his letter in response negating that possibility, but expressing his admiration for her. There is also an unrelated letter in the collection, written by Harry Hunter to Mabel McCormick (Mrs. Ferris? McCormick) in 1951, discussing their respective interests, food, friends, business, and their love for each other. Includes envelopes.

Collection includes letters from Helen Keller to Agatha and Harry Hunter, dated 1930 and undated, thanking them for their food gifts at Christmas. There is another letter from Keller to Frank L. Boyden, dated 1949, regarding the possibility of a bequest by him to the American Foundation for the Blind. Includes his letter in response negating that possibility, but expressing his admiration for her. There is also an unrelated letter in the collection, written by Harry Hunter to Mabel McCormick (Mrs. Ferris? McCormick) in 1951, discussing their respective interests, food, friends, business, and their love for each other. Includes envelopes.

Collection
Elizabeth Arden was a pioneering cosmetics entrepreneur. In this letter, she writes to advise a potential customer on matters relating to health and beauty. Arden advises her to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet, and to use products from Arden's Venetian line in order to soothe her chapped hands. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter dated 1926 June 26 written by Elizabeth Arden to a Mrs. Hyatt, who had contacted her for advice after hearing her speak on the radio. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday." Arden advises her to "get a little rest period at least once a day and relax in a quiet room or take a soothing, warm bath and a little nap," as well as to eat a healthy diet. She goes on to recommend products in her Venetian Preparations line that will soothe chapped hands, and encloses her booklet "The Quest of the Beautiful." On letterhead stationery from 673 Fifth Avenue embossed with the Venetian trademark.

Collection
The Margaret Sanger letter to Vachel Linsday regards a request from the contraception activist to the poet asking him to write a statement of support to be read at an upcoming birth control conference. Linsday responds by writing a note at the bottom of Sanger's letter replying that he wishes to father "twelve sons seven feet high" with the famously long-haired Seven Sutherland Sisters. The accompanying pamphlet contains the program for the upcoming conference.

The collection consists of a single-page typescript autograph letter from Margaret Sanger to the poet Vachel Lindsay with an autograph manuscript note at the bottom and an accompanying single-sheet folded pamphlet. The pamphlet contains the program for the Sixth International Neo-Malthusian and Birth Control Conference held in New York March 25-31, 1925; the letter is composed on matching letterhead and addressed to Lindsay care of the Macmillan Company in New York. In the letter, Sanger asks Lindsay if he would be willing to compose a message of support to be read at the conference. Lindsay sent the letter back to Sanger with a playful manuscript note by way of reply at the bottom signed Nicholas Vachel Lindsay. His response states that he wants "twelve sons, seven feet high," and that the best way to get them would be "to marry the Seven Sutherland Sisters, as long-haired women have long-legged sons." He concludes by asking Sanger if she knows where the Sisters happen to be at the time. The Seven Sutherland Sisters were famously long-haired and traveled with Barnum and Bailey as a family singing act. In a 1926 letter to the poet Sara Teasdale, Lindsay's wife Elizabeth refers to this as "his famous response" to the Neo-Malthusian Conference.

Source: The Annotated Letters of Nicholas Vachel Linsday to Sara Trevor Teasdale http://www.vachellindsay.org/LetterstoSara/vl_letters_210_241.pdf; viewed March 9, 2017

Collection
Dame Sybil Thorndike was a distinguished British actress best known for her work on stage. In this letter to the actress and playwright Elizabeth Robins, Thorndike thanks her for the gift of some heather from Yorkshire. She also sends her regards and thanks to "Lady Bell" for her support. The letter is addressed to Robins at Rounton Grange, the North Yorkshire estate which was the family home of the writer Florence Bell ("Lady Bell"). Bell and Robins were close friends and collaborators. Thorndike refers to a play; at the time of this letter, she was in rehearsals for the 1922-23 London production of Shelley's The Cenci at the New Theater, directed by her husband, Lewis Casson. This letter connecting three key female figures of the London stage is evidence of the strong support network these women formed in a male-dominated arena.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from Sybil Thorndike to Elizabeth Robins at Rounton Grange, Northallerton in North Yorkshire. In the letter, Thorndike thanks Robins for sending her a piece of heather from Rounton Grange. Thorndike writes, "I am sure it is going to bring us luck, and I love having something from Rounton on my dressing table. How lovely to think of you up there among the peacocks and the glorious moors! I really think the play is going to be a success." The letter is signed "yours affectionately, Sybil" with a manuscript postscript asking Robins to give her love to Lady Bell, and to thank Lady Bell for her support. The letter is composed on Thorndike's own letterhead stationery, "Miss Sybil Thorndike" at the address of the New Theater, London and listing her husband, Lewis Casson, as Director. The play in production Thorndike refers to is Shelley's The Cenci, in which she played the lead, Beatrice. With stamped, postmarked envelope.

Collection

Grace Hazard Conkling letters, 1918, 1925. 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Grace Walcott Hazard Conkling was an American author, a poet and an English professor. Collection comprises two letters written to Conkling. The first was written by Florence Converse at the Atlantic Monthly, dated 1918 October 19, in regard to the publishing of Conkling's poem, "Names," in the magazine. The second was written by Elisabeth Cutting at the North American Review, dated 1925 June 22, asking Conkling to be a book reviewer, and mentioning Amy Lowell in association with a speech Conkling made.

Collection comprises two letters written to Conkling. The first was written by Florence Converse at the Atlantic Monthly, dated 1918 October 19, in regard to the publishing of Conkling's poem, "Names," in the magazine. The second was written by Elisabeth Cutting at the North American Review, dated 1925 June 22, asking Conkling to be a book reviewer, and mentioning Amy Lowell in association with a speech Conkling made.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter written by the United States Senator from Ohio Warren G. Harding to the suffragist Harriet Taylor Upton regarding support for women's suffrage. Harding responds to a telegram from Upton asking him to use his influence on Ohio State Senator U.G. Murrell in support of women's voting rights. Harding replies that he is "reluctant" to advise Murrell on the matter because of his previous experience with Murrell while Harding was a member of the Ohio General Assembly.

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter on Senator Warren G. Harding's United States Senate letterhead dated 1917 February 11. Senator Harding writes to suffragist Mrs. Harriet Taylor Upton of Warren, Ohio, "I beg to acknowledge your telegram of February 4. By reason of my former experience as a member of the Senate of Ohio General Assembly, I would be reluctant to advise Senator Murrell of Clinton County as to his ultimate action on the suffrage matter." Murrell was a member of the Ohio General Assembly. By 1917, Senator Harding was prepared to vote in the affirmative on the issue of women's suffrage. Harriet Upton was was hoping to leverage his influence to generate similar support in their home state of Ohio.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter Stokes wrote to dramatist Benjamin Butler Davenport regarding her plan to attend his play "The Silent Assertion" with her husband. Includes enclosure.
Collection
Collection comprises a letter written by "Nonia" on June 16, 1913, regarding how she managed to obtain the Emily Wilding Davison memorial items, including a bulletin for the memorial service, an official program for the funeral procession, and a memorial card. Nonia was likely an upper class woman, for Princess Alice of Teck assisted her in collecting the items; the princess was afraid they would be considered suffragettes. The collection also holds a transcription for the letter.
Collection
Online
Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

Collection

May Morris papers, 1909-1931 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — 24 items

Mary "May" Morris was an English artisan, embroidery designer, jeweller, socialist, and editor. Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

Collection
Sir Lionel Henry Cust was a British art historian, courtier, and museum director. He was director of the National Portrait Gallery from 1895 to 1909 and co-edited The Burlington Magazine from 1909 to 1919. Collection comprises two autograph letters signed by Cust, dated 1906 November 22 and 1906 November 26, to "Jack," regarding a portrait said to be that of Charlotte Brontë. The November 26 letter also mentions Constantine Gilles Romain Heger. On letterhead of the National Portrait Gallery.

Collection comprises two autograph letters signed by Cust, dated 1906 November 22 and 1906 November 26, to "Jack," regarding a portrait said to be that of Charlotte Brontë. The November 26 letter also mentions Constantine Gilles Romain Heger. On letterhead of the National Portrait Gallery.

Collection
Maud Ballington Booth was the founder, with her husband, of the Volunteers of America in 1896 and its auxiliary, the Volunteer Prison League. Collection comprises a typescript letter, signed Maud B. Booth, written to Alice Boughton on 1905 January 27, regarding a photographic portrait to be completed by Boughton.

Collection comprises a typescript letter, signed Maud B. Booth, written to Alice Boughton on 1905 January 27, regarding a photographic portrait to be completed by Boughton. On Prison League, Volunteers of America, stationary.

Collection
The Women's Guild of Arts was founded in England in 1907 by textile designer and jeweller May Morris, and grew to about 60 members. The organization offered female artists an alternative to the Art Workers' Guild, the artists' association established in 1884 to encourage excellence in the fine and applied arts, and from which women were excluded until the 1960s. Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes.

Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes. Three letters predate the founding of the organization in 1907. The primary topic of the letters is the crisis within the Guild regarding its women-only status, an argument regarding how restrictive the Guild should be. Pamela Colman Smith wrote to May Morris (22 January 1913) that the reason she joined the Guild was that it made a point of asking its members not to exhibit at women-only shows, as it lowered the standard of work and that the Guild was never intended to be a purely woman's affair. Other letters on the subject come from Evelyn de Morgan, Feodora Gleichen, and Ethel Sandell. Gleichen's letter was circulated to members, and the collection contains a list of those who agreed with her; several letters are marked up to indicate a position on the matter. There is also a draft resolution welcoming any move to widen the scope of the Guild "such as stimulating and interesting lectures not only from our own members but from men and women outside....It is with this in view that we supported the resolution passed at the recent Annual Meeting, inviting as Honorary Associates a few people with whose work we are in sympathy..." (22 January 1913). Other topics in the letters include the role of the president, exhibitions, lectures, and the work of the organization, along with the William Morris Centenary Commemoration in 1934.

Collection
Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.
Collection
Lydia L. Brennan ran a photographic business, the Elite Studio in Butte, Montana, until December 1896, when she sold the business to J. W. Nelson. Brennan married John N. Kirk, a Butte lawyer. Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters Lydia L. Brennan wrote to the Holter Hardware Company in Helena, Montana, on July 1 and October 3, 1896, to place orders for photographic supplies, particularly American Aristo Platino papers.

Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters Lydia L. Brennan wrote to the Holter Hardware Company in Helena, Montana, on July 1 and October 3, 1896, to place orders for photographic supplies, particularly American Aristo Platino papers. On her Elite Studio stationary, with the stamp of Holter Hardware indicating the inquiries were received and answered.

Collection
The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

Collection
Collection comprises an undated letter Becker wrote to Lady [Downing?] regarding the fate of an unnamed bill before the House of Lords. She mentions that "... we have done what we could to bring a strong body of earnest, intelligent, feminine opinion to bear on the Peers." She then requests help finding accommodations for upcoming meetings in Exeter. Pasted to the letter, probably dated 1890, is a copy of Becker's obituary.
Collection

Louisa Wright needlework sample book, 1888 0.8 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume entitled "Needlework," containing 16 pages of illustrations for sewing and darning patterns and techniques, accompanied by 22 finished samples. The title page indicates the work was done by Louisa Wright during a "Second Year" at an unnamed institute or training facility. There are illustrations for hemming and seaming, stitching, sewing on a tape, gathering, setting-in, making a buttonhole, herring-boning, darning a thin place, tacking, making a gusset, making a calico patch, darning a hole, whipping, using a print patch, crosscut darning, Swiss darning and grafting, and stocking-web darning. The volume has a sewn cover in khaki cloth featuring two pink ribbon closures with bows, buttons, and thread button-loops. The title "Needlework" is emboidered in pink thread.
Collection

Frances Power Cobbe letters, 1886 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Frances Power Cobbe was an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women's suffrage campaigner. Cobbe wrote the first letter to Mrs. Madden, undated but probably in 1886, regarding vivisection along with the poor treatment of horses. She wrote the second, undated, letter to Miss Galtz[?], regarding a planned visit.

Cobbe wrote the first letter to Mrs. Madden, undated but probably in 1886, regarding vivisection along with the poor treatment of horses. She wrote the second, undated, letter to Miss Galtz[?], regarding a planned visit.

Collection
Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz (December 5, 1822 – June 27, 1907) was an American educator, and the co-founder and first president of Radcliffe College. Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. Also includes a printed photograph of her.

Collection comprises an autograph, signed letter Elizabeth Cary Agassiz wrote to Dr. Thomas Hill on January 20 [1886] regarding his article on her husband published in the Unitarian Review in December 1885. She notes that she was unable to follow his entire argument, "for the kingdoms of geometry are closed to me. But in reading it I am nonetheless conscious of a law which binds all things together...." Also includes a printed photograph of her.