Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

Back to top
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Level Collection Remove constraint Level: Collection Repository David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library Remove constraint Repository: David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Number of results to display per page
View results as:

Search Results

Collection
Zuriel Waterman was a physician from Cranston, Rhode Island and served as a surgeon aboard several American privateers during the Revolutionary War. He relocated to Edenton, North Carolina after the war. Commonplace book, dated circa 1769-1774, appears to have been created by Zuriel Waterman and Sarah Dean. The name Sarah Dean appears on the inside cover, but many later entries written in a different hand are attributed to Zuriel Waterman. The book contains a number of excerpts, verse, and other writings including: "A Chronological Table of Epithets of the Kings of England," "Versus on Mr. George Whitefield," "A Short and True Description of North Carolina and its Inhabitants," and "Care for bite of a mad dog." Also included is a count of inhabitants in the colony of Rhode Island by locale and race, a sketch of the city of Troy, a petition of the Continental Congress to the King of England, and various religious and political writings.

Commonplace book, dated circa 1769-1774, appears to have been created by Zuriel Waterman and Sarah Dean. The name Sarah Dean appears on the inside cover, but many later entries written in a different hand are attributed to Zuriel Waterman. The book contains a number of excerpts, verse, and other writings including: "A Chronological Table of Epithets of the Kings of England," "Versus on Mr. George Whitefield," "A Short and True Description of North Carolina and its Inhabitants," and "Care for bite of a mad dog." Also included is a count of inhabitants in the colony of Rhode Island by locale and race, a sketch of the city of Troy, a petition of the Continental Congress to the King of England, and various religious and political writings.

Collection

Zora J. Murff photographs, 2013-2015 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 color inkjet prints

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa.

In the artist's statement, also included in the collection, Murff writes: "From 2012 to 2015, I worked as a Tracker for Linn County Juvenile Detention and Diversion Services in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. As a Tracker, I provided services to youths who were convicted of crimes, adjudicated, and subsequently ordered to complete probation...Through employing ideas of anonymity, voyeurism, and introspection, 'Corrections' is an examination of youth experience in the system, the role images play in defining someone who is deemed a 'criminal,' and how the concepts of privacy and control may affect their future."

This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Zerah C. Whipple letter, 1873 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection contains a 4-page letter (7 March 1873) Whipple wrote to Jeremiah Hacker, a Maine reformer, abolition advocate, journalist, and publisher of "The Pleasure Boat." Whipple mentions an article Hacker wrote for "The Voice of Peace," as well as his admiration for "The Pleasure Boat" and "N.P. Rogers' Newspaper Writings." He also discusses his difficulty printing "The Voice of Peace," and the increase in pacifism since the end of the Civil War, noting that abolitionists and industrialists Adin Ballou and E. D. Draper were constant in their support of peace, while members of the utopian Hopedale Community were "untrue to the professions of years." Whipple included a printed photograph with his letter.
Collection
Yusuf Salim (1929-2008) was a jazz musician and composer who began his career in Baltimore in the 1940s. He moved to Durham, North Carolina in the 1970s where he taught jazz workshops through the Salaam Cultural Center and hosted a series on WUNC-TV. The collection contains manuscripts of 36 lead sheets for Salim's jazz compositions, a piece of prose by Salim, and a photocopy of an article about him from the Raleigh News and Observer.

The Yusuf Salim Collection (chiefly undated, but some dated between 1982 and 1987) has as its focal point manuscripts of 36 lead sheets for Salim's jazz compositions. One additional folder contains a piece of writing by Salim and a photocopy of an article on him from the Raleigh News and Observer from 1987. Acquired as part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

Collection

Youth Noise Network records, 2000-2005 0.5 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Youth Noise Network (YNN) is a youth radio project based at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. YNN brings together a diverse group of Durham teenagers to produce a weekly radio show that addresses current issues of particular concern to teens. YNN participants learn various aspects of the documentary arts and produce their own audio documentaries. Collection includes some printed materials about youth radio as well as audiovisual materials that are closed to use until preservation copies can be made. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection includes some printed materials about youth radio as well as audiovisual materials that are closed to use until preservation copies can be made. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection
Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

Collection

York & Son human anatomy and physiology glass lantern slides, between 1888-1900 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 38 slides; one wooden storage box (empty) — 3 1/4 x 3 14/ inches — 38 slides; one wooden storage box

Collection is made up of three commercial sets of instructional black-and-white glass lantern slides (3 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches) that accompanied lectures on human anatomy for general audiences. They were produced sometime between 1888 and 1900. The first set (17 slides of about 50 in the original set) is titled "Human physiology, popularly explained," and illustrates aspects of the neurological, cardiovascular, muscular, and skeletal systems. The second series (18 slides of about 40) has as its title "The heart and its action." The third set (3 slides) offers microscopic views of liver and bone cells, and tooth structure. The images in the first set are based on illustrations by English author, scientist, and teacher William S. Furneaux. The sets were produced by York & Son, London, and distributed by a Glasgow optician, J. Lizars. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection is made up of three commercial sets of black-and-white glass lantern slides that accompanied lectures on human anatomy for general audiences. They were produced sometime between 1888 and 1900. The slides measure 3 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches (83x83 mm), and the glass plates are bound with black paper. Most of the slides have titles printed along the edges of the paper mounts.

The first set (17 slides out of about 50 in the original set) is titled Human physiology popularly explained, and illustrates aspects of neurological, cardiovascular, muscular, and skeletal systems. Among the slides of the thorax and its organs is an image showing the effects of the "tight lacing" on women's corsets. As indicated on the title slide, the detailed images in the set are based on illustrations by English author, teacher, and naturalist William S. Furneaux.

The second set (18 slides of about 40) has as its title The heart and its action, and illustrates all aspects of the cardiovascular system, including pulmonary and neurological anatomy. The illustrator is unknown.

The third set (3 slides) offers microscopic cross-sections of the human liver, bone, and tooth. The slides are part of a set called Microscopic gems: from the three kingdoms of nature.

All three lecture sets were produced in the late 19th century and perhaps into the first years of the 20th century by the firm York & Son, as evidenced by the presence on each slide of the London firm's "snake" trademark on a paper label.

These lecture sets were distributed widely by a number of optical and photographic firms. Two sets in this collection were sold through a Glasgow optician, J. Lizars, whose trademark label also appears on most of the slides in the first and third sets.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection
Yōko Hioki was born about 1938 and was a resident of Ōmiya-shi, Saitama, Japan, near Tokyō. Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by Yōko Hioki primarily featuring her family and school. She was a 9th grader in 1953. There are 128 albumen and gelatin silver photographs ranging in size from 0.875 x 1.375-inches to 7.75 x 5.5-inches. The majority of the photographs are captioned. The first photograph in the album is a group family photograph taken sometime during the war, before the deployment of one of her family members. In addition, besides several pictures of Yōko, there are group and individual photographs of her school teachers and classmates, including reunion photographs, and many images of class field trips, including one trip to Nikko. There are also casual and formal individual and group images of Yōko's family, including those taken at a birthday party for her sister.

Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by Yōko Hioki primarily featuring her family and school. She was a 9th grader in 1953. There are 128 albumen and gelatin silver photographs ranging in size from 0.875 x 1.375-inches to 7.75 x 5.5-inches. The majority of the photographs are captioned. The first photograph in the album is a group family photograph taken sometime during the war, before the deployment of one of her family members. In addition, besides several pictures of Yōko, there are group and individual photographs of her school teachers and classmates, including reunion photographs, and many images of class field trips, including one trip to Nikko. There are also casual and formal individual and group images of Yōko's family, including those taken at a birthday party for her sister.

Collection

Yehudit Shadur Mizrach papercut, 1975 2.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Yehudit Shadur (1928-2011) pioneered the contemporary revival of the Jewish papercutting tradition. Collection comprises a papercut by Yehudit Shadur, entitled "Mizrach" (east wall marker), from the original in the Jewish National Museum and Archives, Israel. Cut blue paper; mounted on brown paper. 15.25 x 18.75 inches.

Collection comprises a papercut by Yehudit Shadur, entitled "Mizrach" (east wall marker), from the original in the Jewish National Museum and Archives, Israel. Cut blue paper; mounted on brown paper. 15.25 x 18.75 inches.

Collection
Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt (née Rochelle, 1881-1980) was the daughter of Durham merchant Leander Sydney and Jeanette Stanley Rochelle. She was the fourth and final wife of Brodie L. Duke and a Durham landowner in her own right. The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt Papers date from 1889 to 1980 and chronicle the personal life of Wylanta as well as the business and financial transactions which she conducted as a prominent landowner in Durham. Materials include correspondence, photographs, and financial records.

The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers date from 1889 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials from the 1920s and 1930s. The collection chronicles Wylanta's familial and social life as well as her business dealings.

The Correspondence Series contains primarily incoming correspondence from Wylanta's sister, Hettie, nieces and nephews, and husbands as well as letters to and from a wide range of friends and Durham citizens. It contains a number of holiday greeting and sympathy cards, but does not contain any correspondence explicitly addressed to Brodie L. Duke.

The Clippings Series includes excerpts from newspaper columns and articles which Wylanta collected throughout her life. These clippings include the regular opinion column written by Wylanta's brother, Zapheus A. Rochelle, notes from the society section chronicling Wylanta and others' visits and travels, and coverage of Wylanta and Stayhorn's 1923 motor vehicle accident in Nice, France, as well as other political and social subjects.

The Financial Records Series encompasses deposit slips, receipts, dividend notices, ledgers, and correspondence evidencing Wylanta's business transactions. The series also contains information about her property ownership in the city of Durham.

The Miscellaneous Series contains assorted handwritten notes and printed commercial images.

The Photographs Series includes a number of portraits of Wylanta, her husbands and her family as well as numerous images of as-yet unidentified individuals. The materials include images of Wylanta in her wedding gowns, snapshots, and portraits. There are also a handful of images of places and an early x-ray of Wylanta's arm following an accident.

Collection

Wyatt T. Dixon papers, 1850s-1987 3.6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2700 Items

The Wyatt T. Dixon Papers span the 1850s to 1987, although the bulk of the material dates from 1918 to the 1960s. The collection consists of diaries, vintage photographs, photomechanical prints, postcards, clippings, correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, printed materials, forms, military records, leaflets, and maps. The Photographs Series comprises the largest portion of the collection. The collection documents the history of Durham, N.C., the Dixon family, activities of the United States Army, American Expeditionary Forces, 30th Division, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, from 1917 to 1919; Durham, North Carolina; and Dixon's career as a journalist.

The World War I Series chronicles the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, which consisted primarily of men from Durham, N.C. Dixon's diaries chronicle the unit's movements and activities in the United States and Europe including England, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Battery C was involved in the Saint Michiel offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. The diaries describe camp life in the United States and Europe, including daily routines; camp conditions; outbreaks of measles and other medical situations; and the soldiers' personal recreational activities. The journey by ship to Europe is also described in detail, including the sale of food to the soldiers and the conditions on board. Civilian responses to the soldiers as they visited or traveled through towns and cities in America, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg are noted throughout the diaries. Dixon mentions a unit of African-American soldiers was at Mont Dore, France. There are some snapshot photographs of Battery C which Dixon probably created with his Kodak camera and some formal panoramic photographs of the entire unit. Letters written by Dixon and his family while he was in the Army are found in the Writings Series.

The Writings Series contains some personal correspondence and a diary, but the bulk of the series documents Dixon's career as a writer for newspapers published by the Durham Herald Company in Durham, N.C. In his column "How Times Do Change," Dixon described life in Durham and the surrounding area and the manner in which cityscapes and social life had changed over the past decades.

The Photographs Series consists primarily of photographs and documents social life and cityscapes in Durham, N.C. Images include buildings such as banks, businesses, cemeteries, churches, court houses, dams and power plants, hospitals, hotels and inns, plantations (abandoned), post offices, schools, and tobacco warehouses and factories. There are street scenes and aerial views. Many of these local images appear to have been collected by Dixon to illustrate his articles. Pictures of people include portraits of family members and friends, and candid scenes of groups engaged in social activities. There are images of events such as holiday celebrations and parades. Transportation, including trolleys, buses, fire fighting equipment and train depots, is also documented.

The Durham Printed Materials Series and the Miscellaneous Series include information about the City of Durham and Durham County, genealogical information about Dixon's family, and the minutes book of a social club for young men.

Collection

W.W. Parleir papers, 1909-1937 1.8 Linear Feet — 9 Items

W.W. Parleir (d. 1937) was an outdoor advertising executive in Alabama during the 1910s through the 1930s. He worked at Theiss, Douglas & Ribble (Birmingham) and at Capital City Advertising (Montgomery), and was Chairman of the Outdoor Advertising Association of Alabama 1934-1937. The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Arranged alphabetically.

Collection
ALS discussing minerals, coins and astronomy. He mentions the Royal Society, Sir Hans Sloane, Robert Hooke and Edmund Halley, among others. Some letters bear explanatory manuscript notes, probably in Palmer's hand.
Collection

Wunderman Archives, 1946-2010 and undated 520 Linear Feet — 354,000 Items

Wunderman is a direct marketing and behavior-oriented marketing communications firm founded in 1958 as Wunderman Ricotta & Kline. It is currently a subsidiary of the Young & Rubicam agency. The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox.

Collection
ALS. Turner appeals to Major Milo Mason and to William Hunter for help in unspecified matters.
Collection
ALS. This body of correspondence, almost exclusively letters to Forwood and written immediately before and during the early part of the Civil War, relates to questions of race, e.g. "the Negro problem", intermarriage and consanguinity. The mechanics of editing and publishing a medical journal also form a topic of discussion. Principal correspondents are Samuel Worcester Butler and Washington Chew Van Bibber. Other correspondents are Sylvester David Willard, John H. Van Evrie, J.P. Evans, Joseph Leidy, S.M. Bemiss, James A. Bayard, and Samuel A. Cartwright.
Collection
2 TLS from Maugham, 1 TLS from A.F. Searle, Maugham's secretary. Correspondence relates to Bett's biography, "Sir John Bland-Sutton."
Collection
Although filed under the name Leckie, the collection primarily consists of the papers of two individuals: W. Robert Leckie, and his son-in-law, William Hendrick. The papers of Leckie, who was educated in Scotland, are concerned with construction of public buildings, canals, arsenals, aqueducts, fortifications, masonry of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and surveying and building of walls in the District of Columbia. The papers of Hendrick and those of his wife, after his death, constitute a long record of the sales of plantation products and the purchase of supplies from commission merchants in Petersburg, Virginia, and the operation of a series of corn and grain farms.

The collection is divided into two series: Correspondence and Papers, and Ledgers. The papers of W. Robert Leckie and William Hendrick overlap; both series contain records of Hendrick's ancestors. Both series are arranged chronologically by year.

In the Correspondence and Papers series, the papers of W. Robert Leckie are concerned with the construction of public buildings, canals, arsenals, aqueducts, fortifications, masonry of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and surveying and building of walls in the District of Columbia. The papers focus primarily on the prices of commodities used in construction work, rather than on qualities of military architecture itself. Also included are the records of a lawsuit between Leckie and James Couty; papers relative to experiments in the production of lime, cement, and bricks; nine letters from Isaac Roberdeau revealing practices of engineers of the period; and a 91-page bound report of the commissioners appointed by the president for planning the defense of the United States. This report, though undated, was probably made after the War of 1812 and includes extensive details relative to the problems of defense, including topography, waterways, roadways, population, distances, and probable expenses of constructing forts. Some of Leckie's papers reflect his efforts to obtain contracts for the construction of such buildings at the Augusta Arsenal.

The papers of William Hendrick and Mary Ann Leckie, his wife, constitute a long record of the sales of plantation products and the purchase of supplies from commission merchants in Petersburg, Virginia, and the operation of a series of tobacco and corn farms. In addition, Hendrick's children wrote letters from Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Virginia Military Institute, Lexington; and various other academies. Also includes two writing exercise books for children.

In the Ledgers series, among the volumes from Leckie are the following: diary and accounts, 1828-1829, of engineering contracts and cement stone quarries at Shepherdstown, Va., Seneca, Md., Baltimore, and a point near the Monocacy River; a memorandum book containing data for surveying water lines, leveling streets, and building aqueducts in Georgetown and Washington, D.C.; and a memorandum book of John Leckie, associated with his father, W. Robert Leckie. Among the volumes from Hendrick are several plantation account books, a memorandum book, and accounts of a mercantile firm. The account books dated 1799 and earlier were kept by Hendrick’s forbears.

Collection
In his letter to Mason Fitch Cogswell, Post writes of the controversy among New York medical professionals over the establishment of a dispensary and a college of surgeons; refers to an attack upon William Dunlap; and comments upon Cogswell's ambitions to write an anatomy. A portrait of Post is attached.
Collection
Manufacturing firm founded in 1893 in Durham, N.C. that produced machinery for the packaging industry. Collection includes articles, brochures, clippings, correspondence, memorabilia, newsletters, photographs and other materials. Materials touch on business acquisition, company events, employee policies, retirements, staff promotions, stock and other issues. Individuals and companies represented in the collection include ACMA, Emhart, John Thomas Dalton, John L. Moorhead, Rexham, Richard Harvey Wright, Richard Harvey Wright II, and Sperry Rand.

Collection includes articles, brochures, clippings, correspondence, memorabilia, newsletters, photographs and other materials. Materials touch on business acquisition, company events, employee policies, retirements, staff promotions, stock and other issues. Individuals and companies represented in the collection include ACMA, Emhart, John Thomas Dalton, John L. Moorhead, Rexham, Richard Harvey Wright, Richard Harvey Wright II, and Sperry Rand.

Collection

Wright H. Everett papers, 1853-1998 and undated 27 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Wright H. Bill Everett (1925-2010) was a media space salesman for several major magazines, and the founder of his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co., that specialized in a variety of print materials combining humorous captions with still images from silent movies. The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audiotapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, Maclean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office? Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audio tapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, MacLean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office?

Collection
Founded in 1971 as a manufacturer of shopping baskets; converted into a holdling company in 1985 and grew to become one of the largest advertising and communications conglomerates in the world.

Spans 1986-2015 and includes annual reports, financial statements, correspondence, artifacts, newsletters and other publications and printed materials. Includes materials pertaining to the acquisition of the Ogilvy Group (formerly Ogilvy & Mather). Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection
The Worth family was a family of plantation owners, lawyers, politicians, and businessmen from Randolph County, North Carolina, residing in Asheboro and Wilmington. Collection includes correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency.

The papers of the Worth family of North Carolina contain correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency. Includes the papers of Jonathan Worth (1802-1869), lawyer and governor of North Carolina, including a few of his official papers as governor during Reconstruction, 1865-1868; correspondence relating to his business interests and law practice; and letters of Jonathan Worth and Martitia (Daniel) Worth in the 1850s to a son at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, concerning family matters and the construction of a plank road near Asheboro, North Carolina. Also among the papers identified with him are commissions signed by him as governor and a copy of a newspaper article concerning a speech he delivered at the Negro Educational Convention (October 13, 1866), a certification of election returns in Beaufort County (October 20, 1866), and an 1868 letter related to elections and the North Carolina Constitution of 1868.

Materials relating to David Gaston Worth (1831-1897) contain essays from David Worth's college days; Civil War correspondence concerning financial conditions in the Confederacy and the Confederate salt works at Wilmington, North Carolina; material relating to the Bingham School, Mebane, North Carolina, and the Fifth Street Methodist Church, Wilmington, North Carolina; there are also some business papers.

Later papers consist of business records belonging to William Elliott Worth: a ledger, 1906-1911, for William E. Worth and Company, dealers in ice, coal, wood, and other merchandise; and records of the Universal Oil and Fertilizer Company, including a ledger, 1903-1914, and a letterpress book, 1906-1907, concerning the manufacture and marketing of various fertilizers, cottonseed oil, and related products.

The papers of Charles William Worth contain letters written to and from his parents while he was a student at the Bingham School, Orange County, N.C., and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and letters from many prominent North Carolinians advocating for his appointment as American consul at Shanghai, China, and other political posts, 1912-1913 and later years.

The collection also contains five account books, 1888-1924, of Worth & Worth and its successor, The Worth Co., a large Wilmington firm of grocers and commission merchants which also traded in cotton and naval stores.

Collection
Online
Collection consists of ration coupons, stickers, permits, and certificates for tires, bicycles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel oil, gasoline, and food which were issued by the Office of Price Administration between 1942-1946. There are duplicates for a few items.
Collection

World War II propaganda collection, 1939-1945 0.5 Linear Feet — 400 items

The collection includes pro-Allied, anti-Allied, pro-Axis, and anti-Axis propaganda leaflets and broadsides that were distributed in Europe and the Pacific war zones with the aim of damaging enemy morale and sustaining the morale of the occupied countries. Also includes a set of Special Service I.B.S. posters warning soldiers against venereal disease.

The collection includes pro-Allied, pro-Axis, and anti-Allie and anti-Axis propaganda in the form of flyers, broadsides, and leaflets that were distributed or dropped in the United States, England, Germany, occupied France, and the Pacific arena from 1939 and 1945. The majority of the leaflets are in German and were dropped by the Political Warfare Executive (PWE) over Germany. There is also a significant run of anti-Semitic, anti-Bolshevik, pro-German broadsides published by Theodor Kasse and the Deutscher Fichte-Bund of Hamburg, Germany, in English and intended for Allied audiences. The collection also contains propaganda leaflets from the Psychological Warfare Branch, U.S. Army Forces, Pacific Area, APO 500, most of which are in Japanese (most with English translations), some of them in Tok Pisin. There are also leaflets from the French exile government dropped over occupied France (in French, most accompanied by English translations); some propaganda newsletters, magazines and newspapers from France and the Netherlands (in English translation); German propaganda in English intended for dropping over Great Britain; some examples of Japanese propaganda (in Japanese); and a few single leaflets in Finnish, Russian, and Burmese. One notable portion of the collection is a set of broadsides illustrated by Pvt. Franklyn, printed by Special Service I.B.S., targeting American soldiers and warning them against loose women who may be infected with venereal disease. These posters often include the campaign's catchphrase, "Leave 'Em Alone! Don't be a Dope with a Dose."

Collection
The Workers League for a Revolutionary Party was formed by George Spiro in 1938 as the Leninist League. In the mid-1940s the party became critical of Leninism and Marxism and changed its name to the Workers League for a Revoluionary Party. The Party was a splinter group of the Trotskyist party, the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL). Collection contains letters, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other documents relating to the activities of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party.

Collection contains correspondence, memoranda, meeting minutes, and other assorted documents relating to the activites of the Workers League for a Revolutionary Party and their publications, In Defense of Bolshevism and, later, the Bulletin. Topics discussed are mainly ideological in nature and include the break with the Revolutionary Workers League (RWL), Stalinism, Trotskyism, World War II, Unionism, and various party platforms. Political developments in Poland, Bulgaria, China, and Czechoslovakia are also discussed.

Collection

Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949 0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items

The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

Collection
Woolworth's was a discount retail chain founded by Frank W. Woolworth in 1879 in Lancaster, Pa. now doing business as Foot Locker, Inc. Collection is comprised of a photograph album depicting shop window and department store floor displays featured at the Spring Convention of the Woolworth Chicago District. Displays feature a variety of goods including candies and confections, cosmetics, sewing supplies, publishing and printing, and women's clothing. Companies represented include American Colortype, Luxor, Maybelline, Merrill Publishing, National Candy, Regensteiner, Revlon (Cutex), Spool Cotton (Coats & Clark), Standard Oil, and Whitman Publishing. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection is comprised of a photograph album depicting shop window and department store floor displays featured at the Spring Convention of the Woolworth Chicago District. Displays feature a variety of goods including candies and confections, cosmetics, sewing supplies, publishing and printing, and women's clothing. Companies represented include American Colortype, Luxor, Maybelline, Merrill Publishing, National Candy, Regensteiner, Revlon (Cutex), Spool Cotton (Coats & Clark), Standard Oil, and Whitman Publishing. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection

Woody family papers, 1784-1939 9 Linear Feet — 2,389 Items

Family of Quaker merchants and millers residing in Guildford County, North Carolina, with relatives in Indiana and Montana Territory. Collection comprises a rich array of business and personal correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1835-1887) relating to Newton D. Woody, merchant and miller of North Carolina, his Civil War service, and his flight to Indiana in 1865 and eventual return to N.C.; the activities of Frank H. Woody, who traveled to and described life in the territories of Washington and Montana before and after the Civil War. There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by Confederate soldiers, one of whom was in the 21st North Carolina Regiment; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868, as well as economic conditions in North Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also some documents and letters concerning African American life in the South before, during, and after the war. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. Other topics include the activities of Woody relatives who had migrated to Indiana; the activities of the children of Newton and of his brother, Robert Woody, postmaster, miller, and merchant; and the history of the Society of Friends in antebellum North Carolina. Includes legal documents, business records, and minutes of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, N.C.

Papers of Robert Woody, Newton Dixon Woody, and other members of the Woody family include a rich trove of business and personal correspondence; legal and financial papers; printed materials; and manuscript volumes. The papers of this family concern the mercantile and milling businesses of Robert Woody in Chatham County, North Carolina, and Newton Dixon Woody in Guilford County, North Carolina, in the 1850s; the decision of Newton D. Woody to leave North Carolina during the Civil War and his return in 1865; experiences of Frank H. Woody, a lawyer and clerk, in the Washington and Montana territories in the 1860s and 1870s, in which he mentions clashes with Native Americans and settlers, and reports seeing Sherman in 1878. There are also letters with news from relatives living in Indiana.

Other papers include information about temperance meetings, including the General Southern Temperance Conference at Fayetteville, North Carolina, 1835; hog droving; commodity prices in the last half of the 19th century; general economic conditions in North Carolina and the United States in the 19th century; the upkeep of roads in Guilford County; and the experiences of Mary Ann Woody as a student at New Garden Boarding School, Guilford County, 1852-1853. In addition, there is a bill of sale for slaves and a letter from Alabama describing African American celebrations at Christmas, 1857.

There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by a soldier in the 21st North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; and accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. There is also a May 1865 letter saying that John Gilmore of N.C. was dividing land with freed African Americans, and a letter mentioning African American violence during elections in an unspecified state in Dec. 1870.

Volumes in the collection include minutes of meetings of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, North Carolina, 1824-1830; memorandum books; an account book kept during the construction of a Quaker church at High Falls, North Carolina, 1905-1909; minute book of meetings of the Friends of Prosperity, 1913-1914. Other papers in the collection mention camp meetings and religious revivals in North Carolina and their effect on Quakers. There are also financial record books of Robert Woody and Newton Dixon Woody.

Collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

Collection
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

Collection
Materials documenting the Women's Worship Circle activities including correspondence, invitations, programs, handouts, liturgies, member reflections, photographs, planning and meeting notes and agendas.

The Women's Worship Circle records document the creation and operation of the organization, in which members engaged with and performed feminist theology through the development of their own worship services. The records consist of correspondence, liturgies, programs, meeting notes, handouts, members' reflections, photographs and invitations.

Collection
The Women's Theological Center, founded in 1981 and active through 2007, was a Boston-based organization that provided feminist theological and ministerial education for women. Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes. Also included are grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials (especially related to the Study/Action program), and writings and publications. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes from Francine Cardman and Gay Harter. Budgets, membership information, and reports are also in the administrative records. Collection also includes grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials, and writings and publications. The publicity and programming materials document the WTC's activities and include articles, brochures, and event programs, as well as information, readings, and other materials from the Study/Action program. Most of the Study/Action material is from Gay Harter's files. Writings and publications include WTC newsletters, drafts of an unpublished book about the Study/Action program, and other writings by WTC members.

WTC members who appear frequently in the administrative records, particularly meeting minutes, as well as Study/Action materials and WTC newsletters include Donna Bivens, Nancy Richardson, Marian (Meck) Groot, Angelica (Gay) Harter, Francine Cardman, and Joan Martin.

Collection
Online
Collection comprises a scrapbook (96 pages) featuring primarily newspaper and magazine clippings that document the leaders, activists, actions and activities of the Women's Social and Political Union between 1908 and 1917. The unidentified compiler was likely a member of the organization, for she included handwritten labels identifying unnamed participants and often provided handwritten commentary on actions taken or the treatment of women imprisoned. In several cases, she was also able to obtain autographs of individual suffragists. Events documented include the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, the memorial for Emily Wilding Davison, Rosa May Billinghurst, the Coronation procession, and the suffragist's bombing of Westminster Abbey. Other topics include what men did to get the vote; voting as a right; forcible feedings and other injuries the women sustained; marches, speeches, and gatherings of support; the work of the Pankhursts; women's activities in support of the war in Europe; the organization's offices; and international supporters of women's suffrage. Includes several items laid-in.
Collection

Women's Refugee Commission records, 1979-2020; 1979-ongoing, bulk 1989-2011 55.6 Linear Feet — 0.92 Gigabytes — 36,200 Items

Online
The Women's Refugee Commission was established in 1989 as part of the International Rescue Committee. It advocates for laws, policies, and programs to improve the lives and protect the rights of refugee and internally displaced women, children, and adolescents. Collection includes audiovisual materials (interviews, Voices of Courage luncheons, and footage and photographs from trips to refugee camps); field and research reports; children, education, and youth program materials; foundation files; former board and commission member files; Reproductive Health program materials and reports; Livelihoods program materials and reports; files from executive directors; subject files; board of directors files; and media binders for the Women's Refugee Commission. Countries represented include Cambodia, Afghanistan, Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Thailand, Myanmar, Israel, Guatemala, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, Liberia, Kosovo, Iraq, Zambia, Tanzania, the United States, and others. Material predating the founding of the Commission primarily includes photographs from UNHCR and other organizations. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The collection is organized into several series, each representing different operations within the Women's Refugee Commission.

The Audiovisual Materials series includes tapes in a variety of formats documenting speaking engagements, luncheons, and interviews with WRC staff; raw footage of trips to refugee camps and field visits with refugees around the world; and recordings of testimony and other projects highlighting the experiences of refugee women and children. This series also includes over 5,000 photographs, slides, and negatives documenting trips to refugee camps and the activities of refugees around the world. Access is RESTRICTED: use copies are required for access.

The Printed Materials and Publications series consists largely of the publications and documentation produced by the Women's Refugee Commission staff about refugee conditions in crisis situations around the world. Trip reports constitute a large portion within the series, covering visits to refugee camps in Africa, Asia, Europe, South America, and United States prisons (where asylum seekers are detained). Also included are public reports and guidelines on issues like domestic and gender-based violence; reproductive health and the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP); armed conflict and its effects on children; and fuel alternatives and strategies. Drafts of publications, newsletters from the WRC, and a small amount of drawings by refugee children make up the rest of this series.

The Children, Youth, and Education series includes a variety of materials from that WRC program, including additional reports and guidelines. A large component consists of reports, meetings, and other files from the Education in Emergencies initiative.

The Foundations series includes name files for various foundations, trusts, and charities who support the operations of the Women's Refugee Commission. Also included are name files for former board members and commissioners.

Protection Program is a small series with materials from the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) group and meeting files from the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW).

The Reproductive Health series is a large series with several subseries, all relating to the activities of the Reproductive Health program. One such subseries is the Reproductive Health Response in Conflict (RHRC) Consortium's historical documents, which includes meeting files, conference and event materials, annual reports, and some photographs. Another subseries is United States government-funded projects, covering HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) projects, Thai-Burma border trafficking research, donor files, and subgrantee files make up the remainder of the series. The majority of the Reproductive Health series is restricted.

The Media series consists of newspaper clippings and printouts regarding refugee sitations and the Women's Refugee Commission's coverage in the media.

The Social Protection and Livelihoods series includes program materials and evaluations, with heavy documentation for the Age, Gender and Diversity Mainstreaming (AGDM) Initiative project and its various implementations around the world. Also included in this series are reports and research relating to the Livelihoods program, WRC general information and materials, strategic planning for the group, and board and delegation visits, meetings, and agendas.

The Subject Files series includes topical files primarily related to refugee women and their organizations; issues, such internal displacement, habitat, literacy, and resettlement; the Commission's participation and protection project; and education, especially in emergencies and for girls and adolescents. Other files are related to the Commission's partners in refugee work.

The Executive Director Files series includes materials from Executive Directors Mary Diaz, Carolyn Makinson, and Sarah Costa, such as summary reports and correspondence from all of the WRC programs, UN Security Council Resolutions and other WRC-related initiatives, Board of Director meeting packets, and files for individual board members, commissioners, experts, and fundraisers.

The Board of Directors (BOD) Files series contains primarily board member packets and planning documents for Commission board meetings between 1997-2014. Some board member packets also contain Advocacy Day materials. There are also items related to the Excecutive and Nominating Committee meetings, as well as packets on specialized topics, such as peace initiatives and the Bureau of Public Affairs in the U.S. Department of State. There are a few files related to Board mailings, donors, and potential commissioners.

D.C. Office Files are CLOSED for 20 years (until 2031) unless prior permission is received from the donor. The series includes files on Haiti, Gender, Detention and Asylum, and other programs run through the D.C. office.

The New York Office Files includes material related to the rebranding of the Commission's logo and general design issues, planning anniversary celebrations, launches for reports and book publications, and general files on communications and accountability working groups.

Acronyms frequently used in the collection:

  • AGDM: Age Gender Diversity Mainstreaming
  • CSW: Commission on the Status of Women
  • EmOC: Emergency Obstetric Care
  • GBV: Gender-based Violence
  • INS: Immigration and Naturalization Service (US)
  • IRC: International Rescue Committee
  • MISP: Minimum Initial Service Package
  • RH: Reproductive Health
  • RHC: Reproductive Health in Crises
  • RHRC: Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium
  • SIPA: School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • UNFPA: United Nations Population Fund
  • UNHCR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
  • WPS: Women, Peace, and Security
  • WRC: Women's Refugee Commission

Collection
Branch of an international peace advocacy organization founded in 1915; formerly known as the Chapel Hill Branch (N.C.). Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Collection comprises a poster that promotes the organization's "aims to make knowledge about women's bodies and health available to women," and to "develop policy about women's health with women." Important issues illustrated include affordable health care, stopping the spread of AIDS, and a woman's right to choose contraception. There is also contact information.
Collection
The Women's Guild of Arts was founded in England in 1907 by textile designer and jeweller May Morris, and grew to about 60 members. The organization offered female artists an alternative to the Art Workers' Guild, the artists' association established in 1884 to encourage excellence in the fine and applied arts, and from which women were excluded until the 1960s. Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes.

Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes. Three letters predate the founding of the organization in 1907. The primary topic of the letters is the crisis within the Guild regarding its women-only status, an argument regarding how restrictive the Guild should be. Pamela Colman Smith wrote to May Morris (22 January 1913) that the reason she joined the Guild was that it made a point of asking its members not to exhibit at women-only shows, as it lowered the standard of work and that the Guild was never intended to be a purely woman's affair. Other letters on the subject come from Evelyn de Morgan, Feodora Gleichen, and Ethel Sandell. Gleichen's letter was circulated to members, and the collection contains a list of those who agreed with her; several letters are marked up to indicate a position on the matter. There is also a draft resolution welcoming any move to widen the scope of the Guild "such as stimulating and interesting lectures not only from our own members but from men and women outside....It is with this in view that we supported the resolution passed at the recent Annual Meeting, inviting as Honorary Associates a few people with whose work we are in sympathy..." (22 January 1913). Other topics in the letters include the role of the president, exhibitions, lectures, and the work of the organization, along with the William Morris Centenary Commemoration in 1934.

Collection
Online
Collection consists of a 44-page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, that documents the history of Fort Des Moines as a Women's Army Corps training center, and more specifically the 404th Women's Army Corps (WAC) band, the first African American female band in the United States military. In addition to the approximately 100 photographs, there are photographic postcards, and clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The scrapbook begins with a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from 8 December 1941, followed by a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings and photo postcards documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The second half of the scrapbook documents the African American women's band, with photographs showing the women in and out of uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Scenes include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and band members enjoying off-duty pastimes. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of a forty-four page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, documenting the history of Fort Des Moines, Iowa, as a Women's Army Corps (WAC) training center, and the 404th Women's Army Corps band, the first African American female band in the United States military. The scrapbook contains 100 photographs, all but one black-and-white, ranging in size from 2 x 3 inches to 7 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches. The creator also included photographic postcards as well as clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The covers for the scrapbook are missing.

The first page contains a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from December 8, 1941. The following early pages provide a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The clippings are augmented by photo postcards depicting the grounds, along with one showing a woman blowing a bugle into a oversize megaphone.

Documentation of the African American women's band begins on page 21, with a group portrait. Other photographs show the women in uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Images include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and off-duty band members relaxing, riding bicycles, traveling together, preparing for sleep, or playing with pets. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection
Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The original collection numbered forty-one boxes. Additions in 2009, 2011 and 2012 expanded the collection.

Collection

The Women in Jazz Photographs Collection contains photographs, clippings, concert programs, and other promotional materials related to women jazz musicians in the United States from 1940 to 1945. The collection focuses on all-female big bands such as Ada Leonard's All-American Girl Orchestra and the Tennessee-based Marjorie Rainey's Rhythmettes. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the Jazz Archive staff for use in reference and research.

Collection
Online
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

Collection

"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901 49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.

Online
Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection
Collection contains objects and ephemera relating to the women's suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Various pro- and anti-suffrage perspectives are represented. The items include banners, textiles, buttons, pins, and badges, along with other related handbills and printed materials.

Collection comprises materials relating to the women's suffrage movement in the United States and United Kingdom, including pins, medallions, buttons, textiles, card sets, stamps, photographs, and printed materials and ephemera. The majority of the collection's items express pro-women's suffrage sentiments. Organizations present include the Woman's Peace Party, Catholic Women's Suffrage Society, Women's Freedom League, National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, Cymeric Suffrage Union, Men's League for Women's Suffrage, Women's Social and Political Union (W.S.P.U.), Women's Christian Temperance Union, and the Woman's Suffrage National Aid Corps. Examples of messages conveyed include: "Votes for Women," "Vote No on Women's Suffrage," "Women's Equality. Women's Lives." Some items include portraits of women suffragists, including Susan B. Anthony and Inez Milholland. Several items reference voting to repeal the 19th amendment. Also includes three sets of "Panko or Votes for Women: The Great Card Game Suffragists v. Anti-Suffragists," published in 1909 by Peter Gurney with illustrations by E.T. Reed, from Punch magazine. Postcards and photographs include both caricatures and real-photo images of suffragists, suffragettes, and their allies, as well as items mocking or opposing the woman's suffrage movement. The collection contains some 1910s banners, scarves, and sashes in yellow and white, and others in green and purple fabric, with text reading "Votes for Women"; there are also a variety of printed handbills, handouts, fliers, and ephemeral materials circulated and distributed to the public for suffrage campaigns in different states, including Massachusetts, New York, and Maine.