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Collection

"A brief history of medicine" short subject film, circa 1969 .2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 1 film reel; 2 DVD use copy

Short subject film whose sequence of still images encapsulates the evolution of medical knowledge and practices from Neolithic times to the 20th century. The style is sixties psychedelic, with fast-moving sequences and vivid colors. The still images consist of historical scenes, procedures, and individuals significant to the history of medicine, chiefly Western, but there are a few images from Eastern practices. The only sound is music from "Mass in F Minor" by the Electric Prunes rock group (1968). Produced by staff in the Audio Visual Resources at the School of Medicine at Wake Forest University for educational purposes as well as for photographic research. Although the original 16 mm film is restricted, there are two DVD use copies for viewing. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.
Collection
This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. Types of materials include minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Major subjects include Duke University faculty, Duke University Administration, and Duke University Board of Trustees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. English.

This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. The collection includes minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. Materials are continuously added to this collection.

Collection
The Academic Rankings Reference Collection contains files of magazines and newspaper and magazine clippings concerning the academic ranking of Duke and other schools. The bulk of the collection consists of copies of the U.S. News & World Report publications on undergraduate and graduate schools. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research. English.

The collection contains materials pertaining to academic ranking of Duke and other schools in the United States.

Collection

Academics and Research Reference collection, 1851-ongoing 1.25 Linear Feet — approx. 1000 Items

The Academics and Research Reference Collection contains materials documenting academic and research matters at the University. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The collection contains documents pertaining to academic and research matters at the University such as curriculum development, advising, academic and research support, interdisciplinary programs, consortia and cooperative programs, research centers, and so forth. The materials include handbooks, clippings, flyers, reports, and proposals. The bulk dates are 1964-1994.

Collection

Activating the Archive student projects collection, 2015 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 7 computer files; 10.6 Gigabyte

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Materials have been arranged by student name.

Collection
Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

Collection
Four pages of a materia medica, of which one section bears the title "The Efforts and Vertuos: with the severall use of Venice Triache."
Collection
Adam Reynolds is a conceptual documentary photographer whose work explores contemporary political conflict, primarily in the Middle East. His series "Architecture of an Existential Threat" was the 2016 winner of the ADA Collection Award for an Emerging Documentarian. Taken in Israel between 2013 and 2015, the photographs document bomb shelters and sealable rooms to which residents of the State of Israel are required to have access. There are over 10,000 of these public and private bomb shelters in Israel and the Occupied Territories. The photographs show the way these spaces are normalized in Israeli life, using them as community centers, places of worship, or bars. Reynolds writes that "these shelters are the architecture of an existential threat--both real and perceived."

Adam Reynolds's series "Architecture of an Existential Threat" was the 2016 winner of the ADA Collection Award for an Emerging Documentarian. He included the following abstract of his work:

"Since its creation in 1948, the State of Israel has felt itself isolated and beset by enemies seeking its destruction. This collective siege mentality is best expressed in the ubiquity of the thousands of bomb shelters found throughout the country. By law all Israelis are required to have access to a bomb shelter and rooms that can be sealed off in case of an unconventional weapons attack. There are over 10,000 public and private bomb shelters found throughout Israel and the Occupied Territories.

The photographs in this series document these bomb shelters and offer a window into the collective mindset of the Israeli people. Israelis have normalized this “doomsday space” into their daily lives, often using the shelters as dance studios, community centers, pubs, and places of worship. For Jewish Israelis haunted by a history of exile and persecution, these shelters are the architecture of an existential threat – both real and perceived."

Collection

Addison "Add" Penfield papers, 1985 0.5 Linear Feet — 750 Items

Addison "Add" Penfield was born in Meriden, Connecticut in 1918. He came to Duke University in Durham, North Carolina in 1936. During his four years as an undergraduate he became deeply involved with sports radio broadcasting on-campus, as the play-by-play announcer for Duke Football, and of-campus he worked with numerous other radio stations throughout North Carolina. The collection contains a typed manuscript, 553 pages, concerning Penfield's career as a sports broadcaster and writer, and as a member of the Duke staff.

The collection contains a typed manuscript, 553 pages, concerning Penfield's career as a sports broadcaster and writer, and as a member of the Duke staff. Topics include his years as a student at Duke, Eddie Cameron, Ted Mann, Vic Bubas, Wallace Wade and other members of the athletic staff, the 1942 Rose Bowl, the Duke Football Network (1952-1962), Duke Basketball in the 1950's and 1960's and other related subjects.

Collection
Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.