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American Dance Festival Archives
American Dance Festival Archives

The American Dance Festival Archives serves as the repository for records of enduring historical value created and collected by ADF. The Archives preserves its collections for use by the dance community, including students, scholars, and the general public.

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The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection consists of materials collected by the American Dance Festival pertaining to choreographers, dance companies, and others involved in modern dance, including printed materials, newspaper and magazine clippings, press kits, programs, and correspondence.

The collection consists of materials collected by the American Dance Festival pertaining to choreographers, dance companies, and others involved in modern dance, including printed materials, newspaper and magazine clippings, press kits, programs, and correspondence.

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The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

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The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. Contains correspondence, lists, administrative materials, memoranda, contracts, legal documents, financial records, class schedules, teaching materials, student records, clippings, press releases, publicity materials, brochures, tickets, posters, and other printed materials created by or related to the American Dance Festival.

Contains correspondence, lists, administrative materials, memoranda, contracts, legal documents, financial records, class schedules, teaching materials, student records, clippings, press releases, publicity materials, brochures, tickets, posters, and other printed materials created by or related to the American Dance Festival before the decision to move to Durham, North Carolina, in the fall of 1977.

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Anna Halprin (b. 1920) is a pioneering dancer and choreographer of the post-modern dance movement. She founded the San Francisco Dancer's Workshop in 1955 as a center for movement training, artistic experimentation, and public participatory events open to the local community. Halprin has created 150 full-length dance theater works and is the recipient of numerous awards including the 1997 Samuel H. Scripps Award for Lifetime Achievement in Modern Dance from the American Dance Festival. Her students include Meredith Monk, Trisha Brown, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Ruth Emmerson, Sally Gross, and many others. Collection includes books, magazines, photographic prints, clippings, flyers, written correspondence, programs, essays, and other printed materials.

Collection includes books, magazines, photographic prints, clippings, flyers, written correspondence, programs, essays, and other printed materials.

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Charles Reinhart Management, Inc. (CRMI) was involved in dance company management, festival production, grant-funded projects, and assorted professional services. Collection includes correspondence, printed material, and business and financial records created by Charles L. Reinhart and the employees of Charles Reinhart Management, Inc., 1951-2008.

Collection includes correspondence, printed material, and business and financial records created by Charles L. Reinhart and the employees of Charles Reinhart Management, Inc., 1951-2008. Some personal papers of Charles L. Reinhart are also included.

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Dance Pages (circa 1983-1997), a quarterly magazine, presented its readers with articles about a wide range of dance genres, performances, companies, and individual dancers. The magazine also contained studio listings, book and video reviews, and information about dance history and health. Kenneth Romo and Donna Gianell, both professional dancers, created Dance Pages as a hobby, and they continued to serve as the publishers and editors of the magazine as it grew in size and scope. In 1995, the magazine changed names, becoming Dance & the Arts, and moved to a bimonthly publication schedule. The magazine ceassed publication in 1997. The collection includes publicity information, magazines, drafts of articles and advertisements, paste-ups for advertisements and magazine features, newspaper clippings, press kits, programs, flyers, brochures, catalogs, invoices, personal and professional correspondence, photographs, contact sheets, negatives, 35 mm slides, and transparencies.

The collection contains the records of Dance Pages, which were collected or created during the production of the magazine, as well as copies of the magazine from 1987 to 1997. Records were typically filed by subject or person rather than by type of record, so files contain a range of materials. The majority of the Dance Pages records are subject files, which primarily contain publicity information such as photographs and press releases for dance companies, dancers, schools, teachers, artists, musicians, filmmakers, photographers, performance venues, events, performances, and other dance-related topics. In addition to publicity materials, subject folders can contain drafts of articles and advertisements, paste-ups for advertisements and magazine features, illustrated graphics, press clippings, correspondence, invoices, brochures, flyers, programs, 35 mm slides, and negatives. The collection also contains administrative files, which hold materials related to magazine contributors, personnel, and business management. While the collection includes some financial documentation and correspondence, these materials are filed with the subject to which they pertain and are therefore distributed throughout the collection.

The materials housed within the collection are in a variety of formats, including paper-based records, magazines, paste-ups, illustrated graphics, newspaper clippings, press kits, programs, flyers, brochures, and catalogs, as well as photographs, contact sheets, negatives, 35 mm slides, and transparencies.

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Dr. Charles Rudolph "Chuck" Davis or Baba Chuck (1937-2017) was an African American dancer, choreographer, and founder of the African American Dance Ensemble, the Chuck Davis Dance Company, and the annual DanceAfrica Festival. Collection includes correspondence, paper based records, printed materials, teaching materials, programs, posters, publications, newspaper clippings, conference materials, notebooks, photographs, negatives, slides, super 8 film, artwork, and various other types of memorabilia.

Collection includes correspondence, paper based records, printed materials, teaching materials, programs, posters, post cards, publications, newspaper clippings, conference materials, notebooks, photographs, negatives, slides, super 8 film, artwork, and various other types of memorabilia

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Ethel Tison Chaffin was born on January 13, 1921 in Natchitoches, LA. From childhood on, she took dance classes with a variety of instructors and, as a college student, studied dance at Louisiana State University, New York University, the University of Maryland, and Bennington College. Instructors included John Martin (former dance critic at the New York Times), Charles Weidman (Humphrey-Weidman Technique), Ethel Butler (Martha Graham Technique), and Nina Fornoff (Hanya Holm Technique). Ms. Chaffin also participated in master classes with Martha Graham and Katherine Manning. The collection contains the personal papers and dance-related memorabilia (circa 1930-1993) of Ethel Tison Chaffin. Materials include photographic prints, newspaper clippings, programs, and correspondence, which are housed within a scrapbook and one Hollinger box. Many of the materials are annotated by Ms. Chaffin.

The collection contains the personal papers and dance-related memorabilia (circa 1930-1993) of Ethel Tison Chaffin. Materials include photographic prints, newspaper clippings, programs, and correspondence, which are housed within a scrapbook and one Hollinger box. Many of the materials are annotated by Ms. Chaffin.

Included in the scrapbook are Ms. Chaffin's personal photographs documenting her involvement in dance and theater. These photographs depict several of her earliest dance recitals, university dance performances, and her 1948 performance as Laura in Tennessee William's The Glass Menagerie. In addition, she has incorporated photos of colleagues in the dance world. Also included within the scrapbook is correspondence between Ms. Chaffin and various educational institutions regarding admission to advanced dance programs at New York University and Bennington College, as well as job enquiries. Ms. Chaffin documented her career as an instructor by incorporating programs, clippings, and advertisements from her private studio, as well as those relevant to her tenure at Louisiana State University, the University of Alabama, and the Georgia State College for Women (now Georgia College) into the pages of her scrapbook. Memorabilia, including programs from festivals and performances that she attended, is also included within her scrapbook.

Records created after the compilation of the scrapbook are housed separately in a Hollinger box. Materials incorporated into this record set include correspondence with Elizabeth Andrews, educator and dance/drama critic, as well as newspaper clippings for a variety of well-known dancers and choreographers, including George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Charles Weidman, Merce Cunningham, and José Limón.

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Free to Dance: The African-American Presence in Modern Dance was a three-part television documentary co-produced by the American Dance Festival and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in association with Thirteen/WNET New York. The series aired on PBS' Great Performances: Dance in America in 2001. It chronicled the role of African-American choreographers and dancers in the development of modern dance as an American art form. The collection includes film, video, sound recordings, oral histories, interview transcripts, business records, photographs, clippings, and research materials created or collected during the production of the three-part television documentary Free to Dance.

The collection includes business records, grant proposals, correspondence, film, video, sound recordings, oral histories, interview transcripts, photographs, clippings, and research materials created or collected during the production of the three-part television documentary Free to Dance.

The bulk of the Free to Dance Collection dates from 1998 to 2001, when technical production of the series took place; however, the collection also includes grant proposals and early project development documentation dating back to 1987, as well as some correspondence and financial information created after its air date in 2001.

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Gerald E. Myers papers, 1979-1988 0.21 Linear Feet — 100 items

Gerald E. Myers (1923-2009) was a professor of philosophy and the philosopher-in-residence at the American Dance Festival. This collection contains documents pertaining to Gerald Myers' participation in American Dance Festival programs funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities between 1979 and 1988.

This collection contains documents pertaining to Gerald Myers' participation in American Dance Festival programs funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities between 1979 and 1988.