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Collection
Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patteson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village." Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was a British actress, writer, and abolitionist. She was born into a theater family; her acting career spanned the years 1829-1868. Kemble acted to support herself, but she was most passionate about writing, and was an accomplished playwright, poet, and diarist. She married the Pierce Mease Butler, an American who subsequently inherited his family' plantations. After spending time in Georgia, Kemble became an abolitionist and later divorced her husband. In 1863, Kemble published her anti-slavery memoir, Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839, which is said to have influenced the British against supporting the Confederacy in the Civil War. Kemble's own family was divided on that issue, as her elder daughter sided with her mother, while her younger daughter returned to Georgia with her father. Frances Butler Leigh published Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War (1883) as a rebuttal to her mother's memoir. Kemble's success as a Shakespearean actress enabled her to buy a cottage in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her correspondent, Miss Patteson, is the daughter of Frances Duke Patteson, a niece of the poet Samuel Coleridge Taylor; the Lord Coleridge mentioned in the letter is John Duke Coleridge (1820-1894), the 2nd Lord Chief Justice of England. Bishop Patteson refers to Miss Patteson's sister, John Patteson (1827-1871), who became an Anglican martyr after being killed doing mission work in the Solomon Islands.

Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patterson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village."

Collection
The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

Collection
Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.
Collection
Collection comprises a 35-page memorandum book maintained by the Haulsey family of London, England, from 1646-1846. The memoranda usually record marriages, births, christenings, deaths, and burials, but there are also separate notes on family genealogy, as well as a few notes on land tenancy transfers, and money lent and received. There is one record regarding numbers of silver trays and candlesticks. Volume entries are handwritten on varying types of paper, and are not in chronological order. The volume also features an embroidered binding and a metal-clasp closure with initials G.W. (one clasp is missing). The embroidery includes images of day and night, as well as a dog, monkey, church, house, windmill, swallow, snail, and various plants and flowers.
Collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

Collection
Hannah Hutchinson married Samuel Mather in 1731; the couple settled in Boston, Mass. She died in 1781 (some sources have the death date 1752) and Samuel died in 1779. Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection
Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Eleanor "Elly" Elliott was a women's rights activist, a board member of NOW's Legal Defense and Education Fund, a Barnard College Board Member, served on the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs and was an editor at Vogue magazine. These materials consist of personal papers from the Elliott family and administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities. It also includes photographs, scrapbooks and some audio/visual materials.

These papers consist of personal materials from the Elliott and Thomas families as well as administrative files from Elliott's work in various women's rights organizations and philanthropic activities.

The collection includes some material regarding Elly's husband, Jock Elliott, former chairman of the Ogilvy and Mather advertising firm. Included in the Thomas family materials is a series on Eleanor's mother, Dorothy Q. Thomas. In the legal and financial papers series, there are materials pertaining to the divorce and child support matters of Elliott's brother, James A. Thomas Jr.

The collection contains scrapbooks and photographs, as well as reel-to-reel audiotapes that require reformatting before use.

Collection
In the late 18th century, Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), also known as the Ladies of Llangollen, left their lives in the upper tiers of Anglo-Irish society and made a home for themselves in Llangollen, Wales, to the disapproval of both their families. Butler and Ponsonby appeared to have understood their relationship as a marriage, and they were known for dressing alike in masculine clothing. They were part of an emerging culture of 'romantic friendship' between same-sex couples. While they lived a life of rural retreat, the Ladies' relative celebrity and social status meant that their home Plas Newydd became a salon. They hosted the many of the intelligensia of the day, including poets such as Wordsworth and Byron, and the reigning Queen Charlotte. The collection is largely made up of letters by the Ladies, as well as materials about Llangollen, the cultural haven of Plas Newydd, and images of the Ladies in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Ladies of Llangollen Collection is made up of materials both by and about Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby's life at their home, Plas Newydd, in Llangollen, Wales.

The largest part of the collection is the letters written by and to the Ladies. Most of the correspondence takes place between Sarah Ponsonby and her cousin Mrs. Sarah Tighe, along with letters from Eleanor Butler, their neighbor Ch. L. West, and the Fownes family, Sarah Ponsonby's cousins and former guardians. The manuscripts include poems by the Ladies, as well as an account written about the Ladies of Llangollen by Ch. L. West and an album by a visitor to Llangollen. The papers contain items and images of the Ladies of Llangollen, Llangollen Vale, and the traditions of Wales in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Guidebooks, maps, and printed materials make up the materials about the history of the Ladies' beloved Llangollen. The images of the Ladies and their home in Llangollen Vale make up the largest part of the image files.

Collection

Chevalier d'Eon papers, 1778-1779 1.0 Linear Foot — 8 items

Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste André Timothée d'Eon de Beaumont, known as Chevalier d'Eon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War. Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War.

Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War. The seven items are wrapped in a blue paste-paper wrapper. The first item is a collection of 35 commissions and supporting documents from diplomats, military officers and French, Russian or English ministers, testifying to Eon's qualities and his activity in the secret services for 20 years, including the peace mission to the court of Russia (1755-1756); a mission to Vienna carrying the campaign plan of the Russian army and revelation of a secret Russian-Prussian correspondence, along with another mission to Russia (1757); commission as secretary of the French embassy at the court of Russia, after having contributed to the success of four treaties (1757-1759); commission as aide-de-camp of maréchal de Broglie in Germany (1760-1762); secretary of the French Embassy in Great Britain, for the conclusion of peace (1762); resident, then Minister Plenipotentiary in London (1763); refusal of proposals to communicate particulars and papers relative to the peace to the opponents of the court of St. James (1764-1765); followed by a Franco-British plan for the Mexican and Peruvian uprisings against Spain (1766-1768) for the Spanish ambassador in London; against the accusations of venality and corruption by the Court of France by the Princess of Wales and the English ministers (1769-1770); secret correspondence with Louis XV, the Prince de Conti, the Comte de Broglie, all ending in a promise of a life annuity from Louis XV.

The second item is a brief Memoire by d'Eon, dated 20 May 1778, for the Count of Vergennes, Minister for Foreign Affairs, in order to obtain payment of his pension, with a copy of 5 supporting documents. The third item is a memorandum describing the Chevalier's affairs in England, as of August 1778, including rents due on a house in Brewer Street/Golden Square, which is scheduled to be demolished. There are further details of d'Eon's state of affairs in France, where the Chevalier blames his feminine state and sedentariness as cause of a very painful rheumatism. D'Eon accordingly begs the King and his ministers to allow him to don men's clothes and fight.

Items four through seven are signed letters. One to M. de Miromesnil, Garde des Sceaux, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of his petition to the King's special adviser, the Comte de Maurepas, of the 8th of February, asking support for the Chevalier's request to serve as a volunteer in the Comte d'Orvilliers' fleet. The other two letters are written to the Comtesse de Maurepas, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of the Chevalier's petition to the comte, 8 February, requesting the comte's protection.

Collection
Eleanor King, possibly of Liverpool, England. Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

Commonplace book, 13 pages; 31 cm x 19 cm, dated 1781-1784, kept by Eleanor King. The book contains poems--some original, others attributed--interspersed with cooking and medicinal recipes. King typically signs her name and gives the dates with each entry. Recipes range from "Raison Wine," to "Sherif Cake," to her "Elixer of Health." One poem, possibly written by King, is devoted to the pleasures of breastfeeding and is titled: "On Seeing a Lady Nursing her own Child." The commonplace book once included several other pages which were cut away from the book at an early date.

Collection
Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

Collection

Georgette A. Chamberlin papers, 1785-1917 10 Linear Feet — 12 Items

Georgette A. Chamberlin (1831-1920) was daughter of Mehitable Varnum and Franklin Tenney, who was proprietor of the National Hotel in Washington, D.C, where she resided. Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin.

Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin. The diaries document her trips to New England (1877), the Southern States (1881 and 1886) and to Europe (1880, 1882, and 1897). The genealogical album includes material about the Varnum and Tenney families, Franklin Tenney (her father) and the National Hotel. During her travels to Germany (1897) she stayed and traveled with Princess Salm-Salm (Agnes Elizabeth Winona Leclercq) an American adventures, and widow of Prussian nobleman, Prince Felix Salm-Salm. The photograph albums and the scrapbooks document her family history, and the history of and visitors to the National Hotel. The postcard album contains postcards of her travel in Europe, with a few from the United States.

Collection

Summons, 1785 May 31 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

New York County's Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery was the court of criminal jurisdiction, especially for crimes punishable by life imprisonment or death. Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

Collection comprises a manuscript summons from the Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery in New York City dated 1785 May 31 for Doctor Charles M. McKnight, James J. Beekman, Sarah Conolly (Conoly), and Ann McClean (McClain) to serve as witnesses the following day against the African American prisoner Hannah, who was indicted for "Murder of a Bastard Child."

Collection
Cornelia Ann Ludlow Willink (1788-1866) used these notebooks as a young girl in New York studying penmanship, mathematics, and geography. The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments. Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin, and was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of a mathematics manuscript workbook and five manuscript copybooks used by Cornelia Ann Ludlow as a young girl between the ages of approximately eight and fourteen years old (dating between 1796 and 1802). The math workbook (dated 1796) is hardback bound, with arithmetic lessons on numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and measurements. The five copybooks (dated approximately 1800-1802) are bound in marbled paper, with school assignments and lessons on penmanship, geography and history about the United States and Canada, repeatedly copied sentences about manners, morals, and character, and other assorted assignments.

Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

Collection
Collection comprises a full-color, four-page manuscript metamorphosis book, with verses and pen-and-watercolor illustrations by Elizabeth Winspear, who was possibly a resident of New England. Each page features two flaps that fold out in stages to reveal new illustrations. Characters include Adam and Eve, along with a lion, griffin, and eagle, and themes include the attainment of wealth, and impact of sickness and death. Includes a clamshell box.
Collection
Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Collection
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
Collection
Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

Collection
Madame de Staël (1766-1817) was a French literary figure whose writings were highly influential in late 18th and early 19th century Europe. She was a political polemicist whose famous confrontation with Napoléon Bonaparte led to her exile from Paris until the Bourbon Restoration. This letter was written in 1814 towards the end of her life. She writes from Paris to the prominent New York mercantile firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers concerning a financial transaction in the amount of $20,000. She states that she has transferred the sum to McEvers in London, and wishes to confirm that they will, in turn, transfer it to her account with another firm. At the time she wrote this letter, Madame de Staël owned a large tract of land in upstate New York. Her father originally purchased the land in the event that the family wanted to escape France's instability and settle in America. Although she and her children never moved to the United States, de Staël both increased her land holdings and invested in developing her property. LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers represented Europeans purchasing property in New York State, so it's highly likely that the $20,000 was used to either increase or develop Madame de Staël's American land holdings. This letter is evidence of a degree of financial and business independence that was highly unusual for a woman at the time.

Collection consists of a single one page autograph manuscript letter from Madame de Staël to the firm LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers in New York City regarding a financial transaction of $20,000. The letter is dated 1814 October 12; a note on the back states that it was received in New York 1815 March 10. In the letter, de Staël writes that she is sending their partner in London, Mr. McEvers, a note for $20,000. She asks if they have received her letter of July 25 in which she asked them to transfer the $20,000 to her account with the firm Doxat & Divett, and reiterates this request in the event that they have not received it. The letter is signed Necker de Staël Holstein. At the time, Madame de Staël owned an estimated 30,000 acres of land in what is now upstate New York, (Sakolski) and it's likely that this transaction was related to her American property holdings. Madame de Staël's father purchased land in America for his daughter and her children with the thought of leaving unstable France and settling in America. Although she never lived there, de Staël increased her American land holdings and reportedly invested $20,000 in developing the property. -- Sakolski, The Great American Land Bubble (1932)

Collection
Helen Maria Williams was a British novelist, poet, and translator of French-language works. Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. [Joel?]Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. One letter contains the date 1820; the other letters are undated. Topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid, along with the imprisonment of James Wol[l]stonecraft and Thomas Payne's [Paine's] efforts on his behalf. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

Collection comprises four letters written by Helen Maria Williams, two to her nephew, Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, one to Mrs. [Joel?]Barlow, and one to an unidentified recipient. One letter contains the date 1820; the other letters are undated. Topics in the letters include Coquerel's position, her income, the health and situation of friends and family members, an unnamed woman she wishes to avoid, along with the imprisonment of James Wol[l]stonecraft and Thomas Payne's [Paine's] efforts on his behalf. Three letters are accompanied by partial or full transcription.

Collection
Elizabeth Gurney Fry (1780-1845) was an English prison reformer, social reformer, and a Quaker philanthropist. Collection comprises a note and poetry copied by Fry.

Collection comprises a note and poetry copied by Fry. The undated note (probably around 1850) written to Blesia(?) regarding an accident on the part of Fry's daughter[-in-law] Sophia, that prevents Fry's visit. The other page contains two items of poetry, On Parent Knees a Naked New-born Child by Sir William Jones, copied at Plashet House on 1825 February 5, and 1 Timothy 4:12, copied on 1823 July 8.

Collection
Anna Letitia Barbauld was an English woman of letters who had great professional success at a time when women writers were still something of an anomaly. She is remembered for her poetry, children's literature, essays, criticism, and editorial works. She was rediscovered when feminist literary critics examined her place in British literary history. Barbauld was also an abolitionist, something she had in common with fellow educator and Stoke Newington resident William Allen. This item is a single small sheet of paper with an autograph manuscript poem by Barbauld on the front dated August 23, 1823, and another one on the back by William Allen dated August 30, 1823. Both poems were aimed at a juvenile audience. It is likely that their common interests and close proximity led them to develop a friendship. Although this was written towards the end of Barbauld's life, it is evidence that they still had at least an epistolary relationship in 1823.

Collection consists of a single piece of paper (20 x 12.5 cm) with an autograph manuscript poem by Anna Letitia Barbauld on the front and a poem called "Follow Me" by William Allen on the back. Barbauld's poem reads as follows: Born to the weighty honours of a name/Whose deeds of mercy England's shores proclaim/Yet know, you may inherit lands or pelf/But must, for praise - for love, be good yourself. It's signed A.L. Barbauld and dated August 23rd 1823. The verso contains a two-stanza autograph manuscript devotional poem by William Allen titled "Follow Me." It is signed Stoke Newington 30 of 8th month 1823. Barbauld and Allen were both educators and abolitionists who lived in Stoke Newington at the time of this writing. These poems are evidence that they had at least an epistolary friendship.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter from the 19th century writer and editor Sarah J. Hale to the prominent Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey thanking him for his contribution to Hale's charity benefiting Boston seamen.

The collection consists of a single signed autograph letter with text on one side from Sarah J. Hale to the Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey. Hale thanks Carey for his subscription to her charity, the Seaman's Aid Society and Mariner's House of Boston for the year 1822-1823. Hale also inquires about local interest in a Philadelphia organization that teaches needlework as a means of economic empowerment to poor women.

Collection

Margaret McFadden Papers, 1825-2015, bulk 1961-2015 145.0 Linear Feet — 145.0 linear feet

Margaret McFadden is a feminist scholar and activist; she was the founder of the Women's Studies Program and retired as a professor in Interdisciplinary Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. This collection comprises McFadden's professional papers. Includes published materials, conference files, materials related to the Southeastern Women's Studies Association (of which she is a founding member), correspondence, writings, teaching materials, and subject files. This collection also includes several additions; please consult the Collection Overview below to learn more about their contents. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection (2003-0264) (14,000 items, 27 lin. ft.; dated [1970s]-2003 and n.d.) comprises McFadden's professional papers. Includes published materials, conference files, materials related to the Southeastern Women's Studies Association (of which she is a founding member), correspondence, writings, teaching materials, and subject files. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2005-0003) (2585 items, 5.0 lin. ft.; dated 1979-1999 and n.d.) comprises primarily research files, book notes, correspondence with other scholars and with her publisher, and drafts related to McFadden's book Golden Cables of Sympathy (1999). Also includes materials and notes from conferences she attended.

Addition (2005-0089) (2683 items, 4.2 lin. ft.; dated 1974-2005) comprises correspondence, subject files, reviews, research notes, and photographs related to Golden Cables of Sympathy; brochures, programs, and notes from conferences; academic files related to Ph.D students who were part of the Projects Demonstrating Excellence at the Union Institute Graduate School in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1995-2002.

Addition (2006-0001) (1125 items, 1.8 lin. ft.; dated 1989-1998) consists of correspondence, subject files, reviews, research notes, and academic files McFadden maintained during her professorship. There are also brochures, programs, and notes from conferences, including a paper delivered at the 8th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, 8-10 June 1990. There are also newsletters; files McFadden kept while a Fulbright professor in Finland, 1991-1992; and ephemera.

Addition (2007-0124) (750 items; 1.2 lin. ft. ; dated 1982-1994) consists of correspondence, manuscripts, and research materials relating to women's studies books and articles by McFadden. Also included are grant proposals, recommendations, and book catalogs.

Addition (2007-0202) (2000 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1975-2007) includes research materials, notes, and academic files from McFadden's work as a professor.

Addition (2009-0192) (6500 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1970s-2009) includes materials from McFadden's courses and programs at Appalachian State's Interdisciplinary Studies program, including women's studies courses. Also includes materials from her Fulbrights to Finland and Austria, conference schedules, Southeastern Women's Studies Association (SEWSA) files, student evaluations, drafts of Golden Cables of Sympathy, and McFadden's historical women postcard collection.

Addition (2013-0164) (4500 items; 6.0 lin. ft; dated 1961-2009) includes research and academic files, including women's studies courses. Also includes materials from her Fulbright grants, SEWSA files, and professional engagements.

Addition (2015-0095) (30 linear ft; dated 1825-2010) Includes course materials, materials documenting McFadden's activism, including "Equality Barbie", materials from world travels, and a small number of materials documenting McFadden's personal history including family materials and early school work

Addition (2016-0028) (6 linear ft; dated 1960-2015) Materials include travel documentation, subject files, academic materials, and speeches

Collection
Collection comprises a certificate written by Fairfax stating that he examined Alsy (Alice), who was a slave being hired out to Charles Mothershead in Westmoreland Co., Va. He found that she had procidentia uteri (her entire uterus was outside the vagina), which caused her to be unable to work. He added, "She may be made useful by the application of an instrument properly adjusted, to keep the part from coming down."
Collection
Collection comprises a printed copy of a will (1875?), along with manuscript inventories; lists of stocks and bonds; related correspondence; and payments made against the estate of Margaret Bromfield Blanchard in 1877 and 1878. Henry B. Rogers served as her executor. There are also her manuscript records outlining the distribution of the estate, dated 1867-1868. The Bromfield School is mentioned extensively in the will and the distribution documents. In the will she outlines "if boys are admitted [to the school], I order that their number shall always be one-third less than that of girls." In addition, there are a few records related to the estate of Margaret Blanchard's grandfather?, Henry Bromfield, in Cheltenham, England, dated 1836-1842, including the executor's account. Unrelated documents include a written agreement between Mary Blanchard and Hiram Osborn for his assumption of the farming duties in 1864, along with a letter regarding the establishment of trustees for the Bromfield school, dated around 1890.
Collection

Susan P. Parrott account book, 1839-1846 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Susan P. Parrott was a widow who probably resided in Maine during the mid-nineteenth century. Collection comprises an handmade account book with paper covers (35 pages, some blank, with an additional 5 leaves excised) maintained by Susan P. Parrott from 1839-1846, mainly to track her payments to at least 30 women she hired to work for her from one day to several months at a time. It is not clear in what capacity she hired the women, although one, Martha Brackett, was a seamstress.

Collection comprises an handmade account book with paper covers (35 pages, some blank, with an additional 5 leaves excised) maintained by Susan P. Parrott from 1839-1846, mainly to track her payments to at least 30 women she hired to work for her from one day to several months at a time. It is not clear in what capacity she hired the women, although one, Martha Brackett, was a seamstress. A few entries are accompanied by notes on the women: Martha White was African American, and on 1842 July 1, Parrott noted that she engaged Bridget(t) O'Boyle "to stay two months from this date--and to behave herself better." Other payments were recorded for tobacco, cider, gin, pills, medicine, bonnets, dresses, corsets, slippers, ribbons and a lace collar, cloth, gloves, crockery, and letters. Parrott also recorded cash entries.

Collection
Collection comprises a handwritten copy of the Gazette (11 pgs, handstitched), plus an envelope. The Gazette contained a personal and detailed account of the marriage of Charlotte Elizabeth Octavia Collinson (1817-1850) to Charles Stansfield Rawson (1812-1863). The writer of the account was unidentified, but was probably one of Collinson's sisters. There are sections on the bridesmaids, ceremony, cake, wedding breakfast, and other celebrations, as well as desciptions of various family members. Rawson lived at Nether Wasdale, Cumberland, and married Charlotte at Boldon Church on Feb. 18, 1840. Later, two of their sons went to Queensland, where they made a fortune in ranching and pioneered the settlement of Mckay. The envelope, postmarked 1895, is illustrated and addressed to E. Rawson, Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, Queensland.

Collection comprises a handwritten copy of the United Family Gazette (11 pgs, handstitched), plus an envelope. The Gazette contained a personal and detailed account of the marriage of Charlotte Elizabeth Octavia Collinson (1817-1850) to Charles Stansfield Rawson (1812-1863). The writer of the account was unidentified, but was probably one of Collinson's sisters. There are sections on the bridesmaids, ceremony, cake, wedding breakfast, and other celebrations, as well as desciptions of various family members. Rawson lived at Nether Wasdale, Cumberland, and married Charlotte at Boldon Church on Feb. 18, 1840. Later, two of their sons went to Queensland, where they made a fortune in ranching and pioneered the settlement of Mckay. The envelope, postmarked 1895, is illustrated and addressed to E. Rawson, Imperial Hotel, Brisbane, Queensland.

Collection

Margaret Fuller letter, 1840 December 14 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Margaret Fuller was a teacher, journalist, and critic. Collection comprises a letter (1840 December 14) Margaret Fuller wrote to her uncle to request a meeting to review her mother's letter.

Collection comprises a letter (1840 December 14) Margaret Fuller wrote to her uncle to request a meeting to review her mother's letter.

Collection
Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

Collection
Sophia Foord was a 19th century teacher in Massachusetts who was involved with the abolitionist, utopian socialist, and feminist movements. The Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams mainly concerns the Northampton Association of Education and Industry, a utopian socialist community.

Three-page letter from Sophia Foord of Northampton, MA to Robert Adams of Pawtucket, RI regarding the Northampton Association of Education and Industry. Abolitionists Lydia Maria Child and William Lloyd Garrison are also mentioned, as is the Underground Railroad. A section is missing from the top of the first leaf, affecting text on the second page.

Collection

Mary B. Tuckey poems, 1845-1846 0.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a volume containing nine handwritten poems prepared by Mary B. Tuckey and others for the 1845 anti-slavery fair held in Boston, Massachusetts, but brought together in a presentation volume. The volume features hand-painted covers and two illustrations, and was presented to Maria Weston Chapman, editor of the Boston Liberty Bell, by Mary Mannix, secretary of the female anti-slavery society in Cork, Ireland, in 1846. The volume was enclosed in a case with a leather spine, with initials "M.M. to M.W.C" and dated "Cork, 1846." One of the poems commemorates Frederick Douglass' visit to Cork.
Collection
Dr. Mary J. Scarlett was a Quaker, born in 1822 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She devoted her early years to being a teacher in Chester County, Pennsylvania, then entered and graduated from the Woman's Medical College in 1857. In 1862, she became professor of anatomy at Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Collection contains seven letters (22 pages) M. J. Scarlett wrote between 1845-1864. Two letters were addressed to her sister, Elizabeth (1845, 1849), and five to her niece (1858, 1860, 1863, 1864). In the letters she discussed details of her life at the time, from the teaching of students to the choosing of proper fabric for sewing a dress, making a comfortable sitting room, or studying public health and hygiene. She also mentioned many family matters. She commented on her hopes for the abolition of slavery and the infighting among abolitionists at a recent national meeting, and noted her puzzlement that those Quakers who would quickly speak as abolitionists would not also speak up on issues of faith within the Society of Friends. During the Civil War, she described the effect of the draft in Philadelphia, recorded the general concern that the Army of the Potomac needed to be successful, and pointed to camps nearby as well as to funerals passing. Collection also includes an undated broadside for "An Introductory Lecture to a Course on Physiology" to be delivered by Scarlett. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections (Duke University), the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection
Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt.

Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt. Sophy was 37 years old, Sarah was 13 years old, and Henry was 10 years old at the time.

Collection

Lucretia Mott papers, 1848-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 12 items

Lucretia Mott was a Quaker teacher of Philadelphia, Pa.; a Hicksite; an abolitionist; and a promoter of women's rights, temperance, and peace. Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst. There is an additional undated carte de visite of Mott, by Broadbent and Phillips of Philadelphia.

Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst. There is an additional undated carte de visite of Mott, by Broadbent and Phillips of Philadelphia.

Collection
Author Dawn Langley Simmons had one of the first sex-reassignment surgeries in the United States. She was brought up as Gordon Langley Hall in England at Sissinghurst Castle, home of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, and adopted by the actress Margaret Rutherford. After surgery she assumed the identity Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, then became Dawn Langley Simmons after her marriage to John Paul Simmons. The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection includes material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. The collection houses extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000, with topics ranging from Simmons' formative years in Great Britain, her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper, literary circles in Great Britain, later personal events such as her wedding, and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters include Margaret Rutherford, Isabel Whitney, Vita Sackville-West, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Robert Holmes, and Edwin Peacock. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings, including articles and reviews by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer.

The Dawn Langley Simmons Papers span the years 1848-2001, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1969 and 2001. The collection consists of material collected and created by Simmons when she was using the names Gordon Langley Hall, Dawn Pepita Langley Hall, and Dawn Langley Simmons. Extensive files of correspondence dating from the 1950s to 2000 document Simmons' formative years in Kent and Sussex, Great Britain; her relationship with her mother, Marjorie Hall Copper; literary circles in Great Britain; later personal events such as her wedding and purchase of her house in Charleston, S.C.; and Simmons' development as a writer. Significant correspondents or individuals mentioned in letters and other materials include Robert Holmes, Sir Harold Nicolson, Nigel Nicolson, Edwin Peacock, Margaret Rutherford, Vita Sackville-West, and Isabel Whitney. The collection also includes writings by Simmons in the form of typescripts and diaries; printed material and clippings including articles by and about Simmons; legal and financial papers; an extensive collection of scrapbooks; photographs; audiovisual materials; and other material relating to Simmons' personal life and career as a writer. The writings in the collection are primarily typescripts but include a few proofs and printers' galleys. Many of the pieces are unpublished. The publication process of the 1995 autobiography Dawn: A Charleston Legend is extensively documented by a series of edited manuscripts and proofs as well as correspondence with the publisher. Collection materials also document to some extent sex change treatments begun in 1967 at the Gender Identity Clinic of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Simmons' 1969 interracial marriage to John-Paul Simmons; and the disruption in their lives in part brought on by the negative reaction of Charleston society to their marriage.

The collection also contains an electronic file of an unpublished manuscript, WANTING MAGIC, by J. Theodore Ellis, including his unpublished notes, footnotes, and reflections based on the works of Hall-Simmons and related individuals, as well as professional studies of transsexualism and sexual identity. Includes a printout of selected pages of the manuscript. There is also Ellis' copy of Simmon's GREAT WHITE OWL OF SISSINGHURST.

The Audiovisual Materials Series includes video and audio tape recordings and photographs. The recordings include professionally-produced audio broadcasts discussing Simmons' transgender life and her interracial marriage - and an amateur audio tape of Simmons' wedding. Several hundred photographs document Isabel Whitney and her family as well as Simmons' family and friends. Original recordings are closed to research; listening copies are available for most items. Otherwise, staff must arrange for use copies to be made.

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series consists chiefly of incoming correspondence, spanning five decades, from family and friends, from publishers concerning Simmons' writing, and from other individuals. There is some correspondence written by Simmons scattered throughout.

Brief but detailed entries in the eleven volumes housed in the Diaries Series describe Simmons' writing career, emotional states, and family matters during the time periods from 1975-1976 and 1987-1989, ending with the years 1990-1994.

The Legal and Financial Papers Series chiefly consist of documents concerning Simmons' father, Jack Copper, Isabel Whitney and her family and estate, Simmons and her husband, and Simmons' inheritance from Whitney.

The Printed Materials Series houses clippings, travel guides, flyers, and other items that document Simmons' interests, travels, and hobbies; includes early journalistic writings (chiefly columns), and a hardcover copy of her children's book, the Great White Owl of Sissinghurst.

The twenty-odd albums found in the Scrapbooks Series feature memorabilia, clippings, photos, and correspondence assembled by Simmons concerning her writing career, family, hobbies, and interest in celebrities and royalty.

The small Volumes Series consists of two manuscripts collected by Simmons: a nineteenth-century diary written by Sarah Combs, a transcript of this diary, and an early twentieth century travelogue written by a member of the Whitney family.

The Writings Series primarily consists of typescripts of works by Simmons. There are a few written pieces by other authors. Other writings by Simmons can be found in the Correspondence Series (in the topical correspondence folders for the 1950s and 1960s and scattered throughout in other files); in the William Carter Spann Series, which contains research Simmons conducted in preparation for a book on President Carter's nephew; in the Diaries Series; and in the Printed Materials Series, which contains early columns and later writings by Simmons.

Oversize Materials housed separately from the main collection include posters, cover proofs, newspaper and magazine clippings, and a few diplomas and awards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Liberia to America poem, 1849 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Martin Farquhar Tupper was an English writer and poet. Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection comprises Martin Farquhar Tupper's manuscript poem in four verses, "Liberia to America." Signed, with location Albury, England [crossed out], Surrey. Tupper was among the first to support the new country; he exhorts Americans to support their "sable" brothers and to recognize the state officially, "with gracious glance befriend Thine own sons, no longer slaves!" The poem is undated, but probably dates around 1849, with the United States' formal recognition of Liberia.

Collection

Advertising Ephemera collection, 1850s-1980s 35 Linear Feet — 9,279 items

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. The collection is divided into broad subject categories, based on the primary type of product or service being advertised, which are arranged in alphabetical order. Within each subject category material is divided based upon the form of the material; leaflets, letters, and sheets printed on both sides; trade cards (mechanical, metamorphic, see-thru, shape, fabric inserts, unusual feature, postcards and insert cards); booklets; special categories; and miscellaneous. A subseries of foreign advertising material consists predominately of travel related literature and is arrange alphabetically by country. The arrangement of oversize materials parallels the original arrangement.

The researcher should note that trade catalogs that are pamphlets may be found in several places in the Perkins Library: this collections; individually in the stacks as fully cataloged items; or as part of groups of old pamphlets for which the cataloging was by main entry only. Advertising broadsides may also be found in the Broadsides Collection and many collections of manuscripts also contain advertising materials.

Some useful reference sources for gathering further information on this type of material include:

Romaine, Lawrence B., "A Guide to American Trade Catalogs," 1944-1900 (New York, 1960).

Hammond, Dorothy, "Advertising Collectibles of Times Past," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1974).

Kaduck, John M., "Advertising Trade Cards," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1976).

McQuarry, Jim, "Collectors Guide to Advertising Cards," (Gas City, Indiana, 1975).

Additions to the collection have not been processed and therefore to do reflect the arrangement of the rest of the collection. Please refer to the detailed description below for more information about their content.

Collection

Isabella S. Gardner diary, 1852-1874 and undated 0.6 lin. ft. Linear Feet — 8 items

Collection comprises a printed 1853 "West of England Pocket Book or Gentleman's Diary with an almanack" presented to Isabella Gardner by her husband in 1852. Gardner filled the volume with routine diary entries, usually briefly mentioning the weather and the health of family members, whether they were any visitors, along with any travel or activities and with whom the family took tea or had dinner. More unusual entries have to do with a tooth extraction, the birth of Frank, and a fire at their home. Entries became less frequent from October to December 1853. Also, several pages list household accounts and amounts paid, usually for food and servant salaries. Several items post-dating the diary were laid-in, including four brief letters to and from family members, a recipe for a throat tonic, a note with dates of ancestors, and a religious flier. A child later made drawings in available spaces on pages of the diary.
Collection

Lady Wilde letter, 1852 November 19 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a letter from Lady Wilde discussing the loss of her mother, followed by her marriage, and announcing the birth of her eldest son, William Charles Kingsbury Wilde. She also comments on marriage, "a woman's duty ends with marriage. She becomes a vegetable, a house leek, a mop--I feel that I am 'potted' for the rest of my days...." Includes an enclosure with a note written in another hand identifying Wilde along with the letter's recipient, whose last name may be Grant.
Collection
Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (1811 June 14-1896 July 1) was an American abolitionist and author. Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection
Collection comprises a letter from "C.H.H" to a colleague, regarding an ongoing Conn. trial in an abortion case involving "Mrs. Green," "Gen. Walker," and "Mr. Mitchell." Abortion was legal in Conn. until 1821, when it became the first state to explicitly outlaw the practice. The text includes: "Mrs. Green began to testify on Friday night--but was taken sick & had to be sent home. That she was really sick, there can be no doubt. But whether it was the journey &c. or agitation & excitement as to what she was required to testify--is still a mystery. I want you to send me her history & that of her family ... so as to shape our cross examination.... She is expected to testify that the abortion matter was all gotten up by Genl W--without there being any truth in it--She began by saying that Genl W. called on her at Naugatuck [Conn.].... Then [abbr. "said"?] that Gen Walker had been speaking ill of his daughter & also one of hers. That he Walker had [abbr. "said"?] that he had given medicine to produce abortion....They are going to destroy Genl W's testimony--by all kinds of evidence contradicting him--if they possibly can."
Collection
The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was a novelist and short-story writer. Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

Collection contains a letter Elizabeth Gaskell wrote to Ellen Nussey on [1855] July 27 regarding her work on her biography of Charlotte Brontë, and making arrangements to meet with Nussey to review any letters "which you may think it right to entrust me with." She refers to having already reviewed letters held by Mr. Nichols, Brontë's husband, but never mentions Brontë by name.

Collection
M. Almina Stratton was a student in the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. She received her M.D. in the second class the college graduated in 1859. Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

Collection
Letter written by abolitionist Thomas Wentworth Higginson regarding an upcoming lecture entitled A Visit to the Family of John Brown.

The collection consists of a single page autograph manuscript letter from abolitionist Thomas Wentworth Higginson to an unknown male correspondent. Wentworth writes that he has prepared a lecture called A Visit to the Family of John Brown. Sources indicate that Higginson had returned from visiting the Brown family in the Adirondacks on November 4th, 1859. He writes that no one else from Massachusetts has visited the Brown family that he's aware of, except for fellow abolitionist Franklin Benjamin Sanborn. He asks if the recipient would prefer this lecture to the one Higginson had previously prepared. This lecture was likely turned into a chapter in Higginson's 1898 book Contemporaries called A Visit to John Brown's Household in 1859.

Collection
Eliza Beckwith appears to have been a student in 1860 at an unidentified normal college (a school created to train high school graduates to be teachers) in an English-speaking country, most likely Great Britain, Canada, or the United States. The collection consists of a single commonplace book with the name Eliza Beckwith or perhaps Eliza Beckwith Burton on the front cover. Twenty manuscript pages contain 30 poems and short phrases collected from college acquaintances, some with titles such as The Enquiry, Happiness, Remember Me, Prudent Simplicity, The Old and New Year, Friendship, and The Rights of Woman. A few of the poems are extracts taken from Tennyson and Wordsworth, but most appear to be original pieces from fellow students including Annie Kemball, Martha Ardley, Louisa Gillingham, Annie Morris, Helen Taylor, and Lizzie Capez. A few pieces are signed and dated College 1860, Christmas 1860, or Normal College.

The collection consists of a single commonplace book with the name Eliza Beckwith or perhaps Eliza Beckwith Burton on the front cover. Twenty manuscript pages contain 30 poems and short phrases collected from college acquaintances, some with titles such as "The Enquiry," "Happiness," "Remember Me," "Prudent Simplicity," "The Old and New Year," "Friendship," and "The Rights of Woman." A few of the poems are extracts taken from Tennyson and Wordsworth, but most appear to be original pieces from fellow students including Annie Kemball, Martha Ardley, Louisa Gillingham, Annie Morris, Helen Taylor, and Lizzie Capez. A few pieces are signed and dated "College 1860," "Christmas 1860," or "Normal College." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Lydia Maria Child letters, 1863-1873 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Lydia Maria Child was a prominent American abolitionist. The Lydia Maria Child letters consist of two letters written by Child, the first to artist William Tolman Carlton, and the second to a Miss. Howland. The first letter concerns Carlton's well-known painting "Waiting for the Hour," and references the writer and fellow abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier. The second letter replies to a query about the German writer Bettina Von Arnim.

Collection contains two letters written by Lydia Maria Child, the first to artist William Tolman Carlton, and the second to Miss. Howland. The first letter, dated September 15th, 1863, concerns Carlton's painting "Waiting for the Hour", which currently hangs at the White House. Child thanks Carlton for a photograph of the painting that had been delivered to her nephew, George L. Stearns. Child's friend, John Greenleaf Whittier, wanted the painting presented to fellow abolitionist Charles Sumner. The second letter is a reply to Miss Howland, who inquired if Child had ever seen correspondence from the German writer Bettina Von Arnim. Child replies in the negative.