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Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

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Abortion Conversation Project records, 2000-2008 2.2 Linear Feet — 1600 Items

The Abortion Conversation Project was founded in 2000 to create strategies to challenge the stigma surrounding abortion. ACP was originally conceived as the 501(c)(3) sister to the National Coalition for Abortion Providers, a lobbying and trade organization for independent abortion providers. In July 2008, both organizations joined forces to form the Abortion Care Network. General administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes general administrative, financial, programmatic, and educational records; correspondence; founding documents; records of the board of directors; and files from Peg Johnston, co-founder of the Abortion Conversation Project. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

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Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

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Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

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Advertising Ephemera collection, 1850s-1980s 35 Linear Feet — 9,279 items

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. The collection is divided into broad subject categories, based on the primary type of product or service being advertised, which are arranged in alphabetical order. Within each subject category material is divided based upon the form of the material; leaflets, letters, and sheets printed on both sides; trade cards (mechanical, metamorphic, see-thru, shape, fabric inserts, unusual feature, postcards and insert cards); booklets; special categories; and miscellaneous. A subseries of foreign advertising material consists predominately of travel related literature and is arrange alphabetically by country. The arrangement of oversize materials parallels the original arrangement.

The researcher should note that trade catalogs that are pamphlets may be found in several places in the Perkins Library: this collections; individually in the stacks as fully cataloged items; or as part of groups of old pamphlets for which the cataloging was by main entry only. Advertising broadsides may also be found in the Broadsides Collection and many collections of manuscripts also contain advertising materials.

Some useful reference sources for gathering further information on this type of material include:

Romaine, Lawrence B., "A Guide to American Trade Catalogs," 1944-1900 (New York, 1960).

Hammond, Dorothy, "Advertising Collectibles of Times Past," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1974).

Kaduck, John M., "Advertising Trade Cards," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1976).

McQuarry, Jim, "Collectors Guide to Advertising Cards," (Gas City, Indiana, 1975).

Additions to the collection have not been processed and therefore to do reflect the arrangement of the rest of the collection. Please refer to the detailed description below for more information about their content.

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Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

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The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Ailecia Ruscin is a writer, activist, and scholar from San Antonio, Texas and Auburn, Alabama. She is the author or co-author of the zines provo-CAT-ive and alabama grrrl (published from 1997-2000).

The collection consists of 552 zines, collected by the donor between 1994 and 2001. The collection focuses on personal zines by women, politics, the punk music scene, social justice activism, and riot grrrl. Many of the zines are accompanied by correspondence with the donor. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.