Collections : [Duke University Archives]

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Duke University Archives
Duke University Archives

The Duke University Archives is the official repository for records of Duke University and has a charge to make them available for use in accordance with policies approved by Duke University's Board of Trustees, administration and faculty. In addition to the official records of the university, the Duke University Archives holds campus publications; audiovisual materials by and about Duke University; papers and selected publications of Duke University faculty members; records of Duke University student and employee organizations and dissertations, theses, final projects and senior honors papers produced by Duke University students.

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Collection
A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Collection
Online
The Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association was created in 1969, an apparent merger of the men's and women's Y's elements. The YM-YWCA was a student religious organization operating within the Religious Activities Department and overseen by an advisory board and advised by the Associate Directors of Religious Activities. The collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. The dates in the collection range from circa 1968-1979.

Collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA, a social activist religious group, including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. Includes the logbook (1972/1973; restricted) and related material of the organization's Draft Counseling and Information Center; "A White Paper on Institutional Racism at Duke: The Curriculum" (1972); listings of vocations for social change produced by OPT, its center for social change information; and copies of the handbook, The University Experience (1969/1970-1978/1979). The handbooks include essays on race relations, sexuality, civil rights and social change, and the experiences of foreign and minority students, as well as University history and administrative information. In an annual report (1970/1971) the book is said to have changed from "a book of interesting facts and figures" to "a rather controversial" alternative view of the University.

Also present in the collection are the records of the Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action (INSA) which was a leftist, activist agency of the Duke YM-YWCA. Their records include brochures, flyers, newsletters, manuals, and information concerning political and social issues of the early 1970s, and activities of the INSA. A sampling of topics include: Buddhism and nonviolence, Indochina; history, politics, and culture during the war, Cuba, UMWA (United Mine Workers Association), University investment, War -- bombing effects, and Wounded Knee. The INSA also collected flyers, brochures, and other printed matter from national organizations. Some organizations include: Committee on New Alternatives in the Middle East, Gandhi Peace Foundation, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and New American Movement.

Collection
The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University was established at then Trinity College in 1887-1888. In its early years, it functioned primarily as a sort of Bible class. Although it never abandoned its emphasis on Christianity, in its later years the YMCA dedicated itself more to campus and social service projects than Bible study. These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke Universityin the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University in the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

The majority of the records consist of reports of campus student religious organizations, and annual reports prepared by YMCA officers, which date from 1936-1967, although they are not inclusive. The annual reports summarize YMCA activities and projects from the past school year, and offer suggestions for the next year. See also catalogued and bound reports at call number 378.756 D887FA. There are two reports generated by the YMCA in the course of their campus activities: a proposal regarding the Freshman Advisory Council and a report on the success of the 1948 fund drive for the World Student Service Fund (WSSF). For more information on the incorporation of the Freshman Advisory Council (FAC) into the YMCA, see the annual report from 1957-1958. The remaining reports were created by other student religious organizations such as the Hillel Society (for Jewish students), the Baptist Student Union, and the YWCA. Correspondence is limited to one item. "Dads' Day" items consist of programs and schedules for the annual fathers' weekend. See also programs at call number 378.756 D887FD.

Publications are limited to examples of the student handbook and the "Dink," a daily publication for freshmen produced during Freshman Orientation Week. For other student handbooks see call number 378.756 D877S. For discussions of activities related to desegregation at Duke, see annual reports 1959-1960 and 1967-1968. Draft counseling materials are limited to announcements of seminars and conferences. For discussions of Vietnam and the selective service system, see annual reports of 1966-1967 and 1967-1968. For more information on Vietnam, the draft, and the counseling center, see YWCA and YM-YWCA Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action materials. Although there are no membership lists, there are quite inclusive lists of officers from 1888-1936 and 1956-1957.

Collection

York House records, 1966-1979 0.2 Linear Feet — 200 Items

York House was formed in 1961. Contains the records of York House, an independent living group for upperclassmen and underclassmen, at Duke University. Types of materials include newsletters, financial summaries, constitutions, and miscellaneous notes. Major subjects include residential living at Duke University, student life, alcohol use, and social activities among students. Materials are dated from 1966 to 1979.

Contains materials relating to the general governance and social activities of residents of York House, a Duke University Residence Hall.

Collection

WXDU records, 1963-2013 1.5 Linear Feet

WXDU, as a member of the Duke University Union, exists to inform, educate, and entertain both the students of Duke University and the surrounding community of Durham through quality progressive alternative radio programming. WXDU was founded in 1983 when former station WDUK-1600AM switched to a FM signal. Collection contains public records files, including correspondence and other materials related to FCC matters, program guides, clippings, a DJ handbook, and other materials. Materials range in date from 1977-2001.

Collection contains materials pertaining to FCC matters including correspondence, playlists, Music Forums notebooks containing comments by DJs and staff on station happenings, DJ manuals, event flyers and publicity, employment reports, insurance policies, license applications and renewal, public service announcements, program guides, board member and staff lists, clippings, and other materials concerning the operation of the station.

Collection

Wrestling records, 1933-ongoing. 4.9 Linear Feet — 5250 Items

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the wrestling team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1934-ongoing.

Collection
William Porter Kellam was an undergraduate and graduate student at Trinity College/Duke University from 1922 to 1929. The scrapbook includes autograph pages, photographs, clippings and memorabilia related to Trinity College and Duke University athletics, commencement, arts events and campus life. The scrapbook ranges in date from 1922 to 1929.

Contains autograph pages, news clippings, correspondence, programs and memorabilia from music, theater and commencement events. Included are photographs of two of Duke University's early international students, Rodolfo Rivera, AM 1929, Ph.D. 1932, from Puerto Rico (3 photos) --Fung Hui So, AB 1926, from China (2 photos and an autograph).

Also contains photographs of campus scenes, the track, basketball and football teams, the University of Richmond [VA], and many snapshots of Trinity football games. The scrapbook ranges in date from 1922 to 1929.

Collection
Online
The Working Groups in Feminism and History (WGFH, formerly the Feminist Women in History Group, FWHG) is a collective of graudate students and faculty from Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other area universities that meets regularly to discuss scholarship in gender and history. The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History.

The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History. Included are captures of both the Feminist Women in History website from 2003 and the Working Group in Feminism and History site as of 2017; fliers for events organized by the group; correspondence regarding event planning, scheduling speakers, leadership of the group, and other topics; a printed out copy of the website for the Feminist Women in History Group; and schedules for events.

Collection

Women's Studies Program Reference collection, 1988-ongoing 0.5 Linear Feet — approx. 350 Items

The Program in Women's Studies at Duke University is dedicated to exploring gender identities, relations, practices, theories and institutions. The collection includes clippings, flyers, newsletters, conference material, and program information.

Collection
The Women's Studies Program at Duke University started in 1983 and grew rapidly into one of the largest interdisciplinary programs at the University, now called Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program.

The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program. Included are correspondence, minutes, reports, newsletters, flyers, budgets, programs, surveys, and many other materials. Topics include the development of the Women's Studies Program from a certificate program to an undergraduate major and minor as well as the growth of graduate scholarship; the curriculum of the Program and the inclusion of women's studies and women's topics in other areas of the University; outreach to and fundraising with Duke alumni women and others; programs and events organized by Women's Studies, especially the Graduate Research Conference and other large conferences hosted by Women's Studies; the work of the Council on Women's Studies; and a survey given to all women alumni of Duke from the 1920s through the 1980s including questions related to their Duke experience, activities since graduation, and perspective on women's issues, among many other subjects. The majority of the materials date from Jean O'Barr's tenure as director of Women's Studies.

Collection

Women's Network records, 1975-1988 3 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

The Women's Network began in 1975 when female faculty began meeting in a caucus to discuss issues surrounding "the recruitment, retention, and treatment of faculty women." Later on its focus expanded to include matters of sexual harassment, salary equity, and the dual responsibilities of work and family. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, committee minutes, flyers, reports, clippings, and other materials form the faculty and the staff/administrative divisions of the Women's Network.

The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, committee minutes, flyers, reports, clippings, and other materials form the faculty (committee A) and the staff/administrative (committee B) divisions of the Women's Network. Subjects include parental leave, tenure, recruitment and hiring, salary equity, sexual harassment and TIAA-CREF matters. There is one sealed envelope containing records of a sexual harassment case. It has been removed from the collection and placed in the vault; it will remain closed until 2037.

Collection
Online
The Duke University Women's Department of Health and Physical Education began in about 1926 and merged with the Men's Physical Education Department in 1975. The Women's Department was responsible for providing required physical education courses, overseeing recreational and athletic activities, and providing a major in physical education. The Department had three chairmen during its existence: Julia R. Grout, Betty F. McCue, and Elizabeth C. Bookhout. The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records include correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. Major topics include the curriculum and administration of the department, student attitudes toward P.E., the attempt to build or renovate the gymnasium facility for women, the eventual merging of the Women's and Men's departments, and the effect of Title IX on women's athletics. English.

The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records consist of correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. The records are organized into two series: Alphabetical Files and Scrapbooks.

The alphabetical files primarily cover the period from the 1930s to 1975. Of note are photographs of women participating in physical education classes and sports; materials from the Women's Athletic Association and Women's Recreation Association; several surveys and reports from the 1960s and 1970s about women students' feelings and attitudes toward physical education; correspondence, estimates, and reports about the proposed building of a new facility for the department; correspondence and many reports which document the struggle with the administration to maintain the Department as a separate unit from the men's department in the 1970s; materials that discuss the effect of Title IX on women's sports and the growth of women's sports in the 1970s. Major figures include Julia R. Grout and Elizabeth C. Bookhout, both of whom served as Chairman of the department. The Alphabetical Files also include information on students who majored in physical education. In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

The Alphabetical Files are arranged by broad subjects: Addresses, Administration, Annual Reports, Budget, Correspondence, Curriculum, Departmental Studies and Reports, Facilities, History, Photographs, Publicity, Recreation, Staff Meetings, Task Force and Curriculum Committee Action, and Women's Athletics. Within each of these subsections, materials are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically. The original arrangement of the materials has been maintained as much as possible.

The Scrapbooks are compilations of photographs, clippings, programs, correspondence, and other memorabilia. There are three books which date from 1932 to 1975.

Collection

Women's Center records, 1970-2014 31.75 Linear Feet — 6.46 Megabytes

The Women's Center serves the Duke undergraduate, graduate and professional student communities. The center supports and promotes student women and gender issues on campus. Materials present include subject files, correspondence, memoranda, reports, proposals, surveys, programming records, committee records, flyers, job descriptions, training materials, photographs, slides, videocassettes, and other materials relating to the history and daily operation of the Center.

The Women's Center records contain subject files, correspondence, memoranda, reports, proposals, surveys, programming records, committee records, flyers, job descriptions, training materials, photographs, slides, videocassettes, and other materials relating to the history and daily operation of the Center. Major subjects include sexual assault, crime prevention, safe sex, gender issues, sorority life, harassment, and women in science and engineering. Materials can also be found on the following groups or programs: BASES (Building Awareness through Shared Experiences); DARE (Duke Acquaintance Rape Education); GPWN (Graduate and Professional Women's Network); MAC (Men Acting for Change); SASS (Sexual Assault Support Services); Take Back the Night; VOICES (magazine published by the Women's Center); WISE (Women in Science and Engineering); Women of Color; and the Women's Center Art Gallery.

The collection also contains images and text from the "Breaking Out" exhibition. Exhbit materials consist of women sharing stories about sexual violence and harassment. The exhibit was created by students and co-sponsored by the Women's Center. Materials in the collection range in date from 1970-2014.

Collection
The Sports Information Office provides information about Duke athletics to the media. They also facilitate press interviews with Duke athletes and coaches. The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the women's basketball team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1976-ongoing.

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the women's basketball team at Duke University. There are also files regarding the Ronald McDonald House Challenge and the Dial Classic. The material ranges in date from 1976-ongoing.

Collection
The Woman's Student Government Association (WSGA) was formed in 1918, and the organization continued when the Woman's College was incorporated on East Campus in 1930. The WSGA was responsible for the "regulat[ion] of all matters pertaining to the life of the women of the Woman's College of Duke University, not under the jurisdiction of the Faculty." This autonomy along with the segregated campus life style of the coordinate college allowed female students to develop leadership skills and confidence that an integrated student government may not have allowed them to gain. Collection contains minutes, correspondence, reports, printed matter, memos, clippings, and other official records of the WSGA and its committees, along with records of several student organizations and documents generated by the administrations of the Woman's College and Duke University. Materials range in date from 1919-1974.

Extent: 13.7 linear ft. (22 Hollinger boxes + 1 flat box)

Contents: Minutes, correspondence, reports, printed matter, memos, clippings, and other official records of the WSGA and its committees, along with records of several student organizations and documents generated by the administrations of the Woman's College and Duke University. Subjects include the honor system, class reports, dormitory life, athletics, elections, freshman orientation, social organizations, handbooks, celebrations, and social regulations. The collection includes materials, such as handbooks and surveys, received from other schools, and publications and other material from the National Student Association.

Organization: Series: 1. WSGA Minutes; 2. Correspondence; 3. Subject files; 4. Materials from other colleges; 5. National Student Association; 6. Account books; 7. Student Organizations; 8. Oversize

Restriction: Judicial Board case files closed except by permission, University Archivist. Some folders may contain information restricted by FERPA.

Collection

Woman's College records, 1928-1974 60.4 Linear Feet — 42,305 items

Online
The Woman's College was established at Duke University in 1930, as a coordinate to Trinity College for men. As a coordinate college within Duke University, the Woman's College fostered a community that allowed for shared university faculty, curriculum, and educational facilities, while giving women an opportunity for leadership through their separate student government, social standards committees, and judicial board. It was merged with Trinity College in 1972. The collection includes university administrative records, correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, course schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, calendars, financial information, photographs, audio recordings and other materials. Major topics include coordinate education at Duke University, especially administrative and curricular procedures; relationship between the Woman's College and its students (in loco parentis); social standards policies; women's student government; integration of the Woman's College; student health care; and student organizations.

Materials in the collection include university administrative records, correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, course schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, calendars, financial information, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks, and other materials from the tenures of Deans Baldwin, Brinkley, Ball, and Kreps. The university administrative records of other offices such as Dean of Women, Academic Dean, Assistant Dean of Women, and Dean of Freshmen are also present.

Collection
Nine interviews with alumnae of the Duke University Woman's College conducted by Carolyn Murray Happer from 2003 to 2004. Also includes one recording of alumnae reminisces from the 75th anniversary celebration of the Woman's College Library in 2006. Interviewees discuss their experiences and perceptions from their years at Duke University during the period of the co-ordinate college which existed from 1930 to 1972. Subjects interviewed include several class leaders, a member of the Duke family, and others who have had long established ties to the school after graduation. Also includes one recording of alumnae reminisces from the 75th anniversary celebration of the Woman's College Library in 2006.

Carolyn Murray Happer interviewed nine alumnae who graduated from the period of 1931 to 1947. Her goal was to document the experiences and perceptions of women who attended Duke University during this period. In particular she wanted to know why they selected and how the Woman's College figured into that decision. She also explored her subject's position and negative experiences at Duke. Her interviewees include several class leaders, a member of the Duke family, and others who have had long established ties to the school after graduation.

Collection
The Woman's College Library dates from the 1927 construction of the Woman's College campus. During the three years required to build the library on West Campus, this was the library for the entire university. In 1930 the Woman's College Library opened officially with a collection of 4,000 books. The collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits including: announcements of art exhibitions; booklets on works of art; biographical sketches of artists; and schedules of exhibitions. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection

Wladyslaw W. Kulski papers, 1933-1987 7 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Wladyslaw W. Kulski was born in Warsaw, Poland on July 27, 1903. After earning his doctorate, Dr. Kulski served as diplomat and an educator. He taught Political Science at Duke University from 1964 until his retirement in 1973. He died May 16, 1989. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, manuscripts, course notes, notebooks, photographs, printed matter and a scrapbook. The collection ranges in date from 1710-1987 and is in English, Polish, French and German.

Contains correspondence, diplomatic papers, conference papers, articles, printed matter and other materials related to Dr. Kulski's role as a Polish diplomat before and during World War II and as a lecturer and teacher of Political Science after the war. The materials, approximately half of which are in Polish, pertain to Slavic Studies, Soviet politics and government, and issues in European diplomacy and politics before, during and after World War II. The collection includes hand- and typed-written manuscripts in Polish, English, French and German and materials by and about his brother, Julian E. (1905-1988), including a memoir of Stefan Starzynski, mayor of Warsaw. Also included is the correspondence of Antonina Kulski, largely in Polish with a few in English and French. Her letters that largely cover the Kulski's time in London during World War II and consists of communication with Polish soldiers, namely Kazimierz Domaszewski and Bohdan Brzozowski. There are also some photographs of presumably Polish soldiers during World War II and likely Kulksi family members and friends. There is also a scrapbook of clippings and correspondence. Material ranges in date from 1710-1987, with the bulk covering 1933-1969.

Collection
William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.