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Collection
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

Collection
Online
A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Collection
Online
The Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association was created in 1969, an apparent merger of the men's and women's Y's elements. The YM-YWCA was a student religious organization operating within the Religious Activities Department and overseen by an advisory board and advised by the Associate Directors of Religious Activities. The collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. The dates in the collection range from circa 1968-1979.

Collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA, a social activist religious group, including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. Includes the logbook (1972/1973; restricted) and related material of the organization's Draft Counseling and Information Center; "A White Paper on Institutional Racism at Duke: The Curriculum" (1972); listings of vocations for social change produced by OPT, its center for social change information; and copies of the handbook, The University Experience (1969/1970-1978/1979). The handbooks include essays on race relations, sexuality, civil rights and social change, and the experiences of foreign and minority students, as well as University history and administrative information. In an annual report (1970/1971) the book is said to have changed from "a book of interesting facts and figures" to "a rather controversial" alternative view of the University.

Also present in the collection are the records of the Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action (INSA) which was a leftist, activist agency of the Duke YM-YWCA. Their records include brochures, flyers, newsletters, manuals, and information concerning political and social issues of the early 1970s, and activities of the INSA. A sampling of topics include: Buddhism and nonviolence, Indochina; history, politics, and culture during the war, Cuba, UMWA (United Mine Workers Association), University investment, War -- bombing effects, and Wounded Knee. The INSA also collected flyers, brochures, and other printed matter from national organizations. Some organizations include: Committee on New Alternatives in the Middle East, Gandhi Peace Foundation, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and New American Movement.

Collection

York House records, 1966-1979 0.2 Linear Feet — 200 Items

York House was formed in 1961. Contains the records of York House, an independent living group for upperclassmen and underclassmen, at Duke University. Types of materials include newsletters, financial summaries, constitutions, and miscellaneous notes. Major subjects include residential living at Duke University, student life, alcohol use, and social activities among students. Materials are dated from 1966 to 1979.

Contains materials relating to the general governance and social activities of residents of York House, a Duke University Residence Hall.

Collection
Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt (née Rochelle, 1881-1980) was the daughter of Durham merchant Leander Sydney and Jeanette Stanley Rochelle. She was the fourth and final wife of Brodie L. Duke and a Durham landowner in her own right. The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt Papers date from 1889 to 1980 and chronicle the personal life of Wylanta as well as the business and financial transactions which she conducted as a prominent landowner in Durham. Materials include correspondence, photographs, and financial records.

The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers date from 1889 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials from the 1920s and 1930s. The collection chronicles Wylanta's familial and social life as well as her business dealings.

The Correspondence Series contains primarily incoming correspondence from Wylanta's sister, Hettie, nieces and nephews, and husbands as well as letters to and from a wide range of friends and Durham citizens. It contains a number of holiday greeting and sympathy cards, but does not contain any correspondence explicitly addressed to Brodie L. Duke.

The Clippings Series includes excerpts from newspaper columns and articles which Wylanta collected throughout her life. These clippings include the regular opinion column written by Wylanta's brother, Zapheus A. Rochelle, notes from the society section chronicling Wylanta and others' visits and travels, and coverage of Wylanta and Stayhorn's 1923 motor vehicle accident in Nice, France, as well as other political and social subjects.

The Financial Records Series encompasses deposit slips, receipts, dividend notices, ledgers, and correspondence evidencing Wylanta's business transactions. The series also contains information about her property ownership in the city of Durham.

The Miscellaneous Series contains assorted handwritten notes and printed commercial images.

The Photographs Series includes a number of portraits of Wylanta, her husbands and her family as well as numerous images of as-yet unidentified individuals. The materials include images of Wylanta in her wedding gowns, snapshots, and portraits. There are also a handful of images of places and an early x-ray of Wylanta's arm following an accident.

Collection

Wyatt T. Dixon papers, 1850s-1987 3.6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2700 Items

The Wyatt T. Dixon Papers span the 1850s to 1987, although the bulk of the material dates from 1918 to the 1960s. The collection consists of diaries, vintage photographs, photomechanical prints, postcards, clippings, correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, printed materials, forms, military records, leaflets, and maps. The Photographs Series comprises the largest portion of the collection. The collection documents the history of Durham, N.C., the Dixon family, activities of the United States Army, American Expeditionary Forces, 30th Division, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, from 1917 to 1919; Durham, North Carolina; and Dixon's career as a journalist.

The World War I Series chronicles the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, which consisted primarily of men from Durham, N.C. Dixon's diaries chronicle the unit's movements and activities in the United States and Europe including England, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Battery C was involved in the Saint Michiel offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. The diaries describe camp life in the United States and Europe, including daily routines; camp conditions; outbreaks of measles and other medical situations; and the soldiers' personal recreational activities. The journey by ship to Europe is also described in detail, including the sale of food to the soldiers and the conditions on board. Civilian responses to the soldiers as they visited or traveled through towns and cities in America, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg are noted throughout the diaries. Dixon mentions a unit of African-American soldiers was at Mont Dore, France. There are some snapshot photographs of Battery C which Dixon probably created with his Kodak camera and some formal panoramic photographs of the entire unit. Letters written by Dixon and his family while he was in the Army are found in the Writings Series.

The Writings Series contains some personal correspondence and a diary, but the bulk of the series documents Dixon's career as a writer for newspapers published by the Durham Herald Company in Durham, N.C. In his column "How Times Do Change," Dixon described life in Durham and the surrounding area and the manner in which cityscapes and social life had changed over the past decades.

The Photographs Series consists primarily of photographs and documents social life and cityscapes in Durham, N.C. Images include buildings such as banks, businesses, cemeteries, churches, court houses, dams and power plants, hospitals, hotels and inns, plantations (abandoned), post offices, schools, and tobacco warehouses and factories. There are street scenes and aerial views. Many of these local images appear to have been collected by Dixon to illustrate his articles. Pictures of people include portraits of family members and friends, and candid scenes of groups engaged in social activities. There are images of events such as holiday celebrations and parades. Transportation, including trolleys, buses, fire fighting equipment and train depots, is also documented.

The Durham Printed Materials Series and the Miscellaneous Series include information about the City of Durham and Durham County, genealogical information about Dixon's family, and the minutes book of a social club for young men.

Collection

WXDU records, 1963-2013 1.5 Linear Feet

WXDU, as a member of the Duke University Union, exists to inform, educate, and entertain both the students of Duke University and the surrounding community of Durham through quality progressive alternative radio programming. WXDU was founded in 1983 when former station WDUK-1600AM switched to a FM signal. Collection contains public records files, including correspondence and other materials related to FCC matters, program guides, clippings, a DJ handbook, and other materials. Materials range in date from 1977-2001.

Collection contains materials pertaining to FCC matters including correspondence, playlists, Music Forums notebooks containing comments by DJs and staff on station happenings, DJ manuals, event flyers and publicity, employment reports, insurance policies, license applications and renewal, public service announcements, program guides, board member and staff lists, clippings, and other materials concerning the operation of the station.

Collection

Wunderman Archives, 1946-2010 and undated 520 Linear Feet — 354,000 Items

Wunderman is a direct marketing and behavior-oriented marketing communications firm founded in 1958 as Wunderman Ricotta & Kline. It is currently a subsidiary of the Young & Rubicam agency. The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wunderman Archives span the years 1946-2010 and comprise the administrative records of direct-mail and direct marketing agency Wunderman and its predecessor entities Wunderman Ricotta & Kline, Wunderman Worldwide, Wunderman Cato Johnson, and Impiric, as well as its subsidiary offices in the U.S. and abroad, associated firms such as Stone & Adler and Chapman Direct, and its relations with parent company Young & Rubicam. It includes general office files, policy and procedure manuals, training materials, awards, account files, new business records, professional papers of founder Lester Wunderman and other key executives, samples of client campaigns, photographs, slides and audio cassettes and videocassettes. Clients include American Express, Apple, Army/ROTC, AT&T, Britannica Press, CBS, CIT Financial, Citibank, Columbia House, Ford, Gevalia Kaffe (Kraft), the Grolier Society, IBM, Jackson & Perkins, Johnson & Johnson, Lincoln-Mercury, Manufacturers Hanover Trust, Microsoft, Miller beer, National Rifle Association, New York Telephone/NYNEX, Time (Fortune, Money and Sports Illustrated magazines), Time-Life Books, United States Postal Service (USPS), and Xerox.

Collection
Manufacturing firm founded in 1893 in Durham, N.C. that produced machinery for the packaging industry. Collection includes articles, brochures, clippings, correspondence, memorabilia, newsletters, photographs and other materials. Materials touch on business acquisition, company events, employee policies, retirements, staff promotions, stock and other issues. Individuals and companies represented in the collection include ACMA, Emhart, John Thomas Dalton, John L. Moorhead, Rexham, Richard Harvey Wright, Richard Harvey Wright II, and Sperry Rand.

Collection includes articles, brochures, clippings, correspondence, memorabilia, newsletters, photographs and other materials. Materials touch on business acquisition, company events, employee policies, retirements, staff promotions, stock and other issues. Individuals and companies represented in the collection include ACMA, Emhart, John Thomas Dalton, John L. Moorhead, Rexham, Richard Harvey Wright, Richard Harvey Wright II, and Sperry Rand.

Collection

Wright H. Everett papers, 1853-1998 and undated 27 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Wright H. Bill Everett (1925-2010) was a media space salesman for several major magazines, and the founder of his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co., that specialized in a variety of print materials combining humorous captions with still images from silent movies. The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audiotapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, Maclean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office? Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audio tapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, MacLean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office?

Collection

Wrestling records, 1933-ongoing. 4.9 Linear Feet — 5250 Items

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the wrestling team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1934-ongoing.

Collection

Womonwrites records, 1979-2014 3.0 Linear Feet — 1875 Items

Womonwrites is an annual conference of lesbian writers. Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, meeting evaluations, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection includes anthologies of writings by Womonwriters (conference attendees), conference chronological files, meeting notes, and membership lists. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

RESTRICTIONS: Membership mailings lists, in Box 3, are CLOSED until 2020.

Collection
Women Work! improved women's economic security through job training, education, lobbying policymakers, and partnering with other national organizations. It was originally known as the Displaced Homemakers Network, and operated from 1978 until 2009. Accession (2009-0163) (12,375 items; 16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0163) (16.5 lin. ft.; dated 1979-2009) includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, conference files, newsletters and publications, news clippings and photocopies, photographs, slides, electronic files and images, and videos. CDs and other electronic data files have been removed and transferred to Duke's ERM server. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2015-0112) (0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1975-1990) is an addition that includes board materials, training guides and reports, program materials, administrative records, correspondance, and copies of the Network News, the publication for the Displaced Homemakers Network.

Collection
The Women's Theological Center, founded in 1981 and active through 2007, was a Boston-based organization that provided feminist theological and ministerial education for women. Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes. Also included are grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials (especially related to the Study/Action program), and writings and publications. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection consists of administrative records documenting the foundation and development of the WTC, as well as board meeting and other committee notes from Francine Cardman and Gay Harter. Budgets, membership information, and reports are also in the administrative records. Collection also includes grant applications and funding requests, publicity and programming materials, and writings and publications. The publicity and programming materials document the WTC's activities and include articles, brochures, and event programs, as well as information, readings, and other materials from the Study/Action program. Most of the Study/Action material is from Gay Harter's files. Writings and publications include WTC newsletters, drafts of an unpublished book about the Study/Action program, and other writings by WTC members.

WTC members who appear frequently in the administrative records, particularly meeting minutes, as well as Study/Action materials and WTC newsletters include Donna Bivens, Nancy Richardson, Marian (Meck) Groot, Angelica (Gay) Harter, Francine Cardman, and Joan Martin.

Collection

Women's Refugee Commission records, 1979-2020; 1979-ongoing, bulk 1989-2011 55.6 Linear Feet — 0.92 Gigabytes — 36,200 Items

Online
The Women's Refugee Commission was established in 1989 as part of the International Rescue Committee. It advocates for laws, policies, and programs to improve the lives and protect the rights of refugee and internally displaced women, children, and adolescents. Collection includes audiovisual materials (interviews, Voices of Courage luncheons, and footage and photographs from trips to refugee camps); field and research reports; children, education, and youth program materials; foundation files; former board and commission member files; Reproductive Health program materials and reports; Livelihoods program materials and reports; files from executive directors; subject files; board of directors files; and media binders for the Women's Refugee Commission. Countries represented include Cambodia, Afghanistan, Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Thailand, Myanmar, Israel, Guatemala, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Pakistan, Liberia, Kosovo, Iraq, Zambia, Tanzania, the United States, and others. Material predating the founding of the Commission primarily includes photographs from UNHCR and other organizations. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The collection is organized into several series, each representing different operations within the Women's Refugee Commission.

The Audiovisual Materials series includes tapes in a variety of formats documenting speaking engagements, luncheons, and interviews with WRC staff; raw footage of trips to refugee camps and field visits with refugees around the world; and recordings of testimony and other projects highlighting the experiences of refugee women and children. This series also includes over 5,000 photographs, slides, and negatives documenting trips to refugee camps and the activities of refugees around the world. Access is RESTRICTED: use copies are required for access.

The Printed Materials and Publications series consists largely of the publications and documentation produced by the Women's Refugee Commission staff about refugee conditions in crisis situations around the world. Trip reports constitute a large portion within the series, covering visits to refugee camps in Africa, Asia, Europe, South America, and United States prisons (where asylum seekers are detained). Also included are public reports and guidelines on issues like domestic and gender-based violence; reproductive health and the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP); armed conflict and its effects on children; and fuel alternatives and strategies. Drafts of publications, newsletters from the WRC, and a small amount of drawings by refugee children make up the rest of this series.

The Children, Youth, and Education series includes a variety of materials from that WRC program, including additional reports and guidelines. A large component consists of reports, meetings, and other files from the Education in Emergencies initiative.

The Foundations series includes name files for various foundations, trusts, and charities who support the operations of the Women's Refugee Commission. Also included are name files for former board members and commissioners.

Protection Program is a small series with materials from the Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) group and meeting files from the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW).

The Reproductive Health series is a large series with several subseries, all relating to the activities of the Reproductive Health program. One such subseries is the Reproductive Health Response in Conflict (RHRC) Consortium's historical documents, which includes meeting files, conference and event materials, annual reports, and some photographs. Another subseries is United States government-funded projects, covering HIV/AIDS and gender-based violence. Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) projects, Thai-Burma border trafficking research, donor files, and subgrantee files make up the remainder of the series. The majority of the Reproductive Health series is restricted.

The Media series consists of newspaper clippings and printouts regarding refugee sitations and the Women's Refugee Commission's coverage in the media.

The Social Protection and Livelihoods series includes program materials and evaluations, with heavy documentation for the Age, Gender and Diversity Mainstreaming (AGDM) Initiative project and its various implementations around the world. Also included in this series are reports and research relating to the Livelihoods program, WRC general information and materials, strategic planning for the group, and board and delegation visits, meetings, and agendas.

The Subject Files series includes topical files primarily related to refugee women and their organizations; issues, such internal displacement, habitat, literacy, and resettlement; the Commission's participation and protection project; and education, especially in emergencies and for girls and adolescents. Other files are related to the Commission's partners in refugee work.

The Executive Director Files series includes materials from Executive Directors Mary Diaz, Carolyn Makinson, and Sarah Costa, such as summary reports and correspondence from all of the WRC programs, UN Security Council Resolutions and other WRC-related initiatives, Board of Director meeting packets, and files for individual board members, commissioners, experts, and fundraisers.

The Board of Directors (BOD) Files series contains primarily board member packets and planning documents for Commission board meetings between 1997-2014. Some board member packets also contain Advocacy Day materials. There are also items related to the Excecutive and Nominating Committee meetings, as well as packets on specialized topics, such as peace initiatives and the Bureau of Public Affairs in the U.S. Department of State. There are a few files related to Board mailings, donors, and potential commissioners.

D.C. Office Files are CLOSED for 20 years (until 2031) unless prior permission is received from the donor. The series includes files on Haiti, Gender, Detention and Asylum, and other programs run through the D.C. office.

The New York Office Files includes material related to the rebranding of the Commission's logo and general design issues, planning anniversary celebrations, launches for reports and book publications, and general files on communications and accountability working groups.

Acronyms frequently used in the collection:

  • AGDM: Age Gender Diversity Mainstreaming
  • CSW: Commission on the Status of Women
  • EmOC: Emergency Obstetric Care
  • GBV: Gender-based Violence
  • INS: Immigration and Naturalization Service (US)
  • IRC: International Rescue Committee
  • MISP: Minimum Initial Service Package
  • RH: Reproductive Health
  • RHC: Reproductive Health in Crises
  • RHRC: Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium
  • SIPA: School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • UNFPA: United Nations Population Fund
  • UNHCR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
  • WPS: Women, Peace, and Security
  • WRC: Women's Refugee Commission

Collection

Women's Network records, 1975-1988 3 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

The Women's Network began in 1975 when female faculty began meeting in a caucus to discuss issues surrounding "the recruitment, retention, and treatment of faculty women." Later on its focus expanded to include matters of sexual harassment, salary equity, and the dual responsibilities of work and family. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, committee minutes, flyers, reports, clippings, and other materials form the faculty and the staff/administrative divisions of the Women's Network.

The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, committee minutes, flyers, reports, clippings, and other materials form the faculty (committee A) and the staff/administrative (committee B) divisions of the Women's Network. Subjects include parental leave, tenure, recruitment and hiring, salary equity, sexual harassment and TIAA-CREF matters. There is one sealed envelope containing records of a sexual harassment case. It has been removed from the collection and placed in the vault; it will remain closed until 2037.

Collection
Branch of an international peace advocacy organization founded in 1915; formerly known as the Chapel Hill Branch (N.C.). Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Women's Center records, 1970-2014 31.75 Linear Feet — 6.46 Megabytes

The Women's Center serves the Duke undergraduate, graduate and professional student communities. The center supports and promotes student women and gender issues on campus. Materials present include subject files, correspondence, memoranda, reports, proposals, surveys, programming records, committee records, flyers, job descriptions, training materials, photographs, slides, videocassettes, and other materials relating to the history and daily operation of the Center.

The Women's Center records contain subject files, correspondence, memoranda, reports, proposals, surveys, programming records, committee records, flyers, job descriptions, training materials, photographs, slides, videocassettes, and other materials relating to the history and daily operation of the Center. Major subjects include sexual assault, crime prevention, safe sex, gender issues, sorority life, harassment, and women in science and engineering. Materials can also be found on the following groups or programs: BASES (Building Awareness through Shared Experiences); DARE (Duke Acquaintance Rape Education); GPWN (Graduate and Professional Women's Network); MAC (Men Acting for Change); SASS (Sexual Assault Support Services); Take Back the Night; VOICES (magazine published by the Women's Center); WISE (Women in Science and Engineering); Women of Color; and the Women's Center Art Gallery.

The collection also contains images and text from the "Breaking Out" exhibition. Exhbit materials consist of women sharing stories about sexual violence and harassment. The exhibit was created by students and co-sponsored by the Women's Center. Materials in the collection range in date from 1970-2014.

Collection
The Sports Information Office provides information about Duke athletics to the media. They also facilitate press interviews with Duke athletes and coaches. The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the women's basketball team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1976-ongoing.

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the women's basketball team at Duke University. There are also files regarding the Ronald McDonald House Challenge and the Dial Classic. The material ranges in date from 1976-ongoing.

Collection
Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Online
Non-profit, inter-racial organization founded in Durham, N.C. in September 1968; Elna Spaulding was founder and first president. Collection comprises correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, as well as information about the organization's relationship to the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C. Documents the organization's involvement in the Durham community on a variety of issues, including easing racial tensions; smoothing the way for court ordered school integration in 1970; providing for the recreational and cultural needs of disadvantaged youth; and establishing a clearinghouse to offer information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of social problems.

The records of Women-In-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. (WIAPVC), an interracial community service non-profit organization based in Durham, North Carolina, span the years 1968 to 1998. Materials document the organization's history beginning with its foundation in 1968, and include correspondence, by-laws, meeting agendas and minutes, budgets, articles of incorporation, clippings, photographs, a scrapbook, awards, and other documentation of its activities and milestones. The records contain information about the organization's various projects and workshops, and its relationship with the Women In Action Foundation of Durham, N.C., Inc. Persons associated with the organization included business, political, and community leaders and activists, among them Ann Atwater, Mrs. William A. Clement, Mrs. James E. Davis, Dr. Juanita Kreps, Mrs. H.M. Michaux, Mrs. Kenneth C. Royall, Margaret Rose Sanford, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, and Mrs. Albert Whiting. There are also letters of support from Senators B. Everett Jordan and Sam Erwin.

The bulk of the early items in the Correspondence Series, dating from 1968 to 1969, reflects the tenacity and persistence on the part of Spaulding, the first president, in seeking money for the organization's activities. She sought funding from national and North Carolina foundations and local businesses. Among the contributors were the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Grant Foundation, and the City of Durham. Money was also raised by dues paid by its members, which became a point of controversy for the organization.

The Administrative Files include agendas and minutes for WIAPVC's general, board, executive, and advisory committees. Agendas and programs for general meetings indicate that the leaders in the organization attempted to maintain a balance between focusing on some aspect of the group itself (such as its by-laws and self-evaluation) and programs of community-wide importance. The advisory committee evolved from the steering committee and was made up of subcommittee chairs.

Folders in the Subcommittees Series generally contain correspondence, reports, and guidelines. Records show that the number of subcommittees waxed and waned depending on the need for them. Subcommittees for which records exist include Civic Improvement, Education, Human Relations, and Police-Community Relations. The subcommittees undertook outreach and programs that were significant to Durham's community.

The organization's outreach activities are also documented in the Conferences, Workshops, and Projects series. Conferences and workshops sponsored by the organization reflect the group's efforts to improve itself, support other organizations, and reach out to provide service to the community. In the same series, WIAPVC projects indicate the wide range of interests and responsibilities which the organization sought to undertake. Among those represented in the files are the Center for School Support; the Clearinghouse, which offered information and referral services to Durham citizens for a variety of concerns; Cornwallis Housing Project, which helped provide recreational needs for youth residing in the project; the Cultural Experience Pilot Project, which allowed for 37 Durham junior high school students from low income families to spend three days in Washington; the Durham Emergency Energy Committee, which helped provide fuel to needy families in the Durham community; and various intern projects, in which students from the Duke Divinity School Field Education Program participated.

The bulk of the processed collection consists of the early records of the WIAPVC. Later years (1980s-1990s) are represented in Accession 1996-0164 and Accession 2008-0104, which include financial activities, projects, administrative files, reports, event planning information, newsletters, and awards ceremonies.

Collection
The Woman's College Library dates from the 1927 construction of the Woman's College campus. During the three years required to build the library on West Campus, this was the library for the entire university. In 1930 the Woman's College Library opened officially with a collection of 4,000 books. The collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits including: announcements of art exhibitions; booklets on works of art; biographical sketches of artists; and schedules of exhibitions. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection

Womankind Books records, 1977-1984 and undated 1.4 Linear Feet — 128 items

Collection includes materials removed from two incomplete scrapbooks Carole Powell began. Materials cover 1977-1984 but are mostly undated and relate to the founding and opening of Womankind Books, and its associated distribution activities and concerts on behalf of Olivia records. Includes flyers, newspaper articles and clippings, bookmarks, newsletter articles, advertisements, a catalog, press releases and posters for concerts, along with eight glossy black-and-white photographs of the musicians. There are also materials relating to fund raising activities undertaken by the Womankind Support Project, including on behalf of the Womankind Health Center, including mock-ups, mailers, and flyers for benefits; fund raising solicitations; and announcements. There are several items related to Powell's support of the Walter Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro campaign in 1984 and to Powell's campaign for Metropolitan County Council member at-large in 1983. There are also a few items related to Chicago's "Catch the Spirit" campaign in 1984. Includes personal greeting and other cards and messages for Powell, along with her business cards, as well as two 9.5 x 6.75-inch black-and-white photographs of the interior for Womankind Books.
Collection

Wolfgang F. Stolper papers, 1892-2001, bulk dates 1930s-1990s 29 Linear Feet — 38 boxes. — 2 Megabytes — One set.

Wolfgang Stolper (1912-2002) was a professor emeritus of economics at the University of Michigan. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and professional and faculty activities (especially his missions to Africa as an economic advisor). It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

Most of this collection is comprised of Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62 (sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, (1962-68) for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria.

The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972) and other economic missions to Africa, including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983), and Malawi (1981). He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN, and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, November 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950s.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung« (1988).

Collection
William Gorman (1923-2003) was an emeritus fellow at Nuffield College. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, and research. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection includes the professional correspondence, writings, unpublished notes, research reports, and other papers that document the academic career and research of Gorman. His writings include typescripts and handwritten manuscripts of published research. The correspondence segment chiefly holds letters of reference and correspondence received from colleagues.

Collection

W. M. (Warner Max) Corden papers, 1957-2012 14.5 Linear Feet — 10 boxes.

Max Corden (born 1927) is Emeritus Professor of International Economics at Johns Hopkins University. This collection documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, and professional activities. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection consists of material created and assembled by Corden, including writings, correspondence, and project files from his studies and career at Oxford, the International Monetary Fund, and the Australian National University. Items in this collection have been described and sorted by Corden; descriptions are replicated here. He has largely arranged the materials to correspond with his professional career; materials from his time working at Oxford, IMF, and SAIS have been separated from his materials produced in Australia. The collection also contains series based on format, including conferences and lectures, writings and publications, and many files of correspondence with economists around the world.

Collection

Wladyslaw W. Kulski papers, 1933-1987 7 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Wladyslaw W. Kulski was born in Warsaw, Poland on July 27, 1903. After earning his doctorate, Dr. Kulski served as diplomat and an educator. He taught Political Science at Duke University from 1964 until his retirement in 1973. He died May 16, 1989. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, manuscripts, course notes, notebooks, photographs, printed matter and a scrapbook. The collection ranges in date from 1710-1987 and is in English, Polish, French and German.

Contains correspondence, diplomatic papers, conference papers, articles, printed matter and other materials related to Dr. Kulski's role as a Polish diplomat before and during World War II and as a lecturer and teacher of Political Science after the war. The materials, approximately half of which are in Polish, pertain to Slavic Studies, Soviet politics and government, and issues in European diplomacy and politics before, during and after World War II. The collection includes hand- and typed-written manuscripts in Polish, English, French and German and materials by and about his brother, Julian E. (1905-1988), including a memoir of Stefan Starzynski, mayor of Warsaw. Also included is the correspondence of Antonina Kulski, largely in Polish with a few in English and French. Her letters that largely cover the Kulski's time in London during World War II and consists of communication with Polish soldiers, namely Kazimierz Domaszewski and Bohdan Brzozowski. There are also some photographs of presumably Polish soldiers during World War II and likely Kulksi family members and friends. There is also a scrapbook of clippings and correspondence. Material ranges in date from 1710-1987, with the bulk covering 1933-1969.

Collection

Winifred Gail Soules Bradley papers, 1952-1982 4.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 2,760 Items

Women's rights activist. Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, speeches and writings, newsletters, financial reports, pamphlets, clippings, flyers, and printed materials, primarily focusing on women's organizations in which Mrs. Bradley held leadership positions. The majority of the materials pertain to the League of Women Voters of the United States, particularly as they relate to her chairing its Foreign Policy Committee. The collection also documents efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment through the North Carolina State Legislature in the 1970s. Other organizations highlighted are the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, the Women's Equity Action League of North Carolina, and the Women's Forum of North Carolina. Also includes copies of the LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS, (DURHAM, N.C.) BULLETIN. A common goal which runs through many of the papers was her effort to improve the condition of women legally, economically, and politically.

The papers of Winifred Gail Soules Bradley span the period 1952 to 1982 with the bulk of the material dating from 1965 through the 1970s. The focus of the collection is the various women's organizations to which Bradley belonged and in which she held leadership positions.

The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, speeches and writings, newsletters, financial reports, pamphlets, clippings, flyers, and printed materials. It is organized chiefly alphabetically by name of organization, committee, or concern.

The organization primarily represented is the League of Women Voters in which Bradley held local, state, and national office. Files pertaining to the League are subdivided by the League of Women Voters, Durham, N.C., League of Women Voters, N.C., and the League of Women Voters, United States. These files are further subdivided by committees, conferences, and issues in which Bradley held an office or was involved. Within these subgroups, the papers are arranged in chronological order. The majority of materials in this file pertains to her offices at the national level, in particular her service as chair of the League of Women Voters of the United States (LWVUS) Foreign Policy Committee from 1967 to 1970 and her tenure as First Vice President from 1970 to 1974.

Papers relating to the Foreign Policy Committee include memos from Bradley to state league presidents, handwritten notes, reports and speeches (some of these made by Bradley), position papers, and newsletters. Among the topics addressed while she was Foreign Policy committee chairman were foreign aid, biological and chemical warfare, and United States trade policies.

Bradley's positions as First Vice President of the LWVUS and Chair of the Foreign Policy Committee gave her several opportunities to have a highly visible role in the League's activities, some of which are reflected in the collection. They include speeches she made before the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee in support of foreign economic aid in 1968 and before the House Ways and Means Committee regarding U.S. trade policy and the Trade Expansion Act of 1968. She also represented the League on a fact-finding mission to Japan in 1972 and at the Hemispheric Conference for Women in Miami in 1976. Documentation and papers relating to both trips are included in the collection.

In 1971, Bradley was appointed by President Nixon to serve as a member of the board of the National Institute for Consumer Justice. The board's report provided findings and recommendations concerning the adequacy of existing procedures for resolving disputes arising out of consumer transactions, particularly as they related to small claims courts.

Bradley's involvement with the Overseas Education Fund (OEF) also added an international component to her work with the LWVUS. She became a life trustee of the organization. The mission of the OEF was to help women of the third world become integrated into the socioeconomic development of their societies, as well as to further understanding in the United States of issues as they related to women in development. Bradley also represented the LWVUS on the United States National Commission for UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization). Papers related to this organization contain reports by Bradley to the LWVUS about the group and to her activities as chair of its Status of Women Committee. One of these involvements was a Mid-Decade World Conference held in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1980, which grew out of the United Nations Decade for Women (1975-1985). The papers indicate that Bradley contributed to the development of this conference by devising a basic plan to involve nongovernmental organizations in the conference.

The collection contains several speeches Bradley made before League groups both while she was President of the North Carolina League of Women Voters and also when she was First Vice-President of the LWVUS. However, there is not very much material relating to her tenure as president of the League of Women Voters of North Carolina from 1962 to 1965. Some of this material has been donated to the North Carolina State Division of Archives and History and to the state league office in Raleigh, North Carolina. What material there is primarily concerns the League's efforts to revise the structure and operations of the Judicial Department of North Carolina, particularly the North Carolina court system.

The League of Women Voters of Durham, N.C. Bulletin forms the bulk of the material relating to the local league with which Bradley was involved. The Bulletin spans the years 1952 to 1982 and offers insight into League activities at the local level. Bradley was President of the Durham League from 1957 to 1959. Other materials from the Durham League include information about local workshops, general information pertaining to Durham and local issues in the areas of housing, transportation, and law enforcement.

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) File (1971-1982) chiefly relates to efforts to ratify passage of the ERA in the North Carolina State Legislature. These papers particularly reflect those attempts which were made in the state from 1974 to 1979. The organization most prominently represented is North Carolinians United for ERA (NCUERA) which was comprised of a coalition of forty-three groups in North Carolina. NCUERA was apparently referred to by several names, including ERA United Inc., N. C. Coalition for Passage of the ERA, and the North Carolina Equal Rights Amendment Ratification Coalition. Offices Bradley held include Public Relations Coordinator for ERA United, 1974-1975 and lst Vice-President of NCUERA, 1978-1979. The files contain handwritten notes, speeches made by Bradley, correspondence, minutes, and printed materials generated to garner support for the ERA amendment. They also include personal testimonies from persons, who were surveyed by Bradley during her tenure as Public Relations Coordinator, regarding why they were working for passage of the ERA as well as samples of quotes from persons representing different groups who were against passage of the ERA.

Two other North Carolina women's groups in which she held leadership positions were WEAL (Women's Equity Action League) and Women's Forum (WF) of North Carolina. Correspondence, minutes, and newsletters relating to both groups are located in the collection and cover the years 1977 to 1982. Both organizations were affiliated with national organizations. Bradley was President of the North Carolina division of WEAL in 1976 and Vice-President of WF of North Carolina in 1979. WEAL was interested in promoting economic opportunity and pressing for enforcement of anti-discrimination laws against women. It was one of the forty-three groups that joined together to form North Carolinians United for the ERA.

The WF of North Carolina was comprised of women deemed to be high achievers and leaders. Papers indicate that in order to become eligible for membership women had to have influence in the community, have a constituency or make achievements in and beyond their fields. Additionally, members were to have made a commitment to changing the status of women. The papers document considerable debate about eligibility requirements and lengthy discussions about whether or not proposed members should be accepted. Some of the membership proposals are included in the collection.

While most of the collection pertains to volunteer organizations with which Bradley was involved, two other groups are represented in which Bradley held paid positions. She worked as a fundraising consultant for the N. C. Rape Crisis Association, Inc. and as a staff member of the Older Americans Volunteer Program Training Project (OAVP). OAVP was housed in the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development in the Duke University Medical Center. There are two folders of miscellaneous items, including the work by Bradley, ABC's of Fundraising for Volunteer Organizations, speeches she gave (but it is unclear for which organizations they were made), and pamphlets and bibliographies concerning legal, insurance, and child care issues affecting women.

There is very little personal material relating to Mrs. Bradley or to her family in the collection. Some of the papers indicate she and her husband, Dr. David Bradley, worked together for the passage of the ERA in North Carolina and that they traveled abroad to conferences sponsored by the Wilton Park organization. [Wilton Park is described as a British organization to promote greater cooperation in Europe and the West and to offer those influencing opinion in their own countries an opportunity to exchange views on political, economic, and social questions.] Dr. Bradley was for many years on the faculty of the Duke University Religion Department.

A common goal which characterizes the various organizations and committees in which Bradley established herself as a leader was to improve the condition of women legally, economically, and politically. Through her many efforts she worked toward this goal at the local, state, national, and international levels.

Collection
Dr. Willis Edward Byrd was a chemistry professor at Lincoln University. The collection consists of an African American family's papers from the early to mid-twentith century, including correspondence and transcripts from Byrd's education at Talladega College and University of Iowa; some printed materials and writings collected by his parents, Edward D. and Annie L. Jones Byrd, documenting their connections with the Mulberry Rover Missionary Baptist Association, the Better Homes in America organization, and the American Missionary Association; letters to Byrd during his military service in World War II; letters and his employment contract as a chemistry professor at Lincoln University; photographs of Byrd and other family members, some identified, from the early 1900s; and other letters and educational ephemera, including printed materials from Spelman College and Morehouse College. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of assorted printed materials, photographs, and some letters and correspondence relating to the education and employment of Willis Edward Byrd and other members of the Byrd and Jones family, including his parents, siblings, aunts, and uncles.

Byrd's attendance and graduation from Talladega College, and his hiring as a chemistry professor at Lincoln University, represent the bulk of his personal papers. There are some photographs of him, including one in army uniform during World War II, and there are some letters to him from his father that discuss his army service and his father's hopes that he will stay focused on his "life's work," presumably meaning his education. Byrd's series also contains correspondence with prospective employers and transcripts from Talladega, Iowa, and Illinois.

Also included in the collection are materials collected or produced by other members of the Jones and Byrd family. Assorted printed materials collected by parents Edward D. Byrd and Annie L. Jones Byrd reflect their community and church activities in Georgia. The collection also contains family photographs of Byrd's parents' generation, including images of his mother, aunts, and uncles. Correspondence and handwritten drafts and reports from Annie L. Jones Byrd document her communications with Better Homes in America regarding the state of housing and education for African Americans in their community, as well as record her and her sister's search for employment as teachers in the mid-1910s. There are also printed materials from Spelman College and Morehouse College, acquired by Willis Edward Byrd's sibling Sarah L. Byrd King and her husband, Arteria King.

The original acquisition also contains a poll tax and property tax receipt from the early 20th century for Henry Adams, in Brazoria County, Texas; as well as a 19th century tax receipt for "Robert Ballentine's heirs." The connection or relationship these individuals have to the Byrd and Jones family is unclear.

Collection

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

Collection
William T. Blackwell founded the W. T. Blackwell and Co. Tobacco company in Durham, N.C. in 1870 with James R. Day, later adding Julian Shakespeare Carr. This collection includes materials from the Blackwell family, based in Durham, and their descendants, including the J. D. Pridgen and Chester B. Martin families. It includes early materials from Blackwell and Julian Carr's operations of the W.T. Blackwell and Co. Durham Tobacco company; documentation from the building of the W.T. Blackwell and Co. factory; materials from the Durham Tobacco trademark litigation cases of the 1870s; Blackwell family correspondence and financial papers, many documenting local Durham businesses; volumes and ledgers from the operation and closure of the Bank of Durham, operated by Blackwell between 1883 and 1888; photographs, correspondence, and scrapbooks from the Pridgen and Martin families documenting Durham churches, community events, personalities, and local news in the early 20th century; news clippings and family obituaries; and other assorted materials relating to Durham history.

This collection contains assorted materials from the William T. Blackwell family and descendants, including the J. D. Pridgen family and Chester B. Martin family. Materials have been loosely sorted by format and time period, and are arranged chronologically by contributor, if possible.

The bulk of the Family Papers series dates from the late 19th century, with business correspondence and financial materials from the operation of the W. T. Blackwell Tobacco Company, both in the late 1860s (when operating as Blackwell and Day) and following the arrival of Julian Carr in the 1870s and 1880s. Items document the sales and advertising of tobacco products, ongoing factory construction in Durham, travels of both Blackwell and Carr (along with other agents), and the string of trademark violation lawsuits and other legal challenges pursued by Blackwell to protect the Bull Durham trademark in the 1870s.

Other materials from the Blackwell-era relate to the purchases and daily activities of his family, particularly his wife, Emma; the collection contains receipts, invoices, and other correspondence relating to her management of the household, documenting activities like clothing, groceries, and supply purchases. There are a series of condolence notes following the death of Mary Blackwell, the couple's daughter. Blackwell's correspondence with business associates and friends is also housed in the General Correspondence files for the Blackwells.

W.T. Blackwell's niece, Lavinia Blackwell, married Joseph D. Pridgen, Sr., whose Durham-based shoe company is referenced in printed materials and manuscript items in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Scrapbooks from daughters Mary Blackwell Pridgen and Ethelwold Pridgen offer glimpses of these young women's activities in Durham and Hillsboro, both educational and social, during the 1910s and 1920s. These scrapbooks include photographs, programs and ticket stubs, and other ephemeral items collected and preserved by the Pridgens.

Mary Blackwell Pridgen later married Chester B. Martin, and the Martins operated Durham Dairy Products, Inc., a milk processing and distribution company. Mary Pridgen refers to herself as Mrs. C. B. Martin through the rest of the collection's materials. She continued scrapbooking, with clippings and items saved about the Martins and their children dating from the 1950s through the 1960s. Later mid-20th century materials document her interest in Durham history, particularly the establishment of the Historic Preservation Committee in the 1970s.

The collection's Bank of Durham Volumes Series dates from the Blackwell-era, in the 1880s. W.T. Blackwell's operation of the Bank of Durham and its subsequent failure is documented through account books, ledgers, and other volumes recording payments and loans by the bank.

Collection

William Styron papers, 1855-2019 30.2 Linear Feet — 24,562 items

American author and Duke University alumnus. The William Styron Papers span the years 1855-2019, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1943 and 1996. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Styron and other authors; printed materials (including serials containing articles by and about Styron and his work as well as newspaper and magazine clippings); audiotapes, videotapes, and photographs; legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; scrapbooks; and other material relating to Styron's personal life and his career as a writer. Extensive personal and professional correspondence between his family, friends, and fellow authors provides insight into his education at Duke University (particularly his studies with Professor William Blackburn of the Department of English) as well as his literary career and personal life.

The William Styron Papers span the years 1855-2019 with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1943 and 1996. The collection is arranged into the following series: Correspondence, Writings by Styron (which includes Separate Publications, Contributions to Books and Periodicals, Speeches, Unfinished Work, and Miscellaneous Writings), Writings by Others, Printed Material, Audiovisual Material, Scrapbooks, and Miscellaneous Material. Extensive personal and professional correspondence between Styron and his family, friends, editors, and fellow authors provides insight into his education at Duke University (particularly his studies with Professor William Blackburn of the Department of English) as well as his literary career and personal life. The Writings by Styron Series includes numerous drafts, notes, manuscripts, and proofs of his novels, essays, speeches, and articles. Critical and analytical works concerning Styron's writing can be found in both the Printed Material Series and the Writings by Others Series. Interviews with Styron are to be found in both the Interviews section of the Writings by Others Series and in the Audiovisual Material Series.

Numerous American authors are represented in the collection in the Correspondence Series as well as in the Writings by Others Series. Among the major correspondents are Robert Penn Warren, Carlos Fuentes, Norman Mailer, and Reynolds Price. Letters from Eudora Welty, Truman Capote, Art Buchwald, Richard Wilbur, Kurt Vonnegut, William Kennedy, and James Dickey are also included. A separate index to some of the letters by well-known authors and celebrities accompanies the collection. The Writings by Others Series also includes limited edition copies of poems by Reynolds Price and Allen Tate.

Styron's close relationship with his family is documented in the early letters of the Correspondence Series as well as in the scrapbooks kept by his father. The latter include much juvenilia and childhood memorabilia as well as clippings documenting his early literary accomplishments. A diary kept by Styron during the year following his mother's death appears in the Writings by Styron Series: Miscellaneous Writings Subseries. The Audiovisual Material Series includes several family photographs. Videotapes in this series also provide much information about his life and work.

Among the Writings by Styron are numerous holograph notes, manuscripts written in pencil, and printed texts and typescripts with revisions. These provide detailed insight into Styron's creative process and enable the researcher to document the evolution of much of Styron's work. Research material used by Styron for some of his work, particularly The Confessions of Nat Turner, appears among the volumes in the Printed Material Series.

Styron's experience with having his work filmed for both television and the cinema is documented by screenplays of The Long March and Sophie's Choice. Several photographs of the latter production appear in the Audiovisual Material Series. A screenplay of Set This House on Fire, a first draft of a screenplay of Lie Down in Darkness, and a step outline of The Confessions of Nat Turner, none of which were produced, also appear in the Writings by Others Series

Unprocessed addition (06-105) (0.4 lin. ft) contains Styron's copy of The Confessions of Nat Turner and a binder of letters from Styron to Bertha Krantz, Robert D. Loomis, and others, 1967-1993.

Unprocessed addition (07-145) (6 items, 0.1 lin. ft.; dated 2007) contains copies of material from Styron's memorial service, including the program, book of reminiscences, and transcript. This material is boxed in box 1 of 08-142.

Unprocessed addition (08-012) (0.8 lin. ft.; 600 items; dated 1943-2006 and undated) includes published and unpublished essays, drafts, speeches, and writings by Styron, as well as copies of letters to his father (1943-1952) and correspondence from his wife, Rose, from around the time of his death in 2006. Also includes a leather portfolio with drafts of his work, photographs, clippings, and a photograph album from his daughter's film, Shadrach.

Unprocessed addition (08-072) (180 items, .6 lin. ft.; dated 1990-2003 and undated) comprises mainly letters to Styron regarding his works, especially DARKNESS VISIBLE. Also includes letters regarding appearances requested or planned.

Unprocessed addition (08-142) (388 items, .8 lin. ft; dated 1966-2007 and undated) mainly comprises incoming correspondence, which occasionally contains clippings, photographs, and other incidental materials. In addition, includes original manuscripts for several short works by the author, many annotated, as well as some handwritten manuscript pages for SOPHIE'S CHOICE. There are also two dvds of Styron's memorial service. Box 1 of this material includes Acc. 07-145.

Unprocessed addition (08-294) (0.4 lin. ft.; 300 items) was acquired and donated by James West III, and includes manuscripts, essays, edited drafts, and speeches by Styron. Each manuscript includes a cover page by West describing the condition of the materials. This material is boxed with Acc. 08/012.

Addition (11-142) (0.6 lin. ft.; 500 items) was donated by Styron's editor, Robert Loomis. It includes drafts and clippings, as well as photographs used in Styron publications.

Additions (12-017 and 12-131) (1.2 lin. ft.; 500 items) includes various writings and research.

Addition (13-017) contains original blocks used to create advertisements for William Styron's novel The Confessions of Nat Turner.

Addition (15-030) contains correspondence with Thomas P. Peyton and Peyton's family, 1944-2002.

Addition (16-025) comprises 27 items, mainly letters and notes from Styron to Carl Mahakian. There is also an autographed photograph, and three letters to Mahakian from Jim West, who requests help with his biography of Styron. In addition, there is an invitation to Mahakian to attend Styron's private memorial service and several published obituaries, along with a Spanish translation of Darkness Visible and a Book-of-the-Month Club flyer for The Confessions of Nat Turner. Material is dated 1969-2007.

Addition (19-0014) contains 35mm documentary slides donated by Joel Foreman.

Collection
William P. Littell was an advertising executive at the Chicago office of Ruthrauff & Ryan (a subsidiary of the Interpublic Group) from 1922-1964. The William Littell papers include photographs, biographical information, correspondence, writings and other printed materials. The bulk of the collection consists of materials compiled for an advertising instructional course and proposed public relations campaigns for Barry Goldwater and Richard Nixon. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The William Littell papers include photographs, biographical information, correspondence, writings and other printed materials. The bulk of the collection consists of materials compiled for an advertising instructional course and proposed public relations campaigns for Barry Goldwater and Richard Nixon.

Collection

William Peirce Randel papers, 1852-1986 1.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 735 Items

Historian and professor of English, University of Maine. Correspondence, addresses, proofs, drafts and reprints of articles, reviews, and photographs, all concerning William Peirce Randel's work on Edward Eggleston, a Methodist circuit rider who turned agnostic. Includes a bibliography of Randel's writings, and 23 photographs of Eggleston, his home, and various locations where he was active.

Correspondence, addresses, proofs, drafts and reprints of articles, reviews, and photographs, all concerning William Peirce Randel's work on Edward Eggleston, a Methodist circuit rider who turned agnostic and then became president of the American Historical Association. The papers in this collection relate to Randel's research and writings on Eggleston and include correspondence with Eggleston family members, research libraries, Twayne Publishers, King's Cross Publishers, his adviser Ralph L. Rusk, and with others who were doing or had done research on Eggleston. Included are Randel's 1945 dissertation, drafts of his 1963 Edward Eggleston: Hoosier Realist, two volumes of Scribner's Monthly Magazine for 1878, which contain the serialized story "Roxy" by Eggleston; an inventory of the Eggleston collection at Cornell University; and 23 photographs of Eggleston, his home, and locations where he was active.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

Collection
William Minter is a free-lance writer, researcher, and consultant primarily on Africa-related issues, based in Washington, DC. Collection comprises Minter's personal clippings files on economical, political, cultural and health issues (in particular AIDS and ebola) in Africa, foreign relations, as well as his research files for his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Wisconsin on the Council on Foreign Relations.

Collection comprises Minter's personal clippings files on economical, political, cultural and health issues (in particular AIDS and ebola) in Africa, foreign relations, as well as his research files for his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Wisconsin on the Council on Foreign Relations. Among the sources for the clippings are the Washington Post, New York Times, as well as websites and listservs for each topic. His research files contain the source code of the program he used for his CFR (the Council on Foreign Relations) research.

Collection

William McDougall papers, 1892 - 1982 9.5 Linear Feet — 10000 Items

William McDougall (1871-1938), an early twentieth century psychologist, taught at Duke University from 1927 to 1938. McDougall espoused a hormic theory of psychology, emphasizing genetics and instinct over nurture. McDougall was also a strong proponent of parapsychology. The William McDougall Papers, 1892-1982, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, notebooks, photographs, diaries, drawings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Major subjects include Lamarckian experiments conducted by McDougall, the McDougall family (and sons Kenneth and Angus in particular), the study of parapsychology, the Parapsychology Laboratory at Duke University, the Psychology Department at Duke University, and anthropological studies in Borneo and the Torres Strait. English.

The William McDougall Papers date from 1892 to 1982, and contain McDougall's own papers as well as those of his family and other researchers. The collection is organized into three series. The first series, Professional, includes correspondence, writing, research, teaching materials, clippings, and tributes. Most of the materials date from the late 1920s to the late 1930s, the time of McDougall's tenure at Duke University. Of particular note is his correspondence with other scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences. A card file which indexes these correspondents is available with the collection. McDougall's notes from his Lamarckian experiments on rats can also be found here, as can photograph albums from his anthropological travels in the late 1890s. The Family series contains correspondence, notebooks, photographs, clippings, writings, research and education materials, diaries, drawings, and other materials. Many materials belonging to two of McDougall's sons, Kenneth and Angus, are filed here. The third series, Other Researchers, contains writings and correspondence written by other researchers about McDougall or about McDougall's influence on psychology. These materials were not directly related to or owned by McDougall; most were generated after his death.

Collection

William J. Frazer papers, 1961-1980 1.2 Linear Feet — Two boxes.

William Frazer was a professor of economics at the University of Florida. This collection contains material related to economist Milton Friedman, including interviews conducted by Frazer. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection contains material related to economist Milton Friedman. It includes lecture notes, notes on Free to Chose, photographs, and eight audiocassettes with transcriptions of discussions interviews conducted by Frazier.

Collection

William J. Baumol Papers, 1928-2013 130 Linear Feet — 87 boxes and one oversize folder. — 5.7 Gigabytes — Two sets.

Online
William Baumol (1922-2017) was the Harold Price Professor of Entrepreneurship, Emeritus at New York University and Professor Emeritus of Economics at Princeton University. This collection primarily documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, and professional and faculty activities. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

This collection documents Baumol's career as an economist and artist. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, including his research on the cost disease, unbalanced growth, productivity growth, entrepreneurship, increasing returns and international trade, anti-trust policy, contestable markets, market structure, macroeconomic theory, and interest rate and monetary theory, among other topics. Baumol's research and writings on the economics of the arts, undertaken and coauthored with his wife Hilda, are included in the collection.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communication with prominent economists such as Maurice Allais, Gary Becker, Alan Blinder, George Dantzig, Robert Dorfman, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Ralph Gomory, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, John Hicks, Ursula Hicks, Samuel Hollander, Nicholas Kaldor, Harold Kuhn, Abba Lerner, Jacob Marschak, Don Patinkin, Lionel Robbins, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Ralph Turvey, Jacob Viner, and Edward Wolff, among others. Of note is Baumol's longtime collaboration with, and extensive support received from, Sue Anne Batey Blackman.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Baumol's leadership roles at the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the C. V. Starr Center for Applied Economics at New York University, as well as his extensive expert witness and consulting activities for the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Joint Economic Committee, and the Senate Judiciary Committee, among others. Baumol's consulting was often done through the companies Alderson and Sessions, Mathematica, and Consultants in Industry Economics. His notable expert witness testimonies revolved around regulation in telecommunications (particularly the AT&T monopoly), airline ticket prices and sales practices, pricing of railroad freight shipping, and other topics.

Materials from Baumol's teaching at Princeton and New York University, departmental, and committee work are included in the collection. The collection also contains samples of Baumol's artwork, including sketches and paintings.

Collection
Dr. William J. Williams and his wife, Irene Leslie Sands Williams, a nurse, were Southern Baptist medical missionaries stationed at Ogbomosho Baptist Hospital, Nigeria from 1944 through 1984. The couple also worked in Gaza and Kurdistan, and were active in several Baptist churches in the United States. This collection contains their diaries, photographs, correspondence, and other items documenting their work and family life as Christians, medical personnel, and educators.

The collection consists of personal diaries, correspondence, and photographs largely dating from the couple's service in Nigeria from the 1940s-1980s.

The Diaries series contains diaries from both Bill and Leslie; each reflects their personal style of journaling. The William J. Williams subseries contains small datebooks, usually featuring regular entries about his and Leslie's daily movements or activities. Leslie Williams' subseries contains diaries that vary in length and size; for a period of time in the 1940s and 1950s, she used her diary as a sort of scrapbook, which meant volumes arrived with all kinds of letters, clippings, and ephemera tucked in the pages. Because these presented preservation challenges to the volume, and likely difficulty for use in the reading room, archivists separately foldered the inlaid items but attempted to record where in the volume they originated. Thus researchers looking to reconstruct Leslie's correspondence should also check the Diaries series, which includes letters along with other items that she saved in her diaries.

The Correspondence series arrangement largely reflects how the materials were transferred to Rubenstein. The bulk of the letters are from Leslie to friends and family, including Jereen Rugis (her college roommate), May Bernhart, and other stateside friends and family. There are also pockets of correspondence from Bill to Leslie, both dating from the 1930s while each was in school, and from 1976, during a furlough. Other correspondence is more formal, including administrative letters from the Foreign Missions Board regarding their appointments and salaries.

The Photographs series contains albums, slides, prints, and negatives, some captioned but largely uncaptioned. Images date from the 1940s through the 1980s. The bulk of the iamges are from Nigeria, including photographs of Bill, Leslie, and their children; medical care for patients in Ogbomosho, Eku, and various villages and leper colonies; education of student nurses and church services in Nigeria; and photographs of plants and other Nigeria street scenes. Other photographs document their travels to Gaza, El Salvador, Honduras, Gaza, and Kurdistan, as well as their visits to the United States (including images in Texas, Oklahoma, and Detroit).

The Medical Missionary series contains assorted items from Bill and Leslie's theological and medical education in the United States, as well as materials from their appointment as missionaries in Nigeria. The series contains assorted newsletters and administrative materials from the Baptist Mission and other churches that supported their work; travel documents such as passports and shipping logs; their personal banking and cash accounts from the operation of the hospital; two Bibles used by Bill and Leslie; and other ephemeral materials from their missionary careers.

Collection

William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson (1932-2019), from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the southern U.S., with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly; church gatherings; jazz musicians; poverty and homelessness in the city and country; life on the Sea Islands; and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; there are also images are from Mexico, Central America, and France. Also included are photographs of his sculptures and exhibit openings. as well as professional correspondence, fliers and posters chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook from about 1957. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson (1932-2019), from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the southern U.S., particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among Anderson's earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Collection
Contains papers and a scrapbook of William Hall Lander, a Trinity College/Duke University student from 1919 to 1924. Types of materials include pamphlets, short writings, photographs, correspondence, artwork, receipts, report cards, class schedules, a plaque, patches, letters, cards, playbooks, programs, invitations, telegrams, and clippings. Major subjects include life at Duke University, adoption of the Blue Devils mascot, the Beta Lambda chapter of Sigma Chi, secret societies, and general fraternity governance. Materials date from 1919 to 1990.

This collection contains a brief biography, clippings, graduating exercises booklets, a Sigma Chi, Beta Lambda chapter history (1962), a thesis written for the Master of Arts in History degree (1924), short writings, and a scrapbook. The scrapbook contains photographs, correspondence, artwork, receipts, report cards, class schedules, a plaque, patches, letters, cards, playbooks, programs, invitations, telegrams, and clippings. The scrapbook was created by William Hall Lander. It was about 70 pages long and contained general items which reflected his active social and academic life at Duke University from 1919 to 1924. Because the original scrapbook was in poor condition, items were removed and placed in archival folders for preservation. Also included is William Lander's autobiography, "My Life on Three Continents," which includes details of his career as a journalist.

Collection
William Helfand is a scholar of pharmaceutical history and art, and collector of ephemera and art related to medicine. The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats, to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection
Online
Collector and scholar of medical and pharmaceutical advertising, and advertising Go Cards. Collection contains primarily advertising postcards (500 items, 1999-2000), mainly for clothing, entertainment, and alcoholic beverages, but also promoting AIDS awareness, AIDS drugs, and safe sex. The collection includes 5 handmade AIDS awareness cards from Burkina Faso; advertising cards for phone sex lines, 1978-1992; and 5 papers by Helfand on medical and pharmaceutical advertising. A copy of M. Rickard's ENCYCLOPEDIA OF EPHEMERA was removed from the collection and cataloged separately. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection contains primarily advertising postcards (500 items, 1999-2000), mainly for clothing, entertainment, and alcoholic beverages, but also promoting AIDS awareness, AIDS drugs, and safe sex. The collection includes 5 handmade AIDS awareness cards from Burkina Faso; advertising cards for phone sex lines, 1978-1992; and 5 papers by Helfand on medical and pharmaceutical advertising. A copy of M. Rickard's ENCYCLOPEDIA OF EPHEMERA was removed from the collection and cataloged separately.

Collection
The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1988, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe's book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.

The interview tapes and transcripts (1972-1978, undated), which comprise the bulk of the collection, include interviews with government officials, participants in the North Carolina civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and opponents of the movement, including members of the Ku Klux Klan. The few research files in the collection include statistical data related to Greensboro elections (1930s-1950s), notes from the Joan Bluethenthal papers and a report by the North Carolina State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights on civil disturbances at Dudley High School and North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1969.

The Audiotapes Series consists of two identical sets (one for preservation, one for use by researchers) of twenty-eight tapes containing oral history interviews. The Printed Material Series includes transcripts and/or notes on 67 oral history interviews, and three research files related to the civil rights movement and local politics in Greensboro.

Beyond the direct oral history materials, there is also a Writings and Research Series . It includes research notes for several chapters of Chafe's book in addition to newspaper clippings addressing topics such as Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and the return of black veterans from the Vietnam War; an assortment of documents regarding the Black Panther Party collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigations' Counter Intelligence Program, and a number of publications produced by other authors. While the materials predominately relate to Greensboro, this series also includes information on civil rights activity in Durham, Chapel Hill, and the Research Triangle at large. The Photographs Series includes fourteen undated photographs.

William H. Chafe's book, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom, chronicles the continuing conflict over desegregation in Greensboro in the 1950s and 1960s. Chafe explores the "progressive mystique" that defined the terms of culturally-sanctioned behavior, looking at how civility served to preserve the South's racial order. Within this context, he discusses the city's reaction to the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, the Greensboro sit-in movement begun by four college students at North Carolina A&T College in 1960, and the emergence of the Black Power Movement in the late 1960s.

Collection

William Grant Still papers, 1877-1992 12 Linear Feet — circa 2,250 Items

The William Grant Still Papers, 1877-1992, contain chiefly photocopies of music, writings, correspondence, diaries, pictures, printed material, clippings, and recordings, which primarily document his work as a composer. The collection relates to the historical and critical study of his music, as well as being a valuable source of arrangements for performances. Still's music gained recognition due to his ability to compose classical music which both reflected distinctive African-American as well as African influences. In addition, materials (primarily writings and librettos), created by Verna Arvey, Still's second wife, also form an integral part of the collection.

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of music in manuscript and printed formats as well as in recorded formats, and is contained in the Music series and Recordings series. The collection does not contain all the music Still composed, however it does contain a substantial number of his works and can adequately support the research of Still's compositions. The various genres or mediums in which Still worked, including symphonies, operas, spirituals, songs, and chamber music are represented in the collection. Conductors' scores and published arrangements are included. Among the various publishers represented are Charles Pace and W.C. Handy Company and the J. Fischer and Brothers. Originals from these companies are present. Countee Cullen, Verna Arvey, Arna Bontemps, Langston Hughes, and Katherine Garrison Chapin are represented among those who wrote librettos or texts for Still's arrangements. Recordings for some of Still's works are available in compact disc, LP, and audio cassette formats. Included in the recordings are performances by Louis Kaufman, Peter Christ, Videmus, the William Grant Still Music Performing Arts Society, the Denver Symphony and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras, and other individual artists and orchestras.

Insofar as documenting Still's professional life, the diaries, writings, and correspondence are less complete than the music. Since gaps are evident within the diaries and correspondence, these materials do not provide a full and detailed understanding of Still's career development. However, some information pertaining to his work as well as his personal life is available. The Writings series contains several articles by Still as well as biographical and critical works about Still and his music. This series also contains writings by Verna Arvey and Judith Anne Still. An autographed copy of Arvey's In One Lifetime is included. The Correspondence series includes letters between Still and Alain Locke as well as Still and Charles Burch. Within these exchanges, there is some discussion and criticism of Still's compositions, reflections on the problems confronting African-American musicians in the 1930s, and a discussion of the possibility of Still teaching at Howard University. Correspondence between Arvey and Carl Van Vechten is also included. The diaries of both Still and Verna Arvey primarily record daily activities. However, Still's diary entries from 1930 contain reflections on his faith and spirituality, his music, and his first marriage to Grace Bundy. Within the Printed Materials and Clippings series are programs and newspaper articles, many of which are originals, that document the performances and the wide acceptance of Still's music.

The Scrapbooks series primarily contain Verna Arvey's collection of clippings which document political and social events between the 1940s and the early 1970s. These clippings demonstrate Verna Arvey's strong interest in the anti-Communist movements of the mid-twentieth century, primarily Senator Joseph McCarthy's investigations. The contents of these scrapbooks do not directly relate to William Grant Still's music. To a lesser extent the scrapbooks contain clippings pertaining to race and the status of African-Americans in the United States.

Collection

William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

Online
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

Collection
Head of a Durham, N.C. advertising firm and lieutenant in the U.S. Navy during WWII. Collection contains materials related to Stauber's service in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Some of the material contains notes and scripts of announcements and news reports made by Stauber on a radio show onboard the USS Biloxi. These radio broadcasts are dated January-April and document, among other things, the US invasion of Iwo Jima and contain marks of official censorship. A large part of the collection consists of correspondence, primarily from Stauber to his mother (1942-1945). Also included are photographs of USS Biloxi reunions (1974-1980), one of which was located in Durham, North Carolina.

Collection contains materials related to Stauber's service in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Some of the material contains notes and scripts of announcements and news reports made by Stauber on radio broadcasts onboard the USS Biloxi. These radio broadcasts are dated January-April, 1945 and document, among other things, the U.S. invasion of Iwo Jima and contain marks of official censorship. A large part of the collection consists of correspondence, primarily from Stauber to his mother (1942-1945). Also included are photographs of USS Biloxi reunions (1974-1980), one of which was located in Durham, North Carolina.

Collection

William E. Phillips papers, 1969-2001 0.25 Linear Feet — 28 Items

William E. Phillips was an executive and chairman of Ogilvy & Mather and Ogilvy Group advertising agencies. The William E. Phillips Papers span the years 1969-2001 and include writings, speeches and printed materials that document Phillips' career with Ogilvy & Mather.

The William E. Phillips Papers span the years 1969-2001 and include writings, speeches and printed materials that document Phillips' career with the Ogilvy & Mather advertising agency.

The collection is arranged into two categories of materials: Printed Materials, and Writings and Speeches. Phillips writings and speeches cover a wide range of themes, but he was particularly concerned with improving client-agency relations, agency creativity and productivity, and community involvement.

Related Materials: Related materials pertaining to the Ogilvy & Mather agency may be found in the Edgar Hatcher Papers, the Jock Elliott Papers, the Robert S. Smith Papers, the David B. McCall Papers, and in the J. Walter Thompson Company Advertising Vertical Files.

Collection
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner's academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner's involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner's academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

Collection

William Cannicott Olson papers, 1956-1985 7.8 Linear Feet — 7877 Items

Graduate of Duke University and chair of the History Department at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Collection contains mainly papers pertaining to his work in the field of education. Prior to his position at Marist College, he taught history in Danville, Va. He was active in the Danville Education Assoc., and became the Virginia Education Association's president. In addition to professional correspondence, there is a great deal of personal correspondence with family and friends much of which relates to his life as a homosexual. Included also are financial papers, printed materials, clippings, addresses, writings (including a draft of his dissertation), and other records. There is some memorabilia from Olson's school days. Included among the volumes are diaries from his youth.

Collection contains mainly papers pertaining to his work in the field of education. Prior to his position at Marist College, he taught history in Danville, Va. He was active in the Danville Education Assoc., and became the Virginia Education Association's president. In addition to professional correspondence, there is a great deal of personal correspondence with family and friends much of which relates to his life as a homosexual. Included also are financial papers, printed materials, clippings, addresses, writings (including a draft of his dissertation), and other records. There is some memorabilia from Olson's school days. Included among the volumes are diaries from his youth.

Collection

William Blackburn papers, 1859-1985 20 Linear Feet — 15,000 Items

William Blackburn was a professor of English and creative writing at Duke University. The collection includes correspondence, writings, teaching materials and notes, biographical and family papers, printed materials, scrapbooks, audiovisual material, and photographs from William Blackburn and his family.

The William Blackburn papers are arranged in the following series: Correspondence; Writings; Teaching Material; Duke University Literary and Artistic Projects; Biographical Data and Family Papers; Printed Material; Scrapbooks; Audiovisual Material; and Photographs. Correspondence includes Blackburn family letters, letters relating to Blackburn's teaching and career at Duke University, and typescripts of letters by and about Joseph Conrad. Writings include Blackburn's own writings and speeches as well as those of students and his son Alexander Lambert Blackburn. Clippings mostly concern Blackburn's academic work, literary events at Duke in which Blackburn was pivotal, and reviews of the work of his students (including Anne Tyler, William Styron, and Reynolds Price). The collection also includes numerous photographs of family members and some of literary figures.

Addition (2007-0129) (200 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1937-1972) contains correspondence between Blackburn and his daughter, Mary April Blackburn Hill.

Addition (2008-0071) (30 items; 0.1 lin. ft.; 1925-1973) includes correspondence between William Blackburn and his brother, Clark, as well as additional papers from Elizabeth Blackburn. Elizabeth's papers include correspondence and two literary compositions.

Addition (2010-0013) (200 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1928-1985) includes correspondence between Blackburn and his wife, Elizabeth, especially during the breakup of their marriage; notes about William Blackburn from his son, Alexander Blackburn; articles, speeches, and clippings; and materials from his students and colleagues.

Collection

Will Grossman photographs of Durham, North Carolina, 1969-1979, 2006 6 Linear Feet — 8 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 585 items — 585 Items

Will Grossman was a 20th century documentary photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. The 80 black-and-white images in the collection chiefly document Durham County and the city of Durham in the 1970s. There are also 488 negatives, as well as a set of 16 inkjet exhibition prints and an exhibit poster from 2006. Grossman's subjects include barns and rural landscapes; houses and churches; tobacco warehouses, a cigarette factory, and other industrial buildings; tobacco workers and other portraits of individuals, including many African Americans; scenes along the Eno River; and the Durham County Fair. A few images are from Orange County, N.C. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 80 black-and-white images in the collection chiefly document Durham County and the city of Durham in the 1970s. There are also 488 negatives, as well as a set of 16 inkjet exhibition prints and an exhibit poster from 2006. Grossman's subjects include barns and rural landscapes; houses and churches; tobacco warehouses, a cigarette factory, and other industrial buildings; tobacco workers and other portraits of individuals, including many African Americans; scenes along the Eno River; and the Durham County Fair. A few images are from Orange County, N.C. Included in the collection is one of Grossman's most important photographs, "Sunbeam," which features three men sitting in a shaft of sunlight near a warehouse door. Prints are arranged in image number order supplied by library staff.

The 80 gelatin silver prints range in size from 4x6 to 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches, and are organized in the following topical series: Buildings; Durham, N.C.; Durham County Fair; Eno River; Landscapes and the Natural World; and Portraits. These series titles were supplied by library staff, with a few exceptions. There is also an exhibit prints series housing 16 digitally printed inkjet photographs that range from 8x8 to 16 x 24 3/4 inches. The sizes of the mats range from 11x14 to 24x32 inches.

Some prints bear original captions; captions supplied by library staff are in brackets. Print numbers were supplied by library staff. Among the negatives in the collection are images that represent the photographic prints in the collection, but there are also many negatives for which prints do not exist, including images of locations in Durham city and county.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Wilkins Media Company records, 1967-1998 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — 13400 Items

Wilkins Media Company is an outdoor advertising company based in Atlanta, Georgia. Founded in 1965 as Southern Outdoor Markets, the company changed its name in 1974 to Associates of the Bell Company. In 1987 Bill Wilkins purchased the company, changing the name to Wilkins Outdoor Network. The name changed again in 1999 to Wilkins Media Company. The Wilkins Media Company Records span the years 1967-1998 and include slides, photographs, presentation scripts, audio and video cassettes, brochures, pamphlets and publications related to Wilkins Media Company's activities as well as to the outdoor advertising industry in general. Represented are materials from the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Patrick Media Group, Traffic Audit Bureau, Metromedia Technologies and Naegele Advertising Companies. Companies represented include Dole, Ford, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Toyota. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wilkins Media Company Records span the years 1967-1998 and include slides, photographs, presentation scripts, audio and video cassettes, brochures, pamphlets and publications related to the company's activities as well as to the outdoor advertising industry in general. Represented are materials from the Institute of Outdoor Advertising, Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Patrick Media Group, Traffic Audit Bureau, Metromedia Technologies and Naegele Advertising Companies. Companies represented include Dole, Ford, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Toyota.

Collection
Trade catalogs of jewelry prepared for individual local retail stores.

Collection spans 1966-1995 and includes direct-mail jewelry catalogs, print proofs, flyers and newspaper inserts that advertised jewelry sold in local stores. Companies represented include Anson, Inc. of Providence, R.I., Norvell-Marcum Co. of Tulsa, Okla. and the Jewelers of America trade organization. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection
Carl and Enid Whirley were Southern Baptist missionaries in Nigeria from 1947 to 1980. The Whirley Family Papers includes material from throughout their lives, beginning with Carl's studies at Howard College, now Samford University, in the 1940s and ending with his and Enid's retirement into the 1990s. Their papers include correspondence, documents and photographs from the Whirleys' time in multiple regions of Nigeria, as well as Carl's sermon notes and teaching materials. Also includes printed materials from their time as missionaries, including Nigerian newspapers and clippings, church bulletins, and other articles, books, serials, pamphlets, and newsletters.

The Whirley Family Papers collection is divided into seven series: Teaching Materials, Speeches and Sermons, Correspondence, Nigerian Mission, Printed Materials, Personal Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. Teaching Materials is divided into four subseries: subject files, specific course materials, Samford University administration, and Carl Whirley's personal coursework and notes. Speeches and Sermons contains three subseries: Carl Whirley's sermon notes, sermons by himself and others, and speeches by himself and others. Correspondence contains contact between Carl and Enid with personal friends as well as American churches and official organizations. Nigerian Mission includes both administrative documents from various Nigerian missionary organizations as well as some uncaptioned photographs. Printed Materials consists of eight subseries: articles, newsletters, newspapers, pamphlets, serials, books, programs, and church bulletins, mostly from their time in Nigeria. Personal Materials largely relates to the lives both before and after their missionary work in Nigeria.

Collection

Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.

Collection
Prominent family from Asheville, NC. Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photographs of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photos of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

Collection
The Wesley Works Editorial Project, founded in 1960, is an international and inter denominational consortium of scholars that is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The Wesley Works Archive, dating from 1676 to 1996, with the bulk ranging from 1724-1791 and 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). The collection consists of that portion of the project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's editor and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy, who have participated in the Project. There is much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing; materials in the collection also throw light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The Wesley Works Archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). Formed in 1960, this international and inter denominational consortium of scholars is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The collection consists of that portion of the Project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's General Editor, Textual Editor, and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy who have participated in the Project. Because John Wesley preached, wrote, and published so widely, the content of the research materials required for a full edition of his writings necessarily contains much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also much information about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing. Beyond the ostensible purpose of the WWEP, however, the modern correspondence and scholarly debate contained in these papers also throws light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The collection also sheds light on the history and mechanics of the transmission of texts. That is, while the reproduced printed materials here document the complex publishing and textual history of the thousands of editions of Wesley's writings to appear in his lifetime alone, at the same time the original writings of modern scholars involved in the WWEP document how older texts are researched and recovered from the past, all for the purpose of establishing a present authoritative text to be passed on to the future.

Series in the Wesley Works Archive are arranged to correspond to the unit structure of the thirty-five volume Bicentennial Edition. Described more fully below, the initial sixteen series of the archive and the sixteen units and thirty-five volumes of the Bicentennial Edition are as follows: Sermons (1-4); Explanatory Notes upon the New Testament (5-6); A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (7); Worship (8); The Methodist Societies (9-10); The Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion and Certain Related Open Letters (11); Doctrinal and Controversial Treatises (12-13); Social/Political Tracts (14); Catechetical/Educational Works (15); Editorial Works (16); Medical Writings (17); Journals and Diaries (18-24); Letters (25-31); Oxford Diaries (32); Bibliography (33-34); and Index and Miscellanea (35). A concluding seventeenth series, General Files, gathers materials about the overall history and organization of the WWEP.

The history of the Wesley Works Editorial Project already extends more than fifty years, from its inception in 1960 to the 2011 publication of The Methodist Societies: The Minutes of Conference. This volume, as the seventeenth to be published, marks the halfway point of the entire Bicentennial Edition, which will comprise thirty-four volumes plus a concluding general index volume. Although the General Files are placed as the final series in order to avoid interrupting the parallel structure of series and volumes, they actually mark the best place to begin an overview of the collection, since their various folder groups document much of the administrative history of the Project. Overviews and details of the Project's inception, history, institutional support, and editorial guidelines are best found in the folder groups for the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board. The history of the actual content, intellectual structure, and presentation of volumes can be found in such groups as grouped under such categories as Editorial Procedures and Bulletins of the WWP. Most of the latter were issued by Frank Baker in the 1970s and contain much detail about the content and style choices that were being made for various volumes. The General Files also contain materials that may relate to more than one unit of the Bicentennial Edition, as well as some Wesley publications not selected for inclusion, especially his Explanatory Notes Upon the Old Testament.

Collection
Online
The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) advertising agency was founded in 1966 by Mary Wells, Richard Rich, and Stewart Greene, who were associates at Jack Tinker and Partners agency. Until its demise in 1998, WRG was ranked as one of the top 15 advertising agencies in the United States. The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) Records contain primarily print advertisements and broadcast commercials and advertising spots for clients of WRG. Materials span 1966-1998 and include magazine and newspaper advertisements, proof sheets, audiocassettes, videocassettes, analog and digital audio tape. Corporate documentation includes press releases, clipping files, and staff photographs and slides. Clients represented in the collection include: American Motors; Bristol-Myers (Boost, Clairol, Herbal Essence, Vagistat); Cadbury (Canada Dry, Schweppes); Continental Airlines; Ford; IBM; ITT (Technology Institute, Sheraton); Liberty Mutual; MCI; Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer); New York Department of Commerce; Pan Am; Philip Morris (Benson & Hedges, Player, Dunhill); Procter & Gamble (Gain, Oil of Olay, Pringles, Folder's, Sure); Ralston Purina (Chex, Dog Chow, Tender Vittles); Seagram; TWA; and Warnaco (Warner's lingerie). Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wells Rich Greene, Inc. (WRG) Records contain primarily print advertisements and broadcast commercials and advertising spots for clients of WRG. Materials span 1966-1998 and include magazine and newspaper advertisements, proof sheets, audiocassettes, videocassettes, analog and digital audio tape. Corporate documentation includes press releases, clipping files, and staff photographs and slides. Clients represented in the collection include: American Motors; Bristol-Myers (Boost, Clairol, Herbal Essence, Vagistat); Cadbury (Canada Dry, Schweppes); Continental Airlines; Ford; IBM; ITT (Technology Institute, Sheraton); Liberty Mutual; MCI; Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer); New York Department of Commerce; Pan Am; Philip Morris (Benson & Hedges, Player, Dunhill); Procter & Gamble (Gain, Oil of Olay, Pringles, Folder's, Sure); Ralston Purina (Chex, Dog Chow, Tender Vittles); Seagram; TWA; and Warnaco (Warner's lingerie).

NOTE: Throughout this finding aid, "TRT" refers to "Total Running Time," the total duration of content contained on a tape or film.

Collection
W. D. (William David) Davies (1911-2001) was Professor of Biblical Theology at Duke University Divinity School from 1950 to 1955 and from 1966 to 1981 was George Washington Ivey Professor of Advanced Studies and Research in Christian Origins. The collection features correspondence, course materials, writings, subject files, sermon notes, books, and research notes of W. D. Davies. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The collection includes correspondence, research materials, teaching materials, photographs, awards, and books. Major research subjects include the New Testament, especially Pauline letters; Christian theology; Judaism; and the issue of territorial imperative with regard to land.

The first series, containing multiple accessions, includes correspondence, manuscript materials, article reprints, student papers, lecture notes, course reading materials, sermon notes, student notebooks relating to courses taken at the University of Wales Memorial College in Brecon, general research subject files, research notes relating to teaching at Duke University, Columbia University, Princeton University, Union Theological Seminary, and Texas Christian University.

Accession UA2014-0065 contains personal and professional correspondence, scholarly materials and books from Davies' personal library. The collection also contains materials related to Davies' Feschrift, an honor celebrating Davies'contributions to the field of biblical theology.

Accession UA2022-0072 contains books published by W.D. Davies or with references to Davies, and Davies' Burkitt Medal for Biblical Studies and State of Israel medal. Also, inlcudes diplomas awarded to Rachel Davies.

Collection
Online
WDBS was Duke University's campus radio station from 1950-1983. It initially broadcast on AM by carrier current, a system in which radio signals were fed into the university's electrical system. In 1971, WDBS began broadcasting on FM 107.1 as a commercial, non-profit station. AM broadcasts ceased in the early 1970s. WDBS was sold in 1983 to repay debts the station owed Duke University. Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club. English.

Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club.

Collection
Online

The Wayne P. Ellis Collection of Kodakiana spans the dates 1886 to 1989, and was created by Mr. Ellis over the period of nearly four decades. Whereas many photographic collectors concentrate on cameras and photographs, Ellis emphasized advertising and marketing material. As a consequence, the collection is especially rich in print advertisements for Eastman Kodak products that were published in general interest periodicals beginning in the late 19th century. More unusual items are the product catalogs, how-to manuals for both amateur and professional photographers, serial publications for salesmen and photographers, and a variety of marketing and promotional items. There are several scrapbooks of advertising materials with considerable marginalia. The collection also includes training manuals and other publications for Kodak employees. In addition, many items in the collection deal with various aspects of the corporate history of Eastman Kodak from its earliest years up to the mid-20th century.

The collection contains little or no correspondence. There are scattered groups of photographs throughout the collection, though they are few in number. Many are formal and casual black and white photographs of Kodak staff members. Others were used for promotional or sales activities.

Processing Note

Some of Mr. Ellis's material was in excellent order; other items were in greater disarray. The collection has been arranged, as far as practical, according to the type of material. The series names given to each category are as clear and descriptive as possible.

No items were removed from the collection except for some duplicates. Decisions were made early in the processing of this collection, however, to separate several titles for individual cataloging. Notable among these is the entire run of the early periodical Kodakery (v. 1-19, 1913-1932) as well as many issues of the variably titled Photographic Review and Photographic Digest, and several others. All of these titles are part of the Rare Book, Manuscript and Special Collections Library and may be located using that library's online catalog by searching "Wayne P. Ellis" as a keyword. The separation of items may cause some small inconvenience to users of the collection, but it has been deemed impractical to reverse the situation after the fact.

Mr. Ellis also contributed over 160 books on various aspects of advertising to the Duke University Libraries; the titles have been cataloged in the usual fashion as individual books, and are identified in the library catalog as being part of the Wayne P. Ellis collection.

Collection
Online
The Washington Office on Latin America is an international human rights advocacy organization headquartered in Washington D.C. The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative records, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all relating to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America and also document the changing political climate towards the region in Washington D.C. over nearly four decades.

The Washington Office on Latin America Records span the dates 1962 to 2008 and consist of research and project files on nearly every country in Latin America, administrative files, clippings, correspondence, and printed material, all related to the work of the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights advocacy organization based in Washington D.C. WOLA partners with local organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean to raise awareness of human rights abuses in the region and to influence the foreign policy agenda of the United States government. Materials in this collection provide a rich resource for the study of politically motivated violence and other human rights abuses throughout Latin America, and document the changing political attitudes towards the region on the part of the U.S. government over nearly four decades. Numerous files of individual human rights abuse cases, including torture, forced disappearances, and executions can be found in this collection. In addition, WOLA's efforts to lobby for legislative change are chronicled throughout the collection. Material includes some ephemeral or hard-to-find printed material produced by leftist or guerilla groups in Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico, as well as some audiovisual recordings housed within country files.

The collection is arranged in the following series: Administrative Files, Geographic, Initiatives and Activities, Sound Recordings, and Oversize Material. The Administrative Files Series contains records kept by WOLA directors and staff, many funding-related files, some overviews of WOLA's activities, and other files of an administrative nature such as meeting minutes and planning, and staff retreats. The largest in the collection, the Geographic Series is divided into subseries for most countries in the region, documenting the major political and human rights issues associated with each country. These files typically include large sub-groupings on the following broad topics: human rights cases specific to that country; economic development; drug policy and related issues, especially in Colombia and Mexico; elections; police and military; U.S. policy; international relations; files related to WOLA visits to or activities in that country; and in some cases, files of printed materials assembled by WOLA staff. The human rights files cover such issues as labor rights, peasants' rights and land reforms, indigenous people's rights, politically motivated abuses, killings, and discrimination, civil rights cases of all kinds, reconciliation and truth commissions, and the activities of human rights organizations in each country and in the U.S. The Initiatives and Activities Series, divided into topical categories as arranged by WOLA staff, covers the organization's issue-based work in areas such as U.S. drug policy, trade and banking, democratic and peace processes, economic development, issues related to the deployment of military and police forces, and more. A large group of records documents the extensive legislative work performed by WOLA on behalf of human rights issues. There is considerable overlap between this series and the Geographic Series. The Sound Recordings Series contains recordings of conferences, speeches, and events sponsored by WOLA and other groups. Finally, the six boxes in the Oversize Material section at the end of this collection guide contain large items such as posters and newspapers separated from the main collection and rehoused for preservation purposes. Materials are chiefly in English and Spanish, with a smaller percentage in French and Portuguese. All of the series and each subseries are described in more detail in the description of the collection that follows. Unprocessed additions to the collection have been added at the end of the finding aid. Collection was acquired as part of the Duke University's Archive for Human Rights.

Collection
Online
Collection contains business and financial papers, chiefly of Washington Duke. Business and financial papers relate to the tobacco and textile industries and include some early financial records of W. Duke, Sons and Company. Other financial records pertain to Duke's generosity to relatives and to educational institutions such as Trinity College (now Duke University). Personal papers consist of correspondence, the Duke family genealogy, photographs, and memorabilia from the dedication of the Duke Homestead.

The bulk of the papers of Washington Duke, a tobacco manufacturer and philanthropist, date from 1890 to 1905, but the papers include items as early as 1764 and as late as 1987. The collection is a created one; materials from several sources have been brought together to form the Washington Duke Papers. The collection relates primarily to the financial and philanthropic interests of Washington Duke after his retirement from W. Duke, Sons and Company in 1880. There are five series: Correspondence, Financial Papers, Genealogical Papers, Legal Papers, and Miscellaneous Papers.

The Correspondence Series begins with two letters (photocopies) written by Washington Duke in 1863, when he was preparing to enter the Confederate Army. After the war Mr. Duke began establishing his tobacco business. This series contains no correspondence for the period 1865-1889. The bulk of the correspondence covers the period 1890-1905, after Mr. Duke had retired from the tobacco business. These letters reveal his financial and philanthropic interests after retirement. Letters come from the following sources:

  • 1. Relatives, seeking aid or sending thanks for gifts.
  • 2. Methodist Episcopal Church, South, members and ministers seeking assistance for church buildings, furnishings, orphans, widows, and missionaries.
  • 3. Schools and colleges asking for aid or expressing appreciation for aid given. Louisburg Female College, Rutherford College, Trinity College and Kittrell College were among those writing about finances. The orphanage at Oxford was supported for a number of years. Many students, both black and white, sought financial assistance from Mr. Duke in the way of scholarships or loans.
  • 4. Business associates or would-be partners seeking financial assistance or employment. These letters are largely concerned with textiles and tobacco. For example there are letters reflecting Mr. Duke's encouragement of black capitalism in the founding of the Coleman Manufacturing Company at Concord, N.C.
  • 5. People who were ill or unlucky, many of them very impoverished.

The letters in the Correspondence Series dated 1975-1976 are concerned with Washington Duke's dealings with the J. W. Scott and Company in Greensboro, N.C. (1871) and the nomination of St. Joseph's A.M.E Church in Durham to the National Register of Historic Places. This series does not include any original letters written by Washington Duke.

The Financial Papers Series consists of records of Washington Duke's business interests and philanthropy. The oldest volume is a ledger (1873-1877), kept at the time Washington Duke and his sons moved their factory from the farm to Durham. Duke tobacco products were being shipped to markets from Maine to California, including locations in frontier Montana. An account book for the Durham Warehouse covers the period 1876-1884 and gives an interesting glimpse of the beginnings of Duke tobacco organization. Records were kept of purchases of tobacco, promotion trips to Europe and Australia (1883-1884), and the entry of George Washington Watts into the firm (1878).

A summary of the personal finances of Washington Duke is noted in financial papers dating from 1893 until the time of his death in 1905. These records include a journal, ledger, cashbook, and check stubs. They are parallel in content and supplement each other; they appear to have been the work of his private secretary, James E. Stagg.

The journal (1893-1905) indicates gifts to family, relatives, and individuals, as well as transactions with institutions such as the White Rock Baptist Church, St. Joseph's AME Church, Louisburg Female College, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. Businesses noted include the American Tobacco Company, the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, Cary Lumber Company, together with a number of cotton mills, railroads, and banks.

The cashbook (1893-1905) lists, in more detail, dividends from investments as well as donations to individuals and institutions over a period of a decade or more. Washington Duke was consistently generous to his immediate family and his many nieces and nephews. His tithing to the church covered gifts to the Main Street Methodist Church, ministers, Negro churches, orphanages and schools. With the coming of Trinity College to Durham, he made generous contributions to its finances, including small gifts to the baseball team and to the library for book stacks. The check stubs cover the period 1899 to 1905. The final entry refers to the balance transferred to his sons after Washington Duke's death.

The ledger (1893-1904) contains accounts listing mills, railroads, and other property. Also included are notations concerning rents, personal expenses, tithes and repairs. Many names of Durham citizens appear here.

The Genealogical Papers Series contains the Washington Duke family Bible (1861) as well as family trees and correspondence regarding lineage and descendants of Duke family members. The bulk of the material is photocopies from the James B. Duke Papers, including copies of letters which detail what Washington Duke remembered about his family.

The Legal Papers Series includes copies of court, marriage, and property records pertaining to the Duke family and its settlement in Orange County, in the vicinity of present-day Durham, N.C. Other papers include a copy of Washington Duke's last will and testament (1900) and the indenture establishing the Doris Duke Trust (1925).

The Miscellaneous Papers Series is composed of pictures, clippings, and general materials. The pictures are primarily photographs of homes, people, and tobacco factories. They have no dates and many are copies of originals on permanent loan to the Duke Homestead, a National Historic site. The homes include those of Taylor Duke (presumed) and Washington Duke, as well as interior views of rooms at the Duke Homestead. There are pictures of Washington Duke and of his statue and of three buildings on the Duke Farm used as tobacco factories prior to the move to Durham.

Clippings are family and business related dating from 1890-1987. A Memorial Album of notices on the death of Washington Duke (1905) is arranged alphabetically by city.

General materials relate to the Duke Homestead and include a variety of other printed and manuscript items. Among them are a Tribute to Bishop Marvin, ca. 1877 (photocopy); Resolution of Thanks and Appreciation, St. Joseph's AME to Washington Duke, 1902; a Resolution by the Board of Directors of the Fidelity Bank in memory of Washington Duke (1905); and a manuscript list of persons sending condolences/flowers on the death of Washington Duke, 1905. Photostats of two records in the C.S.A. Archives in the National Archives are concerned with the Civil War career of Washington Duke. One, dated April 4, 1864, is a report for Co. A of the Camp Guard by Captain George B. Baker, Assistant Quartermaster at Camp Holmes, Raleigh. The second item is a list of men who signed up for three years service in the Confederate Navy. Washington Duke's signature appears on both of these documents.

Collection
The Washington Committee for Human Rights in Argentina operated in the late 1970s and early 1980s to advocate for the human rights of Argentines targeted during the Dirty War/El Proceso. The committee was formed by prominent Argentines who had resettled in the United States, especially in the Washington, D.C. area. The committee frequently partnered with other human rights organizations, including the Washington Office on Latin America, to sponsor programming and mailings to raise awareness of the situation in Argentina. The Washington Committee for Human Rights in Argentina records consist of correspondence, mailers, flyers, reports, notes, programming information, petitions, lists, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, poetry, photographs, posters, and journal articles.

The Washington Committee for Human Rights in Argentina records document its members' advocacy for the rights of Argentines and their efforts to document human rights abuses during the Dirty War/El Proceso. The collection comprises three series: the Administrative Files series, 1964-1984; the Publications series, 1965-1986; and the Subject Files series, 1973-2016. The Administrative Files series consists of the materials that directly document the work of committee members to do outreach and lobby government officials to support changes in U.S. foreign policy towards Argentina. The Publications series consists of full-length publications. The Subjects Files series consists of newspaper clippings, photographs, flyers from other organizations, posters, and wires. Materials are primarily in English and Spanish with some materials in French, Italian, and Portuguese.

Collection
Advertising agency founded in 1939 as Warwick and Legler; closed in 2001. The Warwick Baker O'Neill Records span the years 1939-2001 and include correspondence, proofs, clippings, research reports, financial records and other materials that document the agency's activities, particularly during the 1980s and 1990s. Formats include as-produced radio and television commercial scripts, 16mm films, audio cassettes and video cassettes. Clients represented include Bacardi, Bausch & Lomb (Curèl and other eye drops), Benjamin Moore paints, Burlington Industries, Coty (Emeraude, Stetson), Crafted with Pride (Made in the USA), Driver's Mart, East Coast Energy Council, Fruit of the Loom, Glenbrook (Midol), Heineken (including Amstel and Buckler), Lehn & Fink (Lysol, Resolve), Prodigy internet services, Reckitt & Colman (Easy Off oven cleaner, Rid-X), Schering-Plough (Lotrimin, Coricidin, Drixoral, Coppertone, St. Joseph's, Di-Gel), Seagram, U.S. Tobacco (Skoal, House of Windsor), and West Point Pepperell. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Warwick Baker O'Neill Records span the years 1939-2001 and include correspondence, proofs, clippings, research reports, financial records and other materials that document the agency's activities, particularly during the 1980s and 1990s. Formats include as-produced radio and television commercial scripts, 16mm films, audiocassettes and videocassettes. Clients represented include Bacardi, Bausch & Lomb (Curèl and other eye drops), Benjamin Moore paints, Burlington Industries, Coty (Emeraude, Stetson), Crafted with Pride (Made in the USA), Driver's Mart, East Coast Energy Council, Fruit of the Loom, Glenbrook (Midol), Heineken (including Amstel and Buckler), Lehn & Fink (Lysol, Resolve), Prodigy internet services, Reckitt & Colman (Easy Off oven cleaner, Rid-X), Schering-Plough (Lotrimin, Coricidin, Drixoral, Coppertone, St. Joseph's, Di-Gel), Seagram, U.S. Tobacco (Skoal, House of Windsor), and West Point Pepperell.

Restrictions on Access: Unpublished corporate records are closed to researchers for 15 years from the date of creation. Personnel records are closed until 2041. Original audiovisual materials are closed until use copies can be produced. Restricted documentation is designated by an "R" in the container numbering (for example, Box R1).

Collection

Wartime at Duke Reference collection, 1917-ongoing 0.4 Linear Feet — approx. 400 Items

The Wartime at Duke Reference Collection contains files of publications, memoranda, reports, clippings, and other materials about the effects of war on the University and the University's contributions to war efforts. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The Wartime at Duke Reference Collection contains material about the effects of war on the University and the University's contributions to war efforts. The collection include publications of the University and other organizations, reports, memoranda, notices, programs and announcements, flyers, clippings, and other material. Other organizations represented include the American Council on Education and American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc.

Collection
Economist, Professor Emeritus at Michigan State University. Photographs of portraits of economists including Herbert Joseph Davenport, Joseph Spengler, Adam Smith, J. M. Clark, Frank H. Knight, Thorstein Veblen, F. M. Taylor, Wesley Clair Mitchell, John Maynard Keynes, Knut Wicksell, Irving Fisher, Eugen Slutsky, Sir William Petty, Friedrich Von Wieser, Jeremy Bentham, Henry George, Turgot, F. Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, Karl Heidelberg, F. Lassalle, Karl Marx, Auguste Comte, Lester F. Ward, Maximilien de Bethune, Jean Baptiste Colbert, H. de Saint-Simon, Albrecht Thaer, Charles Fourier, Herbert Spencer, David Hume, William Graham Sumner, Bohm Bawerk, Carl Menger, J. B. Say, and others. Formerly entitled the Economists' Portraits Collection. Images are reproduced in the Famous Economists Gallery created by the Department of Economics at Duke University. Includes photographs, printed material, and a few negatives.

Photographs of portraits of economists including Herbert Joseph Davenport, Joseph Spengler, Adam Smith, J. M. Clark, Frank H. Knight, Thorstein Veblen, F. M. Taylor, Wesley Clair Mitchell, John Maynard Keynes, Knut Wicksell, Irving Fisher, Eugen Slutsky, Sir William Petty, Von Wieser, Bentham, Henry George, Turgot, F. Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, Karl Heidelberg, F. Lassalle, Karl Marx, Auguste Comte, Lester F. Ward, Maximilien de Bethune, Jean Baptiste Colbert, H. de Saint-Simon, Albrecht Thaer, Charles Fourier, Herbert Spencer, David Hume, William Graham Sumner, Bohm Bawerk, Carl Menger, J. B. Say, and others. Formerly entitled the Economists' Portraits Collection. Images are reproduced in the Famous Economists Gallery created by the Department of Economics at Duke University. Includes photographs, printed material, and a few negatives.

Collection

Wanted Posters collection, 1914-1988 3 Linear Feet — 2350 Items

Miscellaneous posters collected by Westchester County, New York precinct. Posters of wanted criminals collected by an unknown police detective in Westchester County, New York. Posters are from the United States and Canada. Collection includes some well-known criminals such as Lester Gillis, alias Baby Face Nelson; Mary Evelyn Frechette, alias Mrs. John Dillinger; Arthur “Doc” Barker; mobster Roger Touhy; and bank robber Frank Nash. Radicals from 1970s include Weather Underground member Cathlyn Platt Wilkerson, Symbionese Liberation Army member Kathleen Soliah; and Black Liberation Army fugitives JoAnne Chesimard (Assata Shakur) and brother Mutulu Shakur.

This collection consists of posters of wanted criminals collected by an anonymous police detective in Westchester County, NY during the 20th century. Posters are from the United States and Canada. The bulk of the collection is from the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington, D.C. The collection includes some well-known criminals such as Lester Gillis, alias Baby Face Nelson; Mary Evelyn Frechette, alias Mrs. John Dillinger; Arthur "Doc" Barker; mobster Roger Touhy; and bank robber Frank Nash. Radicals from the 1970s include Weather Underground member Cathlyn Platt Wilkerson; Symbionese Liberation Army member Kathleen Soliah; and Black Liberation Army fugitives JoAnne Chesimard (Assata Shakur) and her brother, Mutulu Shakur.

The collection includes approximately 2,250 small-format wanted posters, most measuring 8 x 8 inches. Posters range in size and condition, many with manuscript markings or inked stamps, and some are trimmed and pasted onto printed mug shot cards. The collection was first arranged geographically, then further divided chronologically. Well-known criminals aforementioned are located in their indicated folders. Posters from the Federal Bureau of Investigation are included in the folders marked "District of Columbia." Folders are alphabetized in each box, with the exception of the District of Columbia, which occupies Box 2 entirely.

Collection

Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

Collection

Walter Weir papers, 1909-1996 and undated, bulk 1950-1990 14 Linear Feet — Approximately 7,700 Items

Walter Weir was an advertising executive, marketing and communications consultant, and professor of advertising. He worked for a number of agencies, including N.W. Ayer & Sons, J. M. Mathes, Lord & Thomas, and Kenyon & Eckhardt. He founded Walter Weir, Inc., which merged into larger firms over the years, was co-owner of Switzerland-based La Borie/Weir S.A., and headed Walter Weir Communications, Inc. Weir also taught advertising at the University of Tennessee and Temple University, wrote three books on advertising, annonymously authored the Creative Man's Corner column in Advertising Age magazine for 25 years, and composed numerous speeches, articles, short stories, poems, songs, and musicals. The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Walter Weir Papers span the years 1909 through 1996, the bulk of which cover the 1950s through the early 1990s. The collection consists of audiocassettes, audiotapes, correspondence, course materials, clippings, musical scores, photographs, presentations, proofs, print advertising copy, radio advertisement scripts, songs, speeches, writings, and voiceovers documenting Weir's career in advertising, marketing, consulting, and teaching. The collection also documents Weir's prose, poems, and musicals, as well as his relationship with son Anthony Weir. Agencies and clients represented include the Alexander Proudfoot Company, Green Thumb Corporation, Interhydro AG, Jackson & Perkins Co., La Borie/Weir SA, Ralston Purina, Stratford of Texas, Inc., Walter Weir, Inc., and Walter Weir Communications, Inc. The collection also includes materials relating to Crain Communications Inc., which published Advertising Age, as well as the University of Tennessee and Temple University, and Weir's correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

This collection is organized into six series: Musical, Personal, Professional, Teaching, Writings and Speeches, and Audiovisual Materials.

The Musical Series documents Weir's work on scores and scripts for musical theatre. Much of the correspondence in this series narrates Weir's efforts to produce a musical based on the Frederic Wakeman novel The Hucksters. Includes correspondence with Oscar Hammerstein II.

The Personal Series contains biographical data about Weir and his involvement with family and friends through correspondence, clippings, greeting cards, photographs, and handwritten notes. The bulk of the correspondence documents Weir's personal and professional relationship with his son, Anthony.

The Professional Series documents Weir's career in advertising, marketing, and communications. Advertising copy, clippings, correspondence, proposals, presentations, and legal and financial papers represent Weir's work from the beginning of his career at N.W. Ayer through the evolution of his company, Walter Weir, Inc., as well as through subsequent business ventures, including La Borie/Weir SA, Walter Weir Communications, Inc., and freelance consulting work.

The Teaching Series represents Weir's work, following his official retirement from the advertising industry, as a professor of advertising, marketing and communications at the University of Tennessee and Temple University. Correspondence, course materials, and clippings document this extension of Weir's career from his introduction to and retirement from the academy.

The Writings and Speeches Series includes fiction, poetry, and non-fiction written by Weir on subjects both related and unrelated to advertising. Among these are articles published in Printer's Ink and Advertising Age; unpublished manuscripts of autobiographies, bound copies of Weir's book How to Create Interest-Evoking, Sales-Inducing, Non-Irritating Advertising; transcripts of talks and addresses Weir gave about advertising throught his career, including an address for the James Webb Young Foundation; and correspondence with Rance Crain of Crain Communications, Inc., publisher of Advertising Age.

The Audiovisual Series includes auiotapes and audiocassettes of advertising-related talks and addresses, notably for the Million Dollar Round Table Tape Cassette Program. In addition, there are radio spots for clients including Mountain Dew, E.F. Hutton, and Merril, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane, as well as samples of voiceovers and radio commercial productions.

Large-format print materials have been removed from their original series locations and relocated to Oversize Materials. Relocated items have been indicated in the Detailed Description of the Collection by notes enclosed in brackets.

Collection

Walter S. "Jack" Persons papers, 1937-2001 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Walter Scott "Jack" Persons served as swimming coach at Duke University from 1930 to 1979, and as Duke's lacrosse coach from 1949 to 1966. He was inducted into the Duke Sports Hall of Fame in 1986. Collection includes correspondence, programs, clippings, and photographs related to Jack Persons; the Duke University Physical Education Dept., swim team, and lacrosse team; and the Duke Sports Hall of Fame. Materials range in date from 1937 to 2001.

The materials include letters, greeting cards, invitations, programs, newspaper clippings, accolades, and photographs. The materials cover Persons's tenure as coach of both the Duke Swim team and the Duke Lacrosse team, as well as his election to and membership in the Duke Sports Hall of Fame.

Collection

Walter J. Taylor papers, 1934-2000 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1950 Items

Walter J. Taylor was incarcerated at San Quentin and Folsom prisons from 1968 to 1973. While in jail, he founded the Sisters of Motivation and the Community Concern for Prisoners organizations to help African American convicts. He was also arrested, but never charged, as a suspect in the "Stinky Rapist" crimes in Berkeley, California, from 1973 to 1978. Collection consists largely of materials from Taylor's time in prison and as a community activist, post-prison, in Berkeley, California, during the 1970s. The majority of the materials comprises Taylor's incoming correspondence during his incarceration, which includes letters from a variety of people, especially women participating as pen pals in the Sisters of Motivation organization. Other frequent writers are Taylor's girlfriends, family members, and community organizations that he had contacted regarding his imprisonment and the general condition of black male prisoners. Post-prison materials consist largely of letters of recommendation and thanks relating to his job as a youth counselor; creative writings and poems about black culture and beauty; business flyers for his music store; and Community Concern for Prisoners materials. Collection also includes several folders of news clippings, most of which relate to Taylor being the prime suspect for the "Stinky Rapist" crimes in Berkeley from 1973 to 1978. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

This collection consists of personal papers; prison and legal materials; post-prison materials; organizational papers; business flyers; community and campaign ephemera; creative works and writings by Taylor; correspondence; and news clippings.

Taylor's Personal Papers consist of items like his birth certificate, school diplomas, and certificates. These are the only materials in the collection that date from his childhood and youth. The Prison and Legal Materials Series includes items such as police reports and accounts of Taylor's burglary in 1967, San Quentin Inmate Advisory Council certificates, and grades from his classes at the prison's school. Though this is a small series, it offers insight into Taylor's activities while at the San Quentin and Folsom prisons from 1968-1973.

Post-Prison Materials include information about Taylor's activities following parole in 1973. His work for the Thresholds program is documented through letters of thanks from Oakland officials and school districts, as well as booklets about the program itself. Other materials include items from Taylor's post-prison job search, such as his work for KDIA radio. Later materials offer insight into Taylor's passions following his parole. There are several flyers and other promotional material for Taylor's record store, Oldies But Goodies, as well as documentation of a business loan. The series also documents the political scene of San Francisco in the 1970s, including rosters and candidate lists, materials from the Black Book business directory, and flyers from Taylor's run for the Oakland Community Action Agency's administrative board. This series also has the only portion of the collection dealing with Taylor's life post-1981; travel documents suggest that he was at least visiting the Caribbean in 1999-2000. Finally, there are some miscellaneous materials in this series, including flyers, leaflets, and other general materials that document life in the San Francisco area but do not relate specifically to Taylor's activities.

Materials in the Organizational Papers derive from the Sisters of Motivation, started by Taylor while in prison, and Community Concern for Prisoners, which he appears to have founded after his release from jail. This series includes sign-up sheets, letters of support from public officials and community members, and general information about the organizations. It also contains flyers and bulletins from the CCP's various events, including one with Maya Angelou and other prominent San Francisco artists and writers.

Taylor's Writings and Creative Works include a wide range of materials, beginning with poems and songs and ending with political reflections and essays on black culture. Common themes are the oppression that he faced in prison, the beauty of black women, and the struggle of African Americans for justice. Some of these materials were published as letters to the editor or as poems in black newspapers; others were simply compiled by Taylor into booklets.

The Correspondence Series comprises the largest part of the collection. The original order, based on the writer and recipient of the letter, has been retained. Most of the correspondence dates from Taylor's time in prison from 1968-1973, but there are letters from both before and after. The outgoing correspondence from his time in prison is divided into four parts. The first is Taylor's general correspondence with family, friends, community organizations, politicians, and potential employers. The other three groups consist of Taylor's letters to three girlfriends: Barbara Cheatem, Carolyn Kitson, and Alice/Betty Jo (her full name is not clear).

The incoming correspondence makes up the majority of the Correspondence series. Incoming letters are divided into: general correspondence; the Black Scholar organization; Bill and Ella Carter; Barbara Cheatem; Patricia Dickens; family members (including his parents and his children); Doris Johnson; Carlyn Kitson; his lawyers; public officials; Verdia Rhone; Allyna Robinson; Dorothy Rodgers; Jesse and Dottie Taylor (Taylor's sister and brother-in-law); Marie Taylor (Taylor's wife); and Joni Wetzcher. The "General" incoming file includes materials about Taylor's job search, his parole hearings, requests for help in getting divorced, and other materials about his health and well-being in prison. Topics of note in the letters from his lawyers and public officials include references to Taylor's protest against censorship of black newspapers and the invasion of prisoner privacy in the mail screening procedures, especially at Folsom Prison. The majority of women writing to Taylor pen pals from the Sisters of Motivation program.

The collection is rounded out by the News Clippings Series, most of which dates from Taylor's post-prison life. Some of the clippings are of Taylor's published letters to the editor or his poems; several are general black culture and society articles that do not appear to relate specifically to Taylor. The remainder of the clippings are coverage of the Stinky Rapist case, both from mainstream and black newspapers.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection
Walter H. Smith donated this collection of Beat Literature. The majority relates to the career and life of Allen Ginsberg, a founding member of the Beat Generation. Other writers represented include Anne Waldman, Diane di Prima, and Anselm Hollo. Accessions (2009-0113) and (2009-0130) (200 items; 3.5 lin. ft.; dated 1959-2003) include books, compilations, journals, magazines, and other publications with works by and about Allen Ginsberg. Also included are posters and broadsides advertising events, readings, or publications by Ginsberg; many of these are signed. Accession (2010-0098) (25 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1950-2009) includes writings and some correspondence from Diane di Prima, Anselm Hollo, and Anne Waldman; also includes some Allen Ginsberg materials. Accession (2011-0045) (27 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2007) includes pamphlets and publications by Gary Snyder.

Accessions (2009-0113) and (2009-0130) (200 items; 3.5 lin. ft.; dated 1959-2003) include books, compilations, journals, magazines, and other publications with works by and about Allen Ginsberg. Also included are posters and broadsides advertising events, readings, or publications by Ginsberg; many of these are signed.

Accession (2010-0098) (25 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1964-2009) includes publications and some correspondence from Beat Generation poets such as Anne Waldman, Diane di Prima, Anselm Hollo, and Allen Ginsberg. Includes signatures of Hollo and Waldman.

Accession (2011-0045) (27 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2007) includes publications, pamphlets, and posters featuring works and readings by Gary Snyder.

Collection

Walter Gordy papers, 1935 - 1986 37.5 Linear Feet — 29,000 Items

Walter Gordy (1909-1985) was a James B. Duke Professor of Physics at Duke University. In his over thirty year career at Duke, he founded and directed the Duke Microwave Laboratory, and researched and published extensively. The Walter Gordy Papers include correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. Major subjects include microwave spectroscopy, microwave radar, the Duke Microwave Laboratory, Army research Office , Durham (ARO-D), and the Duke Department of Physics. English.

The collection includes correspondence, bibliographies, vita, articles, speeches, notebooks, teaching materials, illustrations, photographs, and graphs of experimental results. The materials date from approximately 1935 to 1986. Gordy's professional career, particularly his work at Duke, is well represented. Much of the material stems from his research in the Duke Microwave Laboratory. The correspondence in the collection is mainly professional. A few materials, such as trip souvenirs, represent Gordy's personal life.

Collection

Walter Blair papers, 1933-1987 and undated 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1350 Items

Walter Blair (1900-1992) was a professor at the University of Chicago from 1929 to 1968 and a specialist in American folklore and humor. Collection contains early drafts, edited manuscripts, and proofs of Blair's publications, as well as bibliographic information and correspondence regarding publication of materials and other professional services. The bulk of the material is comprised of draft manuscripts of his work which he wrote with Hamlin Hill (Texas A&M), America's Humor from Poor Richard to Doonesbury (Oxford, 1978). There is also a smaller amount of other materials such as correspondence and reviews related to other publications, including Native American Humor: 1800-1900 (1937), Horse Sense in American Humor (1942), Tall Tale America: A Legendary History of Our Humorous Heroes (1944), Half-Horse Half-Alligator: The Growth of the Mike Fink Legend (1956), and Mark Twain and Huck Finn (1960). Forms part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for Literary Historiography.

This collection contains early drafts, edited manuscripts, and master proofs of Blair's publications, including American Humor from Poor Richard to Doonesbury (co-authored with Hamlin Hill of Texas A&M, Oxford, 1978), which makes up the bulk of the Writings Series, as well as manuscripts of, reviews of, and correspondence regarding his earlier publications, including Half Horse Half Alligator, Horse Sense in American Humor, Mark Twain and Huck Finn, and Mike Fink: King of the Mississippi Keelboatmen. The collection also contains several reviews of Blair's publications. Biographical information and related materials, including newspaper clippings, magazine articles and newsletters regarding Walter Blair, and various professional correspondence comprises the remainder of the collection. Among the biographical information is a series of humorous Christmas cards that Blair circulated among his acquaintances, as well as a special issue of Studies in American Humor in honor of Blair. The bulk of the correspondence is comprised of letters to and from various university presses regarding publication of Blair's manuscripts, and letters to colleagues at various universities also regarding his manuscripts and other professional services.

Forms part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for Literary Historiography.

Collection

Walter B. Gibson papers, 1943-1980 0.6 Linear Feet — 450 Items

Walter B. Gibson (1897-1985) was a professional magician and author, who often wrote under the name Maxwell Grant, and is credited with defining and popularizing the pulp hero, The Shadow. The collection includes: Two Shadow story outlines, one from 1943 and another from 1980, which was Gibson's last Shadow story; 97 radio scripts from Strange, a seemingly lost 15-minute program that Gibson hosted in 1955; an unproduced television proposal, Mike Regan, Confidential Investigator, circa the mid 1950s; and two bookplates featuring a black and white image of The Shadow.

The collection includes: Two Shadow story outlines, one from 1943 and another from 1980, which was Gibson's last Shadow story; 97 radio scripts from Strange, a seemingly lost 15-minute program that Gibson hosted in 1955; an unproduced television proposal, Mike Regan, Confidential Investigator, circa the mid 1950s; and two bookplates featuring a black and white image of The Shadow.

Collection

Wallace Kaufman papers, 1959-1994 1.5 Linear Feet — 700 Items

Author, teacher, naturalist, environmental activist, and World Bank consultant Wallace Vickers Kaufman was a 1961 graduate of Duke University's Trinity College majoring in English. Collection contains correspondene, reports, journals, and miscellaneous material relating primarily to Kaufman's environmental activism and as a real estate and entrepeneurial consultat. The collection also contains material documenting his friendship with Reynolds Price, a former instructor of Kaufman's at Duke, specifically correspondence, manuscripts, and several typescripts of Price's work.

The collection contains correspondence, writings and addresses, journals, reports, clippings and assorted print matter. Materials present primarily reflect Kaufman's environmental activism while residing in rural Chatham County, North Carolina and his consulting work with the World Bank and the International City/County Management Association in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc. Correspondence mostly documents Kaufman's role with the Conservation Council of North Carolina and the organization's collaboration with other local, regional, and national environmental organizations.

The journals and reports document Kaufman's work in former Soviet nations. They describe Kaufman's day to day activities in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Kazakhstan, and Poland that include descriptions of local customs and geographic regions, the difficulties and challenges inherent in transition from collectivism to privatization, and surveys of local businesses and manufactories. Also present in the collection is material documenting Kaufman's relationship with author Reynolds Price. This material includes mostly correspondence as well as several manuscripts and typescripts. The correspondence touches upon personal matters as well as professional including the activities of mutual friends and acquaintances, travels, and current works in progress.

Collection

Wallace Fowlie papers, 1911-1998 and undated 5 Linear Feet — 516 Items

Writer, critic, translator, and faculty member at Duke University specializing in modern French literature. The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

Collection

Waldo Beach papers, 1949-1986 0.7 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Waldo Beach was a professor of Christian Ethics in the Duke University Divinity School between the years 1946-1986. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material concerning civil rights, politics and other ethical issues and ranges in date from 1949-1986.

Collection includes correspondence, memoranda, typescripts and printed material primarily concerning ethics. Major subjects include civil rights and research in politics and ethics. Individual files include a proposal to the Danforth Foundation to improve teaching, correspondence concerning residential development in Duke Forest, conferences on Human Values and Public Policy, and cooperative research in the areas of politics and ethics. Items of note include a copy of an undated typescript, "A President Named Jimmy", by James D. Barber, a pamphlet produced by the Durham Community Planning Council titled "Durham's Assets in the Arts", and first-hand accounts of the January 3, 1964 sit-in in Chapel Hill. The collection ranges in date from 1949-1986.

Collection
The Duke University chapter of Volunteers for Youth was established around 1979 and was sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association until the mid-1980s. Contains the records of the Duke University chapter of Volunteer for Youth, a service organization which paired student athletes with at-risk youth. Types of materials include agendas, meeting notes, lists of participants, training materials, handbooks, and newsletters. Major subjects include Duke University students, student athletes, community service, National Collegiate Athletic Association, and Volunteers for Youth. Materials range in date from 1979-1984.

Contains materials pertaining to the Duke University chapter of Volunteers for Youth, a social service organization for students at Duke University. Materials range in date from 1979-1984.

Collection

Volleyball records, 1973-ongoing. 4.9 Linear Feet — 5250 Items

The collection includes clippings, press releases, statistics, rosters, programs and press brochures/media guides about the volleyball team at Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1973-ongoing.

Collection
Scholar and a professor of American literature at Georgia State University. Her first book was The Lonely Hunter: A Biography of Carson McCullers. Correspondence, notes, drafts, clippings, and other materials used by Carr in writing The Lonely Hunter (1975), a biography of Southern author Carson McCullers. Includes correspondence between Carr and McCullers' friends and relatives and literary and artistic figures, notes from interviews, McCullers family correspondence, genealogy, and drafts of Carr's doctoral dissertation on McCullers as well as drafts and foundry proofs for The Lonely Hunter. Includes material on Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, N.Y., February House, Brooklyn Heights, N.Y., and Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Middlebury, Vt. Persons represented in the collection include Elizabeth Ames, W. H. Auden, Leonard Bernstein, Paul Bowles, John Ciardi, David Leo Diamond, Granville Hicks, John Huston, Jordan Massee, Louis Untermeyer, Eudora Welty, Tennessee Williams, Leo Lerman, and Eleanor Clarke Warren.

The Virginia Spencer Carr Papers span the years 1867 to 2009 and document the research and production of Carr's biography of Carson McCullers, The Lonely Hunter. Formats include correspondence, notes, drafts, and clippings. The collection consists of four series: Alphabetical Files, Research Files, Correspondence by McCullers Family, and Drafts and Proofs. The Alphabetical Files Series consists primarily of correspondence and interview notes between Carr and the many individuals she contacted while doing research for her book. Prominent correspondents include David Leo Diamond, Jordan Massee, Edwin Peacock, Mary Mercer, Mary S. Tucker, and Doubleday Publishing. Materials in the Research Files Series also include a large number of copies of correspondence, primarily letters written by Carson McCullers. There are also some clippings, notes from interviews that Carr conducted and letters she received in reaction to the publication of her book. The Correspondence by McCullers Family Series consists of copies of letters written primarily by Carson McCullers to her friends and family, including Reeves McCullers, David Leo Diamond, and her mother, Marguerite Waters Smith. There is also a series of letters McCullers wrote John Huston in the last year of her life. Finally, the Drafts and Proofs Series includes a copy of Carr's doctoral dissertation on Carson McCullers and notes that served in its preparation. There are also edited sections of the manuscript of the The Lonely Hunter, as well as a foundry proof and a galley of the same.

Collection
Virginia Bryan was Assistant Dean of the Woman's College and a botanist. The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.

The collection includes correspondence, notes, field notebooks, article reprints, and other materials related to Virgnina Bryan's work as a botanist.

Collection

Virginia Barber Literary Agency records, 1975-2003 52.5 Linear Feet — .0002 Gigabytes — 40,000 Items

Virginia Barber became a literary agent in 1971 and opened her own agency in 1974. The Virginia Barber Literary Agency was sold to the William Morris Agency in 2001. Among the authors she represented have been Rosellen Brown, Andrew Delbanco, James Dodson, Sue Monk Kidd, Peter Mayle, Alice Munro, David Nasaw, Anita Shreve, and Anne Rivers Siddons. She has served on the Board and as President of Women's Media Group and on the Boards of Literacy Partners, Duke University Libraries, and Poets and Writers. The collection includes client files and correspondence for the VBLA's many clients during the late 1970s through the early 2000s. There are also legal and financial materials, correspondence files with other agencies and publishers, including Virago Books, and materials from Barber's work with professional organizations such as the Independent Literary Agents Association. Notable clients represented in this collection include Peter Mayle, Anita Shreve, MacDonald Harris, and Paul Ehrlich.

The collection includes client files and correspondence for the VBLA's many clients during the late 1970s through the early 2000s. There are also legal and financial materials, correspondence files with other agencies and publishers, including Virago Books, and materials from Barber's work with professional organizations such as the Independent Literary Agents Association. Notable clients represented in this collection include Peter Mayle, Anita Shreve, MacDonald Harris, and Paul Ehrlich.

Collection

Vincent J. Tarascio papers, 1967-2020 1 Linear Foot — One record carton and one oversize folder.

Vincent Tarascio (1930-2020) was a professor emeritus of economics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. This collection documents his professional life through his writings and professional and faculty activities. It was acquired as part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

The most common types of material are handwritten and typed manuscripts, reprints and offprints, and correspondence. There is a program from the first meeting of the History of Economics Society in Chapel Hill, a syllabus for a course on the history of economic thought, and a bound copy of Tarascio's first book. The oversize folder contains eleven reproductions of portraits of mostly 19th century economists.

The main subject is the history of economic thought, with a focus on neoclassical economics and Vilfredo Pareto. There are also files with correspondence on the Southern Economic Association and the Southern Economic Journal.

Collection

Victoria Ortiz papers, 1923-1999 and undated, bulk 1960-1990 12.2 Linear Feet — 19.0 linear feet; approx. 14,999 Items

The Victoria Ortiz Papers span the years 1923 to 1999, with the majority of the papers dating from 1960 to 1990. The main collection (2003-0204) comprises materials separated from the Bobbye S. Ortiz Papers and consists of one series; the accession number 2003-0204 was assigned to this grouping. Viki Ortiz's political and intellectual interests can be gleaned from the topics in the Victoria Ortiz Subject Files Series, which has been divided into seven subseries to facilitate its use. The first three subseries contain newspaper and magazine articles, organizational materials, photographs, pamphlets, speeches, and reports related to Cuba, Mexico, and Latin America. Scholars of U.S. anticommunism and student movements in the 1960s may find of interest materials related to Ortiz's 1963 trip to Cuba, taken with 58 other college students in defiance of U.S. policy. Each subseries is organized alphabetically by topic or title.

The parallels and differences between Viki's and Bobbye's political interests are reflected in their subject files. Both maintained extensive collections of materials on international women's liberation; like her mother, Viki was most interested in the status of women in Latin American nations. Yet while they shared similar social values and political beliefs, Viki's interests often diverged from her mother's. Viki's general files reflect her involvement in International Year of the Woman activities and her interest in population control, as well as her interest in such topics as reproductive rights, family structure, and economic justice.

Viki's great interest in adoption and parenting grew out of her own experiences as a single adoptive parent of a Mexican-born child. The subseries on adoption and parenting includes newsletters and publications of organizations for single parents; research for a book on single adoptive parenting; and miscellaneous clippings, notes, and other materials on issues such as adoptive parenting, international adoption, and gay/lesbian parenting. These materials are arranged alphabetically by topic or title.

The final subseries contains Viki's extensive notes and other materials related to literature. This subseries is organized into coursework, general literature, and Latin American literature, and is arranged alphabetically therein.

The addition (2003-0066) consists primarily of professional and subject files documenting Ortiz's law career, writings, and feminist and social activism. Her work on the literature and women's issues of Latin America are particularly well-represented. Portions of this addition are closed to use until 2050.

Addition (05-024) (3759 items, 7.7 lin. ft.; dated 1923-1997 and n.d) comprises research materials pertaining to gender, women, and the law; artist Elizabeth Catlett; and experimentation with LSD by the U.S. military. Includes family documents about Camilo, Ortiz's adopted son; teaching materials; files from CUNY law school; correspondence, appointment calendars; videotapes; travel diaries; photographs, printed material; and ephemera. This addition is closed to use until 2050.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Victor Bloede (1920-1999) was an advertising executive who served as President and Chief Executive Officer (1968-1974), and Chairman (1971-1983), of the Benton & Bowles agency. He retired in 1983. The Victor Bloede Papers span the years 1952-1983, with the bulk spanning 1962-1983, and consist primarily of speeches given during Bloede's tenure as President, then Chairman, of Benton & Bowles (B&B), as well as speeches delivered during 1973 when Bloede served as Chairman of the American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA or 4-A's). Also included are a portion of the autobiography of Atherton Hobler, one of the co-founders of B&B, and correspondence relating to the anticommunist newsletter Counterattack. Topics included in the speeches include corporate finances and budget performance, television commericials, advertising effectiveness, management and business ethics. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Victor Bloede Papers span the years 1952-1983, with the bulk spanning 1962-1983, and consist primarily of speeches given during Bloede's tenure as President, then Chairman, of Benton & Bowles (B&B), as well as speeches delivered during 1973 when Bloede served as Chairman of the American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA or 4-A's). Also included are a portion of the autobiography of Atherton Hobler, one of the co-founders of B&B, and correspondence relating to the anticommunist newsletter Counterattack. Topics included in the speeches include corporate finances and budget performance, television commericials, advertising effectiveness, management and business ethics.

Collection
Online
The Vice President of Student Affairs oversees the Division of Student Affairs, involved in all aspects of student life at Duke University. William J. Griffith was Dean of Student Affairs and then Vice President of Student Affairs from 1963-1991. The Vice President for Student Affairs Records include correspondence, reports, memorandums, and other materials related to the operations of the Division of Student Affairs and cover such topics as student organizations, student housing, student government, student activities, administrative planning around student facilities and resources, and many other subjects.

The collection includes a wide variety of materials related to the operations of the Student Affairs office. Much of the collection is correspondence, with many reports, printed materials, and memorandums, as well as other materials.

Topics include student organizations and activities, including student government, fraternities, student living groups, interest groups, and publications; administrative activities and policies focused on student life and well-being, including student housing, student health and insurance, resources for supporting student life, and facilities for students; administrative and campus activities including arts and cultural activities such as the Duke Players, Chapel activities and services, and the Publications Board; and events of significance to the Duke community, including materials related to the Allen Building Takeover, protests and demonstrations, and many other topics.

An addition (Accession UA2018-0084) contains correspondence and subject files from Larry Moneta, VP of Student Affairs. An addition (Accession UA2020-0050) consists of email correspondence transferred from Moneta's email account. Email originals are in Outlook PST format, with a copy migrated to MBOX. Accession UA2022-0030 contains materials related to Duke Student Health.

Some materials were removed April 2007 and now make up the Office of Student Affairs Reference Collection.

Collection
The collection documents the records of the office of the Vice Chancellor for Data Processing for the years 1977 through 1982. The bulk of the materials in the collection pertain to the Administrative System Planning Study, a project that studied the effects an automated computing system would have on the accuracy and efficiency of data processing at Duke. Materials include the final project report as well as drafts tracking the development of the project as well as notes and correspondence from members of the project team. The collection also includes interviews the committee conducted with Duke employees across a wide range of departments and external studies of information management at Duke. The Administrative System Planning Study series contains materials related to the report. They include a copy of the final report and several drafts of the report including notes and revisions. This series also contains two 1982 editions of The Chronicle announcing the institution of a new data processing system on campus. The Project Materials series contains meeting minutes from the Administrative System Planning council, papers as well as correspondence and notes from three members of the committee, Vice-Chancellor Mel Ray, Joe Kuran and Jim Prestwood as they worked to develop the project. These materials also include analyses of the research materials used in the report. The Research Materials series includes information the committee gathered while preparing the report. These materials include 15 interviews with employees from many departments about the current data processing environment at Duke. Interviewees included President Terry Sanford, Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye and Provost F. Cleaveland. Research materials also include the final copies of automation reports completed by IBM Corporation and Hay Associates on the existing systems and the potential effects of automation. Also included is a 1980 issue of IBM Corporation’s magazine, Prospectives in Computing featuring an article about the academic applications of computing at Duke.

The collection documents the records of the office of the Vice Chancellor for Data Processing for the years 1977 through 1982. The bulk of the materials in the collection pertain to the Administrative System Planning Study, a project that studies the effects an automated computing system would have on the accuracy and efficiency of data processing at Duke. Materials related to the Administrative System Planning Study include a copy of the final report, drafts of the report and notes and correspondence between members of the committee.

The collection also contains research materials the committee gathered while preparing the report. These materials include 15 interviews with employees from many departments about the current data processing environment at Duke. Interviewees included President Terry Sanford, Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye and Provost F. Cleaveland. Research materials also include the final copies of automation reports completed by IBM Corporation and Hay Associates on the existing systems and the potential effects of automation. Also included is a 1980 issue of IBM Corporation’s magazine, Prospectives in Computing featuring an article about the academic applications of computing at Duke.

Collection

Veteran Feminists of America records, 1971-2017 31.4 Linear Feet — 30.4 lin. ft.

Online
Veteran Feminists of America (VFA) is a nonprofit organization for veterans of the Second Wave of the feminist movement. It was founded by Jacqueline Ceballos and held its first feminist reunion in 1993. The organization continues to operate today, sponsoring reunions, programs, and publications honoring feminists throughout the United States. The accession (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. The addition (2008-0254) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews. Addition (2009-0131) includes administrative files, events files, and other organizational information. Addition (2010-0097) includes program information and other organizational files, predominately from VFA's conference, The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held in Dallas in March 2010. Addition (2010-0128) includes honoree information forms and materials from the Dallas conference. Addition (2012-0083) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009). Addition (2017-0058) includes conference programs from several conferences that took place in the early 2000's and 2010's. The addition also includes meeting minutes from the annual VFA board meeting. Addition (2017-0139) includes administrative files and planning materials for different events that documented the history of VFA and the Second Wave Feminist Movement; along with a history of VFA (2013). Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection (2008-0286) includes administrative files, program and reunion materials, obituaries, correspondence, financial information, newsletters, periodicals, and photographs relating to the activities and programs of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs, floppy disks, and CDs, some of which have been withdrawn for electronic preservation. There are also medals and other ephemera. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (2008-0254) (64 items; 1.2 lin. ft.) consists of DVDs of VFA events and interviews.

The addition (2009-0131) (900 items; 1.8 lin. ft., dated 2001-2008) consists of board minutes, administrative materials, program files, some correspondence, and publicity. Program files include reunions, special presentations, conferences on feminist history and issues, and other educational and commemorative events. In particular, the accession includes materials from the Salute to Feminist Lawyers event put on in June 2008 at the Harvard Club in New York.

The addition (2010-0097) (300 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2005-2010) includes miscellaneous newsletters, dated 2005-2008; board meeting minutes from 2007; event and program files from a 2009 Pompano Beach, FL awards gala and a Dallas conference entitled The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders, held March 2010. The Dallas event files include copies of materials on 22 honorees, as well as the program text and other promotional materials. Other topics in this accession include website initiatives and the Feminists Who Changed America book launch.

The addition (2010-0128) (150 items; 0.6 lin. ft., dated 2009-2010) includes materials submitted by honorees at the "The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders" conference held by the VFA in Dallas. Materials include information forms, resumes, essays, and other miscellaneous biographies.

The addition (2012-0083) (4 items; 0.1 lin. ft., dated 2006, 2009) includes a program from the Tribute to Helen Reddy event (2006) and two copies of an associated commerically-available music compact disc by Sandy Rapp; along with the souvenir program from the VFA salute to feminist lawyers (2009).

The addition (2015-0069) (1800 items; 3.0 lin. ft., dated 2011-2014) consists of event information, program and administrative files relating to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media formats include DVDs of event programming, including the Kate Millett festival (2012), and Labor and the Women's Movement (2014).

The addition (2017-0058) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2002-2017) consists of program and administrative files related to the operation of the Veteran Feminists of America. Special media includes two DVDs; one is of the Harvard Club Luncheon (2014) and the other is of the Veteran Feminist Association South Florida Luncheon (2009).

The addition (2017-0139) (.2 lin. ft., dated 2007-2017 consists of administrative and program files related to the activities of the Veteran Feminists of America.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Vernon L. Smith papers, 1938-2019 238 Linear Feet — 190 record cartons. — 3.3 Gigabytes — Three sets.

Vernon Smith (born 1927) is a Nobel Prize winner and Professor of Economics and Law at Chapman University. This collection primarily documents his professional life through his correspondence, writings, research, teaching, and professional service. It forms part of the Economists' Papers Archive.

The bulk of these papers reside in Research and Writings, which contains extensive files of his research notes, reprints, and revisions of working papers by himself and others with annotations. Broadly speaking, these files document important developments in experimental economics and his contributions to this field of study. Primary subjects include the development of a methodology for experimental economics; the implementation of experimental economics into the studies of asset trading, capital investment, game theory, environmental economics, price behavior, strategic decision making, and utilities; and the behavior toward, as well as the psychology behind, economic decisions. Print Materials includes reprints of journal articles by him on similar topics, many of which are also available through the library catalog.

Correspondence contains primarily professional communications concerning comments on his work by other economists, comments on other economists' work (dating from his days editing for several journals), and academic affairs (including recommendations and planning for classes and seminars). The contents of two emails accounts have been transferred and are available, and they contain tens of thousands of messages.

Professional Service and Teaching follow his activities as a faculty member at the universities of Purdue, Brown, Massachusetts, Arizona, George Mason, and Chapman; his roles with organizations such as the National Science Foundation, National Academy of Science, and the Journal of Economic Behavior; and his domestic and international consulting on utility regulation.

Collection

Urodynamics Society records, 1967-1999 and undated 2.0 Linear Feet — Approx. 900 Items

Online
Collection houses records regarding the history of the Urodynamics Society, currently known as the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU), whose first president and founder (1978-1979) was Dr. Saul Boyarsky, physician and faculty member at Duke University, and donor of the collection. File contents include correspondence relating to the Society's activities and development, chiefly during the 1980s, and the transfer of the collection to the Duke Medical Center Library; several booklets with the Society's membership lists, constitution and by-laws, from 1978 to 1982 and 1993; printed articles and abstracts concerning the history of urodynamics; a bibliography of literature in the field (1990-1991); Dr. Boyarsky's notes and a long published article on the history of the Society (1999); Dr. Luis Perez's published article on the history of urodynamics (1992), with comments and a draft; and other small items. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

File contents include correspondence relating to the Society's activities and development, chiefly during the 1980s, and the transfer of the collection to the Duke Medical Center Library; several booklets with the Society's membership lists, constitution and by-laws, from 1978 to 1982 and 1993; printed articles and abstracts concerning the history of urodynamics; a bibliography of literature in the field (1990-1991); Dr. Boyarsky's notes and a long published article on the history of the Society (1999); Dr. Luis Perez's published article on the history of urodynamics (1992), with comments and a draft; and other small items. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection
Online
The University Reports Reference Collection contains major reports concerning accreditation, university administration and governance, strategic planning, the curriculum, facilities, and student life. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The University Reports Reference Collection contains major reports concerning accreditation, university administration and governance, strategic planning, the curriculum, facilities, and student life. There are cataloged copies of many of these reports.

Collection
The University Program in Genetics and Genomics was founded in 1967 and serves as a primary training environment for students at Duke University interested in graduate Genetics and Genomics. This collection includes memoranda, correspondence, publicity material, printed matter and other records.

This collection includes memoranda, correspondence, publicity material, printed matter and other records.

Collection
The University Policies Reference Collection contains files of University policy statements, manuals, updates, and news clippings.

The University Policies Reference Collection contains University policy manuals, policy statements, updates, memoranda, and news clippings pertaining to the University's operating policies and policies affecting student life, and reactions to these policies. See the container list for specific subjects. Materials pertaining to the severe weather policy and other personnel policies will be found in the Office of Human Resources Reference Collection.

Collection
The Office of the University Marshal is responsible for some of Duke University's most significant occasions: opening convocation, Founders' Day, and commencement. The University Marshal Records include correspondence, lists of candidates for degrees, memos, programs, financial records, records of the awarding of honorary degrees, minutes of the commencement committee, statistics, speeches, and other printed materials. Major subjects include information and procedures related to Founder's Day, baccalaureate services, convocations, and commencements; and files that detail the daily operation of the Office of the University Marshal. English.

The University Marshal Records includes correspondence, lists of candidates for degrees, memos, programs, financial records, records of the awarding of honorary degrees, minutes of the commencement committee, statistics, speeches, and other printed materials. Major subjects include information and procedures related to Founder's Day, baccalaureate services, convocations, and commencements; and files that detail the daily operation of the Office of the University Marshal.

The University Marshall Records is arranged by accession date. These accessions are given in chronological order. The descriptions given for each box are general descriptions of the contents of the box and are not folder titles. There is some consistency in the contents of the boxes from one accession to another, but the folder titles are not identical.

Access to all folders in Box 3 is RESTRICTED. Please consult University Archives staff.

Collection

University Finance Reference collection, 1948-ongoing 1.6 Linear Feet — approx. 700 Items

The University Finances Reference Collection contains files of publications, reports, news clippings, and memoranda related to the University's investments, fundraising, budgeting and similar financial matters. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The University Finances Reference Collection contains files of publications, reports, news clippings, and memoranda related to the University's investments, fundraising, budgeting and other financial matters. Major subjects include fundraising campaigns, and endowment management. The collection includes several publications produced to explain the University's finances to students.

Collection

University File reference collection, 1960-ongoing 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 2000 Items

The University File Reference Collection contains files of memoranda, clippings, brochures, booklets, proposals, reports, and other documents by or about the University's non-academic administrative offices and divisions. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The University File Reference Collection contains files of memoranda, clippings, brochures, booklets, proposals, reports, and other documents by or about the University's administrative offices, divisions, and other non-academic and non-research units. The collection is arranged topically: central administration; accounting and business; safety and security; technology and telecommunications; miscellaneous offices. It includes materials about defunct units the responsibilities of which were absorbed by other units.

Collection
Contains correspondence received by the Archives as well as patron registration forms, permission to publish forms, exhibit materials, supplies, labels and other information gathered/created by the Archives during day-to-day operations. The collection ranges in date from 1941-2004.