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Collection
The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

Collection

Derek Anderson photographs, 2006-2008 1 Linear Foot — 16 Items

Durham-based photographer specializing in editorial and documentary photography. Collection contains 16 11x14 color digital photographs produced by Derek Anderson for his project "When the Dust Settles: A photographic survey of the former Liggett & Myers tobacco factory in Durham, NC." Photographs include captions and range in date from 2006 to 2008.

Collection contains 16 11x14 color digital photographs produced by Derek Anderson for his project "When the Dust Settles: A photographic survey of the former Liggett & Myers tobacco factory in Durham, NC." Photographs include captions and range in date from 2006 to 2008.

More information about the survey is included in the Detailed Description below.

Collection
William T. Blackwell founded the W. T. Blackwell and Co. Tobacco company in Durham, N.C. in 1870 with James R. Day, later adding Julian Shakespeare Carr. This collection includes materials from the Blackwell family, based in Durham, and their descendants, including the J. D. Pridgen and Chester B. Martin families. It includes early materials from Blackwell and Julian Carr's operations of the W.T. Blackwell and Co. Durham Tobacco company; documentation from the building of the W.T. Blackwell and Co. factory; materials from the Durham Tobacco trademark litigation cases of the 1870s; Blackwell family correspondence and financial papers, many documenting local Durham businesses; volumes and ledgers from the operation and closure of the Bank of Durham, operated by Blackwell between 1883 and 1888; photographs, correspondence, and scrapbooks from the Pridgen and Martin families documenting Durham churches, community events, personalities, and local news in the early 20th century; news clippings and family obituaries; and other assorted materials relating to Durham history.

This collection contains assorted materials from the William T. Blackwell family and descendants, including the J. D. Pridgen family and Chester B. Martin family. Materials have been loosely sorted by format and time period, and are arranged chronologically by contributor, if possible.

The bulk of the Family Papers series dates from the late 19th century, with business correspondence and financial materials from the operation of the W. T. Blackwell Tobacco Company, both in the late 1860s (when operating as Blackwell and Day) and following the arrival of Julian Carr in the 1870s and 1880s. Items document the sales and advertising of tobacco products, ongoing factory construction in Durham, travels of both Blackwell and Carr (along with other agents), and the string of trademark violation lawsuits and other legal challenges pursued by Blackwell to protect the Bull Durham trademark in the 1870s.

Other materials from the Blackwell-era relate to the purchases and daily activities of his family, particularly his wife, Emma; the collection contains receipts, invoices, and other correspondence relating to her management of the household, documenting activities like clothing, groceries, and supply purchases. There are a series of condolence notes following the death of Mary Blackwell, the couple's daughter. Blackwell's correspondence with business associates and friends is also housed in the General Correspondence files for the Blackwells.

W.T. Blackwell's niece, Lavinia Blackwell, married Joseph D. Pridgen, Sr., whose Durham-based shoe company is referenced in printed materials and manuscript items in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Scrapbooks from daughters Mary Blackwell Pridgen and Ethelwold Pridgen offer glimpses of these young women's activities in Durham and Hillsboro, both educational and social, during the 1910s and 1920s. These scrapbooks include photographs, programs and ticket stubs, and other ephemeral items collected and preserved by the Pridgens.

Mary Blackwell Pridgen later married Chester B. Martin, and the Martins operated Durham Dairy Products, Inc., a milk processing and distribution company. Mary Pridgen refers to herself as Mrs. C. B. Martin through the rest of the collection's materials. She continued scrapbooking, with clippings and items saved about the Martins and their children dating from the 1950s through the 1960s. Later mid-20th century materials document her interest in Durham history, particularly the establishment of the Historic Preservation Committee in the 1970s.

The collection's Bank of Durham Volumes Series dates from the Blackwell-era, in the 1880s. W.T. Blackwell's operation of the Bank of Durham and its subsequent failure is documented through account books, ledgers, and other volumes recording payments and loans by the bank.

Collection

Herbert Clarence Bradshaw papers, 1922-1976 35 Linear Feet — Approximately 39,585 Items

Bradshaw's papers show detailed involvement as a member of the N.C. State Commission for the Blind for 18 years; member, Advisory Board, Mary Duke Biddle Art Gallery for the Blind in the N C Museum of Art, Raleigh; and President of the N. C Society for the Prevention of Blindness.

Many printed items - rosters, programs, clippings, and photographs - are scattered throughout the files where they are integral parts of personal or organizational files. Papers on Durham include histories and correspondence on city and county government (1853-1973), Chamber of Commerce, Civitan and Optimist Clubs, Merchants Association, Public Library, and the School Board. The latter includes a substantial sequence of folders on Durham, N.C. race relations issues and school integration. There are printed programs of cultural events held in Richmond, Durham, and Raleigh, 1929-1972. The papers include programs, rosters, histories, minutes and correspondence on Lions Club activities in Durham and throughout N.C., 1922-1974.

Material prepared for the Durham (N.C.) Morning Herald centennial edition includes the histories of local organizations, 1805-1953. Bradshaw kept detailed diaries and correspondence on his Book Page and his editorials, 1949-1973. Important in Civil War histories is Bradshaw's account of historic events in the Appomattox area which he wrote for the Centennial Edition of the Farmville (Va.) Herald, 1965. A longer local history account appears in that newspaper's Sesquicentennial Edition of 1948.

Duke University Professor Mason Crum's unpublished manuscript, Washington Duke, is included in the Duke University section (Box 31) along with Bradshaw's 1949-1973 correspondence with Duke faculty. Dr. J. B. Rhine's correspondence shows the development at Duke of his Foundation for Research on the Nature of Man, 1963-1972.

The collection contains voluminous correspondence from 1922 to 1976 (Boxes 19-27), including 44 years of farm business papers on the 900-acre farm in Virginia he and his brother managed. The correspondence also includes the writing of the history of the Baptist Church in N.C., 1805-1973. There is correspondence also on the Yates Baptist Association and the Watts Street Baptist Church, 1950-1971. Other files of correspondence relate to his forty-four year involvement with Hampden-Sydney College (Box 42). Bradshaw's interest in genealogy led to lengthy correspondence on genealogies of the Armistead, Bradshaw, Cunningham, Chambliss, Few, Fuqua, Lockett, McGehee, Marshall, Nash, Scarborough, Venable, and Walton families. Included is a morgue of hundreds of glossy photographs of contemporary writers. There are letters signed by William O. Douglas; Dean Acheson; Dean Rusk; William P. Rogers; J. William Fulbright; Governors Luther Hodges, Terry Sanford and Robert Scott; Senators Henry Jackson and B. Everett Jordan; Norman Mailer; J. B. Rhine; and Douglas M. Knight. There is correspondence with Myrta Lockett Avary, author of A Virginia Girl in the Civil War, and her memoirs are included.

Addition (87-94) contains correspondence, notes and printed material for the development of Durham and its commemoration of the U.S. Bicentennial, 1976. Also contains information concerning health care in N.C., and notes from various conferences held by the U.S. State department for news editors.

Other parts of Bradshaw's papers are also held by the Virginia Baptist Historical Society at the University of Richmond and the Virginia State Library.

Collection

Leslie Brown papers, 1936-2016 and undated 24.3 Linear Feet — 6.71 Gigabytes

Leslie Brown was a Professor of History at Williams College, Williamstown, MA. She was born in 1954 and died in 2016. The Leslie Brown papers span the years 1936-2016 and undated and cover her entire career as a historian, from her doctoral training to her final position at Williams College. There is also extensive information regarding her professional interest in African-American history and the preparation of oral histories. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Leslie Brown papers span the years 1936-2016 and undated and cover her entire career as a historian, from her doctoral training to her final position at Williams College. There is also extensive information regarding her professional interest in African-American history and the preparation of oral histories, especially those related to the Behind the Veil project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. The Interviews series includes those conducted privately by Brown as well as those from various institutions that she used in her research. There are typescripts and audiocassettes. The Research/Subject files series focuses on her courses and publications, with a particular focus on Durham, NC, African-American organizations, and well-known individuals. A few research items predate Brown's birth. The Course Materials series contains subject and course files she used in her teaching, with an emphasis on African-American studies and oral histories. The Academia series provides information regarding her preparation as a historian, as well as material related to her job talks and lectures, professional activities, and book projects. The Publications series provides various publications related to African-American history, both privately published and from the popular press.

Collection

Gilmore Ward Bryant papers, 1860s-1933 2.0 Linear Feet — 3 boxes; 35 items

The collection concerns the Bryant family, who came to Durham, North Carolina to found the Southern Conservatory of Music. There are seven diary volumes: five by James Alonzo Bryant, Gilmore's father and a Bethel, Vermont farmer, and two by Mattie E. Bryant, Gilmore's wife and voice teacher; 19th and early 20th century tintypes, an ambrotype, an albumen print, and gelatin silver photographs of members of the Bryant, Clark, Bird, Dean, Chamberlain, and McConoll families from Vermont, and others; sheet and manuscript music by Bryant; and a copy of the 1920-1921 illustrated Southern Conservatory "Calendar," as well as a sheet of examination grades.

Gilmore Ward Bryant (1859-1946), originally from Bethel, Vermont, founded the Southern Conservatory of Music in Durham in 1898 or 1899, along with his wife, Mattie E. Bryant. The collection contains seven diary volumes: five by James Alonzo Bryant, Gilmore's father and a Vermont farmer, containing brief entries related to the weather, visitors, farm tasks and sales, and church activities; and two by Mattie Bryant, containing brief entries about weather, church activities, visitors, and Conservatory events.

The collection is rich in photographs depicting members of the Bryant, Clark, Bird, Dean, Chamberlain, and McConoll families from Vermont, and others. There are 19th and early 20th century tintypes, many mounted in two small personal albums; an ambrotype; an albumen print; and gelatin silver photographs.

The Conservatory's history and Bryant's career in music are represented by published and manuscript sheet music composed by Bryant (there is also one piece by P.A. Schnecker), and a sheet of examination grades. A copy of the 77-page illustrated "Calendar" of the Southern Conservatory of Music, contains information about its mission, faculty, administration, facilities, and programs, accompanied by many images of the Conservatory building, its faculty and staff, interior rooms, and students at practice.

Collection

Wyatt T. Dixon papers, 1850s-1987 3.6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2700 Items

The Wyatt T. Dixon Papers span the 1850s to 1987, although the bulk of the material dates from 1918 to the 1960s. The collection consists of diaries, vintage photographs, photomechanical prints, postcards, clippings, correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, printed materials, forms, military records, leaflets, and maps. The Photographs Series comprises the largest portion of the collection. The collection documents the history of Durham, N.C., the Dixon family, activities of the United States Army, American Expeditionary Forces, 30th Division, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, from 1917 to 1919; Durham, North Carolina; and Dixon's career as a journalist.

The World War I Series chronicles the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, which consisted primarily of men from Durham, N.C. Dixon's diaries chronicle the unit's movements and activities in the United States and Europe including England, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Battery C was involved in the Saint Michiel offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. The diaries describe camp life in the United States and Europe, including daily routines; camp conditions; outbreaks of measles and other medical situations; and the soldiers' personal recreational activities. The journey by ship to Europe is also described in detail, including the sale of food to the soldiers and the conditions on board. Civilian responses to the soldiers as they visited or traveled through towns and cities in America, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg are noted throughout the diaries. Dixon mentions a unit of African-American soldiers was at Mont Dore, France. There are some snapshot photographs of Battery C which Dixon probably created with his Kodak camera and some formal panoramic photographs of the entire unit. Letters written by Dixon and his family while he was in the Army are found in the Writings Series.

The Writings Series contains some personal correspondence and a diary, but the bulk of the series documents Dixon's career as a writer for newspapers published by the Durham Herald Company in Durham, N.C. In his column "How Times Do Change," Dixon described life in Durham and the surrounding area and the manner in which cityscapes and social life had changed over the past decades.

The Photographs Series consists primarily of photographs and documents social life and cityscapes in Durham, N.C. Images include buildings such as banks, businesses, cemeteries, churches, court houses, dams and power plants, hospitals, hotels and inns, plantations (abandoned), post offices, schools, and tobacco warehouses and factories. There are street scenes and aerial views. Many of these local images appear to have been collected by Dixon to illustrate his articles. Pictures of people include portraits of family members and friends, and candid scenes of groups engaged in social activities. There are images of events such as holiday celebrations and parades. Transportation, including trolleys, buses, fire fighting equipment and train depots, is also documented.

The Durham Printed Materials Series and the Miscellaneous Series include information about the City of Durham and Durham County, genealogical information about Dixon's family, and the minutes book of a social club for young men.

Collection
Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

Collection

ECOS records, 1969 - 2001 1.5 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

ECOS (Environmentally Conscious Organization of Students) is a Duke University and Durham, N.C. environmental activist group founded in 1969. ECOS is also known as the Environmental Alliance. The records of ECOS include articles of incorporation, event reports, member lists, ECOS constitutions, bylaws, minutes, correspondence, printed e-mail correspondence, a webpage printout, financial materials, clippings, flyers, meeting announcements, and newsletters. Major subjects include Duke University students, ECOS, Duke Environmental Center, Durham (N.C.) history, New Hope Dam, Eno River State Park, environmental protection, public interest groups, political activity, and student groups. Materials range in date from 1969 to 1990 (bulk 1970-1973). English.

The ECOS records include correspondence, establishment and governance documents, meeting minutes, events information, financial materials, a statement of purpose, and materials relating to ECOS projects and causes. The most significant ECOS projects within these records include the Eno River Park project, the New Hope Dam project, and Carolina Power and Light Company's proposed power plant in Wake County. The records also include publicity, clippings, and other printed material related to ECOS, the Duke Environmental Center, and the Environmental Coordinating Council at Duke.

Collection

Building Reference collection, 1972 - 2004 3.5 Linear Feet — 4,000 Items

The Building Reference Collection contains files of clippings, images, publications, specifications, and other materials about the Duke University campus, including dormitories, classroom buildings, gymnasiums, stadiums, facilities, statues, and landmarks. Some files include information about the people after whom particular buildings were named. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.
Collection

Washington Duke papers, 1764-1987 2.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 967 Items

Collection contains business and financial papers, chiefly of Washington Duke. Business and financial papers relate to the tobacco and textile industries and include some early financial records of W. Duke, Sons and Company. Other financial records pertain to Duke's generosity to relatives and to educational institutions such as Trinity College (now Duke University). Personal papers consist of correspondence, the Duke family genealogy, photographs, and memorabilia from the dedication of the Duke Homestead.

The bulk of the papers of Washington Duke, a tobacco manufacturer and philanthropist, date from 1890 to 1905, but the papers include items as early as 1764 and as late as 1987. The collection is a created one; materials from several sources have been brought together to form the Washington Duke Papers. The collection relates primarily to the financial and philanthropic interests of Washington Duke after his retirement from W. Duke, Sons and Company in 1880. There are five series: Correspondence, Financial Papers, Genealogical Papers, Legal Papers, and Miscellaneous Papers.

The Correspondence Series begins with two letters (photocopies) written by Washington Duke in 1863, when he was preparing to enter the Confederate Army. After the war Mr. Duke began establishing his tobacco business. This series contains no correspondence for the period 1865-1889. The bulk of the correspondence covers the period 1890-1905, after Mr. Duke had retired from the tobacco business. These letters reveal his financial and philanthropic interests after retirement. Letters come from the following sources:

  • 1. Relatives, seeking aid or sending thanks for gifts.
  • 2. Methodist Episcopal Church, South, members and ministers seeking assistance for church buildings, furnishings, orphans, widows, and missionaries.
  • 3. Schools and colleges asking for aid or expressing appreciation for aid given. Louisburg Female College, Rutherford College, Trinity College and Kittrell College were among those writing about finances. The orphanage at Oxford was supported for a number of years. Many students, both black and white, sought financial assistance from Mr. Duke in the way of scholarships or loans.
  • 4. Business associates or would-be partners seeking financial assistance or employment. These letters are largely concerned with textiles and tobacco. For example there are letters reflecting Mr. Duke's encouragement of black capitalism in the founding of the Coleman Manufacturing Company at Concord, N.C.
  • 5. People who were ill or unlucky, many of them very impoverished.

The letters in the Correspondence Series dated 1975-1976 are concerned with Washington Duke's dealings with the J. W. Scott and Company in Greensboro, N.C. (1871) and the nomination of St. Joseph's A.M.E Church in Durham to the National Register of Historic Places. This series does not include any original letters written by Washington Duke.

The Financial Papers Series consists of records of Washington Duke's business interests and philanthropy. The oldest volume is a ledger (1873-1877), kept at the time Washington Duke and his sons moved their factory from the farm to Durham. Duke tobacco products were being shipped to markets from Maine to California, including locations in frontier Montana. An account book for the Durham Warehouse covers the period 1876-1884 and gives an interesting glimpse of the beginnings of Duke tobacco organization. Records were kept of purchases of tobacco, promotion trips to Europe and Australia (1883-1884), and the entry of George Washington Watts into the firm (1878).

A summary of the personal finances of Washington Duke is noted in financial papers dating from 1893 until the time of his death in 1905. These records include a journal, ledger, cashbook, and check stubs. They are parallel in content and supplement each other; they appear to have been the work of his private secretary, James E. Stagg.

The journal (1893-1905) indicates gifts to family, relatives, and individuals, as well as transactions with institutions such as the White Rock Baptist Church, St. Joseph's AME Church, Louisburg Female College, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. Businesses noted include the American Tobacco Company, the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, Cary Lumber Company, together with a number of cotton mills, railroads, and banks.

The cashbook (1893-1905) lists, in more detail, dividends from investments as well as donations to individuals and institutions over a period of a decade or more. Washington Duke was consistently generous to his immediate family and his many nieces and nephews. His tithing to the church covered gifts to the Main Street Methodist Church, ministers, Negro churches, orphanages and schools. With the coming of Trinity College to Durham, he made generous contributions to its finances, including small gifts to the baseball team and to the library for book stacks. The check stubs cover the period 1899 to 1905. The final entry refers to the balance transferred to his sons after Washington Duke's death.

The ledger (1893-1904) contains accounts listing mills, railroads, and other property. Also included are notations concerning rents, personal expenses, tithes and repairs. Many names of Durham citizens appear here.

The Genealogical Papers Series contains the Washington Duke family Bible (1861) as well as family trees and correspondence regarding lineage and descendants of Duke family members. The bulk of the material is photocopies from the James B. Duke Papers, including copies of letters which detail what Washington Duke remembered about his family.

The Legal Papers Series includes copies of court, marriage, and property records pertaining to the Duke family and its settlement in Orange County, in the vicinity of present-day Durham, N.C. Other papers include a copy of Washington Duke's last will and testament (1900) and the indenture establishing the Doris Duke Trust (1925).

The Miscellaneous Papers Series is composed of pictures, clippings, and general materials. The pictures are primarily photographs of homes, people, and tobacco factories. They have no dates and many are copies of originals on permanent loan to the Duke Homestead, a National Historic site. The homes include those of Taylor Duke (presumed) and Washington Duke, as well as interior views of rooms at the Duke Homestead. There are pictures of Washington Duke and of his statue and of three buildings on the Duke Farm used as tobacco factories prior to the move to Durham.

Clippings are family and business related dating from 1890-1987. A Memorial Album of notices on the death of Washington Duke (1905) is arranged alphabetically by city.

General materials relate to the Duke Homestead and include a variety of other printed and manuscript items. Among them are a Tribute to Bishop Marvin, ca. 1877 (photocopy); Resolution of Thanks and Appreciation, St. Joseph's AME to Washington Duke, 1902; a Resolution by the Board of Directors of the Fidelity Bank in memory of Washington Duke (1905); and a manuscript list of persons sending condolences/flowers on the death of Washington Duke, 1905. Photostats of two records in the C.S.A. Archives in the National Archives are concerned with the Civil War career of Washington Duke. One, dated April 4, 1864, is a report for Co. A of the Camp Guard by Captain George B. Baker, Assistant Quartermaster at Camp Holmes, Raleigh. The second item is a list of men who signed up for three years service in the Confederate Navy. Washington Duke's signature appears on both of these documents.

Collection
Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt (née Rochelle, 1881-1980) was the daughter of Durham merchant Leander Sydney and Jeanette Stanley Rochelle. She was the fourth and final wife of Brodie L. Duke and a Durham landowner in her own right. The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt Papers date from 1889 to 1980 and chronicle the personal life of Wylanta as well as the business and financial transactions which she conducted as a prominent landowner in Durham. Materials include correspondence, photographs, and financial records.

The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers date from 1889 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials from the 1920s and 1930s. The collection chronicles Wylanta's familial and social life as well as her business dealings.

The Correspondence Series contains primarily incoming correspondence from Wylanta's sister, Hettie, nieces and nephews, and husbands as well as letters to and from a wide range of friends and Durham citizens. It contains a number of holiday greeting and sympathy cards, but does not contain any correspondence explicitly addressed to Brodie L. Duke.

The Clippings Series includes excerpts from newspaper columns and articles which Wylanta collected throughout her life. These clippings include the regular opinion column written by Wylanta's brother, Zapheus A. Rochelle, notes from the society section chronicling Wylanta and others' visits and travels, and coverage of Wylanta and Stayhorn's 1923 motor vehicle accident in Nice, France, as well as other political and social subjects.

The Financial Records Series encompasses deposit slips, receipts, dividend notices, ledgers, and correspondence evidencing Wylanta's business transactions. The series also contains information about her property ownership in the city of Durham.

The Miscellaneous Series contains assorted handwritten notes and printed commercial images.

The Photographs Series includes a number of portraits of Wylanta, her husbands and her family as well as numerous images of as-yet unidentified individuals. The materials include images of Wylanta in her wedding gowns, snapshots, and portraits. There are also a handful of images of places and an early x-ray of Wylanta's arm following an accident.

Collection
Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company founded, 1884 by J. A., J. M., and W. R. Odell, W. H. Branson, and Julian S. Carr. Headquarters in Durham, N.C. Dissolved, 1940. Letterpress copybooks, invoices, cancelled checks, check stubs, receipt books, and invoices and accounts from Joshua L. Baily and Co., Philadelphia brokers who sold goods for the company. Most of the material represents the years 1915-1934. Includes information on fluctuations in cotton prices, export trade in cotton cloth, types of cloth and machinery, freight rates, salaries, workers' medical care, tenement rents, stockholders, dividends, and distribution of excess profits.

Letterpress copybooks, invoices, cancelled checks, check stubs, receipt books, and invoices and accounts from Joshua L. Baily and Co., Philadelphia brokers who sold goods for the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company, headquartered in Durham, N.C. Most of the material represents the years 1915-1934. Includes information on fluctuations in cotton prices, export trade in cotton cloth, types of cloth and machinery, freight rates, salaries, workers' medical care, tenement rents, stockholders, dividends, and distribution of excess profits.

Collection
Durham county is a county in northeast central North Carolina. The county was formed in 1881. Collection materials are predominantly arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps.

Collection materials are predominately arranged in chronological order beginning in 1870. Within the chronology, decades are broken down by subject. Subjects include: activism, art, business, churches, clubs, courts, education, landmarks, minorities, politics, public works, publications, senior citizens, the Watts Hospital, women, YMCA/YWCA. Subject folders contain miscellaneous manuscripts and printed materials, including numerous leaflets, booklets, pamphlets, and maps. Collection is heavy in Durham Arts Council and related Durham-area arts publications and materials, workers' rights campaigns and African American political mobility. Some parts of the collection are unprocessed. Finding aid represents present ordering of folders, box labels, and box order.

Collection
Collection comprises letters, bills, time books, ledgers, check stubs, inventories, broadsides, stock certificates, dye house records, and other materials. The bulk of the letters, 1895-1897, date to George M. Graham's service as secretary and treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Company, as do many of the volumes. Topics include machinery and supplies purchased from firms in the North, newly organized textile mills in the South, the installation and repair of machinery, the sale of hosiery, the purchase of yarn, wages offered, and the hiring of laborers.

Collection comprises records, letters, bills, time books, ledgers, check stubs, inventories, broadsides, stock certificates, dye house records, letterbooks, accounts of loopers, cash books, and express books. The bulk of the letters, 1895-1897, date to George M. Graham's service as secretary and treasurer of the Durham Hosiery Company, as do many of the volumes. Topics include machinery and supplies purchased from firms in the North, newly organized textile mills in the South, the installation and repair of machinery, the sale of hosiery, the purchase of yarn, wages offered, and the hiring of laborers. Southern textile mills mentioned include the Raleigh Cotton Mills, the Eden Park Cotton Mill of Atlanta, Ga., the McCall Manufacturing Co. of McCall, S.C., the Eno Cotton Mills of Hillsboro, N.C.; the Mayo Mills of Mayodan, N.C., the Clover Cotton Manfacturing Co. of Clover, S.C., and the Kerr Thread Company of Atlanta, Ga.

Collection
The Durham Bicentennial Commission, officially registered as the Durham-County American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, was a Durham County, N.C. organization responsible for coordinating and planning events to celebrate the American Bicentennial in 1976. Collection contains materials relating to the various activities sponsored by the Commission, the members of the various committees, financial records in the collection and the participants in the Folklife and Summer Arts festivals held in 1976. The lists of potential participants and actual participants name numerous artists, craftpersons, and musicians. Included also are three oversize maps of the NC Bicentennial Folklife Festival grounds. The official name of the Commission as registered with the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration was The Durham-County American Revolution Bicentennial Commission.

Collection contains materials relating to the various activities sponsored by the Commission, the members of the various committees, financial records in the collection and the participants in the Folklife and Summer Arts festivals held in 1976. The lists of potential participants and actual participants name numerous artists, craftpersons, and musicians. Included also are three oversize maps of the NC Bicentennial Folklife Festival grounds. The official name of the Commission as registered with the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration was the Durham-County American Revolution Bicentennial Commission.

Collection

Durham Theatre Guild records, 1946-1994 12 Linear Feet — 8500 Items

Community theatre of Durham County, North Carolina. Established in 1947 and disbanded in 1994. The collection includes account books; tax and insurance records; board meeting minutes (dating from 1946-1994); scrapbooks and scrapbook files, arranged alphabetically (dating from 1950-1994); posters and handbills of the Durham Theatre Guild; audio and videocassettes; news clippings and photographs; and various ephemera, including buttons and t-shirts (dating from 1950-1993).

The collection includes account books; tax and insurance records; board meeting minutes (dating from 1946-1994); scrapbooks and scrapbook files, arranged alphabetically (dating from 1950-1994); posters and handbills of the Durham Theatre Guild; audio and videocassettes; news clippings and photographs; and various ephemera, including buttons and t-shirts (dating from 1950-1993).

Collection

Jesse Harrison Epperson papers, 1915-1959 0.25 Linear Feet — 1 box

Dr. J.H. Epperson (1889-1958) was a resident of Durham, N.C. and director of the Durham County Public Health Department. Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to his life and career. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings center around Durham public health and sanitation history in the early 20th century, including efforts to combat communicable diseases such as tuberculosis and venereal disease in both white and African American populations. Includes 19 black-and-white photographs, mostly local news photographs, among which are 1920s views of downtown Durham, N.C.; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915; portraits of nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and a 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial women.

Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to the life and career of Dr. J. H. Epperson, from his appointment in 1915 to the newly-formed Durham, N.C. Department of Health to his death in 1958. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings (1915-1958) center around Durham public health and sanitation history, including efforts by Epperson and his staff to establish regulations for the safe production of milk, and to combat typhus, polio, tuberculosis, venereal disease, and other infectious diseases among both white and African American populations in early 20th century Durham City and County.

The correspondence chiefly consists of a few congratulatory exchanges between Epperson and Wilburt C. Davidson, Dean of the Duke University Medical School, where Epperson held a teaching position, and condolence letters to Epperson's widow. There is also one personal letter written by Epperson to his daughter and son-in-law.

Also in the collection are 19 black-and-white photographs (1915-1958), chiefly 8x10 inch Durham Herald-Sun press photographs, whose subjects include early views of Durham, N.C., 1920s; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915 with Epperson and staff; portraits of Epperson in his offices and at meetings; nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and meeting and conference attendees, including a group attending a conference on preventing venereal disease. A nursing staff member who appears in several photographs with Epperson is an Elizabeth O'Kelly. Of note is a large 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial, standing with Epperson and several staff on a flight of steps outside the Durham County Courthouse, where the Health Department was located.

Collection

Evans family papers, 1920s-1990s 24 Linear Feet — 5609 Items

Collection contains correspondence, scrapbooks, albums, clippings, addresses, writings, and other materials that concern the personal lives and careers of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel J. ("Mutt") and Sara Evans, and their sons, Robert and Eli. Mutt Evans's mayoral correspondence is divided into a general file and a subject file. Some materials depict the private lives of the Evanses, including photographs, albums, and personal correspondence. Sara's family, the Nachamsons, is often represented. The collection also includes extensive documentation about Sara's role in Hadassah, both locally and nationally, as well as the family's participation in other Isareli and Jewish causes. Also included are materials from their work in developing and fundraising for the Judaic Studies Program at Duke University.

Collection contains correspondence, scrapbooks, albums, clippings, addresses, writings, and other materials that concern the personal lives and careers of the Evans family, particularly Emanuel J. and Sara Evans, their sons, Eli and Robert, and Emanuel's brother, Monroe. The family owned and operated United Department Stores, and for twelve years, 1951 to 1963, Emanuel Evans was mayor of Durham, NC. He was also very active in his synagogue, was a president of VISTAS, and participated actively in the University of North Carolina's Alumni Association.

There are two scrapbooks on Emanuel Evans's mayoral terms and a similar volume and other materials devoted to Mrs. Evans's activities as leader of Hadassah including items pertaining to Israel. Mr. Evans's mayoral correspondence is divided into a general file and a subject file. In pictures and personal correspondence, the Nachamson family is often represented. One early clipping from a Fayetteville, N.C. newspaper, tells of Mr. Evans's sister being refused teaching positions because of her Jewish faith. Eli Evans is a correspondent and writer, led the establishment of the National Jewish Archives of Broadcasting, and was on the staff of the Carnegie Foundation that helped launch "Sesame Street." He was president of the UNC student body and a number of items in the collection concern his presidency.

Also included is an address of Eli Evans presented during the conference on Southern-Jewish history in 1976, Eli Evans's vita, his unpublished diary of the Kissinger shuttle, and a large number of his writings, many concerning U.S. politics, minorities, and Jews in the South. There is a reprint of a chapter from his book, The Provincials, and reports from the Charles H. Revson Foundation, of which he is president. Also included are materials concerning Eli's brother Robert, a correspondent with CBS, who continued on as a television executive. Their uncle, Monroe Evans, was mayor of Fayetteville, NC, and his service is documented in several of the collection's scrapbooks.

One entire scrapbook is devoted to the writings of Mildred and Madeline Evans, Monroe's wife and daughter.

The audiovisual series contains a 16mm film copy of a 1957 episode of Edward R. Murrow's "See It Now," with which Robert Evans was involved, and a 16mm film copy of Governor Terry Sanford's November 1964 appearance on WUNC-TV, in which he reflects on his governorship and the current political scene. Several audio recordings capture Sara Evans addressing the Seaboard Regional Conference of Hadassah in 1982. Eli N. Evans's appearance on Richard D. Heffner's The Open Mind is documented.

Collection
Attorney in Durham, N.C. His wife and son were also prominent N.C. lawyers. The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971. Collection includes Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling Everett's professional career, his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. In addition, transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the Special Collections file server.

The R. O. Everett Papers span the years 1913-1971, centered around Everett's extensive diaries, 1915-1971, chronicling in detail Everett's professional career beginning in Durham N.C., his interests, his family's careers, and social, civic and historical aspects of life in Durham, N.C. Of particular interest are his discussions of legal cases and local politics. The collection also contains a small amount of correspondence, clippings, lecture notes, printed material, pictures, and other papers. Transcripts for all the diaries in the collection have been converted to electronic documents that have been transferred to the librar file server. Please contact Research Services for access to these files before coming to use the collection.