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Collection
Online
The Working Groups in Feminism and History (WGFH, formerly the Feminist Women in History Group, FWHG) is a collective of graudate students and faculty from Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other area universities that meets regularly to discuss scholarship in gender and history. The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History.

The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History. Included are captures of both the Feminist Women in History website from 2003 and the Working Group in Feminism and History site as of 2017; fliers for events organized by the group; correspondence regarding event planning, scheduling speakers, leadership of the group, and other topics; a printed out copy of the website for the Feminist Women in History Group; and schedules for events.

Collection
The Women's Studies Program at Duke University started in 1983 and grew rapidly into one of the largest interdisciplinary programs at the University, now called Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program.

The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program. Included are correspondence, minutes, reports, newsletters, flyers, budgets, programs, surveys, and many other materials. Topics include the development of the Women's Studies Program from a certificate program to an undergraduate major and minor as well as the growth of graduate scholarship; the curriculum of the Program and the inclusion of women's studies and women's topics in other areas of the University; outreach to and fundraising with Duke alumni women and others; programs and events organized by Women's Studies, especially the Graduate Research Conference and other large conferences hosted by Women's Studies; the work of the Council on Women's Studies; and a survey given to all women alumni of Duke from the 1920s through the 1980s including questions related to their Duke experience, activities since graduation, and perspective on women's issues, among many other subjects. The majority of the materials date from Jean O'Barr's tenure as director of Women's Studies.

Collection
Online
The Duke University Women's Department of Health and Physical Education began in about 1926 and merged with the Men's Physical Education Department in 1975. The Women's Department was responsible for providing required physical education courses, overseeing recreational and athletic activities, and providing a major in physical education. The Department had three chairmen during its existence: Julia R. Grout, Betty F. McCue, and Elizabeth C. Bookhout. The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records include correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. Major topics include the curriculum and administration of the department, student attitudes toward P.E., the attempt to build or renovate the gymnasium facility for women, the eventual merging of the Women's and Men's departments, and the effect of Title IX on women's athletics. English.

The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records consist of correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. The records are organized into two series: Alphabetical Files and Scrapbooks.

The alphabetical files primarily cover the period from the 1930s to 1975. Of note are photographs of women participating in physical education classes and sports; materials from the Women's Athletic Association and Women's Recreation Association; several surveys and reports from the 1960s and 1970s about women students' feelings and attitudes toward physical education; correspondence, estimates, and reports about the proposed building of a new facility for the department; correspondence and many reports which document the struggle with the administration to maintain the Department as a separate unit from the men's department in the 1970s; materials that discuss the effect of Title IX on women's sports and the growth of women's sports in the 1970s. Major figures include Julia R. Grout and Elizabeth C. Bookhout, both of whom served as Chairman of the department. The Alphabetical Files also include information on students who majored in physical education. In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

The Alphabetical Files are arranged by broad subjects: Addresses, Administration, Annual Reports, Budget, Correspondence, Curriculum, Departmental Studies and Reports, Facilities, History, Photographs, Publicity, Recreation, Staff Meetings, Task Force and Curriculum Committee Action, and Women's Athletics. Within each of these subsections, materials are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically. The original arrangement of the materials has been maintained as much as possible.

The Scrapbooks are compilations of photographs, clippings, programs, correspondence, and other memorabilia. There are three books which date from 1932 to 1975.

Collection
William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.

Collection

William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

Collection

William H. Wannamaker papers, 1917 - 1948 14 Linear Feet — 14000 Items

William Hane Wannamaker (1873-1958) was a professor and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University for over four decades. He served as Dean of Trinity College and Vice President for the Educational Division, and was responsible for critical decisions regarding student, faculty, and administrative policies. The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, evaluations, and other administrative materials. Major subjects include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, college sports, the hiring and promotion of faculty, and other administrative matters. English.

The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. The first series, Correspondence, covers the period of Wannamaker's tenure in those positions, 1917-1948, and is arranged chronologically. Topics include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, and other administrative concerns. The second series, Personnel, concerns the recruitment and development of the faculty for the years 1930 to 1948, and is arranged chronologically. Faculty appointments and promotions at all levels are included, as are the reports of departmental chairs. The third series, Subject Files, consists of a variety of materials related to Duke University, such as committee and council reports, and reports to the President. It is organized alphabetically.

Collection
William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

Collection
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner's academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner's involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner's academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

Collection

Wilbur Wade Card papers, 1876-1943 5.7 Linear Feet — 1250 Items

Wilbur Wade Card entered Trinity College in 1895 and became one of the school's best athletes. He set and broke numerous baseball records as an outfielder and hitter and served as captain of the Trinity baseball team in 1899 (for which he received his nickname, "Cap"). Card was invited by President John C. Kilgo to return to Trinity as Director of a new program in physical education. He remained at Trinity College/Duke University for the next 46 years. The collection includes volumes of physical education and examination records of male students from Trinity College and Trinity Park School, correspondence, photographs, a scrapbook, articles, clippings and miscellaneous printed matter. The collection ranges in date from 1876-1943.

The collection includes volumes of physical education and examination records of male students from Trinity College and Trinity Park School, correspondence, photographs, a scrapbook, articles, clippings and miscellaneous printed matter.

The physical education records include students' names and grades from Card's physical education classes. The physical examination volumes include information about each student, including his name, birthplace, father's occupation, which parent the student resembled, and general comments made by Card. Corresponding with this information is the date of the examination, the student's age, weight, height, the girth, depth and breadth of several body parts (such as knees, thighs, shoulders, etc.), the color of hair and eyes, temperament, and other facts.

The correspondence includes letters written to Card by former baseball and football players, including Arthur Bradsher, as well as copies of letters Card wrote. The athletics-related items include batting scores, etc. compiled by Card as well as writings he did, such as "Ben F. Few Makes the Greatest Outfield Catch" and "Three Greatest Plays Made by Trinity Men." He also wrote about Robert M. Gantt, a.k.a. "Big Bob."

The miscellany folders include a 1907-1908 map of Cambridge, MA (in the vicinity of Harvard College), event cards for the Trinity College Athletic Association's first field and track meet, a list of the strongest students in college in 1900 as well as other items related to the physical examination of Trinity students and athletic events, including a program for the first annual North Carolina Olympic Games in 1922. Also included are items related to Card's time at Harvard (including his own physical examination), the Raleigh Male Academy, the Franklinton Classical and Military Institute, Trinity College and Duke University, as well as clippings and some correspondence.

The State was a weekly survey of North Carolina, presented in magazine form. The issues in Card's collection include articles he wrote about athletics, including "Football Stars of By-gone Days," "No Hits and No Runs," and "Trinity vs. Carolina in 1898."

The scrapbook largely contains clippings and programs that relate to athletics at both Trinity College and Harvard and also includes the 1900 Trinity College commencement program as well as a program from the [President] McKinley Memorial Services (Mobile Theatre), September 1901. The pages are very fragile and the scrapbook should be handled with care.

The photographs include one oversized card-mounted photograph that is in need of repair as it is split into two pieces. The image is of the cast (of which Card's wife was a member) of an 1892 cantata called "Dream of Fairy Land." The program for the cantata can be found in the miscellany folder. The other photographs are largely card-mounted and include images of Card, his relatives, and athletic teams. Most are identified and some are dated.

The collection ranges in date from 1876-1943.

Collection

Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

Collection

W. D. Davies papers, 1911-2007 106.5 Linear Feet — 78 containers

W. D. (William David) Davies (1911-2001) was Professor of Biblical Theology at Duke University Divinity School from 1950 to 1955 and from 1966 to 1981 was George Washington Ivey Professor of Advanced Studies and Research in Christian Origins. The collection features correspondence, course materials, writings, subject files, sermon notes, books, and research notes of W. D. Davies. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The collection includes correspondence, research materials, teaching materials, photographs, and books. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The first series, containing multiple accessions, includes correspondence, manuscript materials, article reprints, student papers, lecture notes, course reading materials, sermon notes, student notebooks relating to courses taken at the University of Wales Memorial College in Brecon, general research subject files, research notes relating to teaching at Duke University, Columbia University, Princeton University, Union Theological Seminary, and Texas Christian University.

Accession UA2014-0065 contains personal and professional correspondence, scholarly materials and books from Davies' personal library. The collection also contains materials related to Davies' Feschrift, an honor celebrating Davies'contributions to the field of biblical theology.

Collection

Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

Collection
The collection consists of records relating to the academic, faculty, and institutional development of the University, as dealt with through this committee. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, agendas, proposals, and bound materials comprise this collection. Materials in this collection date from 1962 to 1973.
Collection

University Council records, 1952-1962 2.5 Linear Feet — 2500 Items

The creation of the University Council was recommended by the General Faculty's Commission on Faculty Reorganization and authorized by the Board of Trustees in a 1952 revision of the University Bylaws. The collection contains original typed minutes, printed summary minutes, committee records and reports, correspondence, memoranda, agenda, rosters, election results, and other records ranging in date from 1952-1962.

The collection contains original typed minutes, printed summary minutes, committee records and reports, correspondence, memoranda, agenda, rosters, election results, and other records ranging in date from 1952-1962.

Major subjects include appointment, tenure and promotion policies, group life and medical insurance, tuition awards for faculty children, and other fringe benefits, the summer session, admission and grading standards, student life and government, and athletics and academics. Also of interest are reports and discussions about desegregation, the Gross-Edens affair, the format and function of the Academic Council, and the faculty's role in the selection of a president and in the revision of the University's Bylaws.

Collection
The University Committee on Long Range Planning, formed in 1958, was set up to give administrative consideration to matters of educational programming and policy at Duke University. The Committee's first chairman was Paul M. Gross. Its name changed to the University Planning Committee in 1962. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, clippings, pamphlets, charts, projections, and books. It consists of records relating to the academic, faculty, and institutional development of the university. Major subjects include university planning administration, student life, institutional development, enrollment, admissions, and academic life. English.

The collection consists of records relating to the Committee on Long Range Planning's involvement with academic, faculty, and institutional development of the University. Correspondence, memoranda, reports, hand-written and typed minutes, clippings, pamphlets, charts, projections, books, comprise this collection. Materials range in date from 1958-1962. Although the majority of the materials were created by the Committee, some reference materials from other sources were collected by the Committee in relation to its work, including letters, reports, booklets and pamphlets about other schools and programs.

Major subjects include University and planning administration, student life (dormitories, athletics, and extracurricular activities), institutional development (philosophical beginnings and practical implementations), enrollment and admission (test data, alumni involvement, prediction equations and geographical distribution) and academic/intellectual life (graduate and undergraduate schools and departments, curriculum information and planning and faculty development).

This collection is divided into six (6) series: Minutes and Agendas, 1958-1962; Meeting Files, 1959-1961; Correspondence, 1958-1962; Reports and Recommendations, 1958-1962; and Reference Materials, 1958-1962; and Subcommittees and Committees, 1958-1962.

The Minutes and Agendas [1958-1962] series includes minutes, agendas, and summaries, and it chronicles the development of planning at the University. Meeting Files [1959-1961] is arranged chronologically and includes memos, letters, reports, booklets, bulletins, news clippings, and statistical information specifically discussed at meetings of the Committee. The materials in the meeting files, in some cases, can be matched against the materials delineated in the Committee minutes. The Committee met almost weekly during the academic year, from 1958-1962.

The Correspondence [1958-1962] represents the wide range of issues faced by the Committee. Primary correspondents consist of the President of the University, the Provost, faculty and staff members of the University, and expert professors and professionals from other universities; these include R. Taylor Cole, Marcus E. Hobbs, Paul M. Gross, A. Hollis Edens, Daryl J. Hart, Richard L. Predmore, Frank DeVyver, and Alan K. Manchester.

The Reports and Recommendations [1958-1962] series is arranged alphabetically. It includes reports and recommendations from academic and non-academic departments, graduate and professional schools, visiting experts on academic programs and departments, and University faculty and staff. Reference Materials [1958-1962] are arranged alphabetically. These folders contain reports, charts, pamphlets, and statistics collected by the Committee for use during its work.

The Subcommittees and Committees [1958-1962] series is arranged topically. The Long Range Planning Committee had a number of subcommittees, but this series includes reports, recommendations, correspondence and records of a few of these committees: the Committee on the Undergraduate Colleges, 1959-1960; the Committee on Faculty and Staff Improvement, 1960-1961; and the Committee on Professional and Graduate School, 1958-1962.

Collection
Online
The University Archives Web Archives Collection was compiled by University Archives staff beginning in 2010. The majority of the collection are Duke University-affiliated sites, either built on domains owned by the University or on external platforms by affiliated offices, departments, or organizations. Website snapshots include those of administrative offices, academic departments, athletic teams, public relations offices, publications, and student organizations. Also included are some websites related to individual faculty, controversies involving Duke community members, and web content related to student activism.

The University Archives Web Archive Collection consists of approximately website snapshots harvested between 2010 and the present. The majority of the collection are Duke University-affiliated sites, either built on domains owned by the University or on external platforms by affiliated offices, departments, or organizations.

The collection is arranged into eight series: Administration, Academics, Athletics, Public Relations, Student Organizations, Campus Controversies, Miscellaneous, Publications, and Student Activism. The Administration Series includes websites of Duke administrative offices and units. The Academics Series includes websites of academic colleges, departments, and programs, as well as research institutes, interdisciplinary programs, and materials related to faculty. The Athletics Series includes websites of the Duke Athletics program as well as student-run club athletics. The Public Relations Series includes websites related to Duke's communication with employees, the government, students, and the general public. The Student Organizations Series is the largest grouping in the collection, and includes websites of general interest groups, the Greek system, honors societies, selective living groups, arts organizations, political and social cause organizations, religious and cultural organizations, service organizations, and student government. The Campus Controversies Series includes websites collected about controversial events involving Duke and its student body. The Miscellaneous Series consists of several websites that do not fit into the above series.The Publications Series consists of the websites of various publications produced by Duke and Duke-affiliated organizations. The Student Activism series consists of websites, social media content, and individual blog posts and online articles related to various movements on campus led by students.

Due to the size of the collection, the techniques and tools of web harvesting, and the evolving nature of the Internet, some websites have been crawled more comprehensively than others and are represented more faithfully than others.

Collection

University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

Online
The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.

Collection
Formed in 1952, the Undergraduate Faculty Council (UFC) was responsible for the governance of undergraduate education at Duke University. The Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences succeeded the UFC in October 1971, when undergraduate education in engineering and nursing formed separate governing bodies. Collection includes minutes, memoranda, correspondence, questionnaires, reports of standing and ad hoc committees, and other papers pertaining to faculty oversight of undergraduate education. The bulk of the material consists of the records of the Subcommittee on Curriculum, a part of the Committee on Undergraduate Instruction. Other committees include Honors, Program II, the Faculty Advisory System, Residential Life, Study Abroad, Undergraduate Admissions, Financial Aid, and Academic Standards. One of the major accomplishments of the UFC was a report called "Varieties of Learning Experience," or the Krueger Report (1968), which led to major changes in the undergraduate course of study known as the "new curriculum." English.

Collection includes minutes, memoranda, correspondence, and questionnaires, reports of standing and ad hoc committees, and other papers pertaining to faculty oversight of undergraduate education. The bulk of the material consists of the records of the Subcommittee on Curriculum, a part of the Committee on Undergraduate Instruction. The Subcommittee's records feature the Krueger report, "Varieties of Learning Experience (1968), which led to the substantial changes in the undergraduate courses of study known as the "new curriculum." These files include results of a survey of faculty members and freshmen participating in small group learning experiences. The other major curriculum study is the Parker report (1960).

The Program II files contain material from the period after 1971, when the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences was formed. Records of the Supervisory Committee for the Faculty Advisory System include scattered minutes of the committee, memoranda, correspondence, and reports, as well as handbooks for faculty advisers from 1952 to 1964. A number of ad hoc and superseded committees' files are also in the collection.

Collection
The Duke University Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (UFCAS), established in 1971, guided undergraduate education in arts and sciences, adopted academic regulations and admissions policies, advised on financial aid and recognized academic achievement. It succeeded the Undergraduate Faculty Council after the body no longer included representatives from the engineering and nursing schools. In 1991, UFCAS voted to disband and reorganize as the Arts and Sciences Council. Records include bylaws, minutes, correspondence, memoranda, rosters, reports, and other records of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Most of the records were created by the UFCAS Committees, which included: Curriculum, Courses of Instruction, Honors, Study Abroad, Program II, Academic Standards, Advising, Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid, Residential Life, Freshman Year, Advanced Placement, Athletics and Recreation, Health Science Education, and Non-western Studies. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1991. English.

Records include bylaws, minutes, correspondence, memoranda, rosters, reports, and other records of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. The Program II files contain some identifiable student records and are regulated by FERPA. The records also contains materials from a prior body, the Undergraduate Faculty Council, which concern ongoing matters.

Collection

Thomas E. McCollough papers, 1965-1997 3 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Thomas McCollough was a professor of religion at Duke University from 1961-1997. His collection includes correspondence, memoranda, minutes, course materials, and other papers relating to the Religion Department, the Twentieth Century American Program, university-related committees, and other activities. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1997.

Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, minutes, course materials, and other papers and records with bulk dates 1983-1996. Major topics include the Department of Religion, the Twentieth Century America Program, and courses in ethics, community and public policy, along with materials concerning community service and related activities at Duke. While some files still contain student recommendations, student grades and social security numbers were destroyed.

Collection

Sydney Nathans collection, 1975-2018 and undated 3.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The papers in this collection include Duke history professor Sydney Nathans' documentation on the Richard Nixon Presidential Library debate, including his participation in Academic Council resolutions regarding the location of the library on Duke's campus; the Greensboro Massacre (1979), when the Ku Klux Klan murdered several people during a shoot-out at an Anti-KKK demonstration planned by the Communist Workers' Party; Nathans' copies of negatives and contact sheets from the Durham bicentennial photography project (1981 and undated); and materials used in the writing of his book A Mind to Stay, including original interviews, transcripts, and other research materials.

The Nixon Library papers contain correspondence (including that of Terry Sanford, and of the creator of the collection, Sydney Nathans); newspaper and magazine clippings as well as scholarly articles; text from speeches; official statements from groups opposing the Nixon Library; and Sydney Nathan's handwritten notes from a variety of meetings. Documents also include Nathan's research on existing presidential libraries.

The Greensboro Massacre papers contain flyers and other mailings and newsletters from the Communist Workers Party and other socialist organizations; mailings from Greensboro Justice Fund and other sympathetic groups following the massacre; media and press coverage of the massacre and the subsequent trials; a police report from Greensboro's police chief; academic and other literature researching the history of violence between the Communist and Klan organizations; and other miscellaneous materials.

The Durham Bicenntenial photography project relates to a project now held in the Durham Arts Council and consists of negatives and contact sheets for a photographic history of Durham assembled in 1981.

The A Mind to Stay Interviews and Transcripts contain materials used by Sydney Nathans in writing his book A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland, on the descendants of enslaved families forced to migrate from North Carolina to plantations in Greensboro, Alabama, and Tunica, Mississippi, in 1844, and the communities those families formed in the following years. Materials include recordings of interviews with residents of the two towns, Nathans' transcripts and extensive notes of those interviews, photos of interviewees and local landmarks, background material and research, the text of speeches and eulogies, and Nathans' personal correspondence with historians, editors, and Greensboro, Alabama, residents.

Collection

Sports Information Office: Photographic Negatives collection, circa 1924-1992, 1995, undated 23 Linear Feet — 20,122 items — The collection includes nitrate, acetate, and likely polyester film bases. The nitrate is housed in an off-site nitrate storage facility. There is evidence to suggest that some of the nitrate is undergoing degradation. Some of the acetate is also undergoing acetate film base degradation. Most of the negatives tend to be approximately 4x5 inches, but sizes can vary. There are also color negatives within the collection.

Online
Collection includes photographic negatives related to sports at Duke. Sports include the following: baseball, basketball, boxing, cheerleading, cross country, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, wrestling, and volleyball. There are also negatives that pertain to general athletics. The subjects of the negatives include athletes, coaches, team pictures, and game action. The collection ranges in date from 1924-1992, 1995, undated.

This collection contains 20,122 negatives related to sports at Duke, and they range in date from about 1924 to 1992, 1995 and undated. The sports represented are as follows: baseball, basketball, boxing, cheerleading, cross country, fencing, field hockey, football, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, wrestling, and volleyball. There is a series for general athletics, which tends to include images of physical education instructors or coaches from all sports. There is also a series called "Undetermined," which lists individuals for whom no sport or tie to athletes could be determined.

The subjects within each series include athletes, coaches, athletic staff (such as secretaries and trainers), team pictures, game shots, trophies, and athletic fields and facilities. The athletes may have been photographed in uniform, in suits, or in letterman sweaters. They may have been photographed with family and/or friends. Oftentimes, the athletes were posed in faux action shots.

There are not very many images of women athletes, but there are some available, including a small number of images of Women's Athletic Association members playing baseball (not softball), basketball, and tennis.

Collection

South Atlantic Quarterly records, 1926 - 1986 25 Linear Feet — 25000 Items

The South Atlantic Quarterly was founded in 1901 at Trinity College (later Duke University), and faculty from Trinity College and Duke University have served on its editorial board since its inception. The periodical, published by Duke University Press since 1930, began as a scholarly and literary journal about southern topics, and has since expanded to discuss national and international issues. The South Atlantic Quarterly Records consist mainly of correspondence regarding manuscript submissions and editing issues. Other materials include Board of Directors minutes, subject files, and content lists for individual issues of South Atlantic Quarterly. English.

The South Atlantic Quarterly Records consist mainly of correspondence regarding manuscript submissions and editing issues. Other materials include Board of Directors minutes, subject files, and content lists for individual issues of South Atlantic Quarterly. The materials date from the mid-1920s to the mid-1980s. The collection is organized according to accession number, from earliest to latest.

Collection
The Sanford School of Public Policy, originally called the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs, was established by on July 1, 1971, by then-President of Duke University Terry Sanford. This collection includes administrative records, promotional materials, and event-related materials from the Sanford School of Public Policy.

This collection includes administrative records, promotional materials, and event-related materials from the Sanford School of Public Policy. Administrative records include memoranda, meeting minutes, reports, working papers, publications, and other materials. These records also include some documents concerning the undergraduate program and may include some student materials. Promotional and event-related materials describe the school's curriculum, academic programs, faculty, research, and events, and include brochures, pamphlets, posters, newsletters, and audio and video recordings of lectures and panels.

Collection
Poet and librarian, of Washington, D.C. Also sister of Jay B. Hubbell, Professor of American Literature, Duke University. The Ruth Ann Hubbell papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, a small group of photographs, and folders of writings by Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell, and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Pictures, and Writings.

The Ruth Ann Hubbell Papers span the years from 1905 to 1986, with the bulk dating from 1926 to 1972. The collection consists mainly of correspondence between Ruth Ann Hubbell, her brother Jay Broadus Hubbell, and other members of the Hubbell family, but there are also some materials on the establishment of the Hubbell Center at Duke University, and some photographs and writings of Ruth Ann Hubbell, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Paul Edgar Hubbell (their brother), and other individuals. The collection is divided into six series: Clippings, Correspondence, Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography, Miscellany, Photographs, and Writings. These series are described fully below.

Collection

Robert T. Osborn papers, 1963-1967 0.25 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Robert Osborn was a Professor of Religion at Duke University. His collection includes clippings, correspondence and trial-related documents relating to a civil rights protest in Chapel Hill in January 1964.

Contains clippings, correspondence, subpoenas, summons and statements relating to a January 1964 civil rights demonstration in Chapel Hill, and subsequent trials in Hillsboro. Correspondence and court documents are photocopies.

Collection

Robert Taylor Cole papers, 1933-1991 2.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Robert Taylor Cole was a professor in Duke's Political Science department, specializing in comparative politics, Europe and the British Commonwealth and served as Provost to the University from 1960-1969. The collection includes correspondence, student recommendations, and writings. The material ranges in date from 1933-1991.

Contains correspondence, student recommendations, writings, a photo identification card from Heidelberg University (1933), and a dust jacket from "The Recollections of R. Taylor Cole." At least one letter (in box 1, miscellaneous writings folder) is in German. Also included is a folder which holds a few reports related to Duke University. Box 3 contains two bound volumes of both handwritten and typed letters sent to Cole in 1975, upon his retirement. The material ranges in date from 1933-1991.

Collection

Robert S. Rankin papers, 1957-1973 67.6 Linear Feet — 17,000 Items

Robert S. Rankin was a professor of Political Science at Duke University and member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. Collection documents Rankin's work on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1960-1973 and consists of agendas and minutes for the monthly meetings of the commission, 1959-1973, and material on special meetings; memoranda, correspondence, statements, and news clippings dealing with the operational aspects of the commission; background studies; transcripts of proceedings; news clippings from fact finding investigations, 1960-1973; statements of commissioners; and transcripts of testimony before congressional committees. The commission's areas of study included education, employment, political participation, housing and urban development, administration of justice, public accommodations, health and welfare, federal programs, minority groups, federal enforcement, and civil liberties and human rights.

Collection documents Rankin's work on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1960-1973 and consists of agendas and minutes for the monthly meetings of the commission, 1959-1973, and material on special meetings; memoranda, correspondence, statements, and news clippings dealing with the operational aspects of the commission; background studies; transcripts of proceedings; news clippings from fact finding investigations, 1960-1973; statements of commissioners; and transcripts of testimony before congressional committees. The commission's areas of study included education, employment, political participation, housing and urban development, administration of justice, public accommodations, health and welfare, federal programs, minority groups, federal enforcement, and civil liberties and human rights.

An addition (2001-0047) contains 27 loose black-and-white prints and 2 binders containing 89 black-and-white prints, as well as 35 items of correspondence (1963-1977) relating to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Includes group pictures of the commissioners and other political figures (1960-1969) and photographs from the National Conference on Equal Opportunity in Federally Assisted Programs (1965) and an Open Hearing in Jackson, Mississippi (1965). The open hearing includes a list of witnesses. Those represented in the photographs include Burke Marshall, Hubert H. Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, Sheriff Jack Purvis, Charles Evers, Aaron Henry, Spottswood Robinson, and Roy Wilkins.

Collection
Robert Stanley Rankin (1899-1976) taught political science at Duke beginning in 1927 and was chairman of the political science department from 1949 to 1964. He retired from teaching in 1969. The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science. English.

The collection includes departmental records, correspondence, reports, notes, student papers, questionnaires, publications, and other materials of Robert S. Rankin and the Duke University Department of Political Science, circa 1927-1977.

Collection

Robert R. Wilson papers, 1921 - 1975 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Robert Renbert Wilson served as a professor of political science at Duke University from 1925 to 1975. He also acted as chair of the Dept. of Political Science (1934-1948), Director of Graduate Studies (1937-1947, 1949-1966), lecturer in the Law School (1948-1966), and chair of the Commonwealth Studies Center (1959-1966) at Duke University, and as an adviser on commercial treaties to the U.S. State Department. The Robert R. Wilson Papers primarily consist of correspondence, but the collection also contains writings, teaching materials, subject files, and photographs. Major subjects include American politics and government, treaties, international law, political theory, and the American Journal of International Law. English.

The Robert R. Wilson papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Writings, Courses, Subject Files, and Photographs. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence dealing with Wilson's speaking engagements, professional associations, books and publications, and students and colleagues in law and political science at Duke and at institutions across the United States. Major correspondents include the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Dept. of State, the American Journal of International Law, the Commonwealth Studies Center, and university presses. Writings include articles, book reviews, addresses, and other pieces written by Wilson about obligatory arbitration, treaties, African American suffrage, international law, public law, international organization, World War II, the British Commonwealth, the United Nations, and U.S. foreign relations. The Courses series includes syllabi, exams, class case studies, and other materials relating to Wilson's classes in American politics and government, and in international law. Subject Files include reports, articles written about Robert R. Wilson, students' evaluations of Wilson's courses, and other materials. Photographs include a group photo of the Intercollegiate Model Disarmament Conference (Bucknell University, Dec. 4-6, 1931); an unidentified, undated group photo; and an unidentified, undated portrait of a female subject.

Collection

Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

Collection

Richard L. Watson, Jr. papers, 1941 - 1989 19 Linear Feet — 14,500 Items

Richard L. Watson, Jr. served as Professor of History at Duke University (1939-1984), Chair of the Department of History (1960-1967), Chair of the Academic Council (1964-1966, 1975-1977), and associate editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly (1974-1987). Papers include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, course evaluations, research files, and manuscript drafts of chapters, and involve Watson's work with the Army Air Force Historical Office, the History Department, Duke University, professional organizations, research and writings in American history and historiography, and personal materials. English.

The materials in this collection consist of the papers of Richard L. Watson, Jr. accrued between 1941 and 1989. The majority of the collection pertains to his work at Duke University, both in the department of history and in service to university faculty and administration. There are also papers relating to his writings and research, his work in the Army Air Force Historical Office, professional organizations, and personal life. Types of materials include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, teacher course evaluations, chapter files and draft chapters.

Collection
Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

Collection

Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

Collection

Research Council records, 1925 - 1992 13 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

The Research Council, also called the University Council on Research, was established at Duke University in 1934, to support faculty research by providing professional travel funding, publication subvention, and research grants. Until 1978, it prepared the annual bibliography of faculty publications (no longer published). The Research Council was later renamed the Arts & Sciences Committee on Faculty Research. The Research Council Records include reports, minutes, memoranda, correspondence, summaries, and faculty publications lists (1934-1976), pertaining to research projects and support for Duke University faculty. Materials range in date from 1925 to 1992. English.

The Research Council Records include reports, minutes, memoranda, correspondence, summaries, and faculty publications lists (1934-1976), pertaining to research projects and support for Duke University faculty.

Collection
Online
The President's Committee to Address Discrimination in the Classroom (PCADC) was created in April 1988 to address allegations of discrimination at Duke and offer recommendations on how to reduce or eliminate this discrimination. PCADC issued their final report in February 1989. The President's Committee to Address Discrimination in the Classroom records include the results of a student survey to assess discrimination, descriptive statistics, PCADC's final report, and other materials.

The collection includes materials related to the work of the President's Commission to Address Discrimination in the Classroom (PCADC), particularly the results of the student survey conducted by the Commission. Included are completed surveys, compiled survey descriptive statistics, correspondence among PCADC, research materials, responses from other universities on discrimination policies, and copies of the final report. Survey responses and data do not include personally identifying information.

Collection
The President's Advisory Committee on Resources was established by President H. Keith H. Brodie in the summer of 1989 following a recommendation of the Academic Council's Task Force on University Governance. Its predecessor was the University Committee on Resources (1988-1989). PACOR was a broad-based committee, chaired by a faculty member, which advised the President on the allocation of the University's financial, human and physical resources. Material includes minutes, reports, handouts, correspondence, memoranda, spiral-bound publications, diskettes, microcassettes and standard cassettes. Materials range in date from 1988-1995.

Material includes minutes, reports, handouts, correspondence, memoranda, spiral-bound publications, diskettes (floppy disks), microcassettes and standard cassettes. Materials range in date from 1988-1995.

Collection
Philip Stewart is a professor emeritus of Romance Studies at Duke University. Stewart served on the Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was convened by Duke’s Academic Council in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Library Subcommittee, and include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, who initiated the Nixon Library proposal in August 1981; correspondence from Duke faculty and trustees; press clippings; Academic Council meeting minutes; and the Library Subcommittee’s report to the Academic Council. The collection also contains research and reports from the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, another group formed in the wake of the Nixon Library proposal.

Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Duke University Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was formed in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials also include research of the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, formed at the same time, which was to examine the authority of the university president and the faculty’s role in making decisions at the university.

The materials include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, faculty, and trustees; press clippings; minutes of Academic Council meetings between August-November 1981; research, drafts, and the final report from the Library Subcommittee; and research and reports related to the Governance Subcommittee. The collection also contains documents regarding the Faculty Compensation Committee and some press coverage of the opening of the Richard Nixon Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California, in 1990.

Collection
Peter H. Wood is Professor Emeritus in the Dept. of History at Duke University. The collection consists of documentation related to the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981.

This collection contains correspondence, flyers, clippings, and other documents regarding the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981. The documentation was created and/or collected by Dept. of History Professor, Peter H. Wood, and demonstrates the divisiveness of this controversy as well as the opinions of Duke faculty members regarding the Nixon library.

Collection
Peter Klopfer is a Professor in the Department of Biology (previously known as Zoology). This collection contains ledger books and information relating to grants and research proposals, ranging in date from 1957-1971.

Contains materials from the many grants Professor Klopfer received to fund his animal-behavior research. Included are ledger books, correspondence, research and grant paperwork, including applications. The collection ranges in date from 1957-1971.

Collection
Online
Contains the personal and professional records of Paul Magnus Gross, a Duke University administrator, researcher, educator, and scholar. Gross was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). The Paul M. Gross Chemistry Laboratory was named in his honor. Gross was also an independent consultant with the United States Army and various commercial companies. Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Major subjects include Duke University, the Graduate School, the Department of Chemistry, University Council, the Board of Trustees, University Research Council, Duke University administration, University Committee on Long-Range Planning, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, study and teaching of physical sciences, military training, war education, munitions development, United States Navy, United States Army, Office of Ordnance Research, universities in the southern United States, and the Gross-Edens controversy. Major correspondents include J. Deryl Hart, Robert Lee Flowers, Douglas M. Knight, Marcus Hobbs, Charles E. Jordan, and Arthur Hollis Edens. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Paul M. Gross. Gross served as a leader of many national scientific organizations. At Duke University, he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. Box 43 was added to the finding aid 8 March 2007 and is unprocessed.

Collection
Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

Collection
Parents@Duke was created in 2002 by members of the faculty and staff to advocate for improved policies and work culture for people with family responsibilities. The collection includes meeting notes, reports, correspondence, research, flyers, and other materials related to the activities of Parents@Duke.

The collection includes meeting notes, reports, correspondence, research, flyers, and other materials related to the activities of Parents@Duke. The materials document goal-setting discussions and advocacy efforts of the group with University administration as well as events and outreach.

Collection

Otto Meier, Jr., records and papers, 1931 - 1979 20.5 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

Otto Meier, Jr., (1908-1979), professor emeritus of electrical engineering, taught at Duke University from 1934 to 1975. Meier's specialties were electrical machinery and control, illumination, explosives, nucleonics, and experimental nuclear physics. Meier was active in the Southeastern Electric Exchange; the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca. 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975); and the Engineers Club (Durham, N.C.). Meier was a consultant engineer with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab and helped to plan the facility. The collection contains correspondence, lecture and course notes, photographs, reports, minutes, newsletters, slides, lantern slides, black-and-white negatives, and other materials pertaining to professional organizations, regional utilities, faculty and university affairs, curriculum, and other subjects related to the College of Engineering, engineering student organizations, and the domestic use of nuclear power. English.

The Otto Meier, Jr., Records and Papers is divided into eight major series: Personal and Biographical Files; General Subject Files; Duke University; School of Engineering; Organizations; Papers and Articles; Photos and Slides; and the records of the Tau Beta Pi.

The Personal and Biographical Files Series contains Meier's Ph.D. thesis; texts of his lectures and addresses; materials documenting conferences he attended; and materials used on his trips as a Duke University Admissions Office representative to regional high schools. Also, in this series are very extensive files on the courses Meier taught at Duke. These files include detailed notes, projects, tests, solutions to test questions, and course evaluations.

The General Subject Files mainly contain correspondence, memoranda, and reports that document Meier's committee work at Duke. There is considerable material on the Faculty Club and on ROTC, and a minor amount on early computers at Duke. There are documents (agendas, papers, and programs) that deal with the activities of the Southeastern Electric Exchange, a regional utilities group, whose meetings Meier frequently attended.

The Duke University Series consists mainly of minutes and memoranda of the University Council/Academic Council (1953-1973); the Graduate Faculty and its executive committee; the University Faculty (1953-1973); and the University Faculty Council/Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (1967-1972). One binder contains minutes, correspondence, reports, and budgets of the Duke University Church and its Board (1953-1956). There are several folders of University memoranda on a variety of topics (1935-1942).

The School of Engineering Series contains the minutes and related papers of the School of Engineering, known as the College of Engineering until 1966. It includes materials from the Engineering Administrative Council (1968-1974), Engineering Faculty (1953-1974), and the Engineering Faculty Council (1947-1974). In some cases the accounts and comments are more detailed than those in the published minutes. This series also has general information on topics such as administrators; articles and papers by Duke University faculty and students; the Board of Visitors; the engineering building, former faculty, and research and development.

The Dept. of Electrical Engineering is an important subseries within the School of Engineering Series. It contains files on curriculum (1953-1954), minutes of the graduate faculty (1963-1964), and "status reports" from the years 1957, 1962, and 1967. This includes compilations of staff rosters, course descriptions, vitae, and available facilities. There is a sizeable collection of folders entitled "Staff," (1953-1954), that contain minutes of the electrical engineering faculty meetings, memoranda, reports, and other papers on general policies.

The Organizations Series contains correspondence, newsletters, minutes of regional conferences for twenty different organizations. The largest collections concern the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (ca. 1933-1963); Delta Epsilon Sigma (ca 1931-1946); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ca. 1963-1971); and the campus chapter of Tau Beta Pi (ca. 1948-1975). There are also extensive materials from the Durham, N.C., Engineers Club (ca. 1944-1974), in which Meier was an active member. Some organizations are represented by only a few items retained by Meier. There are two folders on Phi Beta Kappa at Duke (1962) and Sigma Xi (ca. 1939-1974).

The Papers and Articles Series includes addresses and papers given by others at various engineering conferences in the 1950-1960s. Of note are the papers from the Southeastern Electric Exchange on technical, electrical, and electronics subjects. Included are speeches by officials of utility companies on nuclear power in its early days.

The Photographs and Slides Series illustrates the life of engineering students in the 1930s; the engineering building (Southgate) and laboratory on East Campus; West Campus; and the construction of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. There are lantern slides that contain diagrams of nuclear particle processes, schematics for a Van de Graaff accelerator, and photographs of the installation of the 4MeV Van de Graaff in the nuclear facility of the Physics Dept. There are also 3 and 1/2 inch x 5 inch slides for a presentation on "Electric Power Utilities - Trends and Nuclear Outlook."

The slides are fragile. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

The Tau Beta Pi Series contains material from the North Carolina Gamma Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national engineering honorary, established at Duke University on Jan. 10, 1948. The material contains banquet initiation programs (1949-1970), correspondence, bulletins, and printed material on the history, purpose, constitution, and other aspects of Tau Beta Pi. It includes two large bound volumes, "Book of the Chairman of the Advisory Board," (1948-1950, 1950-1958). There is also a large amount of material on the National Convention of 1960. Access to Boxes 17-18 is RESTRICTED: Student Records.

Collection
Contains the records of the Order of Red Friars, a senior men's secret honorary society, founded in 1913 at Trinity College (now Duke University). Types of materials include minutes, a constitution, policy and procedure statements, history statement, rituals, correspondence, financial records, invitations, photographs, membership and alumni lists and cards, newspaper clippings, reports, stationery, initiation plans, and descriptions of projects. There is one artifact, a "Featherweight Pocket Seal" (with accompanying leather case) which bears the Red Friars' seal. Major subjects include secret societies, honorary societies, student life at Duke University, male students, student government, initiation, social activities of students, the honor code, student participation in Duke University administration, and student activities during World War II. Some people associated with the Order of Red Friars include Rex Adams, Arthur Hollis Edens, Herbert J. Herring, Furman McLarty, Raymond Nasher, Richard M. Nixon, and William H. Wannamaker. Materials date from 1913 to 1971.

Contains the records of the Order of Red Friars, a senior men's secret honorary society at Duke University, founded in 1913. Constitutions, policies, correspondence, tapping ceremony materials, and minutes outline the influential activities of the Red Friars from about 1913-1971. Materials are ordered by subject; some gaps occur between 1943 and 1948 due to World War II. An index of members is also included.

Collection

Olav K. Lundeberg papers, circa 1940s- 0.25 Linear Feet — 12 Items

Olav K. Lundeberg taught at Duke in the Dept. of Romance Languages from 1931-1948. This collection includes photographs, a bulletin, and a guest log from social events hosted by Lundeberg and his wife.

The collection includes a copy of the 1949 February "Bulletin of Duke University: School of Spanish Studies," photographs, and a guest log of social events hosted by Lundeberg and his wife.

Collection
Contains memoranda, correspondence, budgets, reports, agreements, financial information, organizational records and other printed matter from the Office of the Vice President for Business and Finance. Records concern Duke University, its various academic departments, organizations, and benefactors, including the Medical Center. These records were created by Vice President for Business and Finance Gerhard Henricksen (1962-1966) and his successor Charles B. Huestis (1966-1985), and provide a detailed account of the university's financial status. Major topics include the university's relationship with the Duke Endowment and Local Unions 77 and 465, Medical Center construction;, university properties, physical plant, and facilities renovations, national professional organizations, several university committees, the Board of Trustees, the Duke University Athletic Association, WDBS campus radio station, the Duke Vigil, Duke University Marine Lab, Huestis' personal interests and affiliations, and the departments of the Business and Finance Division (including Housing, Data Processing and the Computation Center, Accounting, Dining Halls, Personnel, Materials Support, Safety and Traffic, TelCom, and Utilities), and the University Architect. Major correspondents include University Architect, University Council, Business Manager, Corporate and University Controllers, Terry Sanford, William G. Anlyan, A. Kenneth Pye, Richard L. Jackson, J. Peyton Fuller, John Adcock. English.

Contains memoranda, correspondence, budgets, reports, agreements, financial information, organizational records and other printed matter pertaining to the financial status Duke University's academic departments, organizations, benefactors, and Medical Center. Major topics include Duke University's relationship with the Duke Endowment and Local Unions 77 and 465, the Internal Audit Office, the Chancellor's Office, the Board of Trustees, Medical Center construction, university properties, parking, the physical plant, facilities renovations, the Environmental Concerns Committee, Research Triangle Park, Research Triangle Institute, highway development, the Duke University Athletic Association, WDBS campus radio station, Duke University Marine Lab, Duke Forest, Charles B. Huestis, C. G. Henricksen, the American Dance Festival, business auxiliaries, departments of the Business and Finance Division (including Housing, Data Processing and the Computation Center, Accounting, Dining Halls, Personnel, Materials Support, Safety and Traffic, Utilities, and the TelCom division), the Duke Vigil, and the University Architect. Major correspondents include University Architect, University Council, Business Manager, Corporate and University Controllers, Terry Sanford, William G. Anlyan, and A. Kenneth Pye. Subject files are arranged alphabetically.

Collection
The Office of the University Secretary at Duke University was established by by-law in 1903. The Office evolved with the University and the roles and responsibilities likely shifted from person to person. Today's Office most likely began in 1941 with Charles Jordan. The Secretary is an officer of the University and reports directly to the President. A major role of the Secretary's Office is to coordinate affairs of the Board of Trustees. Records include correspondence with Trustees and Presidents, Honorary Degrees and Search Committees for high-level administrators, reports, volunteer directories, faculty data and photographs, questionnaires and University by-laws. Some materials have been transferred to the Board of Trustees collection.

The Office of the University Secretary's records includes correspondence, reports, volunteer directories, faculty data and photographs, questionnaires, and University by-laws.

Collection

Norman Guttman papers, 1952-1982 1.5 Linear Feet — 850 Items

Dr. Norman Guttman taught in the Department of Psychology from 1951 until his death in 1984. The collection contains correspondence from 1952-1982.

Contains a mixture of personal, political and professional correspondence, the latter being usually scholarly in nature, with some evaluations of grant proposals and recommendations. The folder on the Nixon Library controversy contains correspondence and printed matter, with a few petitions and name-and-address blanks from contributors to the opposition to the Library, in which Guttman was instrumental. The collection ranges in date from 1952-1982.

Collection

Nora Campbell Chaffin papers, 1835-1981 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Nora Chaffin was on the history faculty at Duke University from 1935-1944. Her collection contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.