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Frances D. Acomb papers, 1953 - 1975 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Frances D. Acomb (1907-1984) served as a professor of history at Duke University from 1945 to 1975. She specialized in French history. The Acomb papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan; as well as the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors, the American Association of University Women, and other professional organizations. English.

The papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of modern European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan. Acomb's memberships in the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors and the American Association of University Women are documented through minutes and other materials.

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The purpose of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. The collection includes correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the American Association of University Professors from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. English.

Correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the AAUP from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. Series 1 consists of correspondence relating to concerns expressed to the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure (Committee A), along with a few reports. Series 2 is made up of the Proceedings noted below. Series 3 appears to be the correspondence files from the office of the Association's President, but there are no folder titles and no apparent order.

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Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated 15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items

Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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James Applewhite papers, 1963-2010 13 Linear Feet — 9825 Items

James Applewhite is a poet and professor emeritus of English at Duke University. The collection is comprised of manuscripts, drafts, and proofs of poems, as well as notes, correspondence, clippings, and printed materials (including serials and anthologies). The collection documents Applewhite's work as a poet and professor of English at Duke University, including his research about Wordsworth. Manuscripts in the collection include Lessons in Soaring: Poems, A History of the River: Poems, and River Writing: An Eno Journal.
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Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995 112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items

Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

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Katharine M. Banham papers, 1910-1995 26 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Katharine May Banham (1897-1995) served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Duke University from 1946 to 1967, specializing in child psychology and development. Papers include correspondence, writings, speeches, case files and research notes, teaching materials, diaries, memorabilia, photographs, and oral history interviews of Katharine M. Banham, relating to her work in the field of psychology and her contributions to Duke University, Durham, and North Carolina. Prominent subjects include psychological experimentation, child psychology, geriatrics and gerontology, human social and emotional development, children with cerebral palsy, the Woman's College, Duke Preschool, Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, the North Carolina Psychological Association, the Durham Child Guidance Clinic, and the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. English.

The Katharine May Banham Papers span the years between 1910 and 1995, with the bulk occurring between 1945 and 1984. These papers include her master's theses and dissertation work, professional and academic writings, case files, and data documenting psychological experiments that culminated in the development of tests, as well as research articles and one monograph; transcripts of talks and addresses; translations of French psychological texts, teaching materials; administrative records of and records documenting her role in various civic and academic clubs and organizations; professional and personal correspondence; and personal materials including art, photographs, memorabilia, poetry and other personal writings, diaries, biographical information, legal documents, and tapes and transcripts of an oral history interview done in 1980. The main subject areas include Banham's contribution to the profession, her participation in the Duke community, and the Durham community as well as regional, national, and international communities and agencies.

The collection chiefly reflects Banham's career as a woman psychologist during a period when there was little support for women in professional or academic careers. The papers document Banham's research and teaching in three countries; her contributions in the areas of child psychology and geriatrics, particularly human social and emotional development; functioning and development of children with cerebral palsy and disabilities; the history and especially the development of psychological testing of children and adults; and parapsychological phenomena. Research and teaching materials are located within the Academic and Professional Psychology series and Duke Activities series. Materials relevant to Banham's professional development are scattered throughout all five series.

The collection is also important for the perspective it offers on the Duke University Psychology Department and the Woman's College during the 1940s to the 1960s. Information related to both as well as her role in the Admissions and scholarships Committees among other faculty committees (see the folder list located in the description of Duke Activities series), the Duke Preschool, the Duke Film Society, and the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement can be found primarily in the Duke Activities series. Material regarding the development and teaching of an infant and child psychology curriculum and a series of correspondence with graduate students are also of special interest and can be found in the Duke Activities series. Other materials relating to her contributions to the Duke Community are located in the Academic and Professional Psychology series, the Correspondence series, and the Personal Files series.

Banham's contribution to the city of Durham is reflected in the Agency and Club Participation series with the most in depth materials relating to her role in establishing the French Club, the Photographic Arts Society, the Altrusa Club, and the Committee for Successful Aging (which became the Golden Age Society and finally, the Coordinating Council for Senior Citizens), and, to a lesser degree, in the Academic and Professional Psychology series specifically in her role as one of the founding psychologists of the Durham Child Guidance Clinic. Banham co-founded the North Carolina Psychological Association in addition to being an active member and officer of other regional, national, and international organizations such as the League of Women Voters, the American Association of University Women, and the International Council of Women Psychologists.

Banham's life was defined by her professional and academic commitments and so her closest relationships were with her colleagues and the many individuals to whom she gave her time and the benefit of her professional skills. The Correspondence and personal series best reflect her tireless efforts on behalf of the people with whom she come into contact. Her papers are particularly useful as they document the period of the 1920s through the 1960s in England, Canada, and especially the United States from the perspective of a highly educated, professional woman.

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Charles A. Baylis papers, 1924-1973 4.5 Linear Feet — 3600 Items

Charles A. Baylis was a professor of philosophy at Duke University from 1952-1970. This collection contains the correspondence, writings, personal papers, and departmental records. The material ranges in date from 1924-1973, bulk from 1950-1970.

This collection is organized into two series, correspondence and personal papers, and covers the years from 1924 to 1973. The bulk of the material is personal correspondence between Baylis and colleagues at other universities. Other material includes papers relating to groups and organizations that Baylis belonged to, course exams and syllabi, and essays he wrote. Notable in this collection is Baylis' Masters Thesis (1924) and a tenure case involving a colleague at the University of Washington (1948).

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Lucius A. Bigelow (1892-1973) served as a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University from 1929 to 1961. Papers of Lucius A. Bigelow include correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs during his career as a professor of chemistry at Brown University and Duke University. Major subjects within the papers are fluorine chemistry, organic chemistry, chemistry education, and research conducted for the Manhattan Project, the Office of Naval Research, and the Army Research Office. Professional correspondents include H. S. Booth, Henry Gilman, and William A. Noyes. English.

Records produced by Lucius A. Bigelow throughout his career as a professor of chemistry both at Brown University and Duke University. Materials are present from 1915 to 1973. The bulk of the records consist of correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs. The majority of the material pertains to Bigelow's time at Duke University however, there is some material stemming from his tenure at Brown University.

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Hugo Leander Blomquist was professor and chair of the Botany Department at Duke University from 1921-1957. The collection includes correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret during the 1920s and during H.L. Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I, class notes, North Carolina maps, as well as drawings and photographs of his book The Grasses of North Carolina. The collection ranges in date from 1912-2000.

Collection contains personal and professional correspondence of Hugo L. Blomquist from the years 1912 to 1961. Correspondence includes letters to his brother during Blomquist's service in the Army during World War I as well as correspondence between H.L. Blomquist and his wife Margaret Mordecai Blomquist before and after their marriage. Also includes materials related to Blomquist's time in the Army, citizenship process, maps, notes, and oversize illustrations and photographs associated with the publication of his book Grasses of North Carolina. Illustrations were removed from acidic paper wrapping and boxed for preservation.

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Allan H. Bone papers, 1944 - 1989 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Allan H. Bone (1917-1992) spent nearly forty years in the Duke University Department of Music. He served as professor of music, chair of the department, and conductor of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners. English.

The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners.