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Collection comprises an autograph album maintained by Jennie Nuttall between about 1884 and 1895 (many entries are undated) in Fall River, Massachusetts. There are autographs from several family members as well as school friends, including an 1886 entry with autograph and verse by Lizzie Borden, who later became famous nationwide after being tried and acquitted for the 1892 murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River.

Collection comprises an autograph album maintained by Jennie Nuttall between about 1884 and 1895 (many entries are undated) in Fall River, Massachusetts. There are autographs from several family members as well as school friends, including an 1886 entry with autograph and verse by Lizzie Borden, who later became famous nationwide after being tried and acquitted for the 1892 murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River. A few entries are directed to other members of Jennie's family rather than Jennie.

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Collection comprises materials created or collected in preparation for a 1990 exhibit held at the University of San Francisco Gleeson Library on Isak Dinesen/Karen Blixen that featured photographs taken of her by Rie Nissen. Includes a few letters, photocopies of biographical information for Nissen, a 1943 catalog of Nissen's photography, caption notes for the photographs, exhibit caption cards, as well as publicity drafts and material. There are two items written in Danish.
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Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.

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Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs picture campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs depict campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

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Hannah Hutchinson married Samuel Mather in 1731; the couple settled in Boston, Mass. She died in 1781 (some sources have the death date 1752) and Samuel died in 1779. Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

Collection comprises a request written by Hannah Hutchinson Matter on 3 April 1858 to Edward Hutchinson, asking him to fulfill the pecuniary bequest made to her by his father and to give the sum (4 pounds) to her son, Samuel Mather, Junior. The back of the request contains Samuel's note, dated 3 May 1858, stating that he received the money.

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Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt.

Collection comprises a deed of manumission for a "negro woman slave named Sophy and a negro girl named Sarah and a negro boy named Henry, children of said Sophy," former property of Sarah E. Murray of Anne Arundel County, Md., and then assigned to J. Nevett Steele of Baltimore, Maryland. The deed was signed and sealed by J. Nevett Steele and the administrator of Sarah E. Murray's personal estate, Mary Murray, then recorded in the [Howard?] District of Anne Arundel County on 1846 December 4. The deed was witnessed by Abner Neal and T.[Thomas] Hanson Belt. Sophy was 37 years old, Sarah was 13 years old, and Henry was 10 years old at the time.

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Ann Lovett is an artist who teaches at the State University of New York at New Paltz. This collection documents her artistic and academic career with a focus on her work in the book arts.

The collection contains materials documenting Lovett's artistic and academic career, including artists' book production materials and photographs.

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Collection comprises a scrapbook (96 pages) featuring primarily newspaper and magazine clippings that document the leaders, activists, actions and activities of the Women's Social and Political Union between 1908 and 1917. The unidentified compiler was likely a member of the organization, for she included handwritten labels identifying unnamed participants and often provided handwritten commentary on actions taken or the treatment of women imprisoned. In several cases, she was also able to obtain autographs of individual suffragists. Events documented include the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, the memorial for Emily Wilding Davison, Rosa May Billinghurst, the Coronation procession, and the suffragist's bombing of Westminster Abbey. Other topics include what men did to get the vote; voting as a right; forcible feedings and other injuries the women sustained; marches, speeches, and gatherings of support; the work of the Pankhursts; women's activities in support of the war in Europe; the organization's offices; and international supporters of women's suffrage. Includes several items laid-in.
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Judy Woodruff is a broadcast journalist covering U.S. politics whose career has spanned work at NBC, CNN, and PBS. This collection documents her professional life, consisting of extensive research and subject files, correspondence including viewer mail, speaking appearances and engagements, and service including the Duke University Board of Trustees and the Interntional Women's Media Foundation.

The collection includes files documenting Woodruff's journalism career with CBS, NBC, the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour, CNN and other news outlets as well as her service at Duke on the Board of Trustees, and the board of the International Women's Media Foundation. Files range from extensive research and subject files to project files, viewer correspondence, interview material, writings, speeches, and audio/visual materials.

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Thomas Smith was a resident of the burrough of Norfolk, Va. Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.

Deed of manumission of "negro Sue," more commonly known as Susannah Mallory, former property of Charles King Mallory, of Elizabeth City County, [Va.?], by Thomas Smith in the Court of Norfolk County, Va., on 1803 July 19. In the document Smith makes it clear that the sixty dollars he paid for her purchase from Charles King Mallory was advanced entirely by Sue and that he acted only as her "Friendly agent" in the matter, with no interest in holding her as a slave. The deed is witnessed by Richard Henry Lee and R. C. Archer.